Fear Zero
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Fear Zero

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"Fear Zero"

Can East meet West? The instant popularity of Fear Zero's debut CD proves that Canadians in general can agree on at least one thing - great music! We might not be able to keep a political party in the majority but give us great music talent and the debate ends. The band's first single "Satellite" got major radio play throughout the rest of Canada before making its way to Canada's best city when it comes to music appreciation! This young band has been together barely a year but the four members: songwriter /vocalist / guitarist Ed Sadler, guitarist Jeremy Harrison, bassist Torry and Drummer Thom Schmidlin are cemented into a strong partnership. Their popularity grew mainly because of their live performances where strong talents seem to blend into a perfect mix and match.

Their sound is not heavy metal, even though the name suggests something rough, but instead fits the anxious sounding modern rock. Somewhere between Matthew Good and Matchbox 20 on the Canadian scale of damn good rock these guys are building a name for themselves that promises an individual seat in this generation's music. From learning to deal with abuse to the crazy city dating scene (finally someone is singing about this painful pitiful farce we all go through) these are songs that hit the core of who we are. This is definitely a strong first album that shoots these guys to the front of the tired pack; the real question is, can they up the ante in their second offering?
- Orcasound.com


"Fear Zero"

Can East meet West? The instant popularity of Fear Zero's debut CD proves that Canadians in general can agree on at least one thing - great music! We might not be able to keep a political party in the majority but give us great music talent and the debate ends. The band's first single "Satellite" got major radio play throughout the rest of Canada before making its way to Canada's best city when it comes to music appreciation! This young band has been together barely a year but the four members: songwriter /vocalist / guitarist Ed Sadler, guitarist Jeremy Harrison, bassist Torry and Drummer Thom Schmidlin are cemented into a strong partnership. Their popularity grew mainly because of their live performances where strong talents seem to blend into a perfect mix and match.

Their sound is not heavy metal, even though the name suggests something rough, but instead fits the anxious sounding modern rock. Somewhere between Matthew Good and Matchbox 20 on the Canadian scale of damn good rock these guys are building a name for themselves that promises an individual seat in this generation's music. From learning to deal with abuse to the crazy city dating scene (finally someone is singing about this painful pitiful farce we all go through) these are songs that hit the core of who we are. This is definitely a strong first album that shoots these guys to the front of the tired pack; the real question is, can they up the ante in their second offering?
- Orcasound.com


"Lion's Pride Fear Zero Review"

Through the years Canada has provided us with some great bands and artists like Nickelback and Avril Lavigne and now we can add Fear Zero. Recently Escape Music released the debut of Panik also from Canada, but instead of releasing quantity, they should have signed and released Fear Zero which has pure quality written all over it. And with a vocalist like Ed Sadler having a voice like a rusty chainsaw cutting through flesh and bones, he is with no doubt one of the best lead singers of more recent time, if one should compare him to anyone else out there it would be fellow country man Chad Kroeger of Nickelback. The songs are beautifully crafted with Sunday Morning, Learn To Love and Seven Sunny Days taking the prize of best songs on the album. Unbelieveable that they arent signed yet. Buy it. CN

- lionspride.com/reviews.html


"Lion's Pride Fear Zero Review"

Through the years Canada has provided us with some great bands and artists like Nickelback and Avril Lavigne and now we can add Fear Zero. Recently Escape Music released the debut of Panik also from Canada, but instead of releasing quantity, they should have signed and released Fear Zero which has pure quality written all over it. And with a vocalist like Ed Sadler having a voice like a rusty chainsaw cutting through flesh and bones, he is with no doubt one of the best lead singers of more recent time, if one should compare him to anyone else out there it would be fellow country man Chad Kroeger of Nickelback. The songs are beautifully crafted with Sunday Morning, Learn To Love and Seven Sunny Days taking the prize of best songs on the album. Unbelieveable that they arent signed yet. Buy it. CN

- lionspride.com/reviews.html


"Fear Zero's a Guilty Pleasure"

It's easy to see why Fear Zero's press kit comes with glowing reviews from radio programmers. Well-produced, enrgetically played, and containing enough hooks to fill Theory of a Deadman's tackle box, the debut from this North Vancouver quartet is modern rock with all the trimmings. Any radio station employing a furry mascot would be happy to stick these faux-angry, testosterone-injected songs between Default and Creed on it's playlists. - The Georgia Straight


"Fear Zero's a Guilty Pleasure"

It's easy to see why Fear Zero's press kit comes with glowing reviews from radio programmers. Well-produced, enrgetically played, and containing enough hooks to fill Theory of a Deadman's tackle box, the debut from this North Vancouver quartet is modern rock with all the trimmings. Any radio station employing a furry mascot would be happy to stick these faux-angry, testosterone-injected songs between Default and Creed on it's playlists. - The Georgia Straight


"Fear Zero is solid Rock"

Fear Zero's recently released self-titled debut CD has 10 tracks of consistently solid, basic rock. The Satellite track is currently getting good airplay for good reasons.

The four-piece rock band, fronted by band manager and lead vocalist Ed Sadler, produces catchy rock songs that are well-crafted and powerful without having to go over the top.

Although the band was formed in late 2002, their work is tight and their future is bright.

Check them at www.fearzero.com.

- Christina Toth - Abbotsford Times


"Fear Zero is solid Rock"

Fear Zero's recently released self-titled debut CD has 10 tracks of consistently solid, basic rock. The Satellite track is currently getting good airplay for good reasons.

The four-piece rock band, fronted by band manager and lead vocalist Ed Sadler, produces catchy rock songs that are well-crafted and powerful without having to go over the top.

Although the band was formed in late 2002, their work is tight and their future is bright.

Check them at www.fearzero.com.

- Christina Toth - Abbotsford Times


"No Fear"

Local band Fear Zero takes on the tough music market with their latest album, set to be released March 17. If you think hard rock is dead, don’t tell Ed Sadler. Arena rock might have seen a decline after radio waves became over-saturated with the hits of Nickelback, but for Sadler, numbers speak louder than words. “Nickelback just sold five million albums,” he pointed out. “Rock is still there. It will never go away. People really identify with it.” Sadler’s band Fear Zero has been compared to Nickelback many times, and for good reason. Both bands embody the power-forward, riff-heavy, whisky rock that is usually classified as a “guilty pleasure” by fans who are not kids in Metallica T-shirts. It’s not because either band is bad at what they do. They are popular because they are meticulously produced and extremely accessible. Choruses stick in your head without any effort. According to Sadler, this describes the band’s debut album more than their most recent record that is set to be released March 17. “The first album was geared towards a certain sound,” he said. “But the music in this band is more complicated than the average music in a rock band. There’s a high calibre of musicianship.” But it took a few tries to find the right mix, he added. In 2003, when Sadler, a North Vancouver guitar teacher, decided he wanted to start up a rock band, he put out a few ads in the Georgia Straight classifieds. He found several duds and two gems, now the group’s bass and drum players. Sadler hooked up with the lead guitarist at his teaching gig. “Eventually we found these guys and they’re great guys: good musicians and down to earth,” he said. But, as every musician will tell you, the road to success in this biz is not easy. It was no different for Fear Zero. After spending nearly $60,000 funding CDs and tours, Sadler found himself in debt, with little but good memories to show for it. However, he had been prepared for the risk. “It had always been my dream,” he said. The band was about to call it quits when a pair of investors decided they could be a success if they had the money it took to get the word out. So Fear Zero was saved and In Lights, the band’s third album, was born. On this latest release, “we do a lot of hard-hitting rock songs, but we like to mix it up,” Sadler said. They touch on everything from reggae to country in an effort to keep things fresh. “We had a lot more time and money to sound the way we wanted,” he said. “It’s more about having fun playing live. If every song is aggressive and hard it’s going to get tired.” Now the band is about to embark on a cross-Canada tour with stops in small cities, as well as major urban centres. “It’s a lot easier to play markets like Kamloops and Kelowna,” Sadler said. “They love music there. In Toronto, they’re trendier. If it’s not on TV they won’t listen to it.” Fear Zero’s CD release party will be at Maplewood Pub, 1970 Spicer in North Vancouver, on March 17 at 11 p.m.

By Alyssa Noel Mar 15 2007 - The Outlook


"No Fear"

Local band Fear Zero takes on the tough music market with their latest album, set to be released March 17. If you think hard rock is dead, don’t tell Ed Sadler. Arena rock might have seen a decline after radio waves became over-saturated with the hits of Nickelback, but for Sadler, numbers speak louder than words. “Nickelback just sold five million albums,” he pointed out. “Rock is still there. It will never go away. People really identify with it.” Sadler’s band Fear Zero has been compared to Nickelback many times, and for good reason. Both bands embody the power-forward, riff-heavy, whisky rock that is usually classified as a “guilty pleasure” by fans who are not kids in Metallica T-shirts. It’s not because either band is bad at what they do. They are popular because they are meticulously produced and extremely accessible. Choruses stick in your head without any effort. According to Sadler, this describes the band’s debut album more than their most recent record that is set to be released March 17. “The first album was geared towards a certain sound,” he said. “But the music in this band is more complicated than the average music in a rock band. There’s a high calibre of musicianship.” But it took a few tries to find the right mix, he added. In 2003, when Sadler, a North Vancouver guitar teacher, decided he wanted to start up a rock band, he put out a few ads in the Georgia Straight classifieds. He found several duds and two gems, now the group’s bass and drum players. Sadler hooked up with the lead guitarist at his teaching gig. “Eventually we found these guys and they’re great guys: good musicians and down to earth,” he said. But, as every musician will tell you, the road to success in this biz is not easy. It was no different for Fear Zero. After spending nearly $60,000 funding CDs and tours, Sadler found himself in debt, with little but good memories to show for it. However, he had been prepared for the risk. “It had always been my dream,” he said. The band was about to call it quits when a pair of investors decided they could be a success if they had the money it took to get the word out. So Fear Zero was saved and In Lights, the band’s third album, was born. On this latest release, “we do a lot of hard-hitting rock songs, but we like to mix it up,” Sadler said. They touch on everything from reggae to country in an effort to keep things fresh. “We had a lot more time and money to sound the way we wanted,” he said. “It’s more about having fun playing live. If every song is aggressive and hard it’s going to get tired.” Now the band is about to embark on a cross-Canada tour with stops in small cities, as well as major urban centres. “It’s a lot easier to play markets like Kamloops and Kelowna,” Sadler said. “They love music there. In Toronto, they’re trendier. If it’s not on TV they won’t listen to it.” Fear Zero’s CD release party will be at Maplewood Pub, 1970 Spicer in North Vancouver, on March 17 at 11 p.m.

By Alyssa Noel Mar 15 2007 - The Outlook


"Fearless band lights it up"

Fear Zero is like a box of chocolates — because you never know what you’re going to get. The melodic-rock band is on tour in support of its third album In Lights, and will be in Kamloops next weekend. Frontman Ed Sadler said the group’s music is “cathartic in one way, and in another, it’s fun, so you never know what you’re going to get.” Inspired by groups like Nirvana, Collective Soul, Everclear and Led Zeppelin, the Vancouver-based band is at the very least eclectic. In Lights highlights a journey through music from reggae to hard rock to pop and country, said Sadler. Steering from the mainstream, the first single, Breath Again, was chosen through an online poll of fans as the first song to be released to radio. Backed by their self-started record label, Satch Records, Fear Zero has a fearless freedom. “When you’re signed to a big label, they want you to sound a certain way and look a certain way and it’s all got to be geared towards commercial success and the all mighty dollar,” said Sadler. “But with us, we’re more about the music.” A professionally trained musician and songwriter, Sadler said he makes music like one would write in a journal. “I’ve got my pick and I’ve got my guitar and I just get into a relaxed state like meditating and I never know what will come out — sometimes I write a really cool riff, and sometimes I play one note for half an hour. It depends what mood I’m in.” If he needs to be a little more professional or the creative juices just aren’t flowing, he falls back on his technical training. “I’ve got a solid background in theory,” he said. “I could write 20 songs in 20 days if I wanted to, because theoretically, if you want to make a song sound good, there are rules.” People are affected differently by his music — some like it, others love it and some hate it. Fans being the barometer for commercial success, Sadler noted it’s good to play what they want to hear, but sometimes he just has to take a total left turn. “Don’t get me wrong,” he said, “but to really mix it up and do something different and take a chance is much more gratifying for the artist.” Fear Zero plays The Brock Centre Pub, March 23 at 9 p.m. with fellow Vancouver rockers Krome, and local favorites Unit 731. “We’re going to be playing our sort of melodic, up-tempo rock,” said Sadler. “And Krome is hard-rock grungier sort of music and Unit 731 is more pop-punk, so people are going to get a good mix of music and good entertainers.” For more information, visit www.fearzero.com.

By Mikelle Sasakamoose. Staff reporter Mar 14 2007 - Kamloops this week


"Fearless band lights it up"

Fear Zero is like a box of chocolates — because you never know what you’re going to get. The melodic-rock band is on tour in support of its third album In Lights, and will be in Kamloops next weekend. Frontman Ed Sadler said the group’s music is “cathartic in one way, and in another, it’s fun, so you never know what you’re going to get.” Inspired by groups like Nirvana, Collective Soul, Everclear and Led Zeppelin, the Vancouver-based band is at the very least eclectic. In Lights highlights a journey through music from reggae to hard rock to pop and country, said Sadler. Steering from the mainstream, the first single, Breath Again, was chosen through an online poll of fans as the first song to be released to radio. Backed by their self-started record label, Satch Records, Fear Zero has a fearless freedom. “When you’re signed to a big label, they want you to sound a certain way and look a certain way and it’s all got to be geared towards commercial success and the all mighty dollar,” said Sadler. “But with us, we’re more about the music.” A professionally trained musician and songwriter, Sadler said he makes music like one would write in a journal. “I’ve got my pick and I’ve got my guitar and I just get into a relaxed state like meditating and I never know what will come out — sometimes I write a really cool riff, and sometimes I play one note for half an hour. It depends what mood I’m in.” If he needs to be a little more professional or the creative juices just aren’t flowing, he falls back on his technical training. “I’ve got a solid background in theory,” he said. “I could write 20 songs in 20 days if I wanted to, because theoretically, if you want to make a song sound good, there are rules.” People are affected differently by his music — some like it, others love it and some hate it. Fans being the barometer for commercial success, Sadler noted it’s good to play what they want to hear, but sometimes he just has to take a total left turn. “Don’t get me wrong,” he said, “but to really mix it up and do something different and take a chance is much more gratifying for the artist.” Fear Zero plays The Brock Centre Pub, March 23 at 9 p.m. with fellow Vancouver rockers Krome, and local favorites Unit 731. “We’re going to be playing our sort of melodic, up-tempo rock,” said Sadler. “And Krome is hard-rock grungier sort of music and Unit 731 is more pop-punk, so people are going to get a good mix of music and good entertainers.” For more information, visit www.fearzero.com.

By Mikelle Sasakamoose. Staff reporter Mar 14 2007 - Kamloops this week


"It's all about the statement"

They have a catchy name. And more than a few catchy tunes (one top 40 and two top 50 singles on Canadian FM Rock Radio.) Fear Zero got is name because its band members were not afraid to take risks, said band leader Ed Sadler. “When we started out, we really didn’t have the money to start up a band so we all got loans. Fear Zero was a statement – we’re not afraid, we’re just going to go out there and do it.” And they did. Sadler who does vocals and plays guitar is joined by band members bassist Torry C (he joined the band three years ago) and drummer Francis Amanse. The three-piece rock band based in Vancouver will be performing at The Generator on Friday, June 9. Sadler has a musical background. He studied jazz in college and he teaches music when he is not performing. But rock music, not jazz, is his first love. “I learned how to play jazz. My grandfather played the sax. I grew up listening to jazz but my roots are in rock, blues and some raggae. I studied jazz and learned how to read music because I needed to be the best musician I could be. I’ve played music all my life.” His band buddies share his enthusiasm for music. “Our band plays melody with good grooves that you can dance to if you want to. We play everything from melodic to heavy music. We mix it up quite a bit.” Whenever they perform, Fear Zero is only half of the show, said Sadler. The audience is the other half. “We’re a fun band. We like to have fun and really interact with the audience. We like to talk to them.” Indeed, the Prince George crowd can look forward to good music and good times, he said. “We’ll be doing 90 minutes of our own material from our two CD’s. And we’ll be doing two of our hits from 94X, Satellite and Porno Nation. And we are recording for our new, as yet untitled, CD. So we’ll be trying out some of those songs. We have about 20 songs so we’ll be picking the best ones for our new CD. Fear Zero plays The Generator, 1232 3rd Avenue, on Friday, June 9. Tickets for the show are $10 at the door.

By Teresa MallamFree PressJun 02 2006
- Prince George Free Press


"It's all about the statement"

They have a catchy name. And more than a few catchy tunes (one top 40 and two top 50 singles on Canadian FM Rock Radio.) Fear Zero got is name because its band members were not afraid to take risks, said band leader Ed Sadler. “When we started out, we really didn’t have the money to start up a band so we all got loans. Fear Zero was a statement – we’re not afraid, we’re just going to go out there and do it.” And they did. Sadler who does vocals and plays guitar is joined by band members bassist Torry C (he joined the band three years ago) and drummer Francis Amanse. The three-piece rock band based in Vancouver will be performing at The Generator on Friday, June 9. Sadler has a musical background. He studied jazz in college and he teaches music when he is not performing. But rock music, not jazz, is his first love. “I learned how to play jazz. My grandfather played the sax. I grew up listening to jazz but my roots are in rock, blues and some raggae. I studied jazz and learned how to read music because I needed to be the best musician I could be. I’ve played music all my life.” His band buddies share his enthusiasm for music. “Our band plays melody with good grooves that you can dance to if you want to. We play everything from melodic to heavy music. We mix it up quite a bit.” Whenever they perform, Fear Zero is only half of the show, said Sadler. The audience is the other half. “We’re a fun band. We like to have fun and really interact with the audience. We like to talk to them.” Indeed, the Prince George crowd can look forward to good music and good times, he said. “We’ll be doing 90 minutes of our own material from our two CD’s. And we’ll be doing two of our hits from 94X, Satellite and Porno Nation. And we are recording for our new, as yet untitled, CD. So we’ll be trying out some of those songs. We have about 20 songs so we’ll be picking the best ones for our new CD. Fear Zero plays The Generator, 1232 3rd Avenue, on Friday, June 9. Tickets for the show are $10 at the door.

By Teresa MallamFree PressJun 02 2006
- Prince George Free Press


"Fear Zero In Lights Review"

This high quality follow up to 2003’s self titled debut from the Vancouver based modern rock band embraces a fuller sound, guitars cranked up to eleven and a major label style production. Band leader and songwriter Ed Sadler, joins up the dots with his undoubted ear for a worthwhile hook. In his capable hands, the likes of ‘You Make Me Feel’, the Tonic sounding ‘Breathe Again’ and the stunning ballad ‘Broken, Still Hoping’ become something rather special. Even the more pop orientated songs, ‘Loner Anthem’ and the reggae tinged ‘Get Over This’-where Sadler sounds remarkably like Paul Young- are classy enough to fit in with the guitar heavy ethos of the first half of the album. With unprecedented airplay for a non-major label act, accompanying minor Canadian chart success, it is simply inconceivable that the major labels haven’t already registered their interest in this talented band. - Alternative Addiction


"Fear Zero In Lights Review"

This high quality follow up to 2003’s self titled debut from the Vancouver based modern rock band embraces a fuller sound, guitars cranked up to eleven and a major label style production. Band leader and songwriter Ed Sadler, joins up the dots with his undoubted ear for a worthwhile hook. In his capable hands, the likes of ‘You Make Me Feel’, the Tonic sounding ‘Breathe Again’ and the stunning ballad ‘Broken, Still Hoping’ become something rather special. Even the more pop orientated songs, ‘Loner Anthem’ and the reggae tinged ‘Get Over This’-where Sadler sounds remarkably like Paul Young- are classy enough to fit in with the guitar heavy ethos of the first half of the album. With unprecedented airplay for a non-major label act, accompanying minor Canadian chart success, it is simply inconceivable that the major labels haven’t already registered their interest in this talented band. - Alternative Addiction


"Fear Zero fears nothing and sets out to seize the day"

Some musicians might be faulted for their commitment issues—genre jumping all willy-nilly, or taking part in side or solo projects—but Vancouver rock band Fear Zero grinds other axes.

Speaking with frontman Ed Sadler as the band pulls into Kelowna, BC on the second stop of their cross-Canada tour, there is a sense that, through all the clichéd litanies of carpe diem, some bands might just want “it” more than others, “it” being, in this case, having success while doing something you really love to do.

Fear Zero’s tour coincides with the release of In Lights, an album that Sadler says is of high production value compared with their first two releases.

“We were able to get Mike Fraser (of AC/DC and Aerosmith acclaim) to mix it and we would have never had that option before,” Sadler says, beaming over the telephone line. “We were able to layer lots more guitars. On this album I used three amps to layer every part—it made the sound that much bigger.”

He’s also keen to attribute some of Fear Zero’s success to website vehicles like MySpace: “With MySpace, that’s helped us spread the word about the band. It’s just a really great tool—you can go online and add people in certain markets where you’re playing.”
For Sadler, at least, the name of the band is linked to a purer distillation of rock ethos—the carpe diem factor.

“A couple of guys had to quit their jobs to come do this,” Sadler says with conviction. “[It’s about] taking a risk and enjoying life for what it is. You get one life on this planet and you [have to] take a chance and follow your dreams and not be afraid of the possible consequences.”

Apparently, that chord of conviction stretches through the rest of the band.

“The bass player in our band worked at Long & McQuade,” he recalls, before adding with a chuckle, “They basically said to him, ‘either you stay here or you lose your job,’ and he said, ‘well, I guess I’m going—see ya.’”

When asked about plans for after the tour, Sadler speaks of potential south of the border.

“We want to try and get down to the US,” he says. “That would be really good for us to get our feet wet in that market.”

It’s not all about success for Sadler, though; the music definitely comes first, and he notes that it’s important for the band to have a range of style and avoid becoming one-dimensional.

“We’re not all one sound,” he says. “We’ve got some country, a little bit of reggae and lots of rock.

“Music’s one of those things,” he continues, explaining that his devotion to music is all consuming. “If you have a passion for it, you’ll pretty much do anything to get to play it.” V

Sat, Mar 31 (8 pm)
Fear Zero
With the New Weapon,
the Well Hung Millionaires
Powerplant, $8

by GAVIN MEALING / gavin@vueweekly.com
- Vue Weekly - Edmonton


"Fear Zero fears nothing and sets out to seize the day"

Some musicians might be faulted for their commitment issues—genre jumping all willy-nilly, or taking part in side or solo projects—but Vancouver rock band Fear Zero grinds other axes.

Speaking with frontman Ed Sadler as the band pulls into Kelowna, BC on the second stop of their cross-Canada tour, there is a sense that, through all the clichéd litanies of carpe diem, some bands might just want “it” more than others, “it” being, in this case, having success while doing something you really love to do.

Fear Zero’s tour coincides with the release of In Lights, an album that Sadler says is of high production value compared with their first two releases.

“We were able to get Mike Fraser (of AC/DC and Aerosmith acclaim) to mix it and we would have never had that option before,” Sadler says, beaming over the telephone line. “We were able to layer lots more guitars. On this album I used three amps to layer every part—it made the sound that much bigger.”

He’s also keen to attribute some of Fear Zero’s success to website vehicles like MySpace: “With MySpace, that’s helped us spread the word about the band. It’s just a really great tool—you can go online and add people in certain markets where you’re playing.”
For Sadler, at least, the name of the band is linked to a purer distillation of rock ethos—the carpe diem factor.

“A couple of guys had to quit their jobs to come do this,” Sadler says with conviction. “[It’s about] taking a risk and enjoying life for what it is. You get one life on this planet and you [have to] take a chance and follow your dreams and not be afraid of the possible consequences.”

Apparently, that chord of conviction stretches through the rest of the band.

“The bass player in our band worked at Long & McQuade,” he recalls, before adding with a chuckle, “They basically said to him, ‘either you stay here or you lose your job,’ and he said, ‘well, I guess I’m going—see ya.’”

When asked about plans for after the tour, Sadler speaks of potential south of the border.

“We want to try and get down to the US,” he says. “That would be really good for us to get our feet wet in that market.”

It’s not all about success for Sadler, though; the music definitely comes first, and he notes that it’s important for the band to have a range of style and avoid becoming one-dimensional.

“We’re not all one sound,” he says. “We’ve got some country, a little bit of reggae and lots of rock.

“Music’s one of those things,” he continues, explaining that his devotion to music is all consuming. “If you have a passion for it, you’ll pretty much do anything to get to play it.” V

Sat, Mar 31 (8 pm)
Fear Zero
With the New Weapon,
the Well Hung Millionaires
Powerplant, $8

by GAVIN MEALING / gavin@vueweekly.com
- Vue Weekly - Edmonton


"Vancouver band to hit The Zone March 29"

Kickstarting your own indie label ain’t easy when illegal downloading is all the rage, but that hasn’t slowed down Vancouver’s Fear Zero.

Fans can check out the masterfully fierce and compelling collection of tunes on the guys’ latest project In Lights at The Zone March 29.

The bristling, soaring first single Breathe Again is already in rotation on FM rock radio stations across the country.

Thundering drums, wailing guitars and bass are topped off by the sometimes edgy, sometimes tenderly but always expressively sung vocals of Ed Sadler, singer/songwriter/guitarist and all-around guru of Fear Zero.

He’s abundantly proud of the project, and rightly so. In Lights showcases an immensely talented collaboration on all fronts.

“I really wanted to take a couple of left turns and surprise the listener by drawing upon more than just my hard rock influences as a songwriter and throw in a little reggae, and even some country and singer/songwriter type stuff,” he says. But he wasn’t about to veer from a proven formula.

There’s lots of heavy stuff to satisfy fans of the band’s previous two discs.

Sadler has a powerful, terrific voice, but almost wasn’t the frontman for the band. He auditioned lots of guys for lead vocals, and often they would suggest he was more than able to tackle the job himself.

Thankfully for listeners, he opted for the role, and hasn’t looked back.

Meanwhile, sheer intensity is indeed the defining phrase in describing Fear Zero, which deftly serves up scorching rockers like You Make Me Feel, the gritty Falling Down and Cry On A Sunday plus the infectious, lively pop-flavoured Day of Our Last Night.

Beautiful Scars is also a fabulous melding of unabashed rock, superbly-crafted lyric and Sadler’s exceptional vocal interpretation.

The disc’s versatility continues fluidly with the blues-inflected simmering California Calling and comparatively softer cuts like Broken, Still Hoping and the poignant Last Photograph.

Sadler has loved music since his early teens, but didn’t aggressively
pursue perfecting his guitar skills until he heard Van Halen’s Eruption when he was 15.

Something in the tune sparked something inside, and he found himself practicing for hours on end.

Music has since offered much fulfillment and healing – it brings a vivid richness to his life.

“Writing is like meditating on a page,” he explains. “When you sit down to write, you think I could write something today that could affect someone.”

With a budget rarely afforded an indie band, Sadler was determined to craft the record he always dreamed of making with the help of a couple of guys known only as the Guiney Bros.

Their help was indispensable to the project on many levels. They connected Fear Zero to guys like Mike Fraser (ACDC, Aerosmith, Hinder) and Darren Grahn (Metallica, Crossfade, Third Eye Blind).

Joining Sadler on the recording is Francis Amanse who handles drums, supporting vocals, and percussion duties, bassist T.J. O’ Malley and guitarist Jeremy Harrison.

Meanwhile, the future looks especially bright for Fear Zero, set to play more than 120 shows in the next year. Dates will also extend into the U.S.

And ultimately, Sadler is aiming to use his art not just to plumb his own creativity but also to have a positive impact. “For me, it’s about reaching more people and making them feel good.”


03/21/07
BY MARK WEBER
mweber@reddeer.greatwest.ca

- Red Deer Express


"Vancouver band to hit The Zone March 29"

Kickstarting your own indie label ain’t easy when illegal downloading is all the rage, but that hasn’t slowed down Vancouver’s Fear Zero.

Fans can check out the masterfully fierce and compelling collection of tunes on the guys’ latest project In Lights at The Zone March 29.

The bristling, soaring first single Breathe Again is already in rotation on FM rock radio stations across the country.

Thundering drums, wailing guitars and bass are topped off by the sometimes edgy, sometimes tenderly but always expressively sung vocals of Ed Sadler, singer/songwriter/guitarist and all-around guru of Fear Zero.

He’s abundantly proud of the project, and rightly so. In Lights showcases an immensely talented collaboration on all fronts.

“I really wanted to take a couple of left turns and surprise the listener by drawing upon more than just my hard rock influences as a songwriter and throw in a little reggae, and even some country and singer/songwriter type stuff,” he says. But he wasn’t about to veer from a proven formula.

There’s lots of heavy stuff to satisfy fans of the band’s previous two discs.

Sadler has a powerful, terrific voice, but almost wasn’t the frontman for the band. He auditioned lots of guys for lead vocals, and often they would suggest he was more than able to tackle the job himself.

Thankfully for listeners, he opted for the role, and hasn’t looked back.

Meanwhile, sheer intensity is indeed the defining phrase in describing Fear Zero, which deftly serves up scorching rockers like You Make Me Feel, the gritty Falling Down and Cry On A Sunday plus the infectious, lively pop-flavoured Day of Our Last Night.

Beautiful Scars is also a fabulous melding of unabashed rock, superbly-crafted lyric and Sadler’s exceptional vocal interpretation.

The disc’s versatility continues fluidly with the blues-inflected simmering California Calling and comparatively softer cuts like Broken, Still Hoping and the poignant Last Photograph.

Sadler has loved music since his early teens, but didn’t aggressively
pursue perfecting his guitar skills until he heard Van Halen’s Eruption when he was 15.

Something in the tune sparked something inside, and he found himself practicing for hours on end.

Music has since offered much fulfillment and healing – it brings a vivid richness to his life.

“Writing is like meditating on a page,” he explains. “When you sit down to write, you think I could write something today that could affect someone.”

With a budget rarely afforded an indie band, Sadler was determined to craft the record he always dreamed of making with the help of a couple of guys known only as the Guiney Bros.

Their help was indispensable to the project on many levels. They connected Fear Zero to guys like Mike Fraser (ACDC, Aerosmith, Hinder) and Darren Grahn (Metallica, Crossfade, Third Eye Blind).

Joining Sadler on the recording is Francis Amanse who handles drums, supporting vocals, and percussion duties, bassist T.J. O’ Malley and guitarist Jeremy Harrison.

Meanwhile, the future looks especially bright for Fear Zero, set to play more than 120 shows in the next year. Dates will also extend into the U.S.

And ultimately, Sadler is aiming to use his art not just to plumb his own creativity but also to have a positive impact. “For me, it’s about reaching more people and making them feel good.”


03/21/07
BY MARK WEBER
mweber@reddeer.greatwest.ca

- Red Deer Express


Discography

Whole Damn Nation - 2007
Breathe Again - #52 Mediabase Feb 2007

Concentrated - 2005
Day of our last night - #48 Mediabase Feb 2006

Fear Zero self titled - 2004
Sunday Morning - #38 BDS Rock spins March 2004
Satellite - #45 BDS Rock Spins July 2004

Photos

Bio

Fear Zero

If it’s true that there is nothing to fear but fear itself, than Fear Zero has taken its name wisely. “Fear Zero doesn’t mean fear,” insists leader Ed Sadler. “It’s sort of an anti-fear. Don’t be afraid of taking chances.

Fear Zero’s new album, Whole Damn Nation, is an example of chance taking. It incorporates a wide variety of styles from hard rock to simple pop. Although Sadler grew up listening to heavy metal, a few years at Capilano College from 1996 to 98 taught him to accept all kinds of music. Not to fear it but to follow instincts. “I would say it comes from a place that is a love for music,” Sadler adds. “I tried to write songs that made me happy. It’s just ideas. You collect ideas as time goes on. If it’s a good idea, I’m all for it. If you were a genius, you might have an iron fist, but I’m not a genius. Whatever makes the song better.”

Thus Fear Zero has developed. Although there has been a Fear Zero for six years, it has taken time for Sadler to realize his ambition. “It was my project.” The guitarist recounts. “I wanted to start a band. In the early days, I’d write a song but I didn’t know where it was going. Eventually, I zeroed in on a direction.”

The first Fear Zero release was virtually a one-man do-it-yourself undertaking. Sadler had the songs but didn’t yet have a band. He hired the musicians, did the radio tracking, handled the distribution.

In his mind, though, there always was a Fear Zero. To put together the band that recorded the second album, he reached back to friends he’d made while growing up in Trail, B.C. The first person Sadler contacted was Tony Ferraro. “He’s a smokin’ drummer who can do other things, like sing and read music. That’s really tough to find”. “Finding players that are on the same wavelength was tough. My technique has been honed by my jazz experience so I was trying to find guys who were technically good and could do their own thing.”

Who is Fear Zero
Bassist is Ryan Jones, whom Sadler knew from Nelson, B.C...
The last band member to join is Jeremy Harrison, a guitarist who did sessions for radio and TV and came to Fear Zero through a free musicians wanted ad. “I basically knew what I wanted,” says Sadler. “I did the arranging and called upon my jazz experience. The album is a fair representation of the band. It shows what they can do. It incorporates a lot of the elements I was interested in. Anywhere I can get my hands dirty on the creative side of things is where I want to go.”

Which means following his instinct without fear….

-Tom Harrison, The Province