Everything All Of The Time
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Everything All Of The Time

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The best kept secret in music

Press



Reign of the Sloth Charmer
2006
Independently released

By: Jessi Hafer

At first, I thought I’d write about some of my favorite tracks from the 2006 release, “Reign of the Sloth Charmer,” from Madera-based rock band “Everything All the Time.” However, the more I listen to the CD, the more difficult it is to choose a favorite song because each song goes through so many phases, each very good in its own way. The variations in the tracks also make it difficult to catch when one song ends and another begins, giving the listener a strong sense of continuity that’s rare in a post-modern culture of choppy sound bites and three-minute songs. Another thing I like about the CD is that much of it feels like motion to me - Track 2 cycles through stages of dreaminess and franticness. Track 4 starts off tip-toeing, then like floating on the ocean, being lifted and forgotten by the waves. The whole CD is profoundly enjoyable, yet somewhat difficult to describe.

One thing is certain: “Everything All the Time” should be nominated for an award for most intriguing/unique song titles for the eight tracks on the CD: “You bring the children, I’ll bring the wolves (tongue in tons),” “Postpone the dawn,” “The People vs. Lux,” “So Ritchie’s is bigger than Tommy’s? (sub tracks Lakes, Itself, and Mothers),” “Oh he’s Goth Now,” “Dear Slothcharmer,” “Sincerely Snake face,” “Angelita (our friend, our sister).”

The beginning of the first track weirds me out a bit; I can’t decide if I think they’re playing their singing backwards or speaking some sloth language. The song quickly moves into the guitar-driven rock that dominates the rest of the cd.

The changeability within and duration of the songs (track 4 is 17 minutes long) give the group a definite progressive rock (AKA “prog rock”) feel. That said, Everything All the Time, whose name was inspired by lyrics of a Radiohead song, did not begin as a prog group. As their music developed from their initial, simpler punk/alternative rock, listeners began associating the sound with prog. The band members, more interested in blues or jazz, don’t listen to much prog themselves.

Band Member Jesus Pelayo describes prog rock as having “the ability to go anywhere… It is similar to the way jazz is composed… Usually there [are] many parts and lots of improvisation. In prog, you start in one place and you end in another.”

The description is a good characterization of this band, which has been playing together about a year and includes Jesus Pelayo (guitar), Freddy Ochoa (drums), Gabriel Flores (vocals), and Gilbert Flores (bass). Jesus, Freddy, and Gabriel have been playing together for over 3 _ years. The band has a full, well-developed sound, especially for coming from just four people.

Everything All the Time has no upcoming shows confirmed for Fresno, though they may play on August 3. For more information on their shows, see their myspace page: http://www.myspace.com/everythingallthetime. Their CD is also available for purchase for $6 on their page.
- The Undercurrent



Reign of the Sloth Charmer
2006
Independently released

By: Jessi Hafer

At first, I thought I’d write about some of my favorite tracks from the 2006 release, “Reign of the Sloth Charmer,” from Madera-based rock band “Everything All the Time.” However, the more I listen to the CD, the more difficult it is to choose a favorite song because each song goes through so many phases, each very good in its own way. The variations in the tracks also make it difficult to catch when one song ends and another begins, giving the listener a strong sense of continuity that’s rare in a post-modern culture of choppy sound bites and three-minute songs. Another thing I like about the CD is that much of it feels like motion to me - Track 2 cycles through stages of dreaminess and franticness. Track 4 starts off tip-toeing, then like floating on the ocean, being lifted and forgotten by the waves. The whole CD is profoundly enjoyable, yet somewhat difficult to describe.

One thing is certain: “Everything All the Time” should be nominated for an award for most intriguing/unique song titles for the eight tracks on the CD: “You bring the children, I’ll bring the wolves (tongue in tons),” “Postpone the dawn,” “The People vs. Lux,” “So Ritchie’s is bigger than Tommy’s? (sub tracks Lakes, Itself, and Mothers),” “Oh he’s Goth Now,” “Dear Slothcharmer,” “Sincerely Snake face,” “Angelita (our friend, our sister).”

The beginning of the first track weirds me out a bit; I can’t decide if I think they’re playing their singing backwards or speaking some sloth language. The song quickly moves into the guitar-driven rock that dominates the rest of the cd.

The changeability within and duration of the songs (track 4 is 17 minutes long) give the group a definite progressive rock (AKA “prog rock”) feel. That said, Everything All the Time, whose name was inspired by lyrics of a Radiohead song, did not begin as a prog group. As their music developed from their initial, simpler punk/alternative rock, listeners began associating the sound with prog. The band members, more interested in blues or jazz, don’t listen to much prog themselves.

Band Member Jesus Pelayo describes prog rock as having “the ability to go anywhere… It is similar to the way jazz is composed… Usually there [are] many parts and lots of improvisation. In prog, you start in one place and you end in another.”

The description is a good characterization of this band, which has been playing together about a year and includes Jesus Pelayo (guitar), Freddy Ochoa (drums), Gabriel Flores (vocals), and Gilbert Flores (bass). Jesus, Freddy, and Gabriel have been playing together for over 3 _ years. The band has a full, well-developed sound, especially for coming from just four people.

Everything All the Time has no upcoming shows confirmed for Fresno, though they may play on August 3. For more information on their shows, see their myspace page: http://www.myspace.com/everythingallthetime. Their CD is also available for purchase for $6 on their page.
- The Undercurrent


Discography

Reign Of The Slothcharmer(2006)

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

Based in the central California town of Madera, Everything All of the Time is an experimental rock band reaching deep into a collection of multi-genre influences to introduce a contemporary take on aggressive music amid a scene dominated by same-sounding metal and punk rock bands. Drawing comparisons to the New Progressive sound revolutionized by The Mars Volta (whom they cite an early influence) the group’s ambitious debut album, Reign of the Sloth Charmer, offers an energized batch of eight modern anthems built on a pyre of swarming emotions, haunting melodic interludes, eclectic rhythms and vocals that recall the noise rock leanings of The Jesus Lizard. Reign of the Sloth Charmer represents a disarming aesthetic of self-expression by four musicians who are all still on the left side of age twenty.

Together since early 2003, Everything All of the Time is comprised of cousins Jesus Pelayo (lead guitar/songwriter) and Freddy Ochoa (drummer) and brothers Gabriel (lead vocals) and Gilbert Flores (bass). “This band started from the roots of another band with the same members,” Jesus explains. “We were playing very straight ahead, alternative rock and it got really boring. One day we were practicing and I stopped the band, went outside and asked myself, ‘what am I doing with this? How can we make this more interesting?’ At the time I was listening to Herbie Hancock’s Sextent and Headhunters albums. I liked the way the musicians on those records interacted and how ‘free’ the music sounded – which was very much the opposite of what we were doing at the time. I talked to the guys about doing something more freestyle and they were up for a change.” The band then took its unusual name from a lyric in the Radiohead song, “Idioteque.” “We chose that name because it has multiple meanings and doesn’t pigeonhole us into any one genre,” Jesus enthuses. “Everything All of The Time” means that we can go in any creative direction with our music.”

As Everything All of The Time developed its distinctive sound, each band member drew from his own musical influences. “Growing up, my mom played me a lot of Santana records and old samba music,” says Jesus. “My dad also played guitar and both Freddy and I were both raised in musical families where different styles of music played in our homes all the time.” Jesus’ early guitar influences included ‘60s jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery, as well as Freddie King, John Coltrane and Miles Davis. Carlos Santana and other Latin players like Chucho Valdez and Omara Portuondo inspired the guitarist to vary his musical style beyond standard rock and jazz. Freddy cites drummers John Bonham and Zach Hill (Hella) as primary influences while also getting inspiration from the Latin rhythms of salsa and cumbia. Gilbert’s influences include Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones as well as 90's hip-hop, 60's and 70's rock and early Santana. Vocalist Gabriel admits being influenced by jazz rap pioneers A Tribe Called Quest as well as 90's hip-hop, jazz, indie rock and folk music. “What I like the most about playing in this band,” Gilbert offers, “is how there are no boundaries. We can do anything in music if we want to.”

Recorded in Fresno, California’s Gardenside Studios, Reign of the Sloth Charmer was produced by the duo of Shawn Covert and Matt Orme. “As far as production,” says Jesus, “it was our objective that Sean and Matt take a very hands-off approach. We talked to them about what we wanted regarding bass, drums and guitar sounds. They basically gave us complete creative control while helping us achieve the best sound possible.” Adding the sonic finishing touches to Sloth Charmer, prolific studio wizard Jeff King (Electric Frankenstein, HorrorPops, Violent Femms, Zakk Wylde) mastered the recording at Threshold Sound in West LA.

The CD kicks off with the episodic yet spontaneous “You Bring the Children, I’ll Bring the Wolves,” whose title implies the dark humor of a Grimm’s fairy tale to which Jesus’ gentle reoccurring guitar motif provides the narrative. “Postpone the Dawn” features more of Jesus’ signature sparse, atmospheric guitar while Gabriel’s vocals remain somewhat submerged in the mix, creating an aural collage that at one point ventures off into a brief, freeform jazz jam. Embracing odd time signatures and viscerally compelling melodies, a highlight of the disc is the three-part epic, “So Ritchie’s is Bigger Than Tommy’s?” On this 17-minute instrumental, Jesus creates an imaginative sense of space with gorgeous, minor chord gloom before Freddy’s innovative drumming propels the sonic journey down previously unblazed trails. The song circles back on itself several times as the captivating instrumental interplay draws the listener further in.

“Oh, He’s Goth Now” intrigues with its humorous title which, when set against the experimental nature of the music, encourages imaginative extrapolation as to the song’s meaning. “I can’t say that a song means just one thing, si