Eytan and The Embassy
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Eytan and The Embassy

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE
Band Rock Pop

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Sep
15
Eytan and The Embassy @ Knitting Factory

Brooklyn, New York, USA

Brooklyn, New York, USA

Sep
14
Eytan and The Embassy @ The Red Room @ Cafe 939

Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Sep
13
Eytan and The Embassy @ Milkboy Philly

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


In Eytan and The Embassy’s "Everything Changes" music video, lead singer Eytan Oren makes 18 costume changes. The video was done in a single take, with no edits. The core theme of the song is that people shouldn't "find themselves" but should "create themselves."

It took the band and crew a full day of rehearsal and 30 takes the next day to successfully capture the final video. Download the song for free here.
Rules
- costume changes must be from chest up
- music video must be recorded in one take with no edits or camera speed changes
- song may be no longer than four minutes, 30 seconds in length - Recordsetter.com


Eytan Oren of Eytan and The Embassy talks about his band's new music video, and setting a very specific world record. - CNN


It's a video everyone from Neil Patrick Harris to deadmau5 is raving about: One take, 18 costume changes and one very catchy song.

Eytan and The Embassy dug deep through rock and pop history for the video for "Everything Changes." Lead singer Eytan is transformed into everyone from John Lennon to Lady Gaga, with plenty of icons in between (Dylan, Bowie, Cobain, etc).

The video is certainly creative, but it's similar to the visuals Ingrid Michaelson debuted a few weeks ago for her song, "Blood Brothers." In her clip, Michaelson transforms into Bowie, Amy Winehouse and many other music figures. Watch both videos and below and see all of Eytan's looks in the gallery that follows. Which was your favorite? - Huffington Post


What is the world record for most costume changes in a one-take music video? Eighteen, according to the new record set by Eytan & The Embassy (@EytanTheEmbassy) in their newest video “Everything Changes.”

Carly Rae Jepsen Releases New Single ‘Good Time’ with Owl City [AUDIO]

The Brooklyn-based indie-pop group helps main singer Eytan Orens in and out of a variety of costumes that channel iconic personas in the whirlwind four minute video.

The video, directed by Joe Pickard and produced by Tony Segreto (@VigilanteHD), is shot in one take during which Orens channels everyone from John Lennon to Elvis to Lady Gaga.

Other impersonated artists include: Jim Morrison, Bob Dylan, Elton John, Bruce Springsteen, Prince, Kurt Cobain, Weird Al and The Beastie Boys.

Turn Dad’s Unused Ties Into Something Better [PHOTOS]

Costume designer Nicole Pezzolla (@npez), hair and wigs stylist Ashley Miller, and makeup artist Nina Jin (@NinaJin153) are responsible for the impressive looks and flawless transitions.

The band is challenging fans to respond in costume of artists that they missed, with the best to be featured in their next video! Who else do you think should have been included? - RyanSeacrest.com


Meet Eytan Oren of Eytan and The Embassy (if you don't remember his hilarious songs from the 2010 MTV Movie Awards.) Vaguely reminiscent of Ben Folds with a tinge of Mark Ronson's signature '60s Phil Spector sound, Etyan and his four-piece band are at the brink of household-name fame. Raised by parents who introduced him on Bob Dylan and The Beatles, Eytan began piano lessons at the age of 6 and studied music throughout high school before heading to Columbia University, where he majored in -- yep -- music. All of which explains why his new "Everything Changes" video is a lesson in modern-day pop music history.

Similar to Ingrid Michaelson's stunning "Blood Brothers" video, in his "Everything Changes" video, Oren morphs into music's greats: Buddy Holly, John Lennon, Jim Morrison, Elton John, David Bowie and even Lady Gaga. What's more, Eytan underwent a whopping 18 different costume changes. And miraculously, the whole thing was shot in one take and came together on an extremely tight budget (props, because that David Bowie Aladdin Sane sparkly eyepiece looks HIGH QUALITY!). And by the way, we're not the only ones impressed -- a bunch of famous people are too! Neil Patrick Harris recently tweeted "Just saw a most creative and inspiring music video. Love it! Gotta watch." Al Yankovic gave the video a shout-out and, and Harry Shum of "Glee" also tweeted the clip's praises. Basically, Eytan created an unforgettable video about famous people that's now adored by famous people. - MTV Buzzworthy


Pop stars have a reputation for making multiple costume changes in their videos, but Eytan And The Embassy may have broken the record with 18 different costume switches in their video for “Everything Changes”. The band’s frontman Eytan Oren travels through musical history while transforming into famous musicians like Bob Dylan, Sid Vicious, Elton John, Billie Joe Armstrong and even Weird Al Yankovic, deadmau5 and Lady Gaga. It’s a clever concept… and one we saw delivered just a few weeks ago with Ingrid Michaelson‘s video for “Blood Brothers.” Not only is the idea identical, many of the musicians both Ingrid and Oren choose to transform into overlap. They both even go for hairbow Gaga, a look the actual Gaga hasn’t worn in years.

Still, props where props are due — Eytan manages to fit more than a dozen costume changes into a four minute video without any editing. Plus, a drunk Courtney Love stand-in stumbling in the background when the singer turns into Kurt Cobain is just pretty much genius. - Idolator


Eytan And The Embassy fans will have to forgive me, because today is the first time I’m learning about the group. But I’m kind of a huge fan now, at least as much as you can be after seven minutes. Their new video for Everything Changes features eighteen costume changes and one, single take. The non-stop flow of images and familiar rock-star faces is the reason the video is going hella viral. Oh, and the song is quite cool, if you ask me. Take a gander at Eytan as Bob Dylan, Lady Gaga, John Lennon, and a host of others inside.


Eytan And The Embassy: Everything Changes




Like I said, I don’t know much about this Brooklyn-based group, but they’ve got me youtube-ing their vids in the next tab over. And apparently, they’ve set a world record for the most costume changes in a single, unedited video. Nice!






The group also took to their official site to offer a really interesting back story on the genesis of this song:

“Everything Changes” was written on two consecutive New Years Eves. The chorus was written first on New Years Eve on an old rickety piano in the parlor of a historic B&B in rural Missourri and the verses and bridge were completed one year later on the following New Years Eve. Like a lot of people on New Year’s Eve, I was contemplating whether my life was on track and whether I could actually achieve my biggest dreams. At the time I was unemployed and more down than usual and the song has a lot of fear built into it, but is also an encouraging “don’t give up” note-to-self. The core theme of the song– something I think about often– is that people shouldn’t “find themselves,” they should create themselves. The idea of “finding yourself” implies a passive approach to life, and the implication that who you are is a fixed point you should return to. The people I admire most constantly reinvent themselves– create a new version of themselves that’s still rooted in the same core values. When Bob Dylan went electric people told him he wasn’t “being himself” and if he listened we wouldn’t have “Like A Rolling Stone.”

Now the people over at HuffPost compared the Everything Changes video to Ingrid Michaelson‘s video for Blood Brothers:




I see it, but I don’t think the artists are trying to do the exact same thing. And I think Eytan And The Embassy‘s version is far more playful.

What do you guys think of these super-creative videos? I especially like the part where the songs are actually good! - Pink is the New Blog


Searching for a reason to cheer the state of humanity? Look no further than this video from Eytan and the Embassy, which won't fail to make you smile. Watch Eytan set the record for the most costume changes in a single video take, swapping outfits 18 times with the help of a 12-person crew -- and he's challenging viewers to top that. His lyrics, "If you're tired of being yourself, go on and be somebody else," sound like the quintessential motto for a Gaga-esqe generation, modeled perfectly here by Eytan's alter egos as he goes from Dylan to Sir Elton to Springsteen to ... we'll let you guess the rest! - MSN Now


The video for “Everything Changes” by Eytan and The Embassy serves as a mini-history of rock and pop in which Eytan Oren, the singer and piano player of the band, changes costumes 18 times in four minutes. From John Lennon to Lady Gaga, Oren chose artists that he and the band love.

The video has been dubbed the record-setter for “most costume changes in an unedited music video” by Recordsetter.com, an alternative to Guinness World Records in which the founders believe “everyone can be the world’s best at something.” Oren became friendly with the founders and “quickly fell in love” with the website. “It occurred to me that the video might have broken a record,” Oren said.

The video was not intentionally shot to break records, however. As the lyrics (“well if you’re tired of being yourself / go on and be somebody else”) suggest, the idea behind the song and the video is simply that “people should have the courage to reinvent themselves,” Oren said. “It is better to create yourself than to find yourself.” The Brooklyn-based band wanted the video to be seamless, so it was shot in one take, without any cuts.

Filmed in Williamsburg in video director Joe Pickard’s apartment in March, the project had help from many hands. “It was an amazing group project that went beyond the band. It ended up being 20 people, from the director to costume and make-up artists, that helped out of passion,” Oren said. “It was a very special experience.”

Because of the band’s limited budget, they enlisted help from Nicole Pezzolla, who runs the costume shop at LaGuardia High School of Music & Arts and Performing Arts in New York, after she responded to “an emergency Facebook status update” from the band. “She came in and saved the day. A couple of amazing high school students were the hands in [the video],” Oren told CNN.

The most expensive prop the band purchased was the Deadmau5 helmet, which they found on eBay.

Eytan and The Embassy are playing shows at the CBGB Festival (Country, Blue Grass, and Blues) in New York City, and a full East Coast tour in September. “Everything Changes” is the title track off the band’s coming album by the same name, due September 18 on M-King Records. - Wall Street Journal


The record-setting music video entitled ‘Everything Changes’ by Eytan & The Embassy is comprised of 18 outfits in under four minutes.

This Brooklyn-based band finds a clever way to showcase their song, which talks about how people shouldn’t “find themselves,” but rather “create themselves.” It’s a one-take music video without any edits or cuts. The costumes are depictions of various artists ranging from John Lennon, Elvis Presley, Lady Gaga, Prince, the Beastie Boys and more.

Eytan & The Embassy is hoping others will attempt to break the record by doing their own music video, but with more costume changes. The entire video took a full day to complete and a total of 30 takes to perfect. - Trendhunter.com


‘Eytan and The Embassy’ Breaks Record for Most Costume Changes in a One-Take Music Video

Eytan and The Embassy Breaks Record for Most Costume Changes in a One Take Music Video music

Eytan and The Embassy Breaks Record for Most Costume Changes in a One Take Music Video music

I’m loving this new video from Brooklyn-based band Eytan and The Embassy that features no less than 18 costume changes in a single take. The video, which took a day to rehearse and 30 takes to get right, features Eytan being transformed into famous rock and pop legends from John Lennon to Bruce Springsteen and even a final appearance by Deadmau5. See the making-of here. (via laughing squid) - This is Colossal


How many celebrities did you recognize? This music video just broke the world record for number of costume changes in an unedited music video. It's pretty cool. - BuzzFeed


18 costume changes in 1 take. Yup. Just another Soundstage band breaking a World Record. - Redbull Soundstage


Eytan and the Embassy set a world record when they made a music video for their song “Everything Changes.” Watch as the singer is dressed as 18 different popular musicians in just over four minutes. Can you name them all? - Fox 13 News


Mental Health Break - The Daily Beast - Andrew Sullivan


Popular alternative rock band OK Go shared Eytan and The Embassy’s latest video ‘Everything Changes’ through twitter this week. ‘Everything Changes’ set a new world record for most costume changes in an unedited music video with 18. Eytan and The Embassy ask their fans to dress up as their favorite artist and cover ‘Everything Changes’. - Mostwatchedtoday.com


UTG is pleased to bring you this exclusive interview with record setting pop rock outfit, Eytan and the Embassy!

The group recently made waves with their video for the song “Everything Changes” by setting the world record for most costume changes in an unedited music video with an impressive 18 changes in a single take to vocalist Eytan Oren’s wardrobe within the video’s four minute and eight second run-time.

Eytan himself took some time to talk with us about the aforementioned video, how the group came together and some future plans for himself and The Embassy. Read through and see what he had to say.

Did you set out to make the video for “Everything Changes” with the intentions of breaking a world record?
Shortly after making the video I became friendly with Dan Rollman who is a co-founder of RecordSetter.com. I loved the site and it occurred to me that our music video probably sets a world record so I submitted it for review. Dan believes that everyone in the world should be the world record holder of something – it’s an unusual way of looking at things but I think it’s pretty great.

How did you come up with the idea for the video and how did you decide to portray the specific people you did?
The video concept is really an extension of the chorus lyric – “Well if you’re tired of being yourself, go on and be somebody else.” I thought it would be fun if my appearance completely morphed throughout the video in real time without any edits, just through the use of costumes. My girlfriend and Joe Pickard, the director, developed that idea and created a chronological narrative of the history of rock n’ roll.

Is this going to be a Guinness World Record book type thing?
Guinness is welcome to sanction it but we love Record Setter. They take a very inclusive approach to world records that’s built around community interaction in a way that I find very appealing. It’s also a great place for musicians to have fun and connect with their audience. Jack White’s gotten some press lately for his feud with Guinness and I was happy to see him publicly endorse Record Setter as a brilliant alternative. Jimmy Fallon’s a big supporter as well and has had them on the show a few times, so I’m hopeful that it’s catching on.

Did you get a cool plaque or anything?
I have a digital badge. The next time I see Dan I’ll have to ask for my physical badge. What I really want though is one of their sweet yellow Record Setter blazers.

You’re quite the multi-instrumentalist from what I’ve read. What is your personal favorite to play?
I play piano in the band. I used to shy away from keys because I thought guitar was more frontman friendly but with some practice I figured out how to turn the piano into something I could treat like a guitar.

How did The Embassy and yourself come to be as a group?
I used to play in a band with Caitlin, our bass player, and we’ve been friends the longest (she plays drunk Courtney Love and a Beastie Boy in the video). I first saw Attis, our drummer, when he played with Eli Reed. I didn’t talk to him at that point but I was really impressed with his playing and stage presence and we connected through a Craigslist ad a year later. Geoff and Grant, our baritone sax and guitar player, were both initially friends of friends. The lineup shifted a bit right before the video and the day of the shoot was actually the first time we hung out as a group.

Are you currently involved with any other projects?
Not at the moment. I have played piano for some talented artists in the past like Nicole Atkins and Jaymay. I also will occasionally write music for documentaries or commercials, but for the moment I’m focused on the band.

You’ve allowed fans to download “Everything Changes” for free. Do you think it’s important to provide listeners with free content?
I think it’s the best decision we’ve made in marketing this video. People can download the single free in exchange for a tweet about the video, and we’ve gotten hundreds of tweets from that which lead to new video views. We’ve also got many e-mails from people that downloaded the free track saying they just went to buy more of our songs.

You and Andy Ross of OK GO are involved with an app called InBloom; for those who aren’t familiar with it, what can you tell us about that?
inBloom is a location-based iPhone app similar to Yelp but specifically it finds the nearest sustainable and eco friendly businesses. It includes restaurants, groceries, farmers markets, green hotels, bio-diesel station, CSAs and more. It can also be customized to your dietary preferences if you’re a vegetarian, vegan, locavore, or prefer to eat organic, gluten-free, or paleo. So far we’ve launched listings in New York City, Austin, and Los Angeles. We started the project initially to help musicians find affordable alternatives to fast food on the road, but then opened it up to non-musicians as well.

What are you touring plans looking like this year?
We have a September east coast tour in the works with our friends Pyyramids, which is a great side project from Tim Nordwind, the bass player from OK Go.

How do you think your imprint on the music industry would differ had you not made the “Everything Changes” video and set a record?
The video and record are ultimately a fun way to get people to hear the song, but I’m just as proud of the video as I am the song. Ultimately they enhance each other and it’s extremely gratifying to see people connect with what we’re doing and share it with friends and family. The message of the song and the video are one and the same – that you should have the courage to reinvent yourself, and I think that’s largely what’s resonating with people. In terms of the industry, I’d say that musically this band doesn’t fit into to an exact scene so it’s helpful to have the right video to reach a wide spectrum of people that appreciate what we do.

What’s your next ambitious goal? Any more record breaking?
My biggest goal right now is to respond to all the tweets and comments we’re getting from people about the video and song. Luckily that goal is getting more ambitious by the day but that connection with people is what matters most. As excited as we are to see the view counter on YouTube keep climbing, it’s really the people who stick by you for the long haul that matter, so we’re having fun talking to all these great new people in our lives. If we can set a record for the most tweets and YouTube comments responded to in a day, I think we’ll be heading in the right direction. - Under the Gun


"This is our first arena show. We're outside the arena but we're getting closer!" - Redbull Soundstage


At the end of June, we featured Eytan And The Embassy's "Everything Changes" as our Song Of The Day. Today, we're spending Seven Questions In Heaven with front man Eytan Oren.

Describe your music for our readers who may not be familiar with you.
It's a mashup of indie, pop, and soul music. We get inspiration from a lot of '60s and '70s music but I'd say it also sounds pretty modern.

Who are your musical influences and idols?
Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Brian Wilson, Otis Redding, Radiohead, The National, Springsteen, The Strokes, Amy Winehouse, Elliott Smith, and T. Rex are a few of our favorites.

What was the first album, cassette, or CD you bought with your own money?
Probably something super embarrassing like C+C Music Factory. You know those cool kids with an older sister in college that gets them into Pavement and Dinosaur Jr. when they're seven? I wasn't one of those kids. I was into terrible Top 40 music but also the classic rock that my parents listened to.



Lets's talk about the video for "Everything Changes." What made you decide to dress like eighteen different people? How many takes did it take to get it right and how long was the shoot? Were there musicians that you wanted to impersonate but couldn't for one reason or another? Did you think the video would receive so much buzz?
We wanted to pay tribute to artists we admire that changed the course of pop and rock music history. And we wanted to do it a fun way that tied into the message of the song, which is that everyone should embrace reinvention as a positive thing. Eighteen was the maximum number we thought we could pull off in four minutes though in retrospect we probably could have done a couple more. It took a full day of rehearsal and thirty takes the next day to get it right, but it was a few months of prep work going into that final weekend.

There were a couple of last-minute changes: we changed Hendrix to Bob Dylan on the day of the shoot and changed Paul McCartney to John Lennon. It would have been fun to get in Freddie Mercury and we were considering Daft Punk but ended up going with Deadmau5.

We hoped people would like the video enough to share it with friends but it happened a lot quicker and on a bigger magnitude than we imagined.

Has the video for "Everything Changes" changed anything for you? Have you seen an increase in album sales or more people coming to your shows?
We have seen a dramatic increase in iTunes sales and a new energy at the shows as well. The most interesting part has been how international the response can be when a video takes off online. We've gotten messages from people in countries we've never been to like Brazil, Japan, Spain, Italy, and Mexico. It's been a very exciting month and we're very thankful for all the support people have shown us.

Tell us about inBloom, the app you created with OK Go's Andy Ross. How's it going? How many cities does it cover now? Do you have plans for another app?
inBloom is a location-based iPhone app that find the nearest sustainable and eco-friendly businesses, in particular restaurants, farmers' markets, eco hotels, biodiesel stops, etc. It started as a way for musicians on tour to find alternatives to fast food and it evolved into an app that could be useful for anyone. We have listings for NYC, Los Angeles, and Austin with more cities on the way. I don't have plans for any other apps but we do new features in the works for inBloom. Hopefully starting later this year, bands will be able to use the app to incentivize and reward fans that reduce carbon emissions by taking mass transit to concerts.

Finally, you're the opening act of a music festival. You can get any five artists, living or dead, to perform on the bill with you. Which five do you choose and what song do you all perform as the final jam?
Radiohead (circa 1997), Bob Dylan (circa 1966), James Brown, The Beatles, and Beethoven (conducting the Eroica symphony). I'll go with Chuck Berry's "Roll Over Beethoven" for our final jam. - Culture Brats


"'Everything Changes' was written on two consecutive New Year's Eves as a 'don't give up' note-to-self when I was unemployed and trying to figure out how to get my life on track," frontman Eytan Oren tells Spinner. "The core theme of the song -- something I think about often -- is that people shouldn't 'find themselves,' they should create themselves. For the video, we thought it would be fun to have what I look like transform repeatedly without any edits or camera tricks. Our director, Joseph Pickard, tied that idea to a great narrative of the chronological history of rock 'n' roll where I start as Buddy Holly and end as Deadmau5. It took several months of planning and costume cutting, a full day of rehearsal, and 30 takes to get it right. With the exception of the Elvis jumpsuit getting stuck on my arm out of the camera's view, the final take went off without a hitch." - AOL Music - Spinner


Japanese TV show ZIp! for a fun interview and feature on our video!! Don't miss the amazing Brady Bunch moment at the 2 minute mark!!! - Zip!


Israeli TV show features Eytan and The Embassy's "Everything Changes" music video. - Hatzinor


When the battle cry of "I want my MTV" debuted 30 years ago, MTV was the only major network offering fans a consistent stream of music videos. Fast forward to 2002: that battle cry had been replaced by a whimpering "Where can I get my MTV?" as music videos played a diminished role in the channel's programming. Today, there is a music video renaissance well underway, and it is not tied to network television. It's clear the medium has been transformed thanks to new online distribution outlets, lower technology costs, potential revenue for labels, and a new generation of artists who understand the necessity of making creative videos to market their songs.

"So much of what you see on MTV is really tedious and has no heart, and you think that's what people must want — but then you create something that pushes the boundaries and people jump for it," says Natasha Pincus, who created, directed, produced, and edited the video for Gotye's "Somebody That I Used To Know," which has generated more than 278 million views on YouTube, plus a handful of parodies.

Vote in the GRAMMY.com poll: Which music video is your favorite?

Gotye and Pincus got lucky: Their video went viral — a magical, elusive concept that is an outgrowth of music video's transition to the Internet. In 2006 OK Go! proved a band could brand itself with a single, catchy video with the single-take, treadmill-choreographed GRAMMY winner "Here It Goes Again," which has more than 14 million views on YouTube.

Nowadays, creating a video that does more than merely showcase the artist — one that can carve out a brand for a band — is akin to the medium's holy grail. So much so that bands will push the creative envelope with the hopes of going viral. Frontman Eytan Oren came up with the concept for Eytan And The Embassy's "Everything Changes" video, which is also a single-take affair despite Oren going through 18 costume changes.

"We were hopeful people would share it," Oren says of the video, which in less than one month has racked up nearly 500,000 views on YouTube. "Most artists that are doing fairly well these days are savvy on that level; it’s not how it used to be back in the day. Rock stars used to be distant and hard to access, but now you have to create a personal connection. I have no misgivings at all about marketing our music or doing whatever helps get it out there."

Music video's creative flowering hasn't occurred in a vacuum. Given new technologies, labels can now make videos that look expensive for a smaller investment and are now looking for creative ways to market their artists.

"What's really changed and helped the landscape for videos in the past few years is thinking outside the box in terms of how to market them and present them," says Sandi Borchetta, vice president of creative for Big Machine Label Group, who oversees videos for artists such as Taylor Swift and Rascal Flatts.

"We use videos as a setup tool," says Kevin Monty, director of online marketing for Razor & Tie Entertainment. "We'll build whatever video it is around a band's promotional plan. Lately we've been building pseudo-videos, where it's just the audio with a fixed slate, a photo of the band or promotional copy, or lyric videos where there's a treatment based on album artwork and the lyrics."

Some videos are accompanied by their own making-of videos, giving labels twice the content. Veteran director Peter Zavadil created a 30-minute standalone short out of footage shot for Eric Church's "Springsteen," which featured clips from the short. "We're inventing new ways to market our technology," says Zavadil. "Maybe they'll run this 30-minute film on CMT without commercial breaks a couple of times, or then you can see it on the Internet."

But the bottom line still remains. Even with the extra content, music video budgets are now in the double-digit range, rather than triple digits. Professional-quality videos can now be made for less than $50,000 given lowered technology costs for cameras, special effects and editing. With smaller budgets, music videos now have a chance to recoup money for labels through product placement or click-through ads on various sites.

"[Return on investment] definitely goes into the process when I'm thinking about making music videos," says Deborah Klein, general manager for Prospect Park, a label representing Smashing Pumpkins and Ice Cube, among others. "Labels know it's a great promotional tool, and that's why they created Vevo — to monetize something they were giving away for free."

Since launching in late 2009, Vevo has all but taken over the territory MTV once claimed. Vevo streams content on its own site and through partners such as YouTube and Yahoo Music, delivering nearly 60 million unique visitors each month. Scott Reich, Vevo's vice president of original content and programming, says the company paid more than $100 million to record labels in their first year.

"From a viewing standpoint, the fans win," says Reich. "On the business side, artists win because we're monetizing all these music video plays, selling ads against that and distributing the money we receive from ad sales back to the artists and labels."

Whether all of these changes will continue to result in more artistic music videos remains to be seen. Ocean MacAdams, general manager at the Warner Sound, believes artists are now creating videos for Web and mobile consumption, rather than TV viewing, and as artists attempt to distinguish themselves from the crowd, he feels the playing field is open to new ideas and fresh approaches.

The director/producer partnership of Mihai Wilson and Marcella Moser created the striking animated video for Of Monsters And Men's "Little Talks," which has surpassed 10 million views on YouTube. The pair is dedicated to making an impact that lasts longer than four minutes at a time.

"We strive to make art," says Wilson, "and we strive to make our music videos as art films. Having a hands-off relationship with the client … that's beneficial to us. So far, it's worked out great. We have yet to see an unhappy customer." - Grammy.com


El vocalista de la banda Eytan and the embassy es cambiado de vestuario 18 veces en un solo plano sin cortes. - Nuestra Tele Noticias


Indie/soul band from Brooklyn, New York, EYTAN & THE EMBASSY projects their soul-powered sound with their own personal style. The band has toured with ‘OK GO’ and ‘Company of Thieves.’ Their album, ‘The Perfect Break-up,’ and their newest single, ‘Everything Changes,’ has only fed popularity to their name. EYTAN & THE EMBASSY has played festivals such as, ‘Isle Of Wight’ and ‘Summerfest.’ The band has also starred in three-spots for the ‘MTV Movie Awards.’

The lead singer, Eytan, has diligently been working on self-established projects that are based on causes that are important to him. Eytan started and runs a non-profit organization called, ‘The Musician’s Energy Conversation Alliance’ (MECA), which aspire to help bands to reduce their carbon footprint when on the road. As well, Eytan had recently developed and launched an App, ‘inBloom.’ The App is focused on the sustainable food movement and includes listings for a variety of necessity services, such as, grocery stores, restaurants, farmers markers, green hotels and retail businesses powered by renewable energy.

Many successful opportunities and experiences have embellished both the past and the future for the band. However, they are not stopping on achieving more, anytime soon…

EYTAN & THE EMBASSY – How did the name of the band come about? As well, how was the band first established?

“My name, Eytan, is Israeli and means “mighty.” A lot of people have trouble pronouncing it-­--­- it sounds like Akon but with a “T.” The Embassy came from a Colbert Report episode I was watching with my girlfriend while brainstorming for band names. My mom always jokes that I should be an ambassador because I’m fairly diplomatic, so The Embassy seemed fitting.”

Who are your musical influences? What types of music inspire you?

“I try to listen to everything. Growing up, my parents where always putting on The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Springsteen, Paul Simon-­--­- and those artists shaped my songwriting style. I started out playing classical piano and that’s still a big influence-­--­- Beethoven, Debussy, Stravinsky, and Chopin especially. In college I was obsessed with Radiohead and they were the first band to get me excited about performing live. I went to a lot of their shows and they were all pretty mind-­-blowing. I also listen to a lot of Motown and soul music like Ottis Redding and Sam Cooke. My favorite newer bands are The National, The Strokes, Arcade Fire, Black Keys, Spoon, and Nada Surf to name a few.”

Why ‘soul-­powered’ rock & roll?

“We have some soul music influence but I’d say we’re less solidly in that camp than some other artists out there now. It’s one of the flavors we throw into the pot, but there’s a lot more going on too.”

Explain the non-­-profit organization MECA and your support behind it. And what is your plan to gain visibility for your organization? Was the launch of the ‘inBloom Meca’ App apart of this plan?

“inBloom and Musician’s Energy Conservation Alliance (MECA) are separate but related projects; they both have the same goal of using technology to make it easier for you to be environmentally friendly in your day to day life. I think a lot of people out there, like myself, would love to support positive sustainable businesses and to do more for the environment, but realistically they’re busy, or in a new city, and it can be hard to know what to do or where to go. So we’re trying to solve that problem.”

“inBloom is a free location based iPhone app that I built with Andy Ross from OK Go, and it shows you the nearest sustainable restaurants and grocery stores, farmers markets, biodiesel and electric charging stops, eco friendly hotels and retail stores. It’s also totally customizable to your personal diet if you’re a Vegan, vegetarian, locavore, or prefer to eat raw food, organic, or paleo-­-friendly foods.”

“MECA is a project I started to help musicians tour in a more environmentally friendly way. We have close to 1,000 members and they can use inBloom to get special discounts from our partner restaurants around the country. The idea is to create affordable, easy-­-to-­-find alternatives to fast food. We’re also working on a program to help venues switch over to renewable energy and another program that incentivizes fans to use mass transit when traveling to concerts.”

As you are currently filming a video for the single, ‘Everything Changes,’ what will the creative concept be of that video?

“I don’t want to give too much away but it’s going to be a one-­-take shot with a single camera and it’s going to involve me completely altering my image about 15 times in the span of four minutes. We’re working with a director friend of mine named Joe Pickard as well as a costume designer named Nicole Pezzolla, and there’s been some pretty elaborate planning to make this whole thing come together. We’re 10 days out from the shoot now so I’m keeping my fingers crossed that we’ll be able to pull it off. It’s a pretty tricky video to execute.”

How has your experience been touring? And within that experience, what has it been like touring with bands like ‘OK GO’ and ‘Company Of Thieves’?

“Music, road trips, and meeting new people are three of my favorite things in life, so being on the road suits me. Touring with OK Go was amazing-­--­- playing to great crowds and hanging out with some of my closest friends-­--­- it doesn’t get better than that.”

“The Company of Thieves guys are great. Genevieve is a very special performer-­--­- 100% pure about what she does and when she’s performing she’s as connected as a person can be. She’s completely lost in the music.”

What are your future plans and goals as a band and as individuals?

“Right now I’m combing through 80 song ideas and trying to figure out which ones to focus on for the next record. We have an absolutely amazing new lineup and I can’t wait to get in the studio. We also have an upcoming show in NYC at Rockwood Music Hall 2 on March 7th as well as some potential tour opportunities on the horizon.”

“The rest of The Embassy is working on some great projects as well—Geoff Countryman (Baritone Sax) has been making some kick-­-ass polka music with The Polka Bros in addition to working at Saturday Night Live. Grant Schulte (Guitar) is in the studio with Devlinelle, Caitlin Gray (Bass) has been doing some gigs with the Big Apple Circus, and Attis Clopton (Drums) is playing with Eli Reed.”

“In terms of inBloom, we’re launching in four new cities in the early spring: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, and Portland.”

What are your collective favorite cities to visit/tour?

“I have a soft spot for Portland, Maine and I can’t wait to get back there. I get great vibes from people in Boston and Syracuse, Albany, and Burlington are always a lot of fun too.”

On your free time, what are your hobbies/interests outside of music?

“I just watched five seasons of 30 Rock and the first season of Cheers in the last two weeks, so that accounts for much of my free time. Ever since I watched ‘Moneyball,’ I’ve developed an interest in predictive data. I just finished a great book called “Super Crunchers” that talks about how companies like Visa can use data to predict if you’re likely to get divorced. I also love reading about oil, politics, and renewable energy.”

Connect with EYTAN & THE EMBASSY on Facebook.

Check out the band’s Website.

Check out the band’s YouTube Channel.

Check out video of the band in discussion about their App!

Check out news press about their App from Forbes Magazine!
Get the inBloom App, here!
- The Rising Hollywood


Today two musicians sat down with me to have a chat: Andy Ross of OK Go, and Eytan Oren of Eytan and the Embassy. But we weren’t there to talk music.

The dynamic duo actually built an iPhone app called InBloom — a Yelp-style application that offers up sustainable businesses and eco-friendly/dietary food retailers based on location — and sat down with me to tell us how it came to be, and what it’s all about.

The application is available now from the Apple App Store for free, and if eating healthy and loving our Mother Earth are important to you, InBloom is definitely on the top of my list of recommendations for you. - Tech Crunch


Tuesday night at the Wescott Theater, after a pretty eclectic mix of pre-show “let’s play something so the drunken crowd doesn’t get pissed off because we opened the doors an hour late” music, Eytan & The Embassy took the stage. Listening to Eytan & The Embassy is a lot like losing your virginity. You’re a little hesitant when the sound first penetrates your ears, but as soon as you hear the unique vocals and swanky saxophone, your inner freak makes its kinky debut; your pelvis can’t ignore their sound. Not only did their opening set kick ass, the band members were some of the wittiest, down-to-earth people I’ve met. I interviewed them. I ate honey with them. I let them shower at my apartment.

Jerk: How would you describe your sound?

Eytan Oren, vocals and piano: Eytan Oren, singer… pianist.

Jerk: Penis?

Eytan Oren: Yes, pianist with a penis (laughs). I usually describe our sound as a mixture of T-Rex, Ben Folds, and Otis Redding. I get that I sound like Elvis Costello all the time, which is funny ‘cause he’s not a big influence at all. I’m embarrassed to say I don’t own any records of his.

Jerk: I was actually going to ask you if anyone has ever told you that you sound like a modern Elvis Costello. You stole my question.

Matt Rullo, drums: Okay good, can we leave? (laughs)

Jerk: No, you have to stick around. I have a really good last question.

Geoff Countryman, bari sax and clarinet: No, none of us are involved with each other … (laughs)

Jerk: How did you guys get started?

Eytan Oren: It started out as pretty much a solo project. I didn’t even know these guys yet. Andy from OK Go — who’s one of my best friends — we used to be in a band together. He played on the record, helped me out. I met a bunch of common friends, I guess. So once 10 songs were done, I assembled this group, and then it became like a real thing, and then we went back and recorded a couple more songs that we added to the record. We’ve been together for a year and a few months.

Jerk: Kickass. So what do you draw on for the content of your songs — personal experiences? You know, where do you get your stuff, man?

Eytan Oren: There’s one song on the record that’s extremely personal. No, there’s a couple. I would say “From Now On” and “The Good Life” are extremely personal songs. About nine or 10 of the songs, I have no idea what they were about. I was almost just channeling some sort of subconscious thing, and then it became what it is. A lot of songs are about money and…making sense of not having any, [getting] older, typical musician themes like that. There’s also definitely a lot of relationship songs on there.

Jerk: So “Queen Bee,” is that about a particular person?

Eytan Oren: Oh, that has a serious story. That one actually is very personal.

Jerk: If you’re uncomfortable, you don’t have to elaborate.

Eytan Oren: Nah, fuck it. This is Jerk. It’s a rabble-rouser journal here. I gotta be part of this. Okay, until I was a touring musician, in my previous life, I was an employee at a company called Google which you guys might know of. I did not get along with my boss at the Goog, and this song is about my boss and how she sucked pretty badly. She’s the queen of all the wrong people I know. Yes, I was fired from the greatest company on Earth (laughs). That’s the title of my future novel.


Jerk: What would you say is your favorite venue to play?

Geoff Countryman: Oh boy … wait, why do I get this question? Actually, this audience [Wescott Theater] was super responsive which is really great ‘cause we’ve definitely had audiences that don’t know what to expect. By the end we almost always win them over, though, which is something we’re all proud of. So I’d say tonight was really great, and then the last show we played with [OK Go] was in Portland, Maine. First song, they were cheering. They loved us.

Jerk: You’re going to Northern Lights tomorrow in Albany, right? If you guys are hungry, order the chicken wings from Ravenswood—right across the street. So bomb.

Geoff Countryman: Great, thanks, we need recommendations like that. Do you actually know any place we can …

All: shower? (laughs)

Jerk: You can shower at my apartment. Give me a call in the morning.

Matt Rullo: lalalalala (opera voice), I’m sick right now. I don’t feel good, but I’m having a great time.

Jerk: What’s your favorite cold medication? Ready? Go.

Jonny Kapps, guitar (answering for Matt Rullo): Zicam!

Matt Rullo: I’ve been using the Neti Pot pretty frequently. I’ve never taken NyQuil, ever.

Jerk: You’re lying.

Matt Rullo: No, I swear. There’s no reason in particular. Someone ask me a fucking question!

Jerk: Enthusiasm, I can dig it. Could you describe your perfect performance? Essentially, in your dreams, how does the crowd react?

Matt Rullo: Undies thrown at me, on me, around me. Men’s, women’s—doesn’t matter.

David Dawda, bass: Tell ‘em about the girl in Portland.

Matt Rullo: There was a nice young lady who said that I had won the ‘I Take You Home With Me Tonight’ award, and not only was I the most talented member of the band, but that I was the most handsome.

Geoff Countryman: Did she really say that?

Matt Rullo: She said that I was the most handsome. I added the talented part myself. The review that came out the next day said that you would like us if you like catchy pop songs and guys that look like they hadn’t showered in a decade.

Geoff Countryman: We’re sort of doing this tour as cheap as possible because, you know, we’re not rolling in cash. I’d say that the funny thing about that review is that we had actually taken showers before that show. We haven’t right now, but you can’t tell that in a magazine.

Matt Rullo: Yeah, we hadn’t taken a shower before that day for years. That’s the irony (laughs).


Jerk: So I think Eytan mentioned the Radiohead and Bob Dylan courses that SU offers. We also have a Beatles course. Out of those three, which would you take?

Eytan Oren: Those are my three top artists ever, so that’s what’s up. I might take a Dylan course though.

Matt Rullo: Really, man? Did you hear the Dylan Christmas album? That ruined it all for me.

Jerk: So my last question of the night, if you guys could compare yourselves to a fruit, what would it be and why?

David Dawda: I’m tempted to say a pineapple because it’s really sweet on the inside, but then you got a whole top part that’s really frilly and nice on the outside.

Geoff Countryman: No, but it’s also like pointed. It’ll cut you up.

Jerk: Shit, one last question. Got any upcoming shows?

Geoff Countryman: Well, we’re in Clifton Park tomorrow, and then we go to Hartford, and the day after that we’re in New York playing Terminal Five and Bowery Electric. We’re hoping to be here on December 10 at Funk ‘n’ Waffles. Okay, this is getting weird. For those of you in magazine land, our lead singer is currently eating a bottle of honey.

Jonny Kapps: I’m Jonny Kapps, and I play guitar. That’s all I wanted.

Geoff Countryman: As a final note, I would just like to say … well, actually I have nothing to say. If I were a fruit, I’d be the Matt Rullo, the biggest fruit of them all.

~Christina Sterbenz - The Jerk (Syracuse University Magazine)


Tuesday night at the Wescott Theater, after a pretty eclectic mix of pre-show “let’s play something so the drunken crowd doesn’t get pissed off because we opened the doors an hour late” music, Eytan & The Embassy took the stage. Listening to Eytan & The Embassy is a lot like losing your virginity. You’re a little hesitant when the sound first penetrates your ears, but as soon as you hear the unique vocals and swanky saxophone, your inner freak makes its kinky debut; your pelvis can’t ignore their sound. Not only did their opening set kick ass, the band members were some of the wittiest, down-to-earth people I’ve met. I interviewed them. I ate honey with them. I let them shower at my apartment.

Jerk: How would you describe your sound?

Eytan Oren, vocals and piano: Eytan Oren, singer… pianist.

Jerk: Penis?

Eytan Oren: Yes, pianist with a penis (laughs). I usually describe our sound as a mixture of T-Rex, Ben Folds, and Otis Redding. I get that I sound like Elvis Costello all the time, which is funny ‘cause he’s not a big influence at all. I’m embarrassed to say I don’t own any records of his.

Jerk: I was actually going to ask you if anyone has ever told you that you sound like a modern Elvis Costello. You stole my question.

Matt Rullo, drums: Okay good, can we leave? (laughs)

Jerk: No, you have to stick around. I have a really good last question.

Geoff Countryman, bari sax and clarinet: No, none of us are involved with each other … (laughs)

Jerk: How did you guys get started?

Eytan Oren: It started out as pretty much a solo project. I didn’t even know these guys yet. Andy from OK Go — who’s one of my best friends — we used to be in a band together. He played on the record, helped me out. I met a bunch of common friends, I guess. So once 10 songs were done, I assembled this group, and then it became like a real thing, and then we went back and recorded a couple more songs that we added to the record. We’ve been together for a year and a few months.

Jerk: Kickass. So what do you draw on for the content of your songs — personal experiences? You know, where do you get your stuff, man?

Eytan Oren: There’s one song on the record that’s extremely personal. No, there’s a couple. I would say “From Now On” and “The Good Life” are extremely personal songs. About nine or 10 of the songs, I have no idea what they were about. I was almost just channeling some sort of subconscious thing, and then it became what it is. A lot of songs are about money and…making sense of not having any, [getting] older, typical musician themes like that. There’s also definitely a lot of relationship songs on there.

Jerk: So “Queen Bee,” is that about a particular person?

Eytan Oren: Oh, that has a serious story. That one actually is very personal.

Jerk: If you’re uncomfortable, you don’t have to elaborate.

Eytan Oren: Nah, fuck it. This is Jerk. It’s a rabble-rouser journal here. I gotta be part of this. Okay, until I was a touring musician, in my previous life, I was an employee at a company called Google which you guys might know of. I did not get along with my boss at the Goog, and this song is about my boss and how she sucked pretty badly. She’s the queen of all the wrong people I know. Yes, I was fired from the greatest company on Earth (laughs). That’s the title of my future novel.


Jerk: What would you say is your favorite venue to play?

Geoff Countryman: Oh boy … wait, why do I get this question? Actually, this audience [Wescott Theater] was super responsive which is really great ‘cause we’ve definitely had audiences that don’t know what to expect. By the end we almost always win them over, though, which is something we’re all proud of. So I’d say tonight was really great, and then the last show we played with [OK Go] was in Portland, Maine. First song, they were cheering. They loved us.

Jerk: You’re going to Northern Lights tomorrow in Albany, right? If you guys are hungry, order the chicken wings from Ravenswood—right across the street. So bomb.

Geoff Countryman: Great, thanks, we need recommendations like that. Do you actually know any place we can …

All: shower? (laughs)

Jerk: You can shower at my apartment. Give me a call in the morning.

Matt Rullo: lalalalala (opera voice), I’m sick right now. I don’t feel good, but I’m having a great time.

Jerk: What’s your favorite cold medication? Ready? Go.

Jonny Kapps, guitar (answering for Matt Rullo): Zicam!

Matt Rullo: I’ve been using the Neti Pot pretty frequently. I’ve never taken NyQuil, ever.

Jerk: You’re lying.

Matt Rullo: No, I swear. There’s no reason in particular. Someone ask me a fucking question!

Jerk: Enthusiasm, I can dig it. Could you describe your perfect performance? Essentially, in your dreams, how does the crowd react?

Matt Rullo: Undies thrown at me, on me, around me. Men’s, women’s—doesn’t matter.

David Dawda, bass: Tell ‘em about the girl in Portland.

Matt Rullo: There was a nice young lady who said that I had won the ‘I Take You Home With Me Tonight’ award, and not only was I the most talented member of the band, but that I was the most handsome.

Geoff Countryman: Did she really say that?

Matt Rullo: She said that I was the most handsome. I added the talented part myself. The review that came out the next day said that you would like us if you like catchy pop songs and guys that look like they hadn’t showered in a decade.

Geoff Countryman: We’re sort of doing this tour as cheap as possible because, you know, we’re not rolling in cash. I’d say that the funny thing about that review is that we had actually taken showers before that show. We haven’t right now, but you can’t tell that in a magazine.

Matt Rullo: Yeah, we hadn’t taken a shower before that day for years. That’s the irony (laughs).


Jerk: So I think Eytan mentioned the Radiohead and Bob Dylan courses that SU offers. We also have a Beatles course. Out of those three, which would you take?

Eytan Oren: Those are my three top artists ever, so that’s what’s up. I might take a Dylan course though.

Matt Rullo: Really, man? Did you hear the Dylan Christmas album? That ruined it all for me.

Jerk: So my last question of the night, if you guys could compare yourselves to a fruit, what would it be and why?

David Dawda: I’m tempted to say a pineapple because it’s really sweet on the inside, but then you got a whole top part that’s really frilly and nice on the outside.

Geoff Countryman: No, but it’s also like pointed. It’ll cut you up.

Jerk: Shit, one last question. Got any upcoming shows?

Geoff Countryman: Well, we’re in Clifton Park tomorrow, and then we go to Hartford, and the day after that we’re in New York playing Terminal Five and Bowery Electric. We’re hoping to be here on December 10 at Funk ‘n’ Waffles. Okay, this is getting weird. For those of you in magazine land, our lead singer is currently eating a bottle of honey.

Jonny Kapps: I’m Jonny Kapps, and I play guitar. That’s all I wanted.

Geoff Countryman: As a final note, I would just like to say … well, actually I have nothing to say. If I were a fruit, I’d be the Matt Rullo, the biggest fruit of them all.

~Christina Sterbenz - The Jerk (Syracuse University Magazine)


Eytan and the Embassy, a catchy alternative-rock-and-pop group, warmed up the crowd before the main event. They did a fine job, somehow incorporating a cowbell into their very last song. - The Setonian (Seton Hall University Paper)


Clips of original songs performed by Eytan & The Embassy for three national commercials for the 2010 MTV Movie Awards. - MTV.com




With the amazingly creative videos that become an instant Internet sensation, you may have thought, well, can OK Go really live up to all of that in a live performance? In one word, YES.

The show began with two opening bands that made their debut performances in Vermont.

First up - Eytan and the Embassy, http://www.myspace.com/eytanmusic. This Brooklyn based band had a fun upbeat vibe and a lead singer that called to mind Elvis Costello. If you didn't make the show, definitely check them out at Nectar's on November 27.

Following a lighthearted set by Eytan and the Embassy were Chicago based Company of Thieves. Fiery. Passionate. Energy. Genevieve Schatz, is a consuming ball of fire that draws you into the songs with her vocals. The rest of the band brings the same energy and passion with Marc Walloch on guitar, Mike Ortiz on drums, Mike Maimone on keys and percussion and Chris Faller on bass and percussion. The band has a new album coming in 2011 and from what they showcased on Sunday night, it should be high on everyone's list. Their closing song was “Under the Umbrella” and it really left the crowd in the perfect mood for OK Go to take the stage.

So OK Go – A thrilling amusement park roller coaster ride with highs and lows, confetti, laser guitars and even a hippie circle campfire song. The band offered up a pleasing mix of familiar and loved older songs with plenty of songs from their new album Of the Colour of the Blue Sky.

From “What to Do” played entirely on the hand bells to Damian hopping into the audience for “campfire time” to a 3D screening of their new “White Knuckles” video, the band truly put on a performance people won't soon forget.

The show's encore performance concluded with “This Too Shall Pass” and the crowd singing the chorus “Let it go, this too shall pass.” This was a positive way to end the show and certainly the lyrics provide a bit of wisdom we all could use from time to time. However, nobody will soon let the memory of this show go and certainly nobody wanted the moment of that night to pass.
- Burlington Examiner


Eytan and the Embassy play that kind of pop music that throws you back to the 50s - something Elvis Costello was very good at, although these guys' opreation is more literal, almost revivalist. It's music that wears its light and fun emotions on its sleeve. Their CD release party at Mercury Lounge on 05.29 should be fun. - The Deli


Before opening for OK Go and Those Darlins at the Westcott Theater, Eytan & the Embassy was kind enough to stop by WERW for a quick interview and an on-air performance. - WERW - Syracuse University Radio


Eytan and The Embassy - Crazed Hits


"The bill was short, but immediately attractive to me: OK Go featuring Company of Thieves. The show was 18-plus and tickets were $16. Who could ask for a better excuse to take a Wednesday night, off-campus excursion? Upon my arrival at Port City, I realized that Eytan and the Embassy had been added to the bill and they proved to be a worthy addition. From the moment guitarist Jonathan Kapps struck his first reverb-laden chord, Eytan and the Embassy offered the crowd pop hooks without a ton of fanfare or bells and whistles.

They are a rock band, pure and simple, but never boring. Their songs were always purposeful and linear, usually progressing from a fun, energetic introductory riff to an epic, raucous finale. If you dig solid pop-rock, not to mention that unshaven, tight-pants-wearing, haven’t-showered-in-a-decade look, then absolutely check out Eytan and the Embassy." - Maine Campus (University of Maine newspaper)


We Heart Eytan

Fo Realz, he is just incredible! This is one of Eytan’s slower songs, which was filmed when he performed at Bell House with his incredible live band as part of Shemspeed’s Summer Music Fest. Here is a little write up on Eytan’s performance that night from our friends Manishtana blog; “starting with a bang was Eytan….excellent. [although i admit I saw a sax and a trombone and was hopefully expecting a lil bit more ska, but in retrospect i realize you need a couple of trumpets to pull that off]. Anyhoo, imagine if Queen, Billy Joel, The Eagles, The Beatles, Bryan Adams and Night Ranger all had a massive coke-induced orgy and gave birth to a child. You’d have Eytan and his band, a multi-armed creature lubricated with melody. There was something comfortingly nostalgic about them that I couldn’t quite put my finger on, like I’d heard them on the soundtrack to my favorite movie circa 1987-92 during a particularly bittersweet moment but couldn’t remember what movie. also, they had something very key for concert full of jews: free cds.” - Shemspeed.com



NYC Artists on the Rise: Eytan

With a six-piece backing band including a horn section, Eytan takes old school Motown and classic rock songwriting and gives it an updated indie-pop twist. Eytan's debut LP will be released this January and features guest performances from members of Locksley, OK Go, Rocketship Park, Unsacred Hearts, Balthrop, Alabama and others. Before recording his debut, Eytan produced tracks from some of NYC's most talented artists like Jaymay and Alison Breitman.<br/><br/> Also on the bill at The Bell House-- Six Point Star, Can!!Can, Electro Morocco, Describe, Y-Love, & Diwon. - (as posted in The Deli's Open Blog - post your band's entries, - The Deli NYC


Discography

- Album "Everything Changes" (Will be released on 10/9/12)
- Single "Everything Changes" (June 2012)
- The Perfect Breakup (2011)

All music on Spotify, iTunes, Amazon, Jango amongst others.

Photos

Bio

"Vaguely reminiscent of Ben Folds with a tinge of Mark Ronson's signature '60s Phil Spector sound, Eytan and his four-piece band are at the brink of household-name fame." —MTV Buzzworthy

"It's a video everyone from Neil Patrick Harris to deadmau5 is raving about: One take, 18 costume changes and one very catchy song." —Huffington Post

"Just saw a most creative and inspiring music video. Love it! Gotta watch." — Neil Patrick Harris via Twitter

"ahhh great vid Eytan and The Embassy" — Deadmau5 via Twitter

"Eytan and The Embassy transforms into Lady Gaga, Elvis Presley, and a dozen other singers in "Everything Changes." -- On Air With Ryan Seacrest via Twitter

Awesome new single-take video... setting a world record for most costume changes." —OK Go via Twitter

Brooklyn's Eytan and The Embassy make infectious indie piano pop. The group's 2012 music video for "Everything Changes" has close to 600,000 YouTube views and was shared by major media outlets and celebrities including Ryan Seacrest, Deadmau5, Neil Patrick Harris, OK Go, Weird Al Yankovic, Huffington Post, CNN, Maxim, MTV Buzzworthy, NY Magazine, and the Wall Street Journal. The video also went into rotation on mtvU and charted on the FMQB Submodern Top 25.

The band’s buoyant live shows won them slots on Summerfest and Isle of Wight lineups, as well as tours / shows with OK Go, The Hold Steady, Hot Chelle Rae, and Old 97s. MTV also picked the band to star in several commercials for the 2010 MTV Movie Awards, all featuring original songs.