Feldiken
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Feldiken

New York City, New York, United States | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
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"Winner - Great American Song Contest - Ken Feldman/Feldiken"

http://www.greatamericansong.com/winners.html - Great American Song Contest


"Winner - Great American Song Contest - Ken Feldman/Feldiken"

http://www.greatamericansong.com/winners.html - Great American Song Contest


"Quick Hits: Feldiken"

Quick Hits: Feldiken

There are few things I love more than a song celebrating life. There are plenty of break-up songs and misery tunes in the world, but not enough songs championing good things. Feldiken (the man) is on a mission to change that.
Feldiken (the musical project) has a new EP called Common Splendor, and it is six songs of relentless positivity. His sound primarily stays in the upbeat, bright-eyed pop that he showcased on his debut album Small Songs About Us. The notable exception is “Together in this Groove,” which is a surprisingly coherent and entertaining dance track. While the songwriting style hasn’t changed too much, the lyrics are much more memorable this time around.
Title track “Common Splendor” tells short stories of people taking care of other people, and it’s sincere enough to defeat any accusations of kitsch. Instead, the lyrics are genuinely uplifting and beautiful. “Everybody Loves You” does get a bit saccharine, but it’s redeemed by the funk-inflected pop of “Everything for Everyone.” It’s still not for everyone; I mean, it’s a funky song about helping people. There is no irony here.
Feldiken’s voice is solid, his songwriting is tight, and the EP wooshes by in with a grin and a dance step or two. Fans of Backyard Tire Fire, Bishop Allen and Guster will embrace Feldiken, as will anyone who loves an optimist.

Posted on January 12, 2011 by Stephen Carradini.







- Independent Clauses Unusual words about underappreciated music


"Quick Hits: Feldiken"

Quick Hits: Feldiken

There are few things I love more than a song celebrating life. There are plenty of break-up songs and misery tunes in the world, but not enough songs championing good things. Feldiken (the man) is on a mission to change that.
Feldiken (the musical project) has a new EP called Common Splendor, and it is six songs of relentless positivity. His sound primarily stays in the upbeat, bright-eyed pop that he showcased on his debut album Small Songs About Us. The notable exception is “Together in this Groove,” which is a surprisingly coherent and entertaining dance track. While the songwriting style hasn’t changed too much, the lyrics are much more memorable this time around.
Title track “Common Splendor” tells short stories of people taking care of other people, and it’s sincere enough to defeat any accusations of kitsch. Instead, the lyrics are genuinely uplifting and beautiful. “Everybody Loves You” does get a bit saccharine, but it’s redeemed by the funk-inflected pop of “Everything for Everyone.” It’s still not for everyone; I mean, it’s a funky song about helping people. There is no irony here.
Feldiken’s voice is solid, his songwriting is tight, and the EP wooshes by in with a grin and a dance step or two. Fans of Backyard Tire Fire, Bishop Allen and Guster will embrace Feldiken, as will anyone who loves an optimist.

Posted on January 12, 2011 by Stephen Carradini.







- Independent Clauses Unusual words about underappreciated music


"THE EXCiTiNG SOUND OF FELDiKEN AND HiS BRAND NEW EP 'COMMON SPLENDOR'"


SEPTEMBER 27, 2010 - I've learned a long time ago to not underestimate the power of the EP. For singer-songwriter FELDIKEN’s latest release COMMON SPLENDOR, Americana sounds go hand-in-hand with electronica-styled dance music all without overwhelming or alienating the listener. In his eagerness of incorporate different sounds and textures on his latest offering, FELDIKEN proves himself to be a songwriter with unparalleled dexterity and craftiness. Part of what makes pop music great is its ability to look beyond demographics and genre and reach everyone and that is exactly what FELDIKEN aims to do with the song (and obvious single) TOGETHER IN THIS GROOVE – a call for folks from all over the globe to come together in case they missed the LOVE TRAIN. The optimistic tune bounces on top of a lighter-than-air techno groove and gets stuck in ones head after one listen. While this is the stand out track it is only one of the many pop tricks that FELDIKEN has up his sleeve on this delightful release. - Rockwired


"THE EXCiTiNG SOUND OF FELDiKEN AND HiS BRAND NEW EP 'COMMON SPLENDOR'"


SEPTEMBER 27, 2010 - I've learned a long time ago to not underestimate the power of the EP. For singer-songwriter FELDIKEN’s latest release COMMON SPLENDOR, Americana sounds go hand-in-hand with electronica-styled dance music all without overwhelming or alienating the listener. In his eagerness of incorporate different sounds and textures on his latest offering, FELDIKEN proves himself to be a songwriter with unparalleled dexterity and craftiness. Part of what makes pop music great is its ability to look beyond demographics and genre and reach everyone and that is exactly what FELDIKEN aims to do with the song (and obvious single) TOGETHER IN THIS GROOVE – a call for folks from all over the globe to come together in case they missed the LOVE TRAIN. The optimistic tune bounces on top of a lighter-than-air techno groove and gets stuck in ones head after one listen. While this is the stand out track it is only one of the many pop tricks that FELDIKEN has up his sleeve on this delightful release. - Rockwired


"EP REVIEW: Feldiken - “Common Splendor." By: Cyrus Rhodes "will lift your spirits" - INDIE MUSIC DIGEST:-"





(8 out of 10 stars)
**********
Artist: Feldiken
EP: Common Splendor
Label: Independent Artist
Website: www.myspace.com/feldiken
Genre: Alternative, Acoustic Rock
Sounds Like: Jack Johnson, They Might Be Giants
Technical Grade: 7/10
Production/Musicianship Grade: 8/10
Commercial Value: 8/10
Overall Talent Level: 8/10
Songwriting Skills: 8/10
Performance Skill: 9/10
Best Songs: Together in this Groove, Everything for Everyone
Weakness: Genera Identity Crisis

EP REVIEW:
Brooklyn, New York’s own Feldiken releases his latest EP entitled “Common Splendor.” in 2010. He is accompanied by Pete Archer on bass & Lou Lacobelli on drums. This is his second release.

The EP takes flight with “Age of Miracles” an upbeat acoustic-rock intro piece that serves up steady rock groove against catchy vocal melodies, & hooky chorus from Feldiken. Track 2 is hands down my personal favorite “Together in the Groove” shifts gears with it’s smooth flowing techno groove beat & infectious vocal melody line from Feldiken Track 2 evolves into a solid rock groove with clever lyrical content, & impressive vocal accents to boot - an amazing piece. Track 3 “Common Splendor” serves up yet another up beat folk-rock ditty with driving rock rhythm, against impressive strings & horn accent along the ways. As the CD slowly unfolds I can hear many musical influences reminiscent of classic They Might Be Giants, Gin Blossoms, Death Cab for Cutie, The Beetles, & perhaps a splash of Jack Johnson. This CD makes a pretty solid first impression. Right from the start you will notice rich musical textures overflowing everywhere, full of warmth, variety, & strong melodic structure. I would classify this music as acoustic pop rock, with a slight aftertaste of alternative folk. The songs themselves are addictive, & upbeat, complete with positive, carefree subject matter. The musicianship of this band is pretty solid across the board. The players themselves write, & play there parts extremely well song for song. Along the way you will notice lush layers of instrumentation. Besides the 4 piece standard you will also catch impressive things well placed keyboard & Hammond Organ Chops, impressive techno groove accents, low end bass grooves & beats, & even well placed horn & string accents. Feldken’s voice works well across the board & fills the sonic space peacefully & unobtrusively. It will at times remind you of a cross between Sugar Ray & Gordon Gano (Violent Femmes). I might add Feldiken’s falsetto is quite impressive & well placed. All songs are short & sweet musical experiences. From heartfelt “Everybody Loves You” to grooving “Everything for Everyone” & “The Future” this CD pretty much has it all.

The overall mix of this EP is a bit inconsistent. A few songs don’t even sound like the same band or EP so it’s fair to say the catalogue is a bit all over the place, perhaps suffering from a slight case of genera identity crisis. However I will add that because the songs themselves are so well crafted, this issue is virtually goes relatively un-noticeable to the common listener. Track 3 is a bit short & just feels like an incomplete statement.

“Common Splendor” is an impressive musical production from start to finish. The music is clean, goes down smooth, & the messages are upbeat, carefree, & sung from a very positive perspective. It’s strong suit – the wide musical variety & musical warmth of Feldken & company. He possesses enough musical talent & songwriting prowess to be extremely dangerous. The musicianship is first rate. Once again the vocals, vocal harmonies, & melodic accents are brilliantly placed & extremely well crafted. The messages are packed to the hilt with rich conventional wisdom offering hope & compassion along the way. As a listener I remained entertained the entire time. “Common Splendor” goes down smooth, & will not only make you want to dance, but will lift your spirits in the process.

Cyrus Rhodes - Indie Music digest


"EP REVIEW: Feldiken - “Common Splendor." By: Cyrus Rhodes "will lift your spirits" - INDIE MUSIC DIGEST:-"





(8 out of 10 stars)
**********
Artist: Feldiken
EP: Common Splendor
Label: Independent Artist
Website: www.myspace.com/feldiken
Genre: Alternative, Acoustic Rock
Sounds Like: Jack Johnson, They Might Be Giants
Technical Grade: 7/10
Production/Musicianship Grade: 8/10
Commercial Value: 8/10
Overall Talent Level: 8/10
Songwriting Skills: 8/10
Performance Skill: 9/10
Best Songs: Together in this Groove, Everything for Everyone
Weakness: Genera Identity Crisis

EP REVIEW:
Brooklyn, New York’s own Feldiken releases his latest EP entitled “Common Splendor.” in 2010. He is accompanied by Pete Archer on bass & Lou Lacobelli on drums. This is his second release.

The EP takes flight with “Age of Miracles” an upbeat acoustic-rock intro piece that serves up steady rock groove against catchy vocal melodies, & hooky chorus from Feldiken. Track 2 is hands down my personal favorite “Together in the Groove” shifts gears with it’s smooth flowing techno groove beat & infectious vocal melody line from Feldiken Track 2 evolves into a solid rock groove with clever lyrical content, & impressive vocal accents to boot - an amazing piece. Track 3 “Common Splendor” serves up yet another up beat folk-rock ditty with driving rock rhythm, against impressive strings & horn accent along the ways. As the CD slowly unfolds I can hear many musical influences reminiscent of classic They Might Be Giants, Gin Blossoms, Death Cab for Cutie, The Beetles, & perhaps a splash of Jack Johnson. This CD makes a pretty solid first impression. Right from the start you will notice rich musical textures overflowing everywhere, full of warmth, variety, & strong melodic structure. I would classify this music as acoustic pop rock, with a slight aftertaste of alternative folk. The songs themselves are addictive, & upbeat, complete with positive, carefree subject matter. The musicianship of this band is pretty solid across the board. The players themselves write, & play there parts extremely well song for song. Along the way you will notice lush layers of instrumentation. Besides the 4 piece standard you will also catch impressive things well placed keyboard & Hammond Organ Chops, impressive techno groove accents, low end bass grooves & beats, & even well placed horn & string accents. Feldken’s voice works well across the board & fills the sonic space peacefully & unobtrusively. It will at times remind you of a cross between Sugar Ray & Gordon Gano (Violent Femmes). I might add Feldiken’s falsetto is quite impressive & well placed. All songs are short & sweet musical experiences. From heartfelt “Everybody Loves You” to grooving “Everything for Everyone” & “The Future” this CD pretty much has it all.

The overall mix of this EP is a bit inconsistent. A few songs don’t even sound like the same band or EP so it’s fair to say the catalogue is a bit all over the place, perhaps suffering from a slight case of genera identity crisis. However I will add that because the songs themselves are so well crafted, this issue is virtually goes relatively un-noticeable to the common listener. Track 3 is a bit short & just feels like an incomplete statement.

“Common Splendor” is an impressive musical production from start to finish. The music is clean, goes down smooth, & the messages are upbeat, carefree, & sung from a very positive perspective. It’s strong suit – the wide musical variety & musical warmth of Feldken & company. He possesses enough musical talent & songwriting prowess to be extremely dangerous. The musicianship is first rate. Once again the vocals, vocal harmonies, & melodic accents are brilliantly placed & extremely well crafted. The messages are packed to the hilt with rich conventional wisdom offering hope & compassion along the way. As a listener I remained entertained the entire time. “Common Splendor” goes down smooth, & will not only make you want to dance, but will lift your spirits in the process.

Cyrus Rhodes - Indie Music digest


"Feldiken"

The musician known as Feldiken comes to us from somewhere in between Brooklyn and New Jersey – a region ripe with influence and a gripping scene. I could go on about that musical landscape… but what I really liked about our conversation with Feldiken was his response to our “What do you think about when you first arrive on stage” question. He says “I think to myself, ‘It's up to me, now.’ Then I quickly think, ‘It's up to us,’ thinking about the band. Then I look out into the audience and think, ‘It's up to all of us.’”



One of the better mentalities we’ve heard, to be sure. It’s that mentality that Feldiken goes into his latest release, “Common Splendor”. The artist describes the effort: “Anytime people do something together there's a light between us. Things are happening. That's what I was trying to capture. There are a couple of story songs that illustrate that, like the title track and ‘Together in this Groove.’ The styles and sounds vary pretty widely, but it's all a new take on traditional forms. I tried to make the most human record I could.”



Keep an eye out for more music from Feldiken, check out “Common Splendor” and read on for all the answers to the XXQ’s.



XXQs: Feldiken



PensEyeView.com (PEV): How would you describe your sound and what do you feel makes you stand out over the others in your genre?



Feldiken: The sound is varied and alive indie roots pop. The lyrics are unusually straightforward. I shoot for simple, practical and understandable. I also think my perspective about people is uniquely hopeful.



PEV: Calling Brooklyn, New York your home, what kind of music were you into growing up? Was anyone your main influence?



Feldiken: Well, obviously it varied in different years. I grew up in New Jersey. Probably my biggest influence was Bruce Springsteen. His work ethic and joy in finding connection with the audience thunderstruck me when I was a teenager. I've lived in Brooklyn for over a decade, and it is more sophisticated. Recently I'm into hip hop and Leonard Cohen, very poetic stuff.



PEV: Having played in the business for a good time now, what was it like for you when you first started out?



Feldiken: It was wild starting out. I was in collaborative bands, and we'd fight over who got to sing the songs. In high school, my band had three singers. We would each sing a third of the songs. But the first gig we played, hundreds of people showed up. Both of the other guys saw the crowd and asked me to sing their songs, they were "tired" or developed a "sore throat." I was scared too, but I was not going to bail so I did it. I could not look into eyes so I picked a spot on the wall to focus on. I remember one of the guys started singing once he saw me do it without dying. I'm slightly more confident now.



PEV: Do you remember the first time you thought to yourself – “I am really onto something!”?



Feldiken: Probably when I was seven years old and I sang and wrote a song with my brother. It was called "There are six different Monkeys in the World."



PEV: With that, what can fans expect from a live Feldiken show?



Feldiken: They'll see me having a ball, being myself connecting with people by playing songs I really love with people I really love. They'll feel good and have fun.



PEV: What is the first thing that comes to mind when you step on stage?



Feldiken: (laughs) I think to myself, "It's up to me, now." Then I quickly think, "It's up to us," thinking about the band. Then I look out into the audience and think, "It's up to all of us."



PEV: Any preshow rituals before going on stage or do you just wing it?



Feldiken: I use a small plastic turkey god and a sprig of parsley. Just kidding. But actually, that's what I do. I make jokes with my band mates and my wife to turn the tension into energy.



PEV: What was the underlining inspiration for your music? Where do get your best ideas for songs?



Feldiken: It's the way music helped save my life, by reminding me that I'm not alone. When I was a young person feeling disrespected and powerless, music helped connect me to other young people and our power. The way the songs come is different with each one. The sources are pretty mundane: a conversation, a touch or a feeling I really want to express. But I do have an agenda for us humans, and I write with that in mind.



PEV: Tell us about your latest release, “Common Splendor.” What can fans expect from this work?



Feldiken: Anytime people do something together there's a light between us. Things are happening. That's what I was trying to capture. There's a couple of story songs that illustrate that, like the title track and "Together in this Groove." The styles and sounds vary pretty widely, but it's all a new take on traditional forms. I tried to make the most human record I could.



PEV: Do you ever find yourself get - Pens Eye View


"Feldiken"

The musician known as Feldiken comes to us from somewhere in between Brooklyn and New Jersey – a region ripe with influence and a gripping scene. I could go on about that musical landscape… but what I really liked about our conversation with Feldiken was his response to our “What do you think about when you first arrive on stage” question. He says “I think to myself, ‘It's up to me, now.’ Then I quickly think, ‘It's up to us,’ thinking about the band. Then I look out into the audience and think, ‘It's up to all of us.’”



One of the better mentalities we’ve heard, to be sure. It’s that mentality that Feldiken goes into his latest release, “Common Splendor”. The artist describes the effort: “Anytime people do something together there's a light between us. Things are happening. That's what I was trying to capture. There are a couple of story songs that illustrate that, like the title track and ‘Together in this Groove.’ The styles and sounds vary pretty widely, but it's all a new take on traditional forms. I tried to make the most human record I could.”



Keep an eye out for more music from Feldiken, check out “Common Splendor” and read on for all the answers to the XXQ’s.



XXQs: Feldiken



PensEyeView.com (PEV): How would you describe your sound and what do you feel makes you stand out over the others in your genre?



Feldiken: The sound is varied and alive indie roots pop. The lyrics are unusually straightforward. I shoot for simple, practical and understandable. I also think my perspective about people is uniquely hopeful.



PEV: Calling Brooklyn, New York your home, what kind of music were you into growing up? Was anyone your main influence?



Feldiken: Well, obviously it varied in different years. I grew up in New Jersey. Probably my biggest influence was Bruce Springsteen. His work ethic and joy in finding connection with the audience thunderstruck me when I was a teenager. I've lived in Brooklyn for over a decade, and it is more sophisticated. Recently I'm into hip hop and Leonard Cohen, very poetic stuff.



PEV: Having played in the business for a good time now, what was it like for you when you first started out?



Feldiken: It was wild starting out. I was in collaborative bands, and we'd fight over who got to sing the songs. In high school, my band had three singers. We would each sing a third of the songs. But the first gig we played, hundreds of people showed up. Both of the other guys saw the crowd and asked me to sing their songs, they were "tired" or developed a "sore throat." I was scared too, but I was not going to bail so I did it. I could not look into eyes so I picked a spot on the wall to focus on. I remember one of the guys started singing once he saw me do it without dying. I'm slightly more confident now.



PEV: Do you remember the first time you thought to yourself – “I am really onto something!”?



Feldiken: Probably when I was seven years old and I sang and wrote a song with my brother. It was called "There are six different Monkeys in the World."



PEV: With that, what can fans expect from a live Feldiken show?



Feldiken: They'll see me having a ball, being myself connecting with people by playing songs I really love with people I really love. They'll feel good and have fun.



PEV: What is the first thing that comes to mind when you step on stage?



Feldiken: (laughs) I think to myself, "It's up to me, now." Then I quickly think, "It's up to us," thinking about the band. Then I look out into the audience and think, "It's up to all of us."



PEV: Any preshow rituals before going on stage or do you just wing it?



Feldiken: I use a small plastic turkey god and a sprig of parsley. Just kidding. But actually, that's what I do. I make jokes with my band mates and my wife to turn the tension into energy.



PEV: What was the underlining inspiration for your music? Where do get your best ideas for songs?



Feldiken: It's the way music helped save my life, by reminding me that I'm not alone. When I was a young person feeling disrespected and powerless, music helped connect me to other young people and our power. The way the songs come is different with each one. The sources are pretty mundane: a conversation, a touch or a feeling I really want to express. But I do have an agenda for us humans, and I write with that in mind.



PEV: Tell us about your latest release, “Common Splendor.” What can fans expect from this work?



Feldiken: Anytime people do something together there's a light between us. Things are happening. That's what I was trying to capture. There's a couple of story songs that illustrate that, like the title track and "Together in this Groove." The styles and sounds vary pretty widely, but it's all a new take on traditional forms. I tried to make the most human record I could.



PEV: Do you ever find yourself get - Pens Eye View


"Feldiken- Common Splendor"

Recommend

Common Splendor is one of those feel-good EPs positively designed for summer consumption. Each song is bright and sunny, bearing a stylistic disposition on par to something along the lines of The Byrds by way of They Might Be Giants.
People may be quick to pass Common Splendor off as sugary tripe by an artist who sees the world through rose-tinted glasses, but they would be missing the point. There is a wholesome honesty to the youthful exuberance Feldiken portrays. He focuses on looking at the bright side of bad situations, picking yourself up after being beaten down, and pushing forward through adversity. And for that, he should be commended, because everything can't be about "bitches and money." I wouldn't be surprised if Feldiken found himself on a Disney soundtrack at some point in time, for his songwriting style perfectly complements Randy Newman's diabetes-inducing flavor.
Despite his Beach Boys-esque "fun-in-the-sun" demeanor, Feldiken does manage to toss in some musical surprises. "Together in This Groove," for example exudes post-modern Ok Go quirkiness. Common Splendor is certainly a CD you need to have around whenever you need a quick pick-me-up. Besides, how can anyone hate a band that makes purposeful use of a trombone? - Music Emissions


"Feldiken- Common Splendor"

Recommend

Common Splendor is one of those feel-good EPs positively designed for summer consumption. Each song is bright and sunny, bearing a stylistic disposition on par to something along the lines of The Byrds by way of They Might Be Giants.
People may be quick to pass Common Splendor off as sugary tripe by an artist who sees the world through rose-tinted glasses, but they would be missing the point. There is a wholesome honesty to the youthful exuberance Feldiken portrays. He focuses on looking at the bright side of bad situations, picking yourself up after being beaten down, and pushing forward through adversity. And for that, he should be commended, because everything can't be about "bitches and money." I wouldn't be surprised if Feldiken found himself on a Disney soundtrack at some point in time, for his songwriting style perfectly complements Randy Newman's diabetes-inducing flavor.
Despite his Beach Boys-esque "fun-in-the-sun" demeanor, Feldiken does manage to toss in some musical surprises. "Together in This Groove," for example exudes post-modern Ok Go quirkiness. Common Splendor is certainly a CD you need to have around whenever you need a quick pick-me-up. Besides, how can anyone hate a band that makes purposeful use of a trombone? - Music Emissions


"Feldiken plays enthusiastic, upbeat, optimistic acoustic pop (emphasis on the adjectives)"

I expected Feldiken to be some sort of techno project from Europe, based on the name. I could not have been more wrong. Feldiken is a Brooklyn-based innocent, buoyant pop band that sounds like an even more optimistic Backyard Tire Fire (yes, I know, that is somewhat difficult to fathom). With bouncy bass lines, organ and accordion accompaniment, lyrics bordering on naivete (in mostly a good way) and harmonies so comfortable that I feel like I already know them, it’s pretty hard to make a case for Feldiken to be anything but a straight-up pop band.

Small Songs About Us is acoustic-based pop, similar to Joshua Radin’s wide-eyed optimism. But where Joshua Radin takes turns for the depressive, Feldiken never goes there. The only remotely sad moment on the album is “Too Good,” where he recites a list of awesome things that are happening in his life and how he’s worried because they’re all too good to be happening. Bro, I’ll take that problem any day of the week. “Not Like Clockwork” is almost depressing, but the chorus comes around to realizing “Oh! I have friends, sunshine, laughter and a woman! And that makes my life better!” I am not exaggerating.

And although it does sound oppressively happy, it rarely reaches that point because the acoustic songwriting is well-grounded, unendingly melodic, and incredibly comfortable. The only point where it gets unbearable is “Rockin’ All the Way,” which feels like a kid’s song because it calls out the instruments as they enter the song. I just can’t bear it.

Thankfully, the sunshine is tempered in points throughout; “Like a Flower” has pensive moments, “This Bridge Won’t Burn” has a bit of a distorted edge to it, and “Like a Flower” has some doubt in the lyrics. “Like a Flower” is the winner here, as it evokes Josh Radin in all the right ways but remains true to the Feldiken aesthetic.

Take this away from this review: the acoustic pop here is so upbeat and charming that it makes zydeco (“Never Really Knew”) seem like a totally legitimate move within the sound the band has established. I like it a lot in small doses, especially “Too Good” and “Like a Flower,” but after a full album it’s hard to stomach. If you like happy music, you need this.

Tags: Backyard Tire Fire, Feldiken, Joshua Radin, Small Songs about Us
- Independent Clauses - Unusual words about underappreciated music


"Feldiken plays enthusiastic, upbeat, optimistic acoustic pop (emphasis on the adjectives)"

I expected Feldiken to be some sort of techno project from Europe, based on the name. I could not have been more wrong. Feldiken is a Brooklyn-based innocent, buoyant pop band that sounds like an even more optimistic Backyard Tire Fire (yes, I know, that is somewhat difficult to fathom). With bouncy bass lines, organ and accordion accompaniment, lyrics bordering on naivete (in mostly a good way) and harmonies so comfortable that I feel like I already know them, it’s pretty hard to make a case for Feldiken to be anything but a straight-up pop band.

Small Songs About Us is acoustic-based pop, similar to Joshua Radin’s wide-eyed optimism. But where Joshua Radin takes turns for the depressive, Feldiken never goes there. The only remotely sad moment on the album is “Too Good,” where he recites a list of awesome things that are happening in his life and how he’s worried because they’re all too good to be happening. Bro, I’ll take that problem any day of the week. “Not Like Clockwork” is almost depressing, but the chorus comes around to realizing “Oh! I have friends, sunshine, laughter and a woman! And that makes my life better!” I am not exaggerating.

And although it does sound oppressively happy, it rarely reaches that point because the acoustic songwriting is well-grounded, unendingly melodic, and incredibly comfortable. The only point where it gets unbearable is “Rockin’ All the Way,” which feels like a kid’s song because it calls out the instruments as they enter the song. I just can’t bear it.

Thankfully, the sunshine is tempered in points throughout; “Like a Flower” has pensive moments, “This Bridge Won’t Burn” has a bit of a distorted edge to it, and “Like a Flower” has some doubt in the lyrics. “Like a Flower” is the winner here, as it evokes Josh Radin in all the right ways but remains true to the Feldiken aesthetic.

Take this away from this review: the acoustic pop here is so upbeat and charming that it makes zydeco (“Never Really Knew”) seem like a totally legitimate move within the sound the band has established. I like it a lot in small doses, especially “Too Good” and “Like a Flower,” but after a full album it’s hard to stomach. If you like happy music, you need this.

Tags: Backyard Tire Fire, Feldiken, Joshua Radin, Small Songs about Us
- Independent Clauses - Unusual words about underappreciated music


"Feldiken- Common Splendor (CD)"


Wednesday, September 29,2010 New York City Indie singer/songwriter Feldiken returns with his latest EP, Common Splendor. The six-song cycle follows on the heels of Small Songs About Us. Feldiken expands his reach by digging into personal experience and infusing broader stylistic influences than in the past, from New Orleans Zydeco to Celtic kitchen party and the broad base of acoustic folk that lay in between.

Common Splendor opens with "Age Of Miracles", turning a mildly ironic comment on the state of the world into a song celebrating the joy of finding the perfect person in a complicated world. "Together In This Groove" is a disco song that celebrates the oneness of people when they dance. Lyrically trite and awkward, the song is nevertheless delicious dance pop. "Common Splendor" is a joyous exploration of the togetherness of family where people love you no matter what. Feldiken highlight the human imperfect of individual members as a component of the perfect whole of the group. A gentle Celtic flavor ties this together with fiddle on top. It's a brilliant tune. "Everybody Loves You" is a brief, pretty transition into "Everything For Everyone", a catchy mid-tempo tune which plays like the idealistic worldview of an entitled mind. Feldiken closes with "The Future", looking to tomorrow an asset. Feldiken's bow reinforces the positive outlook that lay at the heart of Common Splendor, breaking it down to its simplest form.

Feldiken marks his territory in terms of love, using landmarks from the world around him to keep his bearings on Common Splendor. The EP is charming in its honesty and good-natured approach. Feldiken writes and performs with a flair that's unmistakable and projects a persona that's instantly likeable, putting the listener at ease.

Rating: 3.5 Stars (Out of 5)

Learn more about Feldiken at http://www.feldiken.com/ or www.myspace.com/feldiken. Common Splendor is available digially through Feldiken's website. CDs and Downloads are available from Amazon.com. You can also get the digital version from iTunes. - Wildy's World


"Feldiken- Common Splendor (CD)"


Wednesday, September 29,2010 New York City Indie singer/songwriter Feldiken returns with his latest EP, Common Splendor. The six-song cycle follows on the heels of Small Songs About Us. Feldiken expands his reach by digging into personal experience and infusing broader stylistic influences than in the past, from New Orleans Zydeco to Celtic kitchen party and the broad base of acoustic folk that lay in between.

Common Splendor opens with "Age Of Miracles", turning a mildly ironic comment on the state of the world into a song celebrating the joy of finding the perfect person in a complicated world. "Together In This Groove" is a disco song that celebrates the oneness of people when they dance. Lyrically trite and awkward, the song is nevertheless delicious dance pop. "Common Splendor" is a joyous exploration of the togetherness of family where people love you no matter what. Feldiken highlight the human imperfect of individual members as a component of the perfect whole of the group. A gentle Celtic flavor ties this together with fiddle on top. It's a brilliant tune. "Everybody Loves You" is a brief, pretty transition into "Everything For Everyone", a catchy mid-tempo tune which plays like the idealistic worldview of an entitled mind. Feldiken closes with "The Future", looking to tomorrow an asset. Feldiken's bow reinforces the positive outlook that lay at the heart of Common Splendor, breaking it down to its simplest form.

Feldiken marks his territory in terms of love, using landmarks from the world around him to keep his bearings on Common Splendor. The EP is charming in its honesty and good-natured approach. Feldiken writes and performs with a flair that's unmistakable and projects a persona that's instantly likeable, putting the listener at ease.

Rating: 3.5 Stars (Out of 5)

Learn more about Feldiken at http://www.feldiken.com/ or www.myspace.com/feldiken. Common Splendor is available digially through Feldiken's website. CDs and Downloads are available from Amazon.com. You can also get the digital version from iTunes. - Wildy's World


"Feldiken- Common Splendor (CD)"

“Age of Miracles”, the first track off of “Common Splendor”, is a fun little bit of alternative rock. Feldiken create a special musical style that takes up equal parts They Might Be Giants and Ben Folds, all while keeping their unique sound present. “Age of Miracles” has each element of the band working perfectly together, whether it be the vocals, splashy drums, synthesizer, or guitar. “Together In This Groove” changes things up considerably, with the inclusion of ambient synthesizers and a bass groove that is absolutely sick. While bits and pieces of this track feel pulled out of the sevfenties or early eighties, the Death Cab-sounding vocals here ensure that this track firmly resides in the here and now. With a college radio-ready single under their belt, Feldiken come forth with the titular EP track.

“Common Splendor” takes listeners out to a folksy, alt-country (and violin-lead) groove. Coming back to the They Might Be Giants well, marrying it to the aforementioned Uncle Tupelo / Defiance, Ohio instrumental amalgam, Feldiken keep flying high. While “Everybody Loves You” is the shortest track on “Common Splendor”, Feldiken is able to cram it full with the most honest and earnest emotion that they can. The tender arrangements tie together both normal and falsetto-level vocals, while a narrative is weaved between the darker and lighter side of the instrumentation here.

“The Future” is the final track on “Common Splendor”, beginning with an absolutely sizzling guitar line that matches in quality anything strung together by a Stevie Ray Vaughan or Santana. Far from the work of either of those artists, “The Future” is futuristic in terms of the mélange of different styles, sounds, and approaches that Feldiken insert. More than that, the eclectic style of “The Future” bodes well for the band, as listeners will have absolutely no clue where exactly the band will go on their next release. The one thing that fans will know after listening to this work is that Feldiken will never disappoint.

Top Tracks: Age of Miracles, Together in this Groove

Rating: 8.6/10
Posted by James McQuiston on August 18th, 2010 No Comments Printer-Friendly
Feldiken – Common Splendor / 2010 Self / 6 Tracks / www.feldiken.com - Neufuture


"Feldiken- Common Splendor (CD)"

“Age of Miracles”, the first track off of “Common Splendor”, is a fun little bit of alternative rock. Feldiken create a special musical style that takes up equal parts They Might Be Giants and Ben Folds, all while keeping their unique sound present. “Age of Miracles” has each element of the band working perfectly together, whether it be the vocals, splashy drums, synthesizer, or guitar. “Together In This Groove” changes things up considerably, with the inclusion of ambient synthesizers and a bass groove that is absolutely sick. While bits and pieces of this track feel pulled out of the sevfenties or early eighties, the Death Cab-sounding vocals here ensure that this track firmly resides in the here and now. With a college radio-ready single under their belt, Feldiken come forth with the titular EP track.

“Common Splendor” takes listeners out to a folksy, alt-country (and violin-lead) groove. Coming back to the They Might Be Giants well, marrying it to the aforementioned Uncle Tupelo / Defiance, Ohio instrumental amalgam, Feldiken keep flying high. While “Everybody Loves You” is the shortest track on “Common Splendor”, Feldiken is able to cram it full with the most honest and earnest emotion that they can. The tender arrangements tie together both normal and falsetto-level vocals, while a narrative is weaved between the darker and lighter side of the instrumentation here.

“The Future” is the final track on “Common Splendor”, beginning with an absolutely sizzling guitar line that matches in quality anything strung together by a Stevie Ray Vaughan or Santana. Far from the work of either of those artists, “The Future” is futuristic in terms of the mélange of different styles, sounds, and approaches that Feldiken insert. More than that, the eclectic style of “The Future” bodes well for the band, as listeners will have absolutely no clue where exactly the band will go on their next release. The one thing that fans will know after listening to this work is that Feldiken will never disappoint.

Top Tracks: Age of Miracles, Together in this Groove

Rating: 8.6/10
Posted by James McQuiston on August 18th, 2010 No Comments Printer-Friendly
Feldiken – Common Splendor / 2010 Self / 6 Tracks / www.feldiken.com - Neufuture


"Feldiken- Common Splendor"

Delivering a wonderfully upbeat and energetic burst of pure happy vigor, this 6 song EP CD immediately wins the listener over on the irresistible basis of its utterly infectious sunny optimism alone. Fortunately, said optimism never gets too cutesy or cloying. Instead Brooklyn-based artist Feldiken manages to find a bright and better tomorrow past the gloomy present of today. It certainly helps that Feldiken possesses a very warm and reassuring voice and a real knack for pleasant and comforting lyrics. The catchy’n’funky electronic arrangements likewise hit the get-down groovy spot. Sure, we still got dismal crap like the recession and unemployment, but if you hang tight with your supportive friends things will somehow work out in the long run. A sweet and appealing little beaut.

- Jerseybeat


"Feldiken- Common Splendor"

Delivering a wonderfully upbeat and energetic burst of pure happy vigor, this 6 song EP CD immediately wins the listener over on the irresistible basis of its utterly infectious sunny optimism alone. Fortunately, said optimism never gets too cutesy or cloying. Instead Brooklyn-based artist Feldiken manages to find a bright and better tomorrow past the gloomy present of today. It certainly helps that Feldiken possesses a very warm and reassuring voice and a real knack for pleasant and comforting lyrics. The catchy’n’funky electronic arrangements likewise hit the get-down groovy spot. Sure, we still got dismal crap like the recession and unemployment, but if you hang tight with your supportive friends things will somehow work out in the long run. A sweet and appealing little beaut.

- Jerseybeat


"Common Splendor, Feldiken"


August 14, 2010 | by Skope Staff
I had the opportunity to review Feldiken’s last album for Skope titled Small Songs About Us. He made a record for “EVERYONE” as I stated then and this still stands true for the new album Common Splendor. Feldiken’s love for people in general is quite evident here as he plays the role of humanitarian extremely well. It’s worth mentioning that on Small Songs About Us, I referred to his debut as a “fam-favorite Kids album” due to the children-friendly tone and youthful spirit the album conveyed. On Common Splendor, Feldiken still has something for everyone but instead of kiddie-friendly tunes, you’re hearing a celebration of music for ALL the people of the world.
The singer/songwriter from Brooklyn offers up something special here with his new 6-track EP. Feldiken’s wife, who used to be a television producer, now shoots his videos with him. Additionally, his band is made of friends he’s known for years including Pete Archer on bass & Lou Lacobelli on drums. This closeness factor that Feldiken has with his wife and his bandmates carries over into the overall sound. Common Splendor is designed to bring each and every person together through feel-good music.
What I loved most about this recording is how Feldiken mixes up styles and tempos in stellar fashion. The EP starts up with a song titled “Age of Miracles” that offers a unique conversational/narrative vocal tone that is actually pretty cool. You can tell Feldiken & company are just havin’ fun here and I’m also hearing much better singing this time around. Next up is “Together in This Groove” that supplies a contagious dance groove that is highly enjoyable to listen to. On the title track “Common Splendor”, Feldiken goes back to that famous kids tone with an innocent-sounding approach heard loud & clear. On track four, “Everybody Loves You”, you’re witnessing an intimate & wonderful little folk number that Feldiken truly brings to life. Through solid acoustic guitar work and a crisp & soft vocal delivery, Feldiken has tapped into something incredible here. Artistry & musicianship at its finest here as Feldiken gives you a memorable & delicate performance. Song five, “Everything for Everyone” is just that as ALL instruments & musicians come alive through great melodies and top-notch playing. I actually caught myself singing along to this one because the song is extremely catchy.
I’d like to leave you with a famous quote you might have heard a time or two that has major significance to Feldiken’s own message: “—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from earth”. That line of course comes from the Gettysburg Address spoken by President Abraham Lincoln. These words really ring loud in my ears today because a certain BIG “government of the people, by the people, for the people” is no more. However, Feldiken does everything in his power to write songs that can relate with one another on all levels. This Brooklyn native is making music that is “of the people, by the people, ‘and most importantly’ for the people” as he attempts to make a lasting impression on you. At least somebody gets it and is using their skills/talents for the good of mankind; you the man Feldiken! For more on this artist and his new release Common Splendor, SKOPE out www.myspace.com/feldiken.
By Jimmy Rae (jrae@skopemag.com)
rating 4.5 skopes,
(2 Full Skopes higher than the previous album—way to go!)

- Skope Magazine


"Common Splendor, Feldiken"


August 14, 2010 | by Skope Staff
I had the opportunity to review Feldiken’s last album for Skope titled Small Songs About Us. He made a record for “EVERYONE” as I stated then and this still stands true for the new album Common Splendor. Feldiken’s love for people in general is quite evident here as he plays the role of humanitarian extremely well. It’s worth mentioning that on Small Songs About Us, I referred to his debut as a “fam-favorite Kids album” due to the children-friendly tone and youthful spirit the album conveyed. On Common Splendor, Feldiken still has something for everyone but instead of kiddie-friendly tunes, you’re hearing a celebration of music for ALL the people of the world.
The singer/songwriter from Brooklyn offers up something special here with his new 6-track EP. Feldiken’s wife, who used to be a television producer, now shoots his videos with him. Additionally, his band is made of friends he’s known for years including Pete Archer on bass & Lou Lacobelli on drums. This closeness factor that Feldiken has with his wife and his bandmates carries over into the overall sound. Common Splendor is designed to bring each and every person together through feel-good music.
What I loved most about this recording is how Feldiken mixes up styles and tempos in stellar fashion. The EP starts up with a song titled “Age of Miracles” that offers a unique conversational/narrative vocal tone that is actually pretty cool. You can tell Feldiken & company are just havin’ fun here and I’m also hearing much better singing this time around. Next up is “Together in This Groove” that supplies a contagious dance groove that is highly enjoyable to listen to. On the title track “Common Splendor”, Feldiken goes back to that famous kids tone with an innocent-sounding approach heard loud & clear. On track four, “Everybody Loves You”, you’re witnessing an intimate & wonderful little folk number that Feldiken truly brings to life. Through solid acoustic guitar work and a crisp & soft vocal delivery, Feldiken has tapped into something incredible here. Artistry & musicianship at its finest here as Feldiken gives you a memorable & delicate performance. Song five, “Everything for Everyone” is just that as ALL instruments & musicians come alive through great melodies and top-notch playing. I actually caught myself singing along to this one because the song is extremely catchy.
I’d like to leave you with a famous quote you might have heard a time or two that has major significance to Feldiken’s own message: “—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from earth”. That line of course comes from the Gettysburg Address spoken by President Abraham Lincoln. These words really ring loud in my ears today because a certain BIG “government of the people, by the people, for the people” is no more. However, Feldiken does everything in his power to write songs that can relate with one another on all levels. This Brooklyn native is making music that is “of the people, by the people, ‘and most importantly’ for the people” as he attempts to make a lasting impression on you. At least somebody gets it and is using their skills/talents for the good of mankind; you the man Feldiken! For more on this artist and his new release Common Splendor, SKOPE out www.myspace.com/feldiken.
By Jimmy Rae (jrae@skopemag.com)
rating 4.5 skopes,
(2 Full Skopes higher than the previous album—way to go!)

- Skope Magazine


"Singer Songwriter Feldiken draws from simplicity, surprisingly big vibes."

Feldiken grows on a listener. He’s not outright flashy, or buried in poetic flavor. His simple song arrangements and conversational lyrics on Small Songs About Us paint the picture of a warm evening. Windows are open. The neighbor across the way is playing tunes on his guitar.

He, Feldiken that is, could be any man in any apartment jotting down journal entries and putting to song uncomplicated melodies. Still, his unexpected collections of true independent music hold strong throughout the 10 tracks.

New Jersey Native
According to Feldiken’s official biography, the New Jersey-born musician used the finished Small Songs About Us product as guest fanfare at his own wedding. He’d been performing the pieces throughout Brooklyn – in places like The Living Room and even an artist flea market event in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg area.


Drawing from Experiences
These experiences must have been valuable people watching, and lyric research for a man that draws from every day sights and sounds for his work. In “Like a Flower” his singing is conversational. This song is exceptional story telling. His lyrics – cultivate the world of relationships.

Zydeco Fun
“Living Together” is a warm selection featuring a surprising zydeco. Feldiken takes the listener to this couple – like a voyeur in a fun New Orleans- town. It’s as if the listener can picture this normal, every-day couple dancing around the dinner table, having a typical day. The end of the song has a quirky end – where at one point he sings “no, let’s keep going.”

The zydeco and accordion splendor returns in “Never Really Knew.” A silly “sha la, la,” sing-along refrain carries the listener steadily. While it sounds lighthearted and summer-fresh, this would be a great party song. The final track, “Rockin’ All the Way” turns in another tight zydeco, drum and guitar orchestration. This song has a fun jam written all over it.


Alternative Rock Piece
“This Bridge Won’t Burn” is the most alternative rock sounding song. A muffled guitar carries throughout in a modern, but unique way. Again, Feldiken manages to bring to light, an easily envisioned relationship.

“When I Trust Myself “ has a solid piano bed. It means well, this song. However, it gets a tad bit whiney. It can get a bit sappy – much the same as The Counting Crows’ “A Long December.”

Best Song
“Not Like Clockwork” is this album’s best song. Listeners will love the beat – the bass work is tight. This song reminds this writer the song and especially the pace and movement of Minneapolis’ Semisonic (“Closing Time,” “Singing In My Sleep”).

There’s something Square Pegs about this CD. Remember that show? They were pretty dorky, but the viewer still wanted to be friends with them because they were so weird, they were cool. Still they were good, clean fun. People that listen to The Gin Blossoms, Better Than Ezra, The Swell Season, REM, Daniel Powter, The Counting Crows, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers and The Loving Spoonful (“What a Day For a Daydream”) should check out Feldiken's Small Songs About Us.

Copyright Melissa Kucirek. Contact the auth


Read more at Suite101: CD Review: Small Songs About Us: Indie Music's Feldiken http://www.suite101.com/content/cd-review-small-songs-about-us-a211806#ixzz16tizgKNi - Suite 101


"Singer Songwriter Feldiken draws from simplicity, surprisingly big vibes."

Feldiken grows on a listener. He’s not outright flashy, or buried in poetic flavor. His simple song arrangements and conversational lyrics on Small Songs About Us paint the picture of a warm evening. Windows are open. The neighbor across the way is playing tunes on his guitar.

He, Feldiken that is, could be any man in any apartment jotting down journal entries and putting to song uncomplicated melodies. Still, his unexpected collections of true independent music hold strong throughout the 10 tracks.

New Jersey Native
According to Feldiken’s official biography, the New Jersey-born musician used the finished Small Songs About Us product as guest fanfare at his own wedding. He’d been performing the pieces throughout Brooklyn – in places like The Living Room and even an artist flea market event in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg area.


Drawing from Experiences
These experiences must have been valuable people watching, and lyric research for a man that draws from every day sights and sounds for his work. In “Like a Flower” his singing is conversational. This song is exceptional story telling. His lyrics – cultivate the world of relationships.

Zydeco Fun
“Living Together” is a warm selection featuring a surprising zydeco. Feldiken takes the listener to this couple – like a voyeur in a fun New Orleans- town. It’s as if the listener can picture this normal, every-day couple dancing around the dinner table, having a typical day. The end of the song has a quirky end – where at one point he sings “no, let’s keep going.”

The zydeco and accordion splendor returns in “Never Really Knew.” A silly “sha la, la,” sing-along refrain carries the listener steadily. While it sounds lighthearted and summer-fresh, this would be a great party song. The final track, “Rockin’ All the Way” turns in another tight zydeco, drum and guitar orchestration. This song has a fun jam written all over it.


Alternative Rock Piece
“This Bridge Won’t Burn” is the most alternative rock sounding song. A muffled guitar carries throughout in a modern, but unique way. Again, Feldiken manages to bring to light, an easily envisioned relationship.

“When I Trust Myself “ has a solid piano bed. It means well, this song. However, it gets a tad bit whiney. It can get a bit sappy – much the same as The Counting Crows’ “A Long December.”

Best Song
“Not Like Clockwork” is this album’s best song. Listeners will love the beat – the bass work is tight. This song reminds this writer the song and especially the pace and movement of Minneapolis’ Semisonic (“Closing Time,” “Singing In My Sleep”).

There’s something Square Pegs about this CD. Remember that show? They were pretty dorky, but the viewer still wanted to be friends with them because they were so weird, they were cool. Still they were good, clean fun. People that listen to The Gin Blossoms, Better Than Ezra, The Swell Season, REM, Daniel Powter, The Counting Crows, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers and The Loving Spoonful (“What a Day For a Daydream”) should check out Feldiken's Small Songs About Us.

Copyright Melissa Kucirek. Contact the auth


Read more at Suite101: CD Review: Small Songs About Us: Indie Music's Feldiken http://www.suite101.com/content/cd-review-small-songs-about-us-a211806#ixzz16tizgKNi - Suite 101


"Small Songs About Us - Feldiken"

‘Small Songs About Us’ is an album full of chirpy indie pop. But if you don’t want the ending ruined, look away now – it’s also intelligent, universal and personal all at once, and is based around human relationships, some romantic, some not, but all interesting. Oh, and it was debuted at Feldiken’s wedding. Yes, his own wedding.

Now, needless to say I wasn’t at his wedding – the ten-track compilation is now being more widely distributed by iTunes and I’m glad it is. It’s a wonderfully bouncy and charming little collection – folky, nicely instrumented, very easy listening. ‘This Bridge Won’t Burn’ is a lovely tuneful excursion – taking us through a basic but intimate story. Some of the simple-but-effective lyrics make you sit back in your chair and think “I’ve been there. I really have.” It’s not particularly different – standardly arranged, nicely produced and a little dance-y, and it almost makes me wonder what Feldikin could do with the vagaries of human emotion if he really, REALLY tried. All the same, it’s a nice record.

That’s the key to ‘Small Songs About Us’ – We’ve all been there and felt the things Feldiken describes. Instead of taking us through an imaginative, perfect or dysfunctional love story he simply takes us on a blow-by-blow account of our own lives, the daily bread of people-watching and human interaction. The record has two main facets – the first, obviously, being able to shove it on at a summer BBQ and have the guest think “Oh, this is nice” while sipping their drinks and drifting in and out of conversation. The other demands a lot more attention, but is just as valid – it can be a very psychological record. If ever something would stop you in your tracks and cause you to re-evaluate what you’ve just said to a friend or partner, or even a stranger, I’d like to think Feldiken would do it.

- Music with an Exclamation Point


"Small Songs About Us - Feldiken"

‘Small Songs About Us’ is an album full of chirpy indie pop. But if you don’t want the ending ruined, look away now – it’s also intelligent, universal and personal all at once, and is based around human relationships, some romantic, some not, but all interesting. Oh, and it was debuted at Feldiken’s wedding. Yes, his own wedding.

Now, needless to say I wasn’t at his wedding – the ten-track compilation is now being more widely distributed by iTunes and I’m glad it is. It’s a wonderfully bouncy and charming little collection – folky, nicely instrumented, very easy listening. ‘This Bridge Won’t Burn’ is a lovely tuneful excursion – taking us through a basic but intimate story. Some of the simple-but-effective lyrics make you sit back in your chair and think “I’ve been there. I really have.” It’s not particularly different – standardly arranged, nicely produced and a little dance-y, and it almost makes me wonder what Feldikin could do with the vagaries of human emotion if he really, REALLY tried. All the same, it’s a nice record.

That’s the key to ‘Small Songs About Us’ – We’ve all been there and felt the things Feldiken describes. Instead of taking us through an imaginative, perfect or dysfunctional love story he simply takes us on a blow-by-blow account of our own lives, the daily bread of people-watching and human interaction. The record has two main facets – the first, obviously, being able to shove it on at a summer BBQ and have the guest think “Oh, this is nice” while sipping their drinks and drifting in and out of conversation. The other demands a lot more attention, but is just as valid – it can be a very psychological record. If ever something would stop you in your tracks and cause you to re-evaluate what you’ve just said to a friend or partner, or even a stranger, I’d like to think Feldiken would do it.

- Music with an Exclamation Point


Discography

Feldiken made "Small Songs About Us," an album of songs about relationships that he debuted as a gift at his wedding summer 2009. Once released widely the album garnered rave reviews and over a thousand fans on Jango radio. (See press section.)

In 2010 he and his band released the EP "Common Splendor" to more acclaim. It contained his first dance track, "Together in this Groove," and songs about people's connection and power.

For 2011-12 Feldiken is working on "Make it Play" his first album of children's/family music. He is collaborating with his circle of musicians, educators, family music artists, and some of the children he's played for in NYC.

Photos

Bio

Ken Feldman got the name Feldiken when he played with words as a child, making up songs with his family and friends. Now his band of the same name (with bassist Peter Archer and drummer Lou Lacabelli) blend honesty and humor with a rootsy pop sensibility. He has played multiple venues in NYC, both solo and with others, in many projects through the years, including Sidewalk Zydeco with whom he has toured the east coast (Boston/Philly/DC) and the festival circuit. He has also played extensively for children, in the NYC school system, young people's concerts in Brooklyn, and spontaneously at markets and public spaces.

Known for wordplay and youthful perspective, Feldiken's music is catchy and wise.