fiona joy

fiona joy

 Kendall, New South Wales, AUS
SoloPopNew Age

Australian Pianist, Producer & Singer Fiona Joy (previously Fiona Joy Hawkins) is known throughout the world for melodic songs & lush arrangements, as well as her mesmerisingly ballet-like performance style on the concert stage. A prolific composer, her song 'Grace' featured on the 2015 Grammy Winning New Age Album. Fiona, is experiencing a breakout year in 2015, with tours set for Australia, China and the USA as well as a release with Blue Coast Records who are partnered with Sony for content.

Band Press

600 Years in a Moment – Michael Diamond

CD: 600 Years In A Moment
Artist: Fiona Joy Hawkins
Contact: www.fionajoyhawkins.com.au
Album coverAlthough I haven’t met award-winning composer/pianist/vocalist Fiona Joy Hawkins in person, she feels like an old friend, with this being the fourth album of hers that I’ve had the pleasure to write about. The previous recordings include Sensual Journeys, Blue Dream, and Christmas Joy. With the press release for her latest album, 600 Years In A Moment, heralding it as “her most epic and significant album,” I was of course very much looking forward to it. And after hearing it in detail, I have to say that it definitely lives up to that lofty accolade.

Listening to a recording is somewhat akin to enjoying (hopefully) the fruits of the composer’s musical tree. In addition to focusing on the fruits, I sometimes find it fascinating to explore the seed from which the tree grew. In the case of Fiona’s new album, it has had an interesting genesis. It seems that the inspiration for this work evolved from a discussion she had about globalization. Fiona goes on to explain: “I have often wondered how globalisation affects music and how history changes our perception of instruments and the musical culture of our ancestors.” This sparked my curiosity and I felt compelled to ask her to expound on it. Here is her reply: “It inspired me to think about this in a musical sense and how the whole issue of cultures disappearing and the world becoming one big melting pot of genetics and cultures that are replaced by something more generic that represents the world as its becoming today. So after some thought I believe that our musical past is safe and sound and still vibrant. The instruments and ‘sounds’ that define each culture are still well defined and although music has its own evolution and there are always modern elements, we seem to allow history to co-exist with our modern approach because we still celebrate the various musical periods in history and the instruments of the time. I think we get a little caught up with past composers and forget to celebrate new music – I find it interesting that this has always been so, and even the composers of the past had this problem.”

I also had to ask her about the unusual title for the album, to which she replied: “600 Years in a Moment came about as the perfect title when a friend’s life was resolved in an instant after 6 years of searching. I expanded that to 600 Years (although some of my instruments are much older). She gave me the idea that things can come together in an instant as her past problems had resolved and her present and future were determined by one small moment (that I was part of).” 600 Years in a Moment was recorded using a unique contemporary piano crafted in Australia along with ancient instruments from around the world. Fiona’s concept is to bring instruments and their distinctive sounds from villages across the globe to explore the hidden musical treasures of cultures in a modern musical setting. The album is eclectic, acoustic, beautifully produced, and spans genres with influences of new age, jazz, classical, and world music. It explores time and history, bringing the past to the present, joining old with new and finding origins while looking into the future. 600 Years in a Moment is a journey from Fiona’s native Australia that travels sonically around the world with the distinctly Celtic flavour of her ancestors while combining sounds from other ancient cultures. In addition to piano, Fiona also adds vocals on the album and has often been told that she sounds like an “Australian Enya.”

“The end is the beginning…” These spoken words open the album as the title track unfolds. In a soft voice Fiona continues: “Far from the shore, the winds will whisper, 600 years and I’ll be home…” From this enigmatic entrance, the journey begins, as her haunting piano melody sets the stage with a spacious and cinematic air as strings provide subtle accompaniment. An Irish whistle adds a Celtic flavor to the mix while sparse vocals by Heather Rankin in Gaelic and English drift in and out as if in a dream. I particularly liked the interplay between the vocals and the accompanying instruments, which often come in seamlessly at the end of a phrase on the same note. A track entitled “Naked Love,” opens with a motif that bears a slight resemblance to the jazz piano classic “Take Five” by Dave Brubeck, although with a slower tempo and different vibe, before morphing into other movements. A variety of Asian instruments and Mongolian throat singing bring an international flavor to the track. In fact, as I read the liner notes I was amazed at the huge variety of exotic musical instruments from around the world, which appear throughout the album. Equally impressive is the list of accompanying musicians, which include Eugene Friesen (Paul Winter Consort) on cello, bassist Tony Levin (Paul McCartney and Peter Gabriel), Jeff Haynes (Pat Metheney) on drums and percussion, violinist Charlie Bisharat (Yanni), violinist/vocalist Rebecca Daniel (Australian Chamber Orchestra), guitarists Will Ackerman and Todd Boston, and many others. Grammy winners Will Ackerman and Corin Nelsen also shared producer’s credits with Fiona. Truly an all-star cast.

Fiona Joy HawkinsWhile just about all the songs feature diverse collections of instruments and musicians, the album does include a lovely and sensitive piano solo by Fiona entitled “Earthbound.” The sweetly introspective mood continues on “Gliding,” which opens with a piano intro leading into ensemble interplay. Reading the list of accompanists and instruments on the various songs, it might seem like the tracks could be rather busy, but everything is expertly mixed with just the right amount of subtlety to allow Fiona’s graceful piano to shine, while still providing melodic and textural support. A touch of her Australian homeland is heard in “Running On Joy,” as a didgeridoo adds its earthy ambience to this lighthearted tune. A very different part of the globe is referenced on a track called “Antarctica,” which sparkles with glacial beauty. As I neared the end of the album on an interestingly titled piece called “Captured Freedom,” I was aware of how a number of the songs begin with solo piano before being joined by other instruments. I appreciated that it provided a contrast and an opportunity to experience Fiona’s playing and melodic sensibilities on their own before flowing into a collective musical pool. One exception, however, is the final track, which opens with the haunting sound of a Chinese reed instrument called the Bawu played by Paul Jarman. The understated alchemy of this instrument and the piano evokes a Zen-like ambience and is a perfectly peaceful way to bring the album to a close.

Like her music with its global spectrum, Fiona herself is a world citizen and travels far and wide for her performances. As I write this article she has just returned from a regional tour of Australia, and is preparing to leave soon for a European tour. Fans in the US won’t have long to wait either, as she will be in America this September – November 2013. One supporter is well-known LA music publicist Beth Ann Hilton who said of Fiona: “I really appreciate that Fiona likes to push boundaries with her music, her image AND her approach to marketing. She works very hard for excellence at every level, seeking out opportunities and trying innovative tactics; she’s both talented and brave!” And speaking of innovative marketing, in addition to CD’s and downloads the album is also available in SACD and vinyl for audio connoisseurs. 600 Years In A Moment is a masterful mélange of superlative musical performance, stunning contemporary composition, and widely diversified cultural influences. Preceded by a string of award winning and critically acclaimed recordings, Fiona Joy Hawkins has outdone herself with this release and continues to set the bar ever higher in the unfolding of her creative potential.


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Fiona Joy, Signature - Solo Double SDS – Bluray-Definition

Fiona Joy: Signature-Solo DSD Music Download Review
Posted October 13th, 2014 by Lawrence D. Devoe, MD
fiona joy signature solo cover 381x338 Fiona Joy: Signature Solo DSD Music Download Review

The Album

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This is really a tale of two introductions. The first introduction was to Australian musician/composer Fiona Joy Hawkins who has carved out a very successful career as a pianist and vocalist. Fiona Joy’s musical influences include a diverse group of composers like pianist George Winston, British modernist Michael Nyman, and 19th century piano virtuoso, Frederic Chopin.

The second introduction was to Blue Coast Records, a relatively new audiophile label started by legendary audio engineer/producer/musician Cookie Marenco. Blue Coast has recently released high-resolution music downloads in the two hottest “new” formats, DSD64 and DS128.

Returning to our artist, Fiona Joy, her latest Blue Coast release, Signature-Solo, offers the ten original tracks listed below that might be labeled as “New Age” music, but Fiona Joy would probably bristle at this categorization, as the “Down Under” has not received this genre as favorably as has the United States. New Age or not, this program offers tersely titled, beautiful, contemplative yet highly evocative music:

Ceremony (3:37)
Grace (5:43)
Fair Not (4:00)
Once Upon Impossible (Solo) (6:29)
Calling Earth (3:49)
Invisible Train (3:27)
Signature (2:38)
Once Upon Impossible (Duet with Lawrence Blatt) (4:22)
From The Mist (4:55)
Little Star (4:35)
I did hear echoes of George Winston in some of the tracks like Ceremony, and reminiscences of Michael Nyman’s minimalist piano works in Fair Not but Ms. Hawkins really brings her own voice that will take listeners deep into the heart of her contemporary music. The alternative version of “Once Upon Impossible,” an ethereal voice-piano duet lets us see the other side of the artist.

You should know that Fiona Joy is also visual artist and has translated many of her musical ideas into paint and canvas, in this respect, working in the opposite direction from that of Modest Mussorgsky who set Viktor Hartmann’s paintings to music in his Pictures at an Exhibition. Listening to each of the selections in this program, you will readily hear a sound palette that is truly multicolored.

Audio Quality

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DSD files are quite large, so Blue Coast recommends a download manager like DownThemAll (a Firefox-only add-on) to get these files to your computer from the site Downloads Now! (Note: I was able to access them directly via Safari).

Having heard a number of DSD files in their native format, I have been impressed by how amply DSD mastering rewards music, provided that it was well recorded in the first place. Cookie Marenco’s E.S.E. (Extended Sound Environment) recordings at Blue Coast Music never enter the PCM digital state thereby avoiding some of pulse code modulation’s potential problems of linearity, error recovery, and clipping. In this instance, the Blue Coast folks laid down most of the tracks on 2” analog tape and mixed them to 5.6MHz DSD (“Fair Not” and “Little Star” were digitized at 2.8MHz on the Sonoma System and then mixed to 5.6 MHz DSD).

The end result is an incredibly realistic presentation of the piano, an instrument that is notoriously challenging for audio engineers due to its wide dynamic range, overtones, percussive qualities, and, for lack of a better description, sheer size. Of course, Fiona Joy does not play just a piano as she made the fortuitous discovery of Stuart & Sons, a local New South Wales piano manufacturer, whose flagship model has fourteen keys that enhance both top and bottom octaves. This 102-key piano has extended range and a proprietary device that alters the strings’ vibrations. No such technical innovations would be meaningful unless the recording team captured the piano’s intrinsic sonorities properly. Thanks to the above-mentioned E.S.E approach, Signature-Solo is not only one demonstration-quality album but one that allows us to literally see “inside” the piano itself.

All right already, which high-resolution format sounds better? As good as the DSD64 files sound (and they are mighty, mighty good), the DSD128 version is even better. To offer a commonly overused phrase, “there is simply more there, there.” The DSD128 version reveals more space, overtones, and dynamics that do justice to the piano’s sonic complexities. The best way to describe the experience of hearing this extended piano is not to laud the extra keys’ contribution, but to note how the sonic decay of the notes, enhanced by the piano’s unique vibration control, could be so clearly heard.

Supplemental Materials

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A PDF formatted photo of the cover art.

The Definitive Word

Overall:

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I have reached an age at which new recordings provide few if any epiphanies. There are increasing numbers of downloads with higher sampling rates and word lengths in the PCM domain, but these may not be the best high-resolution options for getting the most out of an analog event to the listener, and all acoustic music does begin as an analog event. As ably demonstrated by Ms. Marenco and her superb recording team, we finally get to hear some of the pent-up sonic potential of DSD for recreating the analog experience. Signature-Solo in either DSD version allows listeners to get closer to the live event, and while it may seem pricey for their 40-minute playing time (tracks can be purchased separately), think about what you paid for the last live concert that you could only attend once when you can play its near-equivalent as often as you please. Highly recommended.

Available at Blue Coast Records

600 Years in a Moment – Musikreviews.com

Artist: Fiona Joy Hawkins
Title: 600 Years in a Moment
Genre: New Age Instrumental
Label: Little Hartley Music
Release Date: 2012
Product Link: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/fionajoyhawkins12/from/muzikman
Website: http://www.fionajoyhawkins.com.au/
Source Link:
600 Years in A Moment is a foray across the world wrapped in an epic journey of global experiences. Recorded in Newcastle Australia, Los Angeles California; New York, NY, Bremen and Portland, Maine; Halifax, Canada, and Imaginary Road Studios in Vermont, this album features some heavy hitters in the New Age music community. Fiona Joy Hawkins has crafted a moving and ethereal album that explores the essence of time and history. Contributing artists include: Rebecca Daniel (Australian Chamber Orchestra), Eugene Friesen (Paul Winter Consort), Tony Levin (Paul McCartney), Jeff Haynes (Pat Metheney), Heather Rankin (Rankin Family), Marc Shulman (Suzanne Vega), Tod Boston, Paul Jarman, Michael Jackson, Phil Aaberg, Alfredo Rolando Ortiz and many others.
“Naked Love” is a swirling spiral for the senses and it captured my attention at once. Sensual and pure, like fingers tracing down your skin, the piece relaxes you and takes you beyond the mundane cares of the day. The fluttering piano at the onset of the piece is delicate, like a clockwork butterfly; finely tuned and infinitely beautiful. Multiple instruments wind and spiral out, adding a textural feeling to the experience. Wind and string instruments in particular echo in my mind, drawing me deeper into the essence of the song.
“The Journey” is the third piece on the album and begins with a slow and crepe paper thin beginning, only to wind up and unravel into a finely honed piece of musical embroidery. It is indeed a journey along the bumping and winding roads of time and history. This piece, more so than some of the others, really calls out to me as a flagship song for the album. Poignant violin and string performances tug at my heart and I could feel the essence of time slipping by; an eternity of human lives and loves encapsulated in this one song. Multi-instrumentation with modern and ancient musical instruments joins forces to craft a piece that is truly breathtaking in its majesty.
“The Lost Ballerina” is a fluid piece that begins with an enchanting piano lead in. It brings to mind a ballerina dancing, alone in a studio. About a third of the way into the song, the music explodes in flowering vines of color and texture. It brings the piece to life, like a blooming rose, at once delicate, but full of thorns as well. Hiding within the last portion of the song, a harp flutters into focus, strident and lovely, a gem in an absolutely gorgeous piece of music.
Produced by Will Ackerman, Corin Nelsen and Fiona Joy Hawkins, engineered by Corin Nelsen and Mastered by Bob Ludwig, 600 Years in a Moment is a journey that takes you through time and history. Fiona Joy Hawkins is a truly gifted musician. She is an ARIA Finalist, ZMR multiple category winner (Including Album of the Year), Music OZ Winner and current IMA Finalist just to name a few. Surrounding herself with the vast array of legendary artists for this album made it a sure success and I couldn’t agree more. This album was an eclectic and acoustic exploration of the musical history of our ancestors with modern accompaniments and ancient flavors. It combines New Age, classical and some improvisation to craft an album that will be a long standing member of my collection. I long to reach out to other recordings by Ms. Hawkins now as I am absolutely enthralled with her attention to detail and sensual reach into the human heart.
Stars 5/5
Key Tracks- The Journey, Naked Love, The Lost Ballerina
Dana Wright-Muzikreviews.com Sr. Staff
June 18, 2013
©Muzikreviews.com
For Questions or comments about this review send an email to info@muzikreviews.com

Tracks:
1. 600 Years
2. Naked Love
3. The Journey
4. Earthbound
5. Gliding
6. Tango on Wednesday
7. Running on Joy
8. Ancient Albatross
9. The Lost Ballerina
10. Antarctica
11. Captured Freedom
12. Forgiveness

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Angel Above my Piano – New Age Reporter


Angel Above my Piano by Fiona Joy Hawkins :



Steeped in classical influences and filled with flowing romantic lyricism, pianist Fiona Joy Hawkins latest CD, Angel Above My Piano conveys a variety of moods across its thirteen tracks. Hawkins plays solo or is joined by one or more guest artists on selected tracks. The music on the album wears its emotions on its sleeve yet does so without becoming saccharine or maudlin. Such sincerity is hard to resist when it's married to an artist accomplished on her instrument, as Hawkins is. Special mention should also be made of producer Bruce Wheatley who contributes on "orchestrations" and "instrumentation" (which I take to mean electronic keyboards). Wheatley has given the album a rich fullness but not at the expense of robbing Hawkins' piano of its intimate warmth and naturalness.

The haunting somberness of Crystal Desert opens the CD, with Hawkins veering from plaintive to powerful on the piece, which is also embellished perfectly by superb synthesizer effects (such as a shimmering texture) and chorals. This opening song is part of a four-part suite entitled Antarctic Interludes. The next cut, Dance of the Penguins is heavily influenced by classical music and while it has an uptempo pace, it's surprisingly not as playful as the title might portend. Flight of the Albatross paints a musical picture of the titular bird riding a gentle wind as it glides over the surface of the water. Guitarist Dieter Kleemann accompanies Hawkins on the song with some delicate work on his instrument. Together they impart an air of wistfulness. Last in the suite is the title track, a plaintive, haunting piece, again featuring excellent synth chorals/fills from Wheatley as well as violin from Rebecca Daniel and Elizabeth Cooney.

The next three tracks are also part of a suite, this one titled Opus for Love, which gives you a good idea of the tone and mood of the pieces which comprise it (inspired by the death of the artist's grandmother). There is the somber and even tragic Love in Winter, the softer reconciliatory Love Forever, and the cheery and lively Love n Spring.

Highlights from among the other tracks include the reflective sparseness of Watching the Wind on which Hawkins' piano is deeply echoed, giving the song even more of an evocative feel, the soothing warmth of the softly glowing Thinking of You (Australian Lullaby) on which Hawkins is complemented by Veronica Kennedy’s flute and the violin playing of Daniel and Cooney, and the unexpectedly subdued The Child’s Game.

Showing admirable restraint and bringing power and passion to the forefront discretely and only when called for, Hawkins (and Wheatley) seldom push either her piano or the assorted electronic keyboard textures over the artistic brink into mushy melodrama, even when probably tempted to (such as on the unabashedly romantic Down the Aisle (Wedding March 2). To balance passion and drama with a good ear for what to leave in and what to take out of a song is no small feat and my hat is off to both of them. Angel Above My Piano can be appreciated either through direct listening or played as background music, since it stands up well under both situations (the mix is particularly well-done if listened to through headphones). All in all, an enjoyable and heartfelt collection of piano and ensemble instrumentals and recommended to fans of that subgenre.


Rating: Very Good


- reviewed by Bill Binkelman on 3/19/2007

Angel Above my Piano – New Age Reporter


Angel Above my Piano by Fiona Joy Hawkins :



Steeped in classical influences and filled with flowing romantic lyricism, pianist Fiona Joy Hawkins latest CD, Angel Above My Piano conveys a variety of moods across its thirteen tracks. Hawkins plays solo or is joined by one or more guest artists on selected tracks. The music on the album wears its emotions on its sleeve yet does so without becoming saccharine or maudlin. Such sincerity is hard to resist when it's married to an artist accomplished on her instrument, as Hawkins is. Special mention should also be made of producer Bruce Wheatley who contributes on "orchestrations" and "instrumentation" (which I take to mean electronic keyboards). Wheatley has given the album a rich fullness but not at the expense of robbing Hawkins' piano of its intimate warmth and naturalness.

The haunting somberness of Crystal Desert opens the CD, with Hawkins veering from plaintive to powerful on the piece, which is also embellished perfectly by superb synthesizer effects (such as a shimmering texture) and chorals. This opening song is part of a four-part suite entitled Antarctic Interludes. The next cut, Dance of the Penguins is heavily influenced by classical music and while it has an uptempo pace, it's surprisingly not as playful as the title might portend. Flight of the Albatross paints a musical picture of the titular bird riding a gentle wind as it glides over the surface of the water. Guitarist Dieter Kleemann accompanies Hawkins on the song with some delicate work on his instrument. Together they impart an air of wistfulness. Last in the suite is the title track, a plaintive, haunting piece, again featuring excellent synth chorals/fills from Wheatley as well as violin from Rebecca Daniel and Elizabeth Cooney.

The next three tracks are also part of a suite, this one titled Opus for Love, which gives you a good idea of the tone and mood of the pieces which comprise it (inspired by the death of the artist's grandmother). There is the somber and even tragic Love in Winter, the softer reconciliatory Love Forever, and the cheery and lively Love n Spring.

Highlights from among the other tracks include the reflective sparseness of Watching the Wind on which Hawkins' piano is deeply echoed, giving the song even more of an evocative feel, the soothing warmth of the softly glowing Thinking of You (Australian Lullaby) on which Hawkins is complemented by Veronica Kennedy’s flute and the violin playing of Daniel and Cooney, and the unexpectedly subdued The Child’s Game.

Showing admirable restraint and bringing power and passion to the forefront discretely and only when called for, Hawkins (and Wheatley) seldom push either her piano or the assorted electronic keyboard textures over the artistic brink into mushy melodrama, even when probably tempted to (such as on the unabashedly romantic Down the Aisle (Wedding March 2). To balance passion and drama with a good ear for what to leave in and what to take out of a song is no small feat and my hat is off to both of them. Angel Above My Piano can be appreciated either through direct listening or played as background music, since it stands up well under both situations (the mix is particularly well-done if listened to through headphones). All in all, an enjoyable and heartfelt collection of piano and ensemble instrumentals and recommended to fans of that subgenre.


Rating: Very Good


- reviewed by Bill Binkelman on 3/19/2007

Fiona Joy Hawkins – Sydney Morning Herald

Hawkins hoping for new age of recognition
Email Print Normal font Large font One to watch ... Fiona Joy Hawkins, largely ignored in Australia, has been awarded a top US industry award for her latest album.

Advertisement
AdvertisementMichael Blaxland
April 23, 2007

Musician and artist Fiona Joy Hawkins ranks among the world's best in her genre, but struggles for recognition in her home country.

Europe, North America and Asia have embraced "new age" as a musical form, but Australian critics have largely refused to recognise the style.

Hawkins hopes to change that after taking out a prestigious international award.

Her album, Angel Above My Piano, has been awarded best piano release by industry website New Age Reporter.

NAR collates information from more than 300 radio stations across eight countries to publish monthly charts for music in genres such as new age, neo-classical, jazz, world and Celtic music.

Hawkins has also been a finalist in Australia's MusicOz awards, but there was no new-age section so she had to compete in the classical category.

"It's huge overseas, but people here just think it's whale noises," she lamented.

Angel Above My Piano reached No.3 on the NAR charts. Her previous album, Portrait Of A Waterfall, went to No.1. She is the first Australian to chart in the top 10 and the first to win a NAR award.

Hawkins, 43, was born in Cessnock and attended New Lambton primary school.

She now lives in the Blue Mountains, but still regards the Hunter as her home.

"Most of my work is now overseas and my agent is in Los Angles, but with the internet and digital technology I can live in Australia," she said.

"Fifty per cent of my record sales are now digital through downloads and I'm negotiating work on a Hollywood film score."

Hawkins also incorporates manuscripts of her music onto canvas to create colourful mixed media abstracts that "allow the viewer to hear and see my music".

"I believe in the power of music as a source of inspiration and way of reaching people, and I can transfer a musical quality through my art to the canvas."

She has been exhibiting her works since 1997 and is represented by Butterflies Gallery in Pokolbin.

Her next chance for international exposure will be at the International New Age Trade Show in Denver, Colorado in June.

Hawkins said she would be playing on various stages over the four days of the convention.

Source: The Sun-Herald

Fiona Joy Hawkins – Sydney Morning Herald

Hawkins hoping for new age of recognition
Email Print Normal font Large font One to watch ... Fiona Joy Hawkins, largely ignored in Australia, has been awarded a top US industry award for her latest album.

Advertisement
AdvertisementMichael Blaxland
April 23, 2007

Musician and artist Fiona Joy Hawkins ranks among the world's best in her genre, but struggles for recognition in her home country.

Europe, North America and Asia have embraced "new age" as a musical form, but Australian critics have largely refused to recognise the style.

Hawkins hopes to change that after taking out a prestigious international award.

Her album, Angel Above My Piano, has been awarded best piano release by industry website New Age Reporter.

NAR collates information from more than 300 radio stations across eight countries to publish monthly charts for music in genres such as new age, neo-classical, jazz, world and Celtic music.

Hawkins has also been a finalist in Australia's MusicOz awards, but there was no new-age section so she had to compete in the classical category.

"It's huge overseas, but people here just think it's whale noises," she lamented.

Angel Above My Piano reached No.3 on the NAR charts. Her previous album, Portrait Of A Waterfall, went to No.1. She is the first Australian to chart in the top 10 and the first to win a NAR award.

Hawkins, 43, was born in Cessnock and attended New Lambton primary school.

She now lives in the Blue Mountains, but still regards the Hunter as her home.

"Most of my work is now overseas and my agent is in Los Angles, but with the internet and digital technology I can live in Australia," she said.

"Fifty per cent of my record sales are now digital through downloads and I'm negotiating work on a Hollywood film score."

Hawkins also incorporates manuscripts of her music onto canvas to create colourful mixed media abstracts that "allow the viewer to hear and see my music".

"I believe in the power of music as a source of inspiration and way of reaching people, and I can transfer a musical quality through my art to the canvas."

She has been exhibiting her works since 1997 and is represented by Butterflies Gallery in Pokolbin.

Her next chance for international exposure will be at the International New Age Trade Show in Denver, Colorado in June.

Hawkins said she would be playing on various stages over the four days of the convention.

Source: The Sun-Herald

BLUE DREAM – New Age Music World

Author: John P. Olsen

It seems that few instruments can compare to a piano for personally illustrating the emotion and feeling of what an artist wants to share with another.

The piano is a divine instrument to play or to simply listen while others perform. I am certain many readers like myself have also had the opportunity to play the piano as younger adults either willingly or unwillingly under the guidance of their parents, which ended with varying degrees of success.

Fiona Joy Hawkins is the noteworthy artist I would like to highlight today achieving unbridled success playing the piano, reaching the number 1 spot in World New Age radio charts across 9 countries, achieving the Best Piano Album in the NAR lifestyle music awards in 2006, and winning the classical / jazz category in the Music OZ Awards for 2008. Accomplishments even her parents never would have dreamed possible.

Fiona Joy Hawkins has also received multiple nominations as finalist in classical jazz categories in 2007 and 2009 in multiple genres, among her respectable achievements as an Australian born composer and pianist. Her most recent 2008 Blue Dream album on the Little Hartley Music label, described as world fusion piano, puts the listener into a reflective relaxed state with many refined variations ranging from the poignant quiet moments of thought, to moments with varying rhythms, styles and many orchestration phases in the 22 song album which merge together skillfully.



While already widely recognized, she hopes this album will break into international markets. One can consider the 22 songs contained in this album as chapters in a book, that after reading each chapter, the next phase of this story becomes more revealing when finishing all verses while working your way towards the final chapter.

"My favorite track 9 blends powerful, yet soft vocals, only to crescendo into a moving inspirational piece, blending into the next novel chapter."

All song chapters and illustrations in this book will hold your interest by preventing you from putting the book down, and my favorite track 9 blends powerful, yet soft vocals, only to crescendo into a moving inspirational piece, blending into the next novel chapter. Farther in the storyline, Track 12 opens with a classic piano solo interlude as accompanying vocals add definition, and as the plot thickens, additional momentum begins to increase the readers awareness of a chance encounter, as additional instrumentals and rhythms divulge increasing amounts of dialog of this narrative.



Recorded and produced by Grammy Award winner Will Ackerman, plus an addition of many other talented musicians to their credit, who solo and accompany Fiona Joy Hawkins, influence the beauty and refinement of the album, without ever exceeding the award winning pianist intentions and the message she masterfully portrays with the 88 ebony and ivory keys provided for her on a Steinway concert piano.

Besides her professional career as a pianist, Fiona Joy Hawkins is also a painter with her own online art gallery, where paintings can be purchased, along with her 4 available CDs. The novel website to visit is Fionajoyhawkins.com.

http://www.newagemusicworld.com/novel-blue-dream/

BLUE DREAM – New Age Music World

Author: John P. Olsen

It seems that few instruments can compare to a piano for personally illustrating the emotion and feeling of what an artist wants to share with another.

The piano is a divine instrument to play or to simply listen while others perform. I am certain many readers like myself have also had the opportunity to play the piano as younger adults either willingly or unwillingly under the guidance of their parents, which ended with varying degrees of success.

Fiona Joy Hawkins is the noteworthy artist I would like to highlight today achieving unbridled success playing the piano, reaching the number 1 spot in World New Age radio charts across 9 countries, achieving the Best Piano Album in the NAR lifestyle music awards in 2006, and winning the classical / jazz category in the Music OZ Awards for 2008. Accomplishments even her parents never would have dreamed possible.

Fiona Joy Hawkins has also received multiple nominations as finalist in classical jazz categories in 2007 and 2009 in multiple genres, among her respectable achievements as an Australian born composer and pianist. Her most recent 2008 Blue Dream album on the Little Hartley Music label, described as world fusion piano, puts the listener into a reflective relaxed state with many refined variations ranging from the poignant quiet moments of thought, to moments with varying rhythms, styles and many orchestration phases in the 22 song album which merge together skillfully.



While already widely recognized, she hopes this album will break into international markets. One can consider the 22 songs contained in this album as chapters in a book, that after reading each chapter, the next phase of this story becomes more revealing when finishing all verses while working your way towards the final chapter.

"My favorite track 9 blends powerful, yet soft vocals, only to crescendo into a moving inspirational piece, blending into the next novel chapter."

All song chapters and illustrations in this book will hold your interest by preventing you from putting the book down, and my favorite track 9 blends powerful, yet soft vocals, only to crescendo into a moving inspirational piece, blending into the next novel chapter. Farther in the storyline, Track 12 opens with a classic piano solo interlude as accompanying vocals add definition, and as the plot thickens, additional momentum begins to increase the readers awareness of a chance encounter, as additional instrumentals and rhythms divulge increasing amounts of dialog of this narrative.



Recorded and produced by Grammy Award winner Will Ackerman, plus an addition of many other talented musicians to their credit, who solo and accompany Fiona Joy Hawkins, influence the beauty and refinement of the album, without ever exceeding the award winning pianist intentions and the message she masterfully portrays with the 88 ebony and ivory keys provided for her on a Steinway concert piano.

Besides her professional career as a pianist, Fiona Joy Hawkins is also a painter with her own online art gallery, where paintings can be purchased, along with her 4 available CDs. The novel website to visit is Fionajoyhawkins.com.

http://www.newagemusicworld.com/novel-blue-dream/