Electric Shades of Blue
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Electric Shades of Blue

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The best kept secret in music

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"COOL BLUE--01/19/2005"

Every up-and-coming band struggles to get gigs. But for local band Electric Shades of Blue, the problem isn't lack of talent (they've already been recorded by radio station 92.9 KISM) or publicity (they've played all over northwest Washington). The challege is their age. The four band members are 14 and 15 years old.
"We've had two bars that wanted to have us, but we couldn't do it because we're not at least 18," says Bellingham band member Jacob Lundgren, 15.
One of those bars was the Rainbow Club in Seattle, a venue that's showcased acts like The Neville Brothers and Heart.
The other band members, Kurtis Dengler, 15, Lars Henriksen, 15, and Ben Strom, 14, all of Lopez Island, are also frustrated that they can't play in so many venues. "I think we're talking with certain people trying to get around that [rule] -- arrange it so we take a break and leave...we just can't be in there if we're not playing," says Henriksen, the drummer. "It's kind of disappointing."
Besides being underage, three of the boys live in the San Juans, which makes rehearsal logistics a little challenging. But all these obstacles only make them try harder.
"We all think alike, so we know what we're gonna do when we're playing; it all comes together and we have a good time," says Lundgren, the guitarist and a freshman at Bellingham High School. "I even feel like laughing when we're playing because I'm having so much fun."...
The group formed when Lundgren, Henriksen, and Strom started "jamming" together in fourth grade. Shortly before Lundgren moved off Lopez Island two years later, the group found Dengler.
The reason for starting with the blues?..."Blues and rock are the only kinds of music that really have soul; they're the only ones with meaning to me," says bassist Strom.
Dengler has written most of Electric Shades of Blues original songs..."When they do cover a song," Dengler says, "we make them our own."
The band members said they have played mostly in coffee house, but were featured on "Locals Only" on 92.9 KISM on Jan. 9, 2005...
Meanwhile, "I love the music and the guys in it are my buddies, and yeah, that's all you need," Strom says.

--published January 19, 2005
- Bellingham Herald by Kira Millage


"COOL BLUE--01/19/2005"

Every up-and-coming band struggles to get gigs. But for local band Electric Shades of Blue, the problem isn't lack of talent (they've already been recorded by radio station 92.9 KISM) or publicity (they've played all over northwest Washington). The challege is their age. The four band members are 14 and 15 years old.
"We've had two bars that wanted to have us, but we couldn't do it because we're not at least 18," says Bellingham band member Jacob Lundgren, 15.
One of those bars was the Rainbow Club in Seattle, a venue that's showcased acts like The Neville Brothers and Heart.
The other band members, Kurtis Dengler, 15, Lars Henriksen, 15, and Ben Strom, 14, all of Lopez Island, are also frustrated that they can't play in so many venues. "I think we're talking with certain people trying to get around that [rule] -- arrange it so we take a break and leave...we just can't be in there if we're not playing," says Henriksen, the drummer. "It's kind of disappointing."
Besides being underage, three of the boys live in the San Juans, which makes rehearsal logistics a little challenging. But all these obstacles only make them try harder.
"We all think alike, so we know what we're gonna do when we're playing; it all comes together and we have a good time," says Lundgren, the guitarist and a freshman at Bellingham High School. "I even feel like laughing when we're playing because I'm having so much fun."...
The group formed when Lundgren, Henriksen, and Strom started "jamming" together in fourth grade. Shortly before Lundgren moved off Lopez Island two years later, the group found Dengler.
The reason for starting with the blues?..."Blues and rock are the only kinds of music that really have soul; they're the only ones with meaning to me," says bassist Strom.
Dengler has written most of Electric Shades of Blues original songs..."When they do cover a song," Dengler says, "we make them our own."
The band members said they have played mostly in coffee house, but were featured on "Locals Only" on 92.9 KISM on Jan. 9, 2005...
Meanwhile, "I love the music and the guys in it are my buddies, and yeah, that's all you need," Strom says.

--published January 19, 2005
- Bellingham Herald by Kira Millage


"ELECTRIFYING, AGELESS BLUES--02/02/2005"

They have ageless sound; one that, in fact, belies their age.
Playing a catchy mixture of blues and rock, the local band Electric Shades of Blue has been gaining recognition across Western Washington--and these blues-boys cannot even legally drive a car.
Kurtis Dengler, Ben Strom, and Lars Henriksen (all from Lopez), and Jacob Lundgren (from Bellingham), the founding members of Electric Shades of Blue, have something that sets them apart from your run-of-the-mill garage band.
For starters, they play music reminiscent of decade past. "We're more soulful [than most], " said lead guitarist, singer and songwriter Dengler.
We attract a totally different crowd," drummer Henriksen added.
When you listen to these talented 14- and 15-year-old musicians, you won't hear the grunge or punk music popular with the younger generations, but rather renditions of songs such as Howlin' Wolf's "Sugar Momma" or Electric Shades of Blue originals, influenced by the likes of Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, The Black Keys and Stevie Ray Vaughan--with some Led Zeppelin, Cream, and Free thrown into the mix.
"Blues and rock had a baby, and that's what we play," explained Dengler. "We didn't just want to play the Chicago Blues."
So, why did these talented young musicians decide to play the blues? "It's the only music that has meaning and emotion in it," said Lundgren, the group's rhythm guitarist.
"We don't need to be popular in the sense that music is popular today," said Strom, who jams as the group's bass guitarist.
These blues musicians aren't playing to be mainstream, or even to follow the trend in music. "It's sad to say, but I dont' think it's [the blues] getting any more popular," said Dengler.
"We're not going to change what we're playing just to be popular," said drummer Henriksen.
If the 200-plus people who gathered January 21 at Bellingham's Stuart's Coffee House to listen to Electric Shades of Blue's performance are any indication of popularity, these blues players don't need to worry about being mainstream.
Since they made a basement recording, of both original songs and covers, and sent them to more than 25 different radio stations and clubs, they have had an overwhelming response to their soulful sounds.
Their music was recently featured on 92.9 KISM's "Locals Only," by host "Pooner" Clark, who said, "Fifteen year-old Kurtis Dengler leads this talented group of musicians who play the blues with more heart than a lot of this area's veteran bluesmen."...
And it wasn't just the talent that caught Clark's interest, it was their authentic style, influenced by some of the blues' earliest greats...and their age. "I had no idea they were 14-and 15-year olds," Clark said. "I think there's a certain maturity in their music that sets them apart," he explained, adding what they play is unique to this day and age. "They rise to the challenge [of the music]."
Clark was impressed with Dengler, calling him an accomplished guitarist.
"He could pretty much match himself against anybody, anywhere, in town," said Clark.
At times, Electric Shades of Blue has had a difficult time finding venues, as their age limits the places in which they can perform. They were recently asked to play in Seattle's Rainbow Tavern...However, due to their age, they could not legally play there.
Booking gigs around Western Washington is just the tip of the iceberg for this band, which is now working to raise money for professional recording time at Turtle Recording Studio in White Rock, B.C.
As their popularity grows, Electric Shades of Blue continues to look at becoming a better band. "There's always room for improvement in the music itself," said Strom...

--published February 2, 2005 - Islands' Sounder by Amanda Leidig


"ELECTRIFYING, AGELESS BLUES--02/02/2005"

They have ageless sound; one that, in fact, belies their age.
Playing a catchy mixture of blues and rock, the local band Electric Shades of Blue has been gaining recognition across Western Washington--and these blues-boys cannot even legally drive a car.
Kurtis Dengler, Ben Strom, and Lars Henriksen (all from Lopez), and Jacob Lundgren (from Bellingham), the founding members of Electric Shades of Blue, have something that sets them apart from your run-of-the-mill garage band.
For starters, they play music reminiscent of decade past. "We're more soulful [than most], " said lead guitarist, singer and songwriter Dengler.
We attract a totally different crowd," drummer Henriksen added.
When you listen to these talented 14- and 15-year-old musicians, you won't hear the grunge or punk music popular with the younger generations, but rather renditions of songs such as Howlin' Wolf's "Sugar Momma" or Electric Shades of Blue originals, influenced by the likes of Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, The Black Keys and Stevie Ray Vaughan--with some Led Zeppelin, Cream, and Free thrown into the mix.
"Blues and rock had a baby, and that's what we play," explained Dengler. "We didn't just want to play the Chicago Blues."
So, why did these talented young musicians decide to play the blues? "It's the only music that has meaning and emotion in it," said Lundgren, the group's rhythm guitarist.
"We don't need to be popular in the sense that music is popular today," said Strom, who jams as the group's bass guitarist.
These blues musicians aren't playing to be mainstream, or even to follow the trend in music. "It's sad to say, but I dont' think it's [the blues] getting any more popular," said Dengler.
"We're not going to change what we're playing just to be popular," said drummer Henriksen.
If the 200-plus people who gathered January 21 at Bellingham's Stuart's Coffee House to listen to Electric Shades of Blue's performance are any indication of popularity, these blues players don't need to worry about being mainstream.
Since they made a basement recording, of both original songs and covers, and sent them to more than 25 different radio stations and clubs, they have had an overwhelming response to their soulful sounds.
Their music was recently featured on 92.9 KISM's "Locals Only," by host "Pooner" Clark, who said, "Fifteen year-old Kurtis Dengler leads this talented group of musicians who play the blues with more heart than a lot of this area's veteran bluesmen."...
And it wasn't just the talent that caught Clark's interest, it was their authentic style, influenced by some of the blues' earliest greats...and their age. "I had no idea they were 14-and 15-year olds," Clark said. "I think there's a certain maturity in their music that sets them apart," he explained, adding what they play is unique to this day and age. "They rise to the challenge [of the music]."
Clark was impressed with Dengler, calling him an accomplished guitarist.
"He could pretty much match himself against anybody, anywhere, in town," said Clark.
At times, Electric Shades of Blue has had a difficult time finding venues, as their age limits the places in which they can perform. They were recently asked to play in Seattle's Rainbow Tavern...However, due to their age, they could not legally play there.
Booking gigs around Western Washington is just the tip of the iceberg for this band, which is now working to raise money for professional recording time at Turtle Recording Studio in White Rock, B.C.
As their popularity grows, Electric Shades of Blue continues to look at becoming a better band. "There's always room for improvement in the music itself," said Strom...

--published February 2, 2005 - Islands' Sounder by Amanda Leidig


"ELECTRIC SHADES OF BLUE--07/01/2005"

The soulful sounds that spill fourth from Kurtis Dengler and his Northwest blues band, Electric Shades of Blue, easily eclipse their ages. Gritty, sultry, and sincere, this ensemble of teenage performers creates music that recalls its roots.
It's been a big year for Electric Shades of Blue. In a brief period of time, bandleader Kurtis Dengler, 16, rhythm guitarist Jacob Lundgren, 15, drummer Lars Henriksen, 15, and bassist Ben Strom, 15, have graduated from innocent jam sessions to substantial live performances like the Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival, and they don't seem to plan on stopping there.
Electric Shades of Blue illustrates the raw, challenging qualities of adolescence, something that ultimately contributes to their musical success. The sincerity and passion wound into their music answers a musical craving generated by a music culture that is inundated with overprocessed melodies. Herein lies the beauty of Electric Shades of Blue: their music is skinned to its core and embodies an innate passion that the modern music industry neglects. And it is refreshing.
"With the blues," says Dengler, "you're not playing what you know. You're playing what you feel."
Dengler is the passionate composer behind the songs Electric Shades of Blue plays. These unassuming compositions drew manager Chris Crawford to a performance held at [the former]Stuart's coffeehouse in Bellingham, giving him a taste of their talent.
"I was just grinning after the show," said Crawford. "I was invigorated by their fresh, raw sound."
Crawford manages legendary blues musician Paul Rodgers and, as a result of Electric Shades of Blue's performance at Stuart's, he now manages them as well.
Meeting Crawford was an essential moment on the group's short journey to recognition. They've progressed from playing Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix covers during basement jam sessions to writing their own blues-influenced rock and roll pieces for audiences en masse. In the next few years, Crawford hopes to be able to sign Electric Shades of Blue with a major label. Between now and then, the group is busy with their first studio recording, playing summer festivals, and KISM's 92.9 "Locals Only" radio show.
Electric Shades of Blue's relationship to Crawford is important, and not solely for Crawford's well-established position in the music industry. Crawford's intimacy with music allows him to recognize the crux of Electric Shades of Blue's sound. That is, the rawness of their music doesn't come from years of musical training, but instead comes directly from their hearts.
Electric Shades of Blue sources what comes naturally within themselves as fuel for their music, but they're also weaving in the old, familiar sounds of their blues predecessors and doing it in a fresh way. In this way, the group pages back to the birthplace of music, summons up notes of old blues wisdom, and infuses their songs with a sound whose soul and depth erase the youthfulness of their ages.
"Their music takes you on a nice little journey," Crawford said. "Every note means something."
As they launch audiences on a musical journey, Electric Shades of Blue embarks on a journey of their own, along a route that revives old-style blues and reminds listeners where their own souls reside.

--published July 1, 2005 - Entertainment News Northwest by Anne Treat


"ELECTRIC SHADES OF BLUE--07/01/2005"

The soulful sounds that spill fourth from Kurtis Dengler and his Northwest blues band, Electric Shades of Blue, easily eclipse their ages. Gritty, sultry, and sincere, this ensemble of teenage performers creates music that recalls its roots.
It's been a big year for Electric Shades of Blue. In a brief period of time, bandleader Kurtis Dengler, 16, rhythm guitarist Jacob Lundgren, 15, drummer Lars Henriksen, 15, and bassist Ben Strom, 15, have graduated from innocent jam sessions to substantial live performances like the Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival, and they don't seem to plan on stopping there.
Electric Shades of Blue illustrates the raw, challenging qualities of adolescence, something that ultimately contributes to their musical success. The sincerity and passion wound into their music answers a musical craving generated by a music culture that is inundated with overprocessed melodies. Herein lies the beauty of Electric Shades of Blue: their music is skinned to its core and embodies an innate passion that the modern music industry neglects. And it is refreshing.
"With the blues," says Dengler, "you're not playing what you know. You're playing what you feel."
Dengler is the passionate composer behind the songs Electric Shades of Blue plays. These unassuming compositions drew manager Chris Crawford to a performance held at [the former]Stuart's coffeehouse in Bellingham, giving him a taste of their talent.
"I was just grinning after the show," said Crawford. "I was invigorated by their fresh, raw sound."
Crawford manages legendary blues musician Paul Rodgers and, as a result of Electric Shades of Blue's performance at Stuart's, he now manages them as well.
Meeting Crawford was an essential moment on the group's short journey to recognition. They've progressed from playing Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix covers during basement jam sessions to writing their own blues-influenced rock and roll pieces for audiences en masse. In the next few years, Crawford hopes to be able to sign Electric Shades of Blue with a major label. Between now and then, the group is busy with their first studio recording, playing summer festivals, and KISM's 92.9 "Locals Only" radio show.
Electric Shades of Blue's relationship to Crawford is important, and not solely for Crawford's well-established position in the music industry. Crawford's intimacy with music allows him to recognize the crux of Electric Shades of Blue's sound. That is, the rawness of their music doesn't come from years of musical training, but instead comes directly from their hearts.
Electric Shades of Blue sources what comes naturally within themselves as fuel for their music, but they're also weaving in the old, familiar sounds of their blues predecessors and doing it in a fresh way. In this way, the group pages back to the birthplace of music, summons up notes of old blues wisdom, and infuses their songs with a sound whose soul and depth erase the youthfulness of their ages.
"Their music takes you on a nice little journey," Crawford said. "Every note means something."
As they launch audiences on a musical journey, Electric Shades of Blue embarks on a journey of their own, along a route that revives old-style blues and reminds listeners where their own souls reside.

--published July 1, 2005 - Entertainment News Northwest by Anne Treat


"ALL THE BLUES YOU CAN USE--07/28/05"

For nine years, people have gathered in a little clearing in the woods of Deming. They've shouted, they've drank, but most importantly, they've felt the power of the blues. Now in its 10th year, the Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival is ready to show you why it has won the Best Blues Event in Washington two years running.
"This festival started out as a family reunion for the Walton clan," says Lloyd Peterson, festival producer..."What was once a one-day concert with 150 attendees has grown into a weekend-long party that more than 2,000 people took part in last year."
..."It's the youthful blues players that are really going to keep this going," Peterson says. "The older folks, like myself, will die and that will be it. If it doesn't keep going, then our musical heritiage dies."
...Electric Shades Shades of Blue, a four-piece from Lopez Island and Bellingham, will appear Sunday, and only one of them is old enough to drive.
"They're an unbelievable group," Peterson says. "Their leader, Kurtis Dengler, makes Jonny Lang look like a rookie. Amazing."
Of course, not every performer is going to have to steer clear of the beer garden. Also on the bill are...

--published July 28, 2005 - Bellingham Weekly by Tyson Lynn


"ALL THE BLUES YOU CAN USE--07/28/05"

For nine years, people have gathered in a little clearing in the woods of Deming. They've shouted, they've drank, but most importantly, they've felt the power of the blues. Now in its 10th year, the Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival is ready to show you why it has won the Best Blues Event in Washington two years running.
"This festival started out as a family reunion for the Walton clan," says Lloyd Peterson, festival producer..."What was once a one-day concert with 150 attendees has grown into a weekend-long party that more than 2,000 people took part in last year."
..."It's the youthful blues players that are really going to keep this going," Peterson says. "The older folks, like myself, will die and that will be it. If it doesn't keep going, then our musical heritiage dies."
...Electric Shades Shades of Blue, a four-piece from Lopez Island and Bellingham, will appear Sunday, and only one of them is old enough to drive.
"They're an unbelievable group," Peterson says. "Their leader, Kurtis Dengler, makes Jonny Lang look like a rookie. Amazing."
Of course, not every performer is going to have to steer clear of the beer garden. Also on the bill are...

--published July 28, 2005 - Bellingham Weekly by Tyson Lynn


"LOCAL TALENT & LEGENDS SHARE MT. BAKER STAGE--08/02/2005"

Blues fans couldn't have asked for better conditions for the 10th annual Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival, which was celebrated over two flawless days Saturday and Sunday.
All the elements were in place: top-drawer talent, a marvelous venue and impeccable weather. The result was a two-day concert to rival anything Whatcom County has to offer....
Saturday afternoon, a hard-swinging set by guitarist Robbie Laws set the table for a stunning appearance by flamethrowing slide player Eric Sardinas...It took the crowd about a song and a half to catch its collective breath, move up to the stage and absorb Sardinas and his ripping two-piece band.
The volumne was lowered but the level of brilliance was not for an appearance by David Lindley, who was coming through town for a second time in a few months....
Local talent got loads of stage time as well. Gypsy Lou and the Travelers and the Margaret Wilder Band played Saturday, and Electric Shades of Blue had the early-day crowd buzzing.
The quartet of teenagers from Lopez Island and Bellingham, led by guitarist/singer Kurtis Dengler, plays with a level of soul and passion that's a little frightening for musicians their age.
The band is attracting interest from major labels, according to Chris Crawford, and their performance Sunday was riveting. Electric Shades of Blue blends strong original material with imaginative covers; they're respectful and authentic, and definitely a band to watch.

--published August 2, 2005
- Bellingham Herald by Craig Parrish


"LOCAL TALENT & LEGENDS SHARE MT. BAKER STAGE--08/02/2005"

Blues fans couldn't have asked for better conditions for the 10th annual Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival, which was celebrated over two flawless days Saturday and Sunday.
All the elements were in place: top-drawer talent, a marvelous venue and impeccable weather. The result was a two-day concert to rival anything Whatcom County has to offer....
Saturday afternoon, a hard-swinging set by guitarist Robbie Laws set the table for a stunning appearance by flamethrowing slide player Eric Sardinas...It took the crowd about a song and a half to catch its collective breath, move up to the stage and absorb Sardinas and his ripping two-piece band.
The volumne was lowered but the level of brilliance was not for an appearance by David Lindley, who was coming through town for a second time in a few months....
Local talent got loads of stage time as well. Gypsy Lou and the Travelers and the Margaret Wilder Band played Saturday, and Electric Shades of Blue had the early-day crowd buzzing.
The quartet of teenagers from Lopez Island and Bellingham, led by guitarist/singer Kurtis Dengler, plays with a level of soul and passion that's a little frightening for musicians their age.
The band is attracting interest from major labels, according to Chris Crawford, and their performance Sunday was riveting. Electric Shades of Blue blends strong original material with imaginative covers; they're respectful and authentic, and definitely a band to watch.

--published August 2, 2005
- Bellingham Herald by Craig Parrish


"ELECTRIC SHADES' STRONG DEBUT--09/01/05"

Electric Shades of Blue have the potential and the talent to be the real deal.
The Lopez Island band's self-titled CD, which was released in July, is a smart collection of modern rhythm and blues, with an obvious nod to the disparate but classic sounds of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Electric Flag and Jonny Lang.
That the members of the group are still in their teens is refreshing and a bit astonishing, because the quartet's catalog reeks of music with an old soul.
Singer/guitarist Kurtis Dengler is the chief attraction, but safe to say he'd have a harder time of it without Jacob Lundgren (guitar), Ben Strom (bass) and Lars Henriksen (drums).
Dengler compostions such as "Girl" and "Before Tomorrow" easily stand along-side John Lee Hooker's "Crawling King Snake," dripping with a combination of riffs, backbeats and a little improvisation.
The band has been busy this summer, and major labels are starting to take notice, according to manager Chris Crawford. At the Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival in July, Electric Shades opened the Sunday concert and if they didn't actually steal the show, they set a standard that the subsequent bands had a hard time following.
The band plays a concert on Saturday at the grand opening of the Bellingham Public Market in downtwon Bellingham. For an ideal chance to see a great band still in its impressive infancy, you can't do much better.

--published September 1, 2005 - Bellingham Herald by Craig Parrish


"ELECTRIC SHADES' STRONG DEBUT--09/01/05"

Electric Shades of Blue have the potential and the talent to be the real deal.
The Lopez Island band's self-titled CD, which was released in July, is a smart collection of modern rhythm and blues, with an obvious nod to the disparate but classic sounds of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Electric Flag and Jonny Lang.
That the members of the group are still in their teens is refreshing and a bit astonishing, because the quartet's catalog reeks of music with an old soul.
Singer/guitarist Kurtis Dengler is the chief attraction, but safe to say he'd have a harder time of it without Jacob Lundgren (guitar), Ben Strom (bass) and Lars Henriksen (drums).
Dengler compostions such as "Girl" and "Before Tomorrow" easily stand along-side John Lee Hooker's "Crawling King Snake," dripping with a combination of riffs, backbeats and a little improvisation.
The band has been busy this summer, and major labels are starting to take notice, according to manager Chris Crawford. At the Mount Baker Rhythm and Blues Festival in July, Electric Shades opened the Sunday concert and if they didn't actually steal the show, they set a standard that the subsequent bands had a hard time following.
The band plays a concert on Saturday at the grand opening of the Bellingham Public Market in downtwon Bellingham. For an ideal chance to see a great band still in its impressive infancy, you can't do much better.

--published September 1, 2005 - Bellingham Herald by Craig Parrish


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

Electric Shades of Blue is taking the Pacific Northwest by storm. With the heart and soul of the bands that have influenced them, such as Free, Cream, Led Zeppelin, Howlin' Wolf, and John Lee Hooker, ESB has captured the essence of rock and blues. Fans of all ages are enthusiastically embracing ESB as the next band to hit the charts. With interest from major labels, the band is building a solid fan base.

Kurtis Dengler, 16 (singer, songwriter and lead guitar); Lars Henriksen, 16 (drums); and Ben Strom, 16 (bass), all from Lopez Island, Washington and Jacob Lundgren, 16 (guitar) of Bellingham, Washington are the founding members of ESB.

"Blues and Rock had a baby and that's what we play" says the band's frontman Kurtis D.

Their music was recently featured on 92.9 FM, KISM's "Locals Only," and returned for a second show by popular demand. In 2005 the band performed at the Mount Baker Blues Festival, the Darrington Rock Festival and the Napavine Ampitheater, sharing the stage with rock and blues greats such as Ted Nugent, Dave Hole, Eric Sardinas, Incognito, David Lindley, The Fixx, Rick Derringer, Brett Michaels, and Howard Leese of Heart, who decribes Kurtis as "A new young gun...the soul man."

ESB recently signed with veteren manager Chris Crawford who states "These guys are my favorite band...next to long time friend and client Paul Rodgers of Bad Company, Free, and currently fronting Queen + Paul Rodgers."

The band's self-titled CD, which was released locally in July, will take you on a tasty, soulful journey laced with a combination of riffs and backbeats and filled with a lot of heart and soul.