Fever Marlene
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Fever Marlene

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States | INDIE

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States | INDIE
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"Fever Marlene Finally Unleashes "Civil War""

They say that bad luck comes in threes, and, for a time, the superstition seemed to be manifest for Fever Marlene. Over the course of three years, three zip codes and three complete artistic overhauls, the band was still without an album.

But after settling in Milwaukee after stints in L.A. and Chicago, things started to come together for Scott Starr and Kevin Dunphy -- two musicians who, if you asked them now, might be more prone to saying that the third time's the charm. Converting a huge South Side loft into a space to live, rehearse and record, Fever Marlene has harnessed the power of three into something tangible -- its colorfully spry debut album, "Civil War," set for official release Friday, June 8, at the Historic Turner Ballroom.

Unafraid to tease the goods, the duo has spent the two years since its Milwaukee arrival playing shows to anxious audiences. Needless to say, the buildup to the release of "Civil War" has been nothing if not hyped, both by the media and fans.

"We didn't want to wait to release the album on a label since we love the way it sounds, and we'd rather not change a thing about it -- so we started our own label (Rev Pop) and released it," says Starr. "A lot of people are using the word 'finally.'"

Despite its name, "Civil War" is anything but divided. Although the influences are across the board -- the Brit-pop nods are obvious and abundant, but are also cautiously and creatively layered between morsels of mod and clashes of classic rock -- the musical marriage produces a flavor of rock that feels familiar and fun while still maintaining a certain sense of intrigue.

While album opener "Red Fire" spits the essence of rock 'n' roll at you via aggressive guitar shreds and attitude, other songs -- like "Something's Going to Carry You Down" -- haunt with plinking piano, echoed vocals and reverb. Still, there's something audibly cohesive about total package.

"Some of the songs on the record have parts that we laid down two years ago," says Starr. "Some of those same songs have sections we dubbed over only a month before the release. So the sounds really took shape over that period of time. We struggled in the beginning to figure out who we were and how our sound was going to be perceived. Being a two-piece provides very little movement, musically speaking. After all the hours in the studio and really bad shows, we learned a lot and in the process, keyed in on what our roles are and our limits as a band."

Limitations aside, the duo has no plans to open up the band to more members as it showcases with a slew of major labels this summer. For now, Starr and Dunphy (Don't they have the perfect names for rock?) are just happy to share their songs and are spending time reflecting on everything its taken to get "Civil War" off the ground.

"We listened to a lot of music, read a lot of books, and spent our time experimenting and writing a ton of music," Starr says of the final album push. "I don't think we would hesitate to do it all over again."

And hopefully they won't. Meanwhile, we can enjoy the fruits of Fever Marlene's current labor. The band plays live on 88Nine Radio Milwaukee at 5 p.m. before taking the stage at the Historic Turner Ballroom at 9 p.m. Yield Bar hosts the pre- and post-parties, as well as free rides to the show. - By Julie Lawrence - On Milwaukee


"Milwaukee's Good Fortune"

If Milwaukee ever launched a P.R. effort to lure more bands to the city, no band would make a better poster child for the campaign than Fever Marlene, the alt-rock duo that relocated to Milwaukee from Chicago in 2006.

"It's just so affordable here," explains singer Scott Starr. "We found a real cheap studio loft here that we could build a studio in, and still afford to play Chicago, Minneapolis and Madison whenever we wanted, or to go out to Los Angeles or New York whenever we needed to, because we were saving so much money."

But low overhead isn't the only comfort the duo of Starr and drummer Kevin Dunphy has enjoyed. The group arrived during a transformative period of renewed interest in the city's music scene, and more than any other act, they've been the biggest beneficiaries of Milwaukee's newfound support system for local music.

It began when the city's venerable alternative station, FM 102.1, having re-branded itself to play up its independence from Clear Channel-owned modern-rock stations, championed Fever Marlene with then unheard-of (at least for a local band) regular radio play of the band's debut single.

"[DJ Brian] Kramp was playing an unmastered version of 'Red Fire' before our CD had even come out," Starr recalls.

Around the same time, WYMS 88.9 had relaunched behind an eclectic format heavy on Milwaukee music, and the station selected Fever Marlene as an early symbol of its commitment to local artists, not only airing the band's tunes, but also trumpeting the group through in-house spots for the station.
And shortly after, the Pabst Theater Foundation began booking concerts at the Turner Hall Ballroom, with the explicit promise that Milwaukee musicians would have a strong presence at the repurposed venue. As one of a handful of local acts with enough draw to play the cavernous ballroom, Fever Marlene have become staples at the venue.

To be sure, though, while the group has thrived because of opportunities that weren't available to Milwaukee musicians just a half-decade ago, Fever Marlene have earned their success, writing sticky dream-pop singles that take on a strident, punk-rock edge, courtesy of Starr's adenoidal sneer, and marketing themselves with a proficiency few local peers can match (Starr runs an advertising firm, and deftly handles all of the band's graphics, videos and Web material himself; the group even screen-prints its own T-shirts).

They've also proven unusually prolific. This week they'll release their third album in less than three years, a live disc called Febrile State that they recorded this fall, fittingly, at the Turner Hall Ballroom, during a show that paired them with a slew of guests from the Milwaukee music scene, including The Cocksmiths' Joey Carini, Northern Room's Andrew Jonathan and On a Sun's John McWilliam.

"It was a one-time-only concert," Starr says. "We rehearsed with those guys for probably a month as they learned all our songs and some new ones, so we felt like we needed to put it on tape and capture the moment, since we've never played with such a big band before-it's usually just the two of us. Our producer [Jack LeTourneau] recorded it, so the album is just this big rock 'n' roll record that sounds like a studio album only with this wild audience; it's great."

Fever Marlene return to the Turner Hall Ballroom for a CD release show Saturday, May 16, at 7:30 p.m. with The Melismatics and Slo-Fi. - Shepherd Express


"Milwaukee Radio Embraces Fever Marlene"

As much as some Milwaukee radio stations boast about supporting local music, it's still almost unheard of for a local band to receive regular airtime, especially on commercial stations. Even FM 102.1, the city's alternative rock station, restricts Milwaukee bands from cross-pollinating with the national acts that make up the bulk of their playlist, relegating them instead to just a few goodwill segments that permit local music.

FM 102.1 made a rare exception, however, for Fever Marlene, the first Milwaukee group they've given regular rotation to since re-branding themselves as an "independent alternative" station a year ago. To the station's credit, they play Fever Marlene's "Red Fire" without aggrandizing their efforts to support a Milwaukee band. They just slip the track into the playlist between, say, a classic Nine Inch Nails cut and the new Fall Out Boy single. Striking a stylish balance between the cool composure of '80s British groups like the Stone Roses and the Jesus and Mary Chain and the visceral immediacy of the White Stripes, "Red Fire" could easily fool listeners into assuming Fever Marlene are the latest Spin-approved big thing out of New York, not a local duo still courting record labels.

Two noncommercial stations, 88.9 and 91.7, have also rallied for the group, and all the airtime has helped them amass an impressive following for a relatively green local band. While other local acts host their CD release parties in small clubs, supported by other acts, Fever Marlene will headline their own CD release party at the spacious Turner Hall on Friday, June 8, sans openers (although guest musicians, including members of The Gufs and Northern Room, will join them on stage). Doors open at 9 p.m. The group's debut album, Civil War—a record filled with affable, Big Star-esque power-pop, often with a tender, electronic ambiance that "Red Fire" doesn't hint at—will also be available at Atomic Records, Exclusive Records and www.fevermarlene.com. - By Evan Rytlewski - Shepherd Express


"Maximum Ink"

Bubbling with a feverish energy layered in melodies, beats, and laid back rock and roll, Milwaukee band FEVER MARLENE ambitiously unearth the limits of where they can take their sound. From a big pop-rock debut to a minimalistic approach and now entering raw rock and roll territory, singer/guitarist Scott Starr and drummer Kevin Dunphy let the situation dictate where their band’s music goes.

“It’s important with us being a two-piece to not put ourselves in a corner with what we can do,” says Starr. “We can’t force something that’s not really there.”

With this mentality, Fever Marlene has rapidly grown in popularity in their hometown and the Midwest music scene, constantly adding fans, bands (both local and national), and media memorized by how they create such big sound with only two members. Brian Kramp, morning show co-host on FM 102.1 in Milwaukee, is just one of these people.

“Their mix of vocal harmonies, visual lyrics and dual instrumentation give them a full sound that many four or even five piece bands have a hard time achieving,” Kramp says. “I look forward to their shows because they create an event. It’s not just another gig; they always want to one up themselves.”

Dejan Kralj, bass player from fellow Milwaukee band The Gufs, shares Kramp’s opinion. Fever Marlene provides an exciting sound that’s one of a kind, he said.

“People think of bands like the White Stripes and Black Keys with 2 piece bands but you don’t get that sense because there are a lot of layers and textures that they pull off, even live. They sound much bigger than a guitar and drummer,” Kralj says. ”You could fit them in a couple of different genres but at the end of the day they’ve created quite a unique sound.”

The key to their secret? Moog Taurus pedals. Similar to a Hammond organ bass pedals and featuring a synth bass sound that fills the low end and empty space, these pedals help the band give the illusion of having more members.

“I had these pedals that I had used for playing piano and I used to plug them right into my organ. So when we practiced and didn’t have a bass player I would take these pedals and play bass with my feet while we played to fill the sound,” Starr says. “After a little while of experimenting, we found it was actually kind of cool so we’ve kept it that way.”

After learning how to play bass with his feet, sing, and play guitar, Starr says that he now feels “that when I’m not doing it that I should be.” Not able to find new members that fit their system, the 2-piece stuck. That’s alright, Starr says, since he and Dunphy are on the same page musically.
“Playing live and working in the studio is not work, it’s kind of like good times and we know each other so well that we play off each other instantly,” Starr says. “There are no fights like ‘This band’s breaking up.’ It’s kind of like a brotherhood.”

Starr formed the band in 2003 with longtime friend Dunphy at a bike shop near their campus, the University of Wisconsin. After college, the two traveled across the country searching for the right place to start making music formally. Not able to get the sound they wanted in either Los Angeles or Chicago (not to mention the kind of music scene to be part of), they scraped what they had and moved to Milwaukee.

“We moved to Milwaukee and found this huge 4000 square foot studio space and we built the studio on our own and recorded on our own,” Starr says.

With hard work and a little luck, the band caught fire within a few years. In the middle of a cold January day in 2007 their single “Red Fire” came blaring from Kramp’s FM 102.1 airwaves with its rock anthem-like beat. With the song in rotation for several months, they became the first unsigned band from Milwaukee since the Gufs to get a song played on a major station in the city. At that time getting a local band on corporate radio was a rare occurrence.

“Three years later, things have changed a bit, but let me remind you, their [debut] cd wasn’t even done being recorded and mastered and we played it,” Kramp said. “To me, that was the accomplishment they needed to get the confidence to move forward.”

Since then the band has sent four of their songs to 88NINE Radio Milwaukee. Despite not being on a major label, the band has made their work pay off with their own label, Rev Pop, and help from E Labs Multimedia in Madison.

“A lot of our friends are on big labels and they’re doing just as much as we are but we have freedom to do what we want,” Starr says. “We buy the records ourselves, we sell the records ourselves, and it’s working for now.”

The band first needed a big debut record. In order to succeed, they made sure they took their time recording, using studio time in Milwaukee and Madison. The sessions became the aptly titled “Civil War.”

“Civil War was more of a ‘let’s show everyone what we can do’ and just release a pop album that’s big and sounds great,” says Starr. “It’s a good way to start off a goo - Fever Marlene Exclusive


"Balancing Act"

A low-key cafe is the perfect venue for Fever Marlene duo Scott Starr and Kevin Dunphy to wind down and talk music after a hectic day.

Dunphy (vocals, drums, samples) and Starr (vocals, guitar, bass pedals and organs) are an unlikely pair. Starr embodies all things rock, from his tousled bed head and sunglasses crowning his head, to his simplistic take on music.

Not to say Dunphy, who's comfortable wearing a track jacket and jeans, isn't a rocker. But he prefers a German wheat beer whereas Starr is more of a gin drinking guy.

That's the dynamic that makes them interesting. Their relationship is similar to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards or Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora. As individuals, they're solid musicians. But as a pair, they create a yin-yang relationship that breeds balance.


"It works. I write the music, and then I give it to Kevin. He puts the production behind, and we have a song," Starr says as he starts his third cigarette.

Even the band's name personifies rock 'n' roll. " 'Fever Marlene' is a song we used to perform, and it's about Marlene Dietrich," Starr says.

Then, there's a pause as Dunphy and Starr exchange looks to gauge whether they should say more. Apparently, "Fever Marlene" (the song) is about more than just Marlene. It's a tale of sex, drugs and women.

"(The song) talks about bad things. But we loved the song and felt like it would be a great name for our band," Starr says.

"Besides, it's much easier to get a domain name (online), but that's not a rock thing to say," Dunphy adds.

Having transplanted themselves from Madison to Los Angeles to Chicago, Fever Marlene learned that in order to make music they love, there's no place like home.

"We have a place here (in Milwaukee) where after work we can live, breathe and eat music," Starr says.

Playing shows across the Midwest, they're ready to take their music to the next level and bring it to a wider audience.

"It would be great if everyone loved our music. But I like it. And at the end of the day, I have to be happy with the project we present to people," Starr says.

This is why their album "Civil War" took three years to complete. Not totally comfortable with the music they made in Los Angeles or Chicago, they trashed the whole project and started over.

It will be a while before the album hits stores. But if all goes well, by spring 2007, Starr and Dunphy hope to be on tour and signed to a major label.

"Right now, we're mastering the CD. Then we're going to shop it around to different labels," Starr says.

"We don't want to have two variations of the same CD floating around," Dunphy says. We'd rather wait for a label to pick up the project and then promote it." - By Kennita Hickman - MKE Magazine


"Fever Marlene Tops the Red Walls"

This is always promising to see: Fever Marlene, a slick Milwaukee alternative-rock duo with a flair for networking that suggests they have a shot at bigger things, has been booked to headline a concert at the Turner Hall Ballroom, while The Redwalls, a mediocre and perpetually over-hyped Illinois band with a major-label CD under the belt, have been booked as their openers.

Needless to say, in our humble city local acts usually defer to national openers, so this is an encouraging change of pace. Without reading too much into this, though, it's difficult to tell whether it speaks to the rising fortunes of Fever Marlene or the falling stock in The Redwalls, who were dropped from Capitol Records last year. I can't say I pity them, though: Their Strokes-ified take on ultra-safe Beatles Brit-pop always rubbed me the wrong way. Fever Marlene, on the other hand, I wish the best of luck to. The show will be there CD release for their new album, White China.

For more information on the March 7 concert, see the Turner Hall Ballroom's Web site. Fever Marlene will also be headlining a concert at Shank Hall on Friday, Jan. 11. - Shepherd Express


"Fever Marlene Get Ready For Their Big Debut"

Sometimes you just have to know when to call it a night, and when you suspect your equipment may be on fire is usually that moment. Fever Marlene were only part way through their set opening for the Gufs at the High Noon Saloon on Thursday when guitarist/vocalist Scott Starr's guitar began acting up.

Despite the duo's attempts to remedy the problem, and to lighten the situation -- "It's a power problem" Starr asserted, "A higher power?" drummer/vocalist Kevin Dunphy questioned -- once they saw the smoke curling out of the amp they rightly surrendered.

Fever Marlene get their puzzling moniker from the first song they ever wrote together, even before they were a band. "It's about wanting something even though you know it is bad for you," Starr explained to me after their tragically shortened set. Even though the fictional Marlene may be trouble, everything about her namesake is good.

Dunphy's angelic backing vocals and Starr's Richard Butler-esque lead make for a pretty irresistible pairing. They just finished recording their debut Civil War at E Lab Studios here in Madison and hope to be celebrating their CD release the next time they are in town (April 19 at the Orpheum with Cloud Cult).

Let's hope so, because after seeing them tonight I want those songs now. "Some Saturdays" features a bouncy tune and an irresistible chorus. "She's living on the sun/ She says I'm not the one" they repeat over and over. "When Daniel Goodings Made it Rain" could have come from a happier Psychedelic Furs if they had believed in the power of the "oooh oooh" backing vocal.

Headliner the Gufs seemed poised to be the next big thing for a number of years, even signing with Atlantic Records. After their second major label album Holiday from You fared poorly, they asked to be released from their contract. The hiatus that followed, in addition to a solo record from lead singer Goran Kralj, made it appear the band was done.

A Different Sea came out last year, and it did inject some new life into a set that hasn't changed much since I last saw them at Summerfest sometime back in the '90s. But for the most part, I felt like I could have been standing precariously on a picnic table in Milwaukee. The bulk of the songs are still drawn from just two of the band's releases, Collide and Holiday. They still inject a verse of the Police's "Walking in your Footsteps" into their own "Listen to the Trees." And they still encore with the closest thing they ever had to a hit, the admittedly catchy "Smile."

In fact, sometimes I wondered why they are still doing it, and thought maybe they don't know when to call it a night. And that's when I looked around. I was the only person not singing along to every word of every song. And maybe, even though they were playing for just a hundred people instead of thousands, that's enough. - By Kiki Schueler - The Isthmus


"I've Got a Fever!"

So every time this year, I always get a bit depressed because I'm never able to make it down to SXSW for whatever reason (money, timing, etc). On a whim and a friend's suggestion we ended up at Cafe Montmartre to check out Fever Marlene, a band I knew I had seen (somewhere) before and had thought highly of (I thought I had seen them at momo before, maybe a year ago. I was at their recent Majestic show to shoot the Box Social and didn't actually catch them).

It was worth the $8 cover (I didn't pay) to see them. Their drummer sat down across from me during their set break. I told him that they did more with two people than most bands do with 4 or 5. I also told him his jokes were better than the guitarist's. That they cut through his pretention (his joke was about the guy's puffy hair). I warned him that I thought something would be lost in the translation to larger rooms. He said they do a different sort of a set altogether for big rooms.

These guys deserve bigger rooms, and after playing the Madison-Milwaukee-Chicago circuit for a good 2 years or more, they're seemingly getting there.

But a warning to that lovely drummer I spoke with: your act's (a bit) pretentious. and you leave your dancers hanging on the dance floor when you change up your beats like you do so often with such little reason. But you've got the goods, sir. You're talented and making compelling music worth listening to... But you're good midwesterners, hailing from Chicago and inhabiting Milwaukee. I wanted to smack you guys every time you RE-mentioned that you had recorded your new album in your room at the Chelsea Hotel in New York City. Enough already! We get it! Let us discover the open bathroom window emanating with the sounds of the city on your bathroom track. It's neat that you told the room, but by then it was far too late in the game to turn it into a successful album sales pitch.

So Fever Marlene, you left me burning hot, but sadly, a bit dizzy. Reign in the attitude, stick to your genuine nature and you'll do well for yourselves.

The crowd was definitely a mix of devoted followers and casual listeners, but I believe you won the room. Hell, and Beth Wick appeared out of wherever she's been post-graduation (Chicago?) to come cheer you on... the cool kids know about you. Now you have to give them a compelling reason to rave about you. You're almost there, but don't lose sight of the prize and take your eye off the ball... which I think you might be, Mssrs. "Chelsea Hotel".

Game on! You can bring it. Tighten the act and make me want to rave about you. - Riot In The City


"Third Coast Digest"

Milwaukee’s Fever Marlene have a serious work ethic – they’ve unflaggingly made their presence known since taking up residence in their Historic Fifth Ward creative/living space, absorbing the industriousness of their neighborhood. Scott Starr (guitars, keys, vocals) and Kevin Dunphy (drums, vocals), a duo whose sound is more fleshed out than many a four- or five-piece can claim, received solid praise for their 2007 release Civil War, and their songs spin through the airwaves of local radio stations not just because they’re “Milwaukee music,” but because their music is that good.

With White China, Starr and Dunphy are striding it out after a run of successful previous releases. Recorded in the infamous Chelsea Hotel in New York City, Fever Marlene have returned home to release it on their very own Rev Pop label.

Dense with pianos, synthesizers, strings and various percussion and held together by Starr’s expressive tenor and Dunphy’s lovely shadow-harmonies, White China shows that the band is comfortable enough to make slight alterations, but clever enough to stick to the formula. On “Oh Berlin,” the piano intro sets an echo-y Motown backbeat, but when brassy guitar chords and Starr’s soft voice kick in, the effect is anything but dated. The sincerity of the songs lies in the vocals and lyrics, and the instrumentation follows suit by default.

The upbeat “Lemon King Mahoney” and country-tinged “How Do You Love?” are diversions from the duo’s blanket of rainy-day pop. “Check for Pulse” gets closer with its looped beats and distantly drawled-out guitars – the only thing missing is the hushed sound of raindrops. White China is not Fever Marlene’s pluckiest album, but it is solidly pretty and genuinely enjoyable. Starr and Dunphy have proven that they are more than capable of the songsmith careers they have chosen. - Fever Marlene


"White China Review"

avid Hasselhoff is big in Germany. Indie-popsters Fever Marlene are big in their hometown of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Building off the buzz of last year's Civil War, which was released on Rev Pop Records, the band is back with the more subdued White China. So what does a band do to follow up the retro-flavored electro-indie-popness of their debut... duh, they pack up all their shit, leave town, and head to New York's storied Chelsea Hotel to spend 4 nights weaving a more intimate tapestry of songs. In comparison to the layered fullness of Civil War, White China is on the opposite sonic spectrum. The tracks on the new album are decidedly lo-fi, which makes sense considering they were recorded bare-bones style using a Mac laptop, a Pre-amp, one microphone, an acoustic guitar, a bass guitar, and a keyboard. The more stripped down approach really adds a lot of character and texture to the material. By the time you reach the middle of the album, White China is in full stride. Opening with piano and keyboard flourishes then dropping out into a delicate finger-picked guitar verse, the wonderful "Untitled (Chelsea)" is the undisputed highlight of the album. It's followed up by the equally single-worthy "How Do You Love," which is a mid-tempo jewel. While I recognized the band's talent on their debut, White China is moreso my cup of tea. Definitely a keeper. -- Capt. Obvious - Captain Obvious


"I've Got a Fever!"

So every time this year, I always get a bit depressed because I'm never able to make it down to SXSW for whatever reason (money, timing, etc). On a whim and a friend's suggestion we ended up at Cafe Montmartre to check out Fever Marlene, a band I knew I had seen (somewhere) before and had thought highly of (I thought I had seen them at momo before, maybe a year ago. I was at their recent Majestic show to shoot the Box Social and didn't actually catch them).

It was worth the $8 cover (I didn't pay) to see them. Their drummer sat down across from me during their set break. I told him that they did more with two people than most bands do with 4 or 5. I also told him his jokes were better than the guitarist's. That they cut through his pretention (his joke was about the guy's puffy hair). I warned him that I thought something would be lost in the translation to larger rooms. He said they do a different sort of a set altogether for big rooms.

These guys deserve bigger rooms, and after playing the Madison-Milwaukee-Chicago circuit for a good 2 years or more, they're seemingly getting there.

But a warning to that lovely drummer I spoke with: your act's (a bit) pretentious. and you leave your dancers hanging on the dance floor when you change up your beats like you do so often with such little reason. But you've got the goods, sir. You're talented and making compelling music worth listening to... But you're good midwesterners, hailing from Chicago and inhabiting Milwaukee. I wanted to smack you guys every time you RE-mentioned that you had recorded your new album in your room at the Chelsea Hotel in New York City. Enough already! We get it! Let us discover the open bathroom window emanating with the sounds of the city on your bathroom track. It's neat that you told the room, but by then it was far too late in the game to turn it into a successful album sales pitch.

So Fever Marlene, you left me burning hot, but sadly, a bit dizzy. Reign in the attitude, stick to your genuine nature and you'll do well for yourselves.

The crowd was definitely a mix of devoted followers and casual listeners, but I believe you won the room. Hell, and Beth Wick appeared out of wherever she's been post-graduation (Chicago?) to come cheer you on... the cool kids know about you. Now you have to give them a compelling reason to rave about you. You're almost there, but don't lose sight of the prize and take your eye off the ball... which I think you might be, Mssrs. "Chelsea Hotel".

Game on! You can bring it. Tighten the act and make me want to rave about you. - Riot In The City


Discography

Medicated Friends

Photos

Bio

Hailing from Wisconsin, Fever Marlene calls Milwaukee home. Originally a two-piece, made up of Scott Starr (vocals, guitar, bass pedals, synth) and Kevin Dunphy (vocals, drums) the band emerged into the "garage rock" revival scene in early 2003.

The two met while studying in Madison, Wis. and started rehearsing together under the name The People. After quick stints in Los Angles and Chicago, the duo moved back to Wisconsin and began recording as Fever Marlene, the name stemming from Starr's itch for vintage films and movie star Marlene Dietrich. Yet despite close to a decade of collaboration and playing alongside bands like The Flaming Lips, Alkaline Trio and Social Distortion, this release re-orientates the band and reimagines their sound with a freshly intimate approach.

In their 2013 release, "Medicated Friends," Fever Marlene demonstrates the depth a DIY indie band is able to garner under their own direction and control. Expanding to a five-piece outfit, featuring Dan Mahony (bass, guitar, vocals), Ryan Gardiner (synth, organs) and Christian Hansen (guitar, vocals), Fever Marlene writes, produces, records, mixes and masters all their own material in their self-built studio, Dirty Earth. "Medicated Friends" proves to be a rare treat-the fulfillment of the band's vision in tact and in it's entirety.

Minutes into "Medicated Friends," it's clear the band has come into their own. Simultaneously flaunting skillful maturity and youthful fervor, the band's urban energy and alternative pop sound mesh to generate understated hooks, humble melodies and intricate craft.

The album's sunny, vocal led melodies are eclectic yet to the point; supported by tight chord repetitions layered in a dense, fluid texture. A collection of ten songs, the album pulses with up-tempo songs to highlight Starr's catchy, swift vocals that taunt the sing-along and prime the long sunny car ride.