Evy Jane
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Evy Jane

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada | INDIE

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada | INDIE
Band R&B Alternative

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In advance of experimental R&B duo Evy Jane's forthcoming self-titled 12", the pair has released this video for the record's featured track, "Sayso." The video, crafted by director Jason C. Meyers, matches the somber, low-end-heavy track well, showing Vancouver-based duo Evelyn Mason and Jeremiah Klein at an isolated cabin during the winter. While the tune does go heavy on the vocals, Mason's voice is solid and, more importantly, the track's sharp, icy production is simply too good to ignore. - XLR8R


King Deluxe's very first vinyl release goes to the Vancouver duo of singer/keyboardist Evelyn Jane Mason and beatsmith Jeremiah Klein, who make eyes-down dubstep(ish) songs that proves this stuff has the potential for pop without resorting to histrionics. If the sudden turn to wax is supposed to mean something, it's easy to see why: these songs are the best to hit King Deluxe yet.

Forgive the reductionism, but maybe the best way to describe this release is Emika with a little dusting of Cat Power singing over early James Blake. It certainly sounds that way with "Sayso," a gracefully shuddering dubstep track that tiptoes over creaky floorboards with bits of melody fluttering away in breezes. Mason's lyrics are darkly sensual, threading a defensive anxiety and subtle sexuality through her husky multi-tracked voice. On "Sayso" it's a bewitching whisper and on the punch-drunk swagger of "Ohso" it's a soaring croon, couching a hook in folds of dubby percussion and see-saw synths.

The single is backed with two remixes from Vancouver underground cornerstones. Taal Mala does a subtle tweak job of "Sayso," laying a steady foundation of throbbing sub that nicely complements Mason's vocal, but it's the other remix that looms over the rest of the release. Max Ulis shows off his recent move to house with a fantastic but gentle rework of "Ohso," pushing those synths to the background and replacing the skip with a dry skeleton rattle, a bed of uncomfortably parched drums where the bass comes from painful collision rather than the warm swells of sub we often associate with "bass music." Lightly altering her vocal and sprinkling choice phrases over his haggard house, it's Ulis' best work yet. - Resident Advisor


Canadians Evy Jane can perhaps bring bitter experience to the table – the image of log cabins and fur-coated wanderers populating a snow-covered wilderness seems to be borne out by the video to their debut single, Sayso.

Sonically, it’s a perfect match for the perpetual gloaming of deep winter: subdued chords are framed by a skeletal kick-and-stick arrangement, buoyed up by a periodic injection of smooth, lumbering bassweight. Singer Evelyn Mason’s voice doesn’t stray beyond a sepulchral sigh, just the barest wisps of soul curling off it like smoke. - FACT


Hotly tipped debut from Vancouver's Evy Jane duo - a strong selection for fans of The Weeknd, James Blake, Clams Casino, R Kelly. The two tracks of 'Evy Jane' evoke the warmest R&B intimacies but perhaps from an isolated, wintry stance. It's music to soundtrack bleak, gloomy evenings in northern climes, from the viscous subbass ooze and lonely vocals of 'Sayso' to the slow, air-quivering synth dissonance and lowlit booomp/clap flow of 'Ohso'. Those vocals and lingering riffs provide strong source material for the remixes, coming as blurry Garage from Max Ulis, and ice-melting bass warmth from Taal Mala, or taut, mercurial glitch from Julien Mier and Andy Dixon's autotuned twinkler. Ace. - Boomkat


Delicate synths, smooth vocals and heavy drops make this experimental R&B duo more than worthy of your affection. - Dummy


Experimental electronic musicians aren't quite done yet finding new ways to creatively deface traditional R&B. In the past three years alone, they've pushed it underwater and listened to it sing from beneath the waves; tossed it on a bonfire and recorded the sound of it melting; watched it evaporate and recorded the fumes. Vancouver duo Evy Jane are the latest to bat at the music like curious cats. On "Sayso," vocalist Evelyn Mason sings like she's stumbling around a room in a codeine haze. The lyrics hint darkly at similar sentiments: "There was something in the things you gave me/I was losing all my self control." It's a queasy performance, underlined by the drums' staggered knock. Wwhat raises the song firmly out of the realm of "art-student-fuckery" is the piercing chorus, where Mason pleads repeatedly: "Didn't I tell you/Not to be so kind to me?" Stunning. - Pitchfork


In advance of experimental R&B duo Evy Jane's forthcoming self-titled 12", the pair has released this video for the record's featured track, "Sayso." The video, crafted by director Jason C. Meyers, matches the somber, low-end-heavy track well, showing Vancouver-based duo Evelyn Mason and Jeremiah Klein at an isolated cabin during the winter. While the tune does go heavy on the vocals, Mason's voice is solid and, more importantly, the track's sharp, icy production is simply too good to ignore. - XLR8R


Discography

Evy Jane self-titled 12" (march 2012)
Evy Jane self-titled digital (february 2012)

Photos

Bio

Evy Jane is actually two people: Evelyn Jane Mason and Jeremiah Klein, who met in Vancouver in 2011 and connected thanks to a shared love of UK Bass music, R&B and Pop. At its core, their music weds sensual R&B with the darker corners of trip-hop, combining musical diets of Portishead and Burial with Sade and Mariah Carey. But Evy Jane are so much more than just a distillation of influences; their productions play on mutations of dub and feed off strains of dance music. Klein’s pulsing soundscapes provide a subtle but powerful backdrop for Mason’s smoky vocals, which waft like sweet fragrance as often as they strike with focused, searing power. In 2012 they released a two-track EP on King Deluxe backed which earned them acclaim everywhere from Pitchfork to FACT and Resident Advisor.

- Pitchfork