Elgin-Skye
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Elgin-Skye

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada | SELF

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada | SELF
Band Alternative Pop

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...The line up that night started with Construction and Destruction, followed by the tender Elgin-Skye and finally finished with Julie Doiron as the main act. The openers were effortlessly brilliant and charming. It is welcoming when you feel so close to the artists, as if you are getting a private concert in your living room. Elgin-Skye always impresses with her solo show; she masters that "loop" quite well. Her cover of "Faith" by Limp Bizkit (Ha! I sure hoped she was kidding...) couldn't have been a better way to start off her set. .... - Indecent Exposure


...The line up that night started with Construction and Destruction, followed by the tender Elgin-Skye and finally finished with Julie Doiron as the main act. The openers were effortlessly brilliant and charming. It is welcoming when you feel so close to the artists, as if you are getting a private concert in your living room. Elgin-Skye always impresses with her solo show; she masters that "loop" quite well. Her cover of "Faith" by Limp Bizkit (Ha! I sure hoped she was kidding...) couldn't have been a better way to start off her set. .... - Indecent Exposure


...Back in Barfly, Elgin Skye was about to take the stage. Throughout the festival I heard people asking when Elgin was playing. She had already backed up Ari Swan the night before and now she was performing solo.

The healthy crowd knew most of her songs and called out requests. I wasn’t that familiar with her repertoire like they were but I soon was (and realized I had heard some of them through FTB’s creative director and photographer Chris Zacchia’s car stereo throughout the year). Her song about loving zombies because they only want women for their brains really caught my attention, despite Elgin’s (tongue-in-cheek) fears that recent news stories indicating an actual zombie apocalypse may take some of the fun out of it.

No fun was missing from the song or from anywhere in her set. She rocked out like there was no tomorrow with her accoustic guitar and really interesting sound effects and a great voice. The crowd and this audience member rocked with her.

There was going to be a tomorrow, though. After the evening’s closer and (as Elgin put it) very handsome man Trevor Davies played a solid set, I knew it was time to prepare for another night of Infringing followed by a closing day. I’ll bring you the rest of the fest soon.

For now, though, I’d like to note that the shows on Thursday and Friday all rocked out and (with one exception) they did so without heavy amplification and distortion like the musical infringers of the fest’s first weekend had used. The punk ethos remained as did the passion. This was just a different kind of rockin’.
- Forgetthebox.net


...Back in Barfly, Elgin Skye was about to take the stage. Throughout the festival I heard people asking when Elgin was playing. She had already backed up Ari Swan the night before and now she was performing solo.

The healthy crowd knew most of her songs and called out requests. I wasn’t that familiar with her repertoire like they were but I soon was (and realized I had heard some of them through FTB’s creative director and photographer Chris Zacchia’s car stereo throughout the year). Her song about loving zombies because they only want women for their brains really caught my attention, despite Elgin’s (tongue-in-cheek) fears that recent news stories indicating an actual zombie apocalypse may take some of the fun out of it.

No fun was missing from the song or from anywhere in her set. She rocked out like there was no tomorrow with her accoustic guitar and really interesting sound effects and a great voice. The crowd and this audience member rocked with her.

There was going to be a tomorrow, though. After the evening’s closer and (as Elgin put it) very handsome man Trevor Davies played a solid set, I knew it was time to prepare for another night of Infringing followed by a closing day. I’ll bring you the rest of the fest soon.

For now, though, I’d like to note that the shows on Thursday and Friday all rocked out and (with one exception) they did so without heavy amplification and distortion like the musical infringers of the fest’s first weekend had used. The punk ethos remained as did the passion. This was just a different kind of rockin’.
- Forgetthebox.net


As an arts and culture writer these past few years, I’ve gotten the opportunity to meet artists of all different styles and disciplines. And while most are talented folks, there are those unfortunate times when an artist’s skills are quickly overshadowed by their ridiculous ego. Anyone who’s ever met singer/songwriter Elgin Skye though knows it’s pretty damn hard not to love her.


Elgin Skye – Photo Chris Zacchia
Starting out in music with encouragement from friends in Nanaimo, this BC native made Montreal home four years ago. I first saw Elgin perform last summer at Fringe Park, and I admit to being one of those gushing fans who bought a CD and made her sign it. Over the past year I’ve happily watched her presence grow in the Montreal music scene, and so I was thrilled when she agreed to meet Forget the Box for an interview.

Every piece of writing I’ve seen about about Elgin (which I’m shocked to say there is very little of) have all used the same word to describe her: adorable. It’s not exactly hard to see where the impulse comes from; while I’m sure she has her off days like the rest of us, with her sweet disposition it seems almost impossible to imagine Elgin has ever been sad or angry in her entire life. For our photo shoot in Lafontaine park Elgin frolicked in the grass, climbed trees and afterwards invited Chris Zacchia and I over for beer and cookies. Needless to say she’s not only a special lady but also a smart one who knows exactly how to win Forget the Box people over.

Knowing her primarily as a folk singer, I was surprised during our chat when Elgin mentioned how she’s listening to bands like Nirvana and Sonic Youth lately for inspiration. Along with her rock ‘n roll influences, she’s also added a looping pedal to her set. The looping pedal is a calculated effort to give, as she put it a “bigger sound” to her set. I caught a little of this “new” Elgin sound at this years Infringement Festival; this year’s set definitely had a higher octane feel to it (helped I’m sure by Elgin pre-show ritual of jumping jacks before a set). No matter what the tempo though, it’s always a pleasure to watch Elgin perform because she clearly pours her heart and soul into every moment on stage. Very often you can tell the band on stage can’t wait to get back to their drinks by the bar and trust me, it makes all the difference.

When looking at Elgin I admit it can be hard to see past the nice girl and her sparkly pink ukulele. But after sitting down with her, I realized that Elgin is definitely ready to be known as much more then adorable. And who can blame her? With Elgin her loveliness sometimes overshadows the fact that she is quite a talented musician. I re-listened to Elgin’s demo I got last summer, I noticed that a lot of her songs are in fact much more on the darker side then I remembered. Sure she has her cutesy songs like, Ladies love Zombies (What a woman wouldn’t give/for a man who only wants her for her brains) but a lot of her songs are also about the pain of longing- longing for a better place to live, (Vancouver Sucks) longing for better social scene (All Alone Here), longing for a better relationship (Jetfighter vs. Submarine)



Despite Elgin’s claims to the contrary of not wanting a full time musical career, I have every confidence that she has the chops to make a real go of it if she really wanted to. And with talks of recording and a tour in her future, I think she knows it to. Elgin’s next show is a private loft party on the 28th with Ingrid Gatin and B.W. Brandes. You can email the lady herself elginskye@gmail.com for all the info.

Listen to her album and if you like it buy it for 5$ - Forgetthebox.net


As an arts and culture writer these past few years, I’ve gotten the opportunity to meet artists of all different styles and disciplines. And while most are talented folks, there are those unfortunate times when an artist’s skills are quickly overshadowed by their ridiculous ego. Anyone who’s ever met singer/songwriter Elgin Skye though knows it’s pretty damn hard not to love her.


Elgin Skye – Photo Chris Zacchia
Starting out in music with encouragement from friends in Nanaimo, this BC native made Montreal home four years ago. I first saw Elgin perform last summer at Fringe Park, and I admit to being one of those gushing fans who bought a CD and made her sign it. Over the past year I’ve happily watched her presence grow in the Montreal music scene, and so I was thrilled when she agreed to meet Forget the Box for an interview.

Every piece of writing I’ve seen about about Elgin (which I’m shocked to say there is very little of) have all used the same word to describe her: adorable. It’s not exactly hard to see where the impulse comes from; while I’m sure she has her off days like the rest of us, with her sweet disposition it seems almost impossible to imagine Elgin has ever been sad or angry in her entire life. For our photo shoot in Lafontaine park Elgin frolicked in the grass, climbed trees and afterwards invited Chris Zacchia and I over for beer and cookies. Needless to say she’s not only a special lady but also a smart one who knows exactly how to win Forget the Box people over.

Knowing her primarily as a folk singer, I was surprised during our chat when Elgin mentioned how she’s listening to bands like Nirvana and Sonic Youth lately for inspiration. Along with her rock ‘n roll influences, she’s also added a looping pedal to her set. The looping pedal is a calculated effort to give, as she put it a “bigger sound” to her set. I caught a little of this “new” Elgin sound at this years Infringement Festival; this year’s set definitely had a higher octane feel to it (helped I’m sure by Elgin pre-show ritual of jumping jacks before a set). No matter what the tempo though, it’s always a pleasure to watch Elgin perform because she clearly pours her heart and soul into every moment on stage. Very often you can tell the band on stage can’t wait to get back to their drinks by the bar and trust me, it makes all the difference.

When looking at Elgin I admit it can be hard to see past the nice girl and her sparkly pink ukulele. But after sitting down with her, I realized that Elgin is definitely ready to be known as much more then adorable. And who can blame her? With Elgin her loveliness sometimes overshadows the fact that she is quite a talented musician. I re-listened to Elgin’s demo I got last summer, I noticed that a lot of her songs are in fact much more on the darker side then I remembered. Sure she has her cutesy songs like, Ladies love Zombies (What a woman wouldn’t give/for a man who only wants her for her brains) but a lot of her songs are also about the pain of longing- longing for a better place to live, (Vancouver Sucks) longing for better social scene (All Alone Here), longing for a better relationship (Jetfighter vs. Submarine)



Despite Elgin’s claims to the contrary of not wanting a full time musical career, I have every confidence that she has the chops to make a real go of it if she really wanted to. And with talks of recording and a tour in her future, I think she knows it to. Elgin’s next show is a private loft party on the 28th with Ingrid Gatin and B.W. Brandes. You can email the lady herself elginskye@gmail.com for all the info.

Listen to her album and if you like it buy it for 5$ - Forgetthebox.net


If you listen closely to Concordia commerce student Elgin-Skye McLaren’s short but powerful repertoire of recorded music, you’ll notice that, hidden discretely behind the ukuleles, melodicas, xylophones, and soft acoustic guitar, there’s a little storm brewing.

“When I started in music I was doing things that were really over-the-top, really tweedy-folk, because I found it was easy for me to write, and it was easy to relate to where I was,” said McLaren.

“Now I’m really trying to sort of re-brand myself, because that’s just too narrow—it’s just not where I’m at. My new stuff is a little darker; somebody told me it’s more ‘psychedelic.’”

If her name sounds familiar, don’t be too surprised. Born and raised in the small town of Port Alberni, B.C. (a hometown she describes as being “sort of like a restroom on the way to Tofino”) she’s been living in Montreal for the past three years, studying economics at Concordia.

She charms bespectacled folk fans by night, but by day McLaren keeps a pretty active profile on campus. This past May she started working with the Fine Arts Student Alliance as a bookkeeper, and she also worked as a coordinator for Art Matters last year.

Not to mention, she was voted 11th best singer/songwriter in the Mirror’s Best of Montreal poll this year, one solid notch ahead of Celine Dion—a distinction she holds begrudgingly.

“I’ve been sort of lumped into the category of ‘singer/songwriter,’ which is really cool in some ways, because I respect a lot of singer/songwriters, but I’ve been getting really bored of it,” explained McLaren. “So recently I’ve been experimenting a lot, playing with a looping pedal, an electric guitar, and some distortion on my voice.”

One of McLaren’s latest tracks, “Give Me More,” is a perfect example of this emphasis on her electronic transformation. The track features a clean but repetitious guitar melody, combined with slight tonal manipulations and a rhythm that trots along on one string. The whole track is veiled by ghostly, layered vocal tracks.

But even with these manipulations, her sound remains distinctly her own and never seems to lose its masterful simplicity.

“There’s a wonderful hypnotic feeling you can get with a loop track,” said McLaren. “I really like that I can leave my songs relatively simple, but by adding a few layers you can create a sound that’s really a lot bigger than just one person.”

This year marks McLaren’s first foray into the POP Montreal festival, and an experience she guarantees will be a good time for everybody involved.

“You’re going to see a lot of great bands in a lot of great venues that you might never have had the chance to see before,” said McLaren. “Since a lot of artists are just hanging out, POP offers a great venue to interact with musicians and artists in ways that you wouldn’t be able to in most cases.”
- The Link Newspaper


If you listen closely to Concordia commerce student Elgin-Skye McLaren’s short but powerful repertoire of recorded music, you’ll notice that, hidden discretely behind the ukuleles, melodicas, xylophones, and soft acoustic guitar, there’s a little storm brewing.

“When I started in music I was doing things that were really over-the-top, really tweedy-folk, because I found it was easy for me to write, and it was easy to relate to where I was,” said McLaren.

“Now I’m really trying to sort of re-brand myself, because that’s just too narrow—it’s just not where I’m at. My new stuff is a little darker; somebody told me it’s more ‘psychedelic.’”

If her name sounds familiar, don’t be too surprised. Born and raised in the small town of Port Alberni, B.C. (a hometown she describes as being “sort of like a restroom on the way to Tofino”) she’s been living in Montreal for the past three years, studying economics at Concordia.

She charms bespectacled folk fans by night, but by day McLaren keeps a pretty active profile on campus. This past May she started working with the Fine Arts Student Alliance as a bookkeeper, and she also worked as a coordinator for Art Matters last year.

Not to mention, she was voted 11th best singer/songwriter in the Mirror’s Best of Montreal poll this year, one solid notch ahead of Celine Dion—a distinction she holds begrudgingly.

“I’ve been sort of lumped into the category of ‘singer/songwriter,’ which is really cool in some ways, because I respect a lot of singer/songwriters, but I’ve been getting really bored of it,” explained McLaren. “So recently I’ve been experimenting a lot, playing with a looping pedal, an electric guitar, and some distortion on my voice.”

One of McLaren’s latest tracks, “Give Me More,” is a perfect example of this emphasis on her electronic transformation. The track features a clean but repetitious guitar melody, combined with slight tonal manipulations and a rhythm that trots along on one string. The whole track is veiled by ghostly, layered vocal tracks.

But even with these manipulations, her sound remains distinctly her own and never seems to lose its masterful simplicity.

“There’s a wonderful hypnotic feeling you can get with a loop track,” said McLaren. “I really like that I can leave my songs relatively simple, but by adding a few layers you can create a sound that’s really a lot bigger than just one person.”

This year marks McLaren’s first foray into the POP Montreal festival, and an experience she guarantees will be a good time for everybody involved.

“You’re going to see a lot of great bands in a lot of great venues that you might never have had the chance to see before,” said McLaren. “Since a lot of artists are just hanging out, POP offers a great venue to interact with musicians and artists in ways that you wouldn’t be able to in most cases.”
- The Link Newspaper


Give a young girl from Vancouver a guitar and just wait for the sounds of lo-fi acoustic indie pop to rise. This is something Elgin-Skye (often accompanied by Vincent Reid Hopkins) is happy to provide. Elgin-Skye acknowledges, “…as a solo artist it can be hard to distinguish my music from other guitar-wielding females.” Then just wait for the imminent comparisons of a Joanna Newsom and or Regina Spektor variety. But such comparisons are invalid – these are not pretty songs about pretty things. Elgin-Skye has provided herself with a set of vulnerable and undressed songs, with subtle hints of fuller orchestration. Here is a musician you just know uses the word “lovely” more than most, ready and able to distinguish herself from the crowd. “There are a lot of ideas floating around in my head of how I would like my music to sound, but it’s hard to do with only ten fingers and ten toes.”
- CJLO Magazine


Give a young girl from Vancouver a guitar and just wait for the sounds of lo-fi acoustic indie pop to rise. This is something Elgin-Skye (often accompanied by Vincent Reid Hopkins) is happy to provide. Elgin-Skye acknowledges, “…as a solo artist it can be hard to distinguish my music from other guitar-wielding females.” Then just wait for the imminent comparisons of a Joanna Newsom and or Regina Spektor variety. But such comparisons are invalid – these are not pretty songs about pretty things. Elgin-Skye has provided herself with a set of vulnerable and undressed songs, with subtle hints of fuller orchestration. Here is a musician you just know uses the word “lovely” more than most, ready and able to distinguish herself from the crowd. “There are a lot of ideas floating around in my head of how I would like my music to sound, but it’s hard to do with only ten fingers and ten toes.”
- CJLO Magazine


Discography

New album to be released Summer 2013

Photos

Bio

Elgin-Skye McLaren lives in Montreal, where she writes poems, songs and lonesome love letters. Armed with an electric guitar and a looping pedal, she plays lo-fi indie-pop with a style reminiscent of artists such as Regina Spektor, Bjork, and Braids. Elgin-Skye’s politeness and humble disposition betray her booming, buoyant voice.

Hailing from Vancouver Island, Elgin-Skye began composing original songs as a teenager and has released several self-produced EPs. She has performed across Canada and internationally. In recent years, Elgin-Skye has been featured in several of Canada’s biggest indie music festivals, including POP Montreal and NXNE.

In 2012, Elgin-Skye was voted #3 Singer-Songwriter in the Montreal Mirror’s annual Best of Montreal. She is currently working on new material, and is expecting to release her a new record in summer 2013.