ElastoCitizens
Gig Seeker Pro

ElastoCitizens

Band Rock Funk

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


After a week of non-stop schmoozing, star-studded galas, interviews, open bars, and thought-provoking screening after screening, most people get pretty burnt out by the end of the Toronto International Film Festival, but for Steven McCarthy, star of one the fest's biggest buzz films, Picture Day, the best and most ass-shaking party is yet to come.

To close the book on TIFF's Picture Day -- the critically acclaimed and sold out Canadian coming of age feature by writer and first time director Kate Melville -- McCarthy and his funk rock gogo dancing collective The ElastoCitizens, who also appear in the film, will be taking over Toronto's Horseshoe Tavern on Saturday. They'll also be using the opportunity to celebrate the release of a brand new EP.

McCarthy's a little worried that people might be too tired to make it out, but he believes it will be the perfect cap to all of the festivities, and a nice transition back into the more normal world of rock 'n' roll.

"I think it'll feel like a cleansing moment," he tells Spinner in between takes on a film set. On top of everything else, the acting/singing/theater-producing renaissance man is also playing a serial killer at the moment. "I think it'll feel like all of that stress and all of that energy and all of that expectation of 'What do I look like?' and 'How do I want to present myself?' [at TIFF will go away]. With this it's like you're in a room with a whole bunch of sweaty strangers and everyone's touching each other and you're getting up against each other and it feels good."

It should also prove to be an appropriate end to the ElastoCitizens' Picture Day adventure, seeing as how another gig at the very same bar ended up serving as the band's unofficial audition for the film a few years ago when Melville, a friend of McCarthy's, came to see the them play.

"The band came on and she immediately grabbed her boyfriend's hand and squeezed it as hard as she could and was like 'Steve could be the guy! He could be James! And we don't need to make a band for the movie. The ElastoCitizens could be the band!'"

Watch the 'Picture Day' Trailer

The next Monday, the filmmaker took her prospective star out for drinks and asked him to be a part of her film.

"I was on board right away," he recalls. "As soon as Kate brought it up."

McCarthy was then charged with the task of getting The Elastos -- Joanne Boland, Monica Dottor, Gordon Hyland, Mack Longpre, Caroline Maraghi, Brandon McGibbon, Jason O'Brien
Melissa Jane Shaw and Brian Walterson -- on board, which wasn't exactly a challenge.

"My band consists of friends that I've had since grade six, many of whom are leading choreographers, actors, film actors in the city, and all of whom have these incredible, crazy careers. So it was kind of a no-brainer. We wanted a movie about a band and here's the best looking band in town who happens to have the chops to handle great scenes that Kate wrote. A year later we were filming the movie."

While the band play themselves in the film, McCarthy assumes the role of "James," the older rocker who charms the main character, Claire (breakout star Tatiana Maslany) and introduces the teen to the Toronto rock and art scenes.

"Kate always wants me to make sure that everyone knows that it's not autobiographical in any way, shape or form," he says with a laugh. "James was me if the band was the only thing I had in my life. He is so single-mindedly devoted to keeping the music going and if that means getting attention from someone who he might be better off not having that attention from, it's... he needs something. He needs devotion. He needs love. He needs to be adored."

If anything,McCarthy and the ElastoCitizens have too much of that in their lives these days. Part of the reason that they booked their release party for the tail end of the festival was because TIFF was the only time when the eclectic collective of performers could coordinate their packed schedules and actually get together to play.

As a result of all of this success and all of the band members' diverging projects, McCarthy's not really sure what the future holds for The ElastoCitizens as a whole.

"Part of me think that this could be the last show," he admits. "Or it could be the start of a whole new thing."

Whatever happens, though, they'll always have Picture Day.

"In a way, seeing the movie was like... I can't believe that we got preserved in such a way. Our live performance was documented by one of the world's best cinematographers. Like, we have all of this incredible footage and we're a part of this incredible thing that my friend made." - aol / spinner.ca


I’ve never had more fun at a concert than I have whenever I see The Elastocitizens. In my opinion, the off-beat funk band creates the most memorable live music experience available in Toronto.
Frontman Steven McCarthy leads the audience down the rabbit hole of insane and joyous dance tunes in full Freddy Mercury-esque splendour as his alter ego, Grand Poohbah Groove. (The whole band enjoys names of the like- though none quite as spectacular as the G&S-referencing, still-cool-somehow GPG).
Inevitably, an Elastocitizens concert is an inhibition-bashing good time wherein a massive crowd of strangers forgets that they’re strangers and that 20 minutes ago they were worried that their hair would get frizzy if the dance floor got too hot. From the first drumbeat to the flingy enthusiasm of the dancers pulled up onstage in the final song, an Elastocitizens show is good for the soul.
But as much fun as the crowd has, my favourite thing about the Elastocitizens concert is the revelry of the musicians themselves. If someone seems like they could possibly be happy being an accountant instead, I have a hard time enjoying their musicianship. But as McCarthy lovingly gazes at the crowd and mutters ”God, it’s such a fucking pleasure” in a way not necessarily meant for us to hear, you know that the citizens love nothing more than that moment they’re in. And that is, afterall, the point of the whole thing. - Kelly Bedard


Discography

Ep (2012)
Album (2009)

Photos

Bio

Fresh off of the success of their new feature film 'Picture Day" which screened at the Toronto International Film Festival the ElastoCitizens are one of the most exciting and unique bands to come out of Toronto in some time. Formed in 2004 in Toronto by childhood friends, lead singer Steven McCarthy and bassist Jason O’Brien, with a goal to make people dance, The ElastoCitizens have created a huge following on the Canadian music scene. “We set out to create large-scale musical celebrations that would make people feel glad they’re alive,” says McCarthy, “People have really responded to our songs and our size and our style, a total live-music experience. Our whole presentation – numerous vocalists, a kind of modern punk-funk music, and throwback girl-group dancing -- has cutting-edge projections and sound. The result is this spirited dance-ability that gets people moving.”

The ElastoCitizens takes a theatrical approach to their concerts, collaborating with Andre du Toit on lighting design, Beth Kates and Ben Chaisson of Playground Studios, on costume and multi-media design. Their core membership is comprised of some of the busiest choreographers, musicians, actors and singers in Canada: Steven McCarthy, Lead Vox; Monica Dottor, Joanne Boland and MJ Shaw , Vocals; Brandon McGibbon, Guitar; Jason O’Brien, Bass; Mackenzie Longpre, Drums; Gordon Hyland , Saxophone/Keyboard; Brian Walters and Carolyn Maraghi, Trumpet.

The ElastoCitizens’ performances in festivals and concerts (LuminaTO, NxNE, Harbourfront Centre, Dundas Square indie Fridays) and their recordings (heard on CBC Radio, HBO, Showcase, and on numerous feature films) have earned them a growing fan base. Comparisons to such varied performers as Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, Gogol Bordello and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zero’s have also been made, but The ElastoCitizens are originals in the Canadian music scene with a style not easily categorized. The Elastos are creating their own genre, featuring go-go dancing, multiple singers, grinding guitars, funk-feedback bass lines and a heavy horn section, attracting audiences and critical acclaim along the way:

- "A heavy dose of danceable funk… an excellent debut." Brent Bambury, CBC Radio – GO

- "If you were to whip David Bowie, George Clinton, Prince and Beck in a blender, add a dash of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and serve up with the zaniness of Dee-Lite in an old Sly and the Family Stone pair of pants, you'd get the ElastoCitizens.” Toronto Metro

- "The show is a legend in the making. You must check this group out. Do it for your children.” www.torontoexclusive.com

- "Eye-Candy Over the Top Funk rock... lead by the "Grand Poobah of Funk", who was part Tinsel Jesus, part Elvis, part Mick Jagger, part Ace Frehley, part George Clinton…This show was definitely an "I was there" moment!" www.Jambands.ca