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Louisville, Kentucky, United States | INDIE

Louisville, Kentucky, United States | INDIE
Band Americana

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Mar
25
not here @ The Monkey Wrench

Louisville, None, USA

Louisville, None, USA

Mar
19
not here @ Highlands Art Gallery

Louisville, Kentucky, USA

Louisville, Kentucky, USA

Mar
04
not here @ House Show

Brooklyn, New York, USA

Brooklyn, New York, USA

Music

Press


The relaxing country/folk vibe of The American Freedom Machine turned the Tap Room into a slow, beer sipping honky-tonk. The band’s rich harmonies and slow rolling style maintained a genuine, heartfelt sound using horns and instruments such as the “Box Bass” to enrich the show both in sight and sound. The horns fall so seamlessly into the music that one forgets that they are not traditional country instruments and begins to wonder why more people haven’t done it. The box bass, on the other hand, intrigues and amuses me. Whether it’s a washtub or an upright bass, Brent Lehr plays the hell out of it either way. During the show, each of the four musicians got their moment but none of it ever felt forced or ego driven. The American Freedom Machine’s show takes you home, it’s that favorite hoody you slip into at the end of a rough day. - Louisville Arts Review


The American Freedom Machine - Home, The Road, Family and Friends (Independent)
Conceived as a straight-up, honest-to-goodness bar band, The American Freedom Machine have now been together for six years, with three albums under their collective belts. Their latest “Home, The Road, Family and Friends” was recorded in a farmhouse on a mobile 16-track unit straight onto analogue tape. It’s the sort of thing that should be compulsory for all bands of the Americana persuasion but, alas, most only make it into their local digital studio emporium, where the lights shine brighter, the bills come cheaper, but maybe something’s lost in the sound – ask Neil Young.

This album, a collection of warm-blooded originals, finds The American Freedom Machine plying their brand of indie-stringband country music with their usual panache. The four musicians (five, in some pictures) play ten instruments between them, including brass, banjo, pedal steel, and a stand-up bass made from an old cardboard box. They’re not afraid to mix a bit of humour into their songs (“Big Ol’ Country Girl”) but it’s just as likely to turn into pathos (“The Drunken Painter”). Fans of Freakwater and Low Anthem will find much here to like, and should investigate pronto. It certainly won’t do any harm. - Leicester Bangs


The name scared me. Who knows what to expect from a group who would choose “The American Freedom Machine” as their handle? The Harley-Davidson tagline lends itself to every “Easy Rider” cliché available, and at first listen, it’s impossible to gauge the level of sincerity from the players of this indie-country ensemble. Things start roughly, as the first couple songs seem entirely too self-aware to be serious (“Big Ol’ Country Girl,” “Bluegrass Sunsets”). The former could be a barnburner live, but to open the record with it feels like too much, too soon. The album settles into a more comfortable vibe with the beautiful “Barstool” and “Blue & Gold.” These are the radio songs. “Barstool” is a lament in waltz form, while “Blue & Gold” amps up emotion across the board. The songwriting is more evident; this isn’t a song played by a bunch of friends, this is a fully realized effort. There’s enough worthy material here. In the age of playlists, rearrange and whittle this one to the perfect six out of 10. - Leo Weekly


The name scared me. Who knows what to expect from a group who would choose “The American Freedom Machine” as their handle? The Harley-Davidson tagline lends itself to every “Easy Rider” cliché available, and at first listen, it’s impossible to gauge the level of sincerity from the players of this indie-country ensemble. Things start roughly, as the first couple songs seem entirely too self-aware to be serious (“Big Ol’ Country Girl,” “Bluegrass Sunsets”). The former could be a barnburner live, but to open the record with it feels like too much, too soon. The album settles into a more comfortable vibe with the beautiful “Barstool” and “Blue & Gold.” These are the radio songs. “Barstool” is a lament in waltz form, while “Blue & Gold” amps up emotion across the board. The songwriting is more evident; this isn’t a song played by a bunch of friends, this is a fully realized effort. There’s enough worthy material here. In the age of playlists, rearrange and whittle this one to the perfect six out of 10. - Leo Weekly


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Currently at a loss for words...