FLCON FCKER
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FLCON FCKER

Houston, Texas, United States | SELF

Houston, Texas, United States | SELF
Solo EDM Hip Hop

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We got another interview for you. This time around we're talking to 2012's Houston Press Best electronic musician FLCON FCKER. He and Andre talk Houston's electronic music scene, building synths and doughnuts. - FUHAvision


2012 Houston Press Music Award Winners
Size matters.

By Chris Gray Thursday, Aug 9 2012
Like everything else about this city, the size of the Houston music scene can sneak up on you. It always seems so far-flung and diffuse most of the year, because our performers and venues are spread out across some 700 square miles.

But then Music Awards time rolls around and suddenly a lot of them (more than 50) are playing practically right on top of each other at our Houston Press Music Awards showcase, which took place this past weekend at 11 downtown venues. Then you can get a somewhat clearer picture of the depth and diversity we really have here. Take just a moment to appreciate that.

What we have below is the list of 2012 Houston Press Music Award winners in 41 categories, as voted on by Houston Press readers and announced August 8 at our Warehouse Live ceremony. Take just a moment to appreciate them, too.

BEST LP/CD/EP: Free Radicals, The Freedom Fence

BEST MIXTAPE: One Hunnidt, #keepit100

BEST SONG: Free Radicals, "Ben Taub Blues"

BEST LOCAL MUSIC VIDEO: H.I.S.D., "Rockit Man"

LOCAL MUSICIAN OF THE YEAR: Robert Ellis

BEST NEW ACT: The Suffers

BEST MALE VOCALS: Chase Hamblin

BEST FEMALE VOCALS: Kam Franklin, The Suffers

BEST SONGWRITER: Nathan Quick

BEST POP ARTIST: Chase Hamblin

BEST ROCK: The Trimms

BEST MODERN ROCK: Another Run

BEST GARAGE/PUNK/HARDCORE: Skeleton Dick

BEST METAL: Venomous Maximus

BEST EXPERIMENTAL/NOISE: B L A C K I E

BEST ELECTRONIC ACT: FLCON FCKER

BEST SOLO RAPPER: Onehunnidt

BEST RAP GROUP: The Niceguys

BEST RAP DJ: DJ Candlestick

BEST CLUB DJ/DJ NIGHT: Skeezer

BEST LATIN ARTIST: Los Skarnales

BEST JAZZ: Free Radicals

BEST BLUES: The Mighty Orq

BEST SOUL/FUNK/R&B: Electric Attitude

BEST REGGAE/SKA/DUB: The Suffers

BEST ZYDECO: Zydeco Dots

BEST COUNTRY: Justin Van Sant

BEST FOLK: Kevin Kendrick

BEST AMERICANA: Nathan Quick

BEST COVER/TRIBUTE ACT: The Fab 5

BEST GUITARIST: James Henry, Steve Krase & the In Crowd

BEST BASSIST: Spare Time Murray, Steve Krase & the In Crowd/H-Town Jukes

BEST DRUMMER: Gabe Bravo, the Trimms

BEST OTHER INSTRUMENT: Niki Sims, ­saxophone/clarinet

BEST PRODUCER: Josiah Gabriel

BEST RADIO STATION: Local Live Houston

BEST RADIO PROGRAM: The Rod Ryan Show, 94.5 The Buzz

BEST LOCAL LABEL: Space City Records

BEST LIVE MUSIC VENUE: Fitzgerald's

BEST RECORD STORE: Cactus Music

BEST INSTRUMENT/EQUIPMENT STORE: Rockin' Robin - Houston Press


The Process of Making Music Must Be Changed
Recently, I read a number of tweets and updates from various artists stating that they are in the process of "recording some demos" in preparation for a new "album". The standard operating procedure of the conventional recording artist includes 1) writing new songs or parts of songs 2) recording demos of the songs 3) selecting the songs that work best for the album 4) record the selected songs 5) overdub, mix, and ultimately master the songs 6) compose and create artwork for the cd/vinyl record 7) begin promoting the record with an early single release 8) set-up a "record release party" to promote and celebrate your nascent work 9) tour in support of the new record 10) release a video of your strongest piece, which usually is labeled a "single". These ten commandments have Mishnah-like amendments and redactions. Sure, radio and internet promotion can be adroitly attached to these "commandments", but where the concern exists is with the process, not the product.

In Houston, an artist with the moniker Flcon Fcker reflects a forward-thinking approach to making music. The impetus of his musical creation stems from his desire to produce electronic instruments that produce new sounds. Naturally, you can hear a wide range of influences in his music, but the most sincere element is his unconventional approach to making music. The ephemera surrounding his live compositions, playing with a jazz-like improvisation, playing live without a net makes listening to his music dangerous. The risk rests in the fact that he is willing to take it. R.T.H.M., or Real Time Hand Motion--is a band who influenced Flcon Fcker with interface-building during performances. The largest criticism of live performances from electronic musicians is that the music is pre-made, not performed in real time. With the use of interfacing programs, a monome, and personally constructed instruments, he crafts music in real time with a richness of a skilled painter. His approach is not limited to beat-making; in fact, his best stuff (to me, of course) is the ambient, more experimental compositions.

In addition to his musical process, Flcon Fcker has embraced a more relevant approach toward promoting his music. Performance videos and collaborations are his primary emphasis. They "show" the listener the music. Needless to say, electronic music is visual, like contemporary art where the subject is relegated to abstraction. So are the forms of Flcon Fcker's music.

http://fuckmyfalcon.com/media/ - The Illegal Wiretaps


FLCON FCKER, Treasure Mammal @ Mango’s – FF showed me a live video where his gear crashed to the floor. It still pained him to watch it but if you are a bad ass like he is, you can afford to laugh a little bit at your misfortune. - Free Press Houston


Big and far-flung and ever-changing as Houston is, sometimes the names who show up in the Houston Press Music Awards nominations every year surprise even us. This is not a bad thing at all: Within the music scene (which continues to amaze us in its ingenuity and diversity), it keeps the circle of life going, and certainly keeps us on our toes.
That's how Rocks Off came to make the electronic acquaintance of the artist who goes by FLCON FCKER, a 2012 nominee for Best Electronic Act. This gentleman, whom we'll leave as FLCON FCKER because his Web site and social-media pages do the same thing, contacted us to let us know we had originally omitted the "O" in FLCON.

Oops. It's since been corrected, of course, but even he admits via email "as you can imagine, it happens a lot -- perhaps it wasn't the best name choice in retrospect lol."

But while we had him on the line, so to speak, we figured we might as well learn a little more about this FLCON FCKER. He says he learned guitar in high school (he's 34), and just recently started playing electronic music.

FLCON FCKER's background is in medical research and virology. He has a Biology/Chemistry degree from UT-Pan Am in Edinburg in the Valley, and spend several years in Vanderbilt University's Pharmacology Ph.D. Program. He moved to Houston and spent five years at a viral oncology lab in the Med Center.
"I took some time off and ended up making synths," says FLCON FCKER. "Not sure how that works, but yeah."

Now he builds vintage synthesizers along the lines of Gary Numan (he's a big fan) and other electronic audio equipment, both for himself and other musicians. Austin's Roger Sellers commissioned one of FCKER's works for a show he's doing with popular techno-rock duo Ghostland Observatory next month.

As far as performing goes, FLCON FCKER says he started as a way to showcase his hardware, and lately he's been doing "random events" around town on a fairly regular basis. The audio and video clips on his Web site feature him performing at places like Notsuoh; his burbling ambient sound collages, with perhaps a trace of trip-hop, would be recognizable to any Aphex Twin fan or even Radiohead circa Kid A/Amnesiac.

"The performance aspect took a long time to get right," says FLCON FCKER, 34. "I was concerned about automating too many things. I wanted it to be clear to the audience that I was doing things in real-time.
"That's not easy to do and I am still working on it," he adds, "but apparently some people somewhere are really digging it."

Houstonians can next catch FLCON FCKER July 8 at Mango's with Treasure Mammal, whom he describes as "some band I met on the road... their show is the most fun I've had at a small electronic show.

"They use 'shake weights' in their act," he adds. "That's all I'm gonna say."
- Houston Press


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

FLCON FCKER comes to Houston by way of Nashville, TN, and a graduate program in Pharmacology. Being a long time fan of live electronica a frustrated FCKER finds Nashville's lively music scene disappointingly devoid of electronic music. The one exception, is R.T.H.M (Real Time Hand Motion) a live music duo who build the interfaces they use during performances. The future FLCON FCKER is introduced to the emerging art of open-source controllerism, but a career in medical research delays any avio-musical transformations.

A position with a laboratory in Houston's Medical Center prompts a move to a city with a thriving electronic DJ scene. And although he immerses himself in the turntable culture, he has no interest in learning the intricacies of turntables nor does he feel compelled to hear others perform his music. In Houston, FCKER learns he has a knack for electronic circuitry, a fondness for the warm, low frequency reverberations of analog synthesizers, and a vision of performance based, real-time electronic music performances. After building a few synths, he begins experimenting with various open source controllers in an effort to create interesting live performances. He begins playing local venues as a way, mostly, to hear his hard work on the larger sound systems. After a few showcases, it becomes clear the analog tones, slower BPM, and motion-based expressive controllers are a phenomenal combination.

Videos make their way onto the internet and FLCON FCKER is asked to play his first out of state show with Brooklyn producers, Active and Pixel Ale, as well as San Francisco based synth programmer, Wolf Interval. This leads to more local opportunities at El Rincon Social, Counter Crawl III, Binarium Sound Series, Khon's Bar, The Fairview, Dean's Credit Clothing, Notsuoh's and Taos by South West 2012, an unofficial SXSW showcase. It is now clear FLCON FCKER is set to make an impact on Houston's beat culture.

Band Members