fo/mo/deep
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fo/mo/deep

Columbus, Ohio, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2007

Columbus, Ohio, United States
Established on Jan, 2007
Band Jazz Fusion

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Review of ‘A Beautiful Bang’ by fo/mo/deep

You can find out about this 5-piece, Ohio-based ‘funky jazz collective’ on their website. I can tell you that ‘A Beautiful Bang’ is fo/mo/deep’s second album (after ‘Eclecticism’) and, well, let’s get right into it…
I’m a fan of funky jazz collectives, such as Incognito and Down to the Bone and I’m already placing FMD squarely in that bracket when I hear the bass-driven groove of the opener ‘Jawjacka’ (love that title). This instrumental focuses on the funk and has some nice key changes. Keith Newton’s tenor sax is well up in the mix and sounds really strong. The whole song reminds me of Paz at their best. That same sax tone pervades on the sexy ‘Martini Blues’, which slows the pace right down and allows you to enjoy the flavour of Kevin Jones’ old-school electric piano. I’m drawn in already.
FMD’s take on Bobby Hutcherson’s ‘Montara’ has that deeply urban jazzy vibe that I’ve loved for so long in Incognito’s music. From the first few bars, I know I’ll be playing this for years. Ron Holmes’ sinewy bassline teams perfectly with André Scott’s crisp snare and underpins this gorgeous mid-tempo instrumental all the way. Over headphones especially, Kevin Pouncey’s percussion really adds a layer of style to this song. Fatkat’s fretless bass solo sure does it for me! On ‘Mama Said, Mama Said’ the only word you need to remember is funk. Some nice rhythm guitar gets poured over the already tight rhythm section. The organ solo on here is straight out of the 1970’s – where I live that’s a great thing!
The 6-string electric upright bass solo (you read that right!) that starts ‘Da Ba Di Do (Sonrisa de Zoe)’ took me by surprise but I was pleased to hear it build into a nicely offbeat, almost Latin instrumental with some nicely zany background vocals and percussion. Makes me smile each time I play it. The title track has, in contrast, almost an African feel to it, with some great backbeats and lively percussion touches. The horn arrangement is particularly worth mention, as is the funky breakdown which must work great live!
Let your hips move to the slinky reggae wiggle that is ‘Red Clay’. It’s a Freddie Hubbard composition and I’ve never heard the original – I don’t care because this has flavour, then more flavour, and then just a little more… Where is the album’s big ballad? It’s right here in ‘The Wanting’, which brings a complete change of tempo from all that’s gone before and allows soprano sax acoustic piano to weave a melody together that will really stick in your head. This is modern instrumental soul on a par with Brian Culbertson, Marcus Johnson or Marion Meadows. Fabulous!
Keith Newton’s hits – and holds – an impossibly high note on tenor sax to kick off a slippery version of Fela Kuti’s ‘Gentleman’. It it weren’t for the cleanliness of the production, you’d swear this had been recorded back in the day. The groove is repetitive and hypnotic and really gets under your skin. As you’d expect from Fela Kuti, the song has a message – and it comes across loud and clear! Holmes goes nice and low – ah yes, a 6-string bass gives away the fact that this funk is now!! This band can write – and play – the blues and they let you hear it to great effect on the sax-led ‘My Baby Gots’ the Blues, Blues’. It’s a classic – well, it’s going to be.
Talking of classics, John Coltrane’s lovely ‘Naima’ has been interpreted by many artists and this grand treatment is my favourite from the versions I’ve heard – and they include those by Gene Harris and Tom Browne. Its beauty lies in its simplicity: we have piano and tenor sax and that’s all we need for a gorgeous piece of real jazz. This isn’t a cover version – it’s a homage. When you read a title like ‘A Plethora of Pleasant Thoughts’ you expect the musical equivalent of your favourite comfort food – well I do. And here it is, with its Latin sway and soothing percussion. Fans of Mongo Santamaria and Dave Valentin, you won - Chris Mann’s Review of ‘A Beautiful Bang’ by fo/mo/deep


fo/mo/deep A Beautiful Bang RH Media 2012
The Declaration of Independence via Wikipedia:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

I see nothing mentioning a major label deal but if there are indeed exceptions to a rule then fo/mo/deep may indeed be the Independent band to start with as A Beautiful Bang is as good as any major label contemporary release I’ve heard this year. Why?
Simple: According to leader Ron Holmes

“I’m not a fan of synths or drum programming – I love real sax , real drums, real percussion and real keys.
So no programming stuff – We play that whole CD live and in the same room in some cases. We did stack the horns on 2 cuts.”
There are no production crutches used to wake those from the sonic coma some contemporary records seem to magically induce or to aid the rhythmically challenged. A real working band. Cats that can play, play well and pull from a variety of influences and make their own sound that smashes barriers including the musical glass ceiling that most contemporary acts can not come close to crashing. Jazz/Funk/World – call it anything you want. A Beautiful Bang kills on every possible level. Tower of Power meets old school Afro-Cuban with a cosmopolitan neo-soul and occasional Brazilian back beat and you have that new sound contemporary jazz has been looking for over the last few years. Two years ago two label executives told me this side of the contemporary street had to flip totally urban to survive. Wrong. Take a band with the chops to do a cross-cultural riff on modern jazz but with a funky global spin and that is the sound of the tomorrow. That sound is fo/mo/deep! A funky jazz collective.
The flash fried funk of “Jawjacka” coupled with the an intense blues infused “Martini Blues” are but two of the highlights here and there are many! A eclectic surprise pulled off with finesse and flavor to burn is the reggae twist placed on the classic Freddie Hubbard tune “Red Clay.” Old school continues to morph into new cool with a saxophone piano duet of the John Coltrane standard “Naima.” The spoken word funky is as funky does “Gentleman” is beatnik chic with attitude. Normally I would run the other way and be reaching for the mute button on anything remotely close to spoken word but the groove grabs you. Infectious. A spoken word history reminder, nothing polarizing it simply is what it is…
“One nation under a groove”…P-Funk.

5 Stars. If this release does not hit a musical sweet spot deep inside you then hang on because your autopsy report should be ready soon!

Tracks: Jawjacka; Martini Blues; Montara; Mama Said, Mama Said; Da Ba Di Do; A Beautiful Bang; Red Clay; The Wanting; Gentleman; My Baby Got’s the Blues, Blues; Naima; A Plethora of Pleasant Thoughts; The Road.

Personnel: Ron “Fatkat” Holmes: 6 string fretted, fretless & electric upright basses; Kevin Jones: keyboards; Andre Scott Drums; Keith Newton: soprano, tenor, baritone saxes & flute; Kenneth “Pounce” Pouncey: all percussion.
Additional musicians: N. Michael Goecke: rombone & vocals (9); Matt “Stylie” Steidle: guitar (4,6,9); Vickie Saunders, Tia Harris Roseboro, Debra James Tucker: vocals (5,13).

http://www.fomodeep.com/
www.facebook.com/fomodeep - @Criticaljazz:


fo/mo/deep – Eclecticism

Those of you who enjoy your contemporary jazz on the dangerous side could do worse than to check out the CD Eclecticism from the interestingly named fo/mo/deep. This rhythmic roller coaster from a band who describe themselves as an eclectic, groove orientated and funky jazz collective has its share of outstanding tracks while as a reference point Gill Scott-Heron or Brass Construction would be good places at which to start. Indeed original compositions by the bands leader and bass player Ron Holmes Jr. sit very tidily with material from Lonnie Liston Smith, Charlie Hunter, John Coltrane and Nat Adderley. As a consequence the entire collection drips with 70s style nostalgia but in doing so never sounds out of date.

Of the original compositions, look out for the brassy Slap That Thing which is underpinned by great bass from Holmes or Kiggundus Bazaar where the beat seems to go on and on. Also good is the bands version of Charlie Hunters Mitch Betta Have My Bunny which first appeared on his 2001 album Songs From The Analog Playground but my own personal favorite is fo/mo/deeps brilliant take on the Lonnie Liston Smith classic Expansions. Delivered in both vocal and instrumental form its a tune that evokes the great days of jazz fusion and then some.

For more go to www.fomodeep.com

October 07, 2010 in CD Reviews | Permalink Smooth Jazz Therapy is written and produced by Denis Poole. - Denis Pool


fo/mo/deep – Eclecticism – Hans-Bernd Hülsmann – Smooth Jazz Daily:

When you live in Columbus, Ohio and regularly attend concerts in and around that city, you certainly have the opportunity for a close encounter of the third kind, a musical one. I speak about fo/mo/deep, what stands according of the band’s website for an eclectic groove oriented-funky jazz collective.

Fo/mo/deep are Ron FatKat Holmes. Jr (bass), Kenneth Pounce Pouncey (percussion), Keith Newton (sax, flute), N. Michael Goecke (trombone), Andre Scott (drums), and Kevin Jones (Keys). For those, who haven’t listen to their music yet, we have good news. The group has just released their debut album Eclecticism.

Now, what’s that? According to Wikipedia Eclecticism is a conceptual approach that does not hold rigidly to a single paradigm or set of assumptions, but instead draws upon multiple theories, styles, or ideas to gain complementary insights into a subject, or applies different theories in particular cases.

Now, are we wiser? No! Let’s ask the bandleader. Ron explains: “Eclecticism in music draws from a plethora of grooves/styles from around the world.” In short we can await a diversity of styles.

The attentive listener is first confronted with the intro Waiting. Someone opened the micro, while the crowd was waiting for the start. Ok, I am curious. Drinks@8(Words), that are dynamic horns, driving drums, a propulsive bass and keys adjustment. Enjoy Michael Goecke’s elusive trombone solo followed by Keith Newton’s blow of heart on sax. Now Kevin starts on piano his furious excursion. Great interaction between all musicians building their string of tones.

What can a live band cover at its best? A tune from a live album. It’s Fu/Mo/Deep’s treat of Nathaniel Adderley’s Hummin’ taken from Cannonball Adderley’s album Country Preacher (1969). This is one for Michael’s trombone and Ron’s bass. Now the trip goes to Africa. Kiggundu’s Bazaar has much of onomatopoeia, the horns are bursting out like a stampede of elephants, but there is also oriental atmosphere. Chaos yes, but boxed or as Ron says: “You cannot have groove without pocket.”

Mitch Betta Have My Bunny is a superb track from Charlie Hunter’s jamming album Songs from the Analog Playground (2001). As Mark Corroto wrote in his review: “There are five tracks of Hunter’s quartet laying out jam-band fare that begs to be heard live.” And Ron does us the favor to add the live version of the tune on this album too. If you don’t get enough of this song, on YouTube is a recording of this song taken from the band’s gig at Comfest 2010 Columbus.

There is much more to discover on this surprising album. For example two fantastic renditions (vocal and instrumental) of Lonnie Liston Smith’s Expansions (1975). Lonnie Liston Smith is well known for embracing fusion, crossover, soul and funk with his 1970's band the Cosmic Echoes. This is a reminiscence to the flower power generation. Especially to mention is Keith Newton’s outstanding flute performance.

According to his friends Ron Holmes is a bass junkie performing in the past like Stanley Clarke on exstasy. So the title Slap that Thang sounds like a piece written by a bass player for a bass player. But Fo/mo/deep is a collective and the members are acting as band. Also exquisite is the cover of John Coltrane’s piece Giant Steps (1960). Keyboardist Kevin Jones’ approach is a little daring, because he alienated the sound of keyboard perhaps to build a bridge to Keith Newton’s adventurous sax play. Ok, they called the tune Giant Fonky Steps and live performance has always its own twist.

With Eclecticism will fo/mo/deep certainly rise a lot of attention in the jazz community. This band has character and diversity. High recommendable in particular for live events! - Hans-Bernd Hülsmann – Smooth Jazz Daily:


From: Qute FM

To: Ron Holmes <fomodeep@rocketmail.com>

Sent: Tue, September 21, 2010 9:21:46 PM

Subject: Eclecticism

Ron: the info in your bio does not do justice to the product you provide.

Maybe it’s just me, but I’m so feelin’ the product.

Funky, Old School–jazzy and R&B! I’m hooked. Especially enjoy interpretation of Expansions, and Hummin’ and basically the entire CD. It’s like Down to the Bone, Funkee Boy, some Candy Dulfer, the JBs, James Brown, BWB and so not a copy at the same time. I can feel the “roots” comin’ through.

I will begin using tracks next week during my mid-morning Uptown Grooves 10–2 p.m. shift. We do a little jazz and a little R&B. Your stuff is just what I needed at this juncture.

Old and New in a great musical amalgamation! Funky, energetic, controlled, groove oriented for a mid-morning program.

Thank you for being patient.

Tom Smith, Chief of Operations – WQTQ FM - Tom Smith, Chief of Operations – WQTQ FM


MAJOR MINOR: Fo/Mo/Deep

By John Petric

Published: Thursday, August 19, 2010

Recorded charisma

One of the highlights of this years Comfest was Fo/Mo/Deep, a local and very good soul funk jazz band that had the crowd in the palm of its collective hand.

Well, the group has managed to do something thats actually quite difficult for local, national or international talent, and thats to go into a studio and transfer its live charisma onto a disc: Eclecticism.

The snazzy-looking disc sports several originals by leader/bassist Ron FatKat Holmes Jr., and material by Lonnie Liston Smith, Charlie Hunter, John Coltrane and Nate Addely.

The thing sounds great, and you can buy it between 8 p.m. and midnight tonight (Aug. 19) during the CD-release party at Vonn Jazz & Blues.

Standout track: Hunters play on the rap classic Mitch Betta Have My Bunny. Cant say this band doesnt have a sense of humor. - By John Petric The Other Paper


fo/mo/deep Eclecticism

Starting a memorable groove may be easy pickings, but keeping that drive alive is another matter. What is even more challenging is mastering these grooves in a live setting without adding extra studio clutter while always bringing out the best musicianship. Ron Holmes, Jr., founder of jazz/funk collective fo/mo/deep believes being in the pocket is key to maintaining a cohesive groove structure. The man also named as Fat Kat and his sextet fo/mo/deep have wowed audiences in their hometown of Columbus, Ohio for some time and finally decided to share their diverse groove pockets on a national level. Their self-released debut, Eclecticism,presents some of modern jazz and jazz fusions finest hours, along with some original treats from the pen of Holmes, Jr. Daring to take on jazz greats like Cannonball & Nat Adderley, Charlie Hunter, Lonnie Liston Smith and John Coltrane, fo/mo/deep convincingly resurrects the seventies and early eighties, a period when music was played with a focused, fiery spirit. More importantly, the rhythm section of Holmes,and percussionists Kenneth Pounce Pouncy and Andre Scott beautifully frame every chorus and solo while holding down the varied, sometimes complex grooves on Eclecticism. And fo/mo/deeps front men of keyboardist Kevin Jones and brass players N.Michael Goecke and Keith Newton complete the package with joyful and funky solo abandon.

Goecke flexes some trombone sass on Hummin written by Nat Adderley and featured on Cannonball Adderleys Country Preacher disc from 1969. Holmes answers back with an equally sassy acoustic bass passage. Mitch Betta Have My Bunny cranks up the jazz funk meter on this Charlie Hunter composition from his 2001 project, Songs from the Analog Playground. Turning back the clock, the smooth as spacey dance jam, Expansions, revisits the Lonnie Liston Smith & The Cosmic Echoes heyday in the mid-seventies. Keith Newton mesmerizes the senses with his flute, Jones dances all over the keys and Goecke passes on words of wisdom from one of African-American mighty musical voices, Gil Scott-Heron: The revolution will not be televised. Kiggundus Bazaar, one of three tracks written by Holmes, Jr., meshes grooves with African back beats, bits of horn section experimentation and percussion barrage (three percussionists). Then there is the ‘dare to be different but it’s still fly award’ given to Giant FONKY Steps, with a critical emphasis on FONKY. Recorded live at the Columbus Arts Festival in June 2010, Trombonist Michael Goeckes’ solo blows me away on this John Coltranes signature piece.

fo/mo/deep has a special way to To hear the raw passion of jazz and funk played in all its full glory, fo/mo/deep accommodates on all accounts with Eclecticism.

Peggy Oliver
The Urban Music Scene - Peggy Oliver


Eclecticism Drawing from a plethora of grooves/styles from around the world.

The above definition of the title of the first release from fo/mo/deep is provided on the back cover of the groups new CD. Also included on the CD cover is a self-characterization by fo/mo/deep that reads An Eclectic Groove Oriented Funky Jazz Collective. That assessment is concise and sums up their mission astutely. fo/mo/deep is a vibrant jazz collective which utilizes their dynamic rhythm section to keep the heat turned up to maximum fervor throughout. They flourish equally well on a couple original compositions as well as select choices for cover selections. Andre Scott, a skilled and powerful drummer, helps force the robust rhythms forward with potent brawn and committed vigor. On bass, Ron FatKat Holmes Jr. is also a stellar contributor, exceptionally adept at using his instrument to help buttress a beefy foundation as well as stepping to the forefront to bravely scout the way. Kenneth Pounce Pouncy on percussion completes this expert rhythm trifecta.

An example of the groove oriented funk found on Eclecticism is provided right out of the gate on Drinks@8. Kevin Jones plays energetic keyboard streams that serve as an appendage to a spirited dialogue between the trombone of N. Michael Goecke and the tenor saxophone yielded by Keith Newton. The solid, mid-tempo rhythm groove on this one is pure delight and serves as an example of how a top-grade rhythm section meshes together via a scheme of ultra-tight cohesiveness to function faultlessly.

The slower tempo on Nat Adderleys Hummin allows Goecke an opportunity to make a tart sassy trombone statement and Ron Holmes, Jr. to impressively demonstrate his stand-up bass chops. Kiggundus Bazaar embraces the atmosphere of a bustling African bazaar with the horn section trumpeting with elephant-like calls and emulating vendors hawking their wares. The bouncy keyboards of Kevin Jones provide added seasoning, as do the various background clamoring effects supplied by Darrell Jones. Yet again, the rhythm teamwork shines with added backing from Ron Hope on congas, all contributing to give the song a strong sense of adventure.

A cover of ex-Miles Davis member Lonnie Liston Smiths Expansions appears first with a vocal that is mutually sung and sung-spoken and espouses the need for peace on Earth with the expansion advocated taking place inside ones mind. The philosophy declared on this 70s song that if you expand your mind to the acceptance of love of all mankind your heart will surely follow remains relevant today. The song begins with a bass solo, which is soon joined by rapid-fire drumming, flashy flute fireworks and impressive displays on organ. The quickened pace on the instrumental rendition of Expansions that follows later on the disc allows multiple members of the fo/mo/deep ensemble to show off their musical savoir faire with abundant soloing as well as en masse execution.

Another successful cover appears with Charlie Hunters Mitch Betta Have My Bunny. The ultra-funky Ron Holmes, Jr. penned Slap That Thang, features a first-rate rhythm melody with flanking support coming from guitar, saxophone and trombone. It cooks at a slow boil, simmering with horn flavored spice that satisfies totally. Slap That Thang assuredly has to be one of their premier showcases when it is presented in concert.

The final two songs are performed live, exhibiting the power and excitement that this ensemble can muster away from the recording studio and in front of an audience. The venue for this enthused performance was the 2010 Columbus Arts Festival. Giant FONKY Steps is needless to say a respectful tribute to John Coltranes standard Giant Steps, a tune long used by jazz musicians to display their skills at improvisation. Improvising is one of fo/mo/deeps foremost gifts. Joness keyboards take on some of the characteristics of a melodica, Newtons sax-work is inspired, and the entire group takes pleasure in providing a fun-laced musical history lesson. The groups live take on Hunters Mitch outshines their previous offering of the tune, due to the increased spontaneous flow. Guided by Fatkat, the group wails away with a passion and technical expertise that is exceptional.

The auspicious debut of fo/mo/deep is exhilarating music. Eclecticism whets the appetite for more, much more. As the legendary great Miles Davis once said jazz music has to have that thing. I believe that Miles would agree: Eclecticism has it.

Tracks:

Waiting (Intro), Drinks@8 (Words), Hummin, At The Market, Kiggundus Bazaar, Mitch Betta Have My Bunny, Expansions (Vocal), Slap That Thang, Customer Service Call, Expansions (Instrumental), Giant FONKY Steps (Live), Mitch Betta Have My Bunny (Live)

Reviewed by: Randall Parrish - Reviewed by: Randall Parrish


The Other Paper, John Petric: …..Recorded charisma - One of the highlights of this year’s Comfest was Fo/Mo/Deep, a local and very good soul-funk-jazz band that had the crowd in the palm of its collective hand. Well, the group has managed to do something that’s actually quite difficult for local, national or international talent, and that’s to go into a studio and transfer its live charisma onto a disc: Eclecticism…..
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Jazz Review.com, Randall Parrish:…. The auspicious debut of fo/mo/deep is exhilarating music. Eclecticism whets the appetite for more, much more. As the legendary great Miles Davis once said jazz music has to have that thing. I believe that Miles would agree: Eclecticism has it.

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TheUrbanMusicScene.com, Peggy Oliver: Their self-released debut, Eclecticism, presents some of modern jazz and jazz fusions finest hours, along with some original treats from the pen of Holmes, Jr. Daring to take on jazz greats like Cannonball & Nat Adderley, Charlie Hunter, Lonnie Liston Smith and John Coltrane, fo/mo/deep convincingly resurrects the seventies and early eighties, a period when music was played with a focused, fiery spirit.

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The Smooth Jazz Ride, Ronald Jackson: …. With a very alluring, ear-friendly blend of jazz, world, and soul influences, fo/mo/deep, this talented group of musicians who remind one of the iconic group War in some ways, teases and pleases with touches and tastes of piano, sax, trumpet, and percussion in all the right places on this aptly-titled debut release, Eclectism, with plenty of rhythm and exoticism…..

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Hans-Bernd Hülsmann - Smooth Jazz Daily:….. With Eclecticism will fo/mo/deep certainly rise a lot of attention in the jazz community. This band has character and diversity. High recommendable in particular for live events!

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Smooth Jazz Therapy.com, Denis Pool:…. Those of you who enjoy your contemporary jazz on the dangerous side could do worse than to check out the CD Eclecticism from the interestingly named fo/mo/deep. This rhythmic roller coaster from a band who describe themselves as an eclectic, groove orientated and funky jazz collective has its share of outstanding tracks while as a reference point Gill Scott-Heron or Brass Construction would be good places at which to start. Indeed original compositions by the bands leader and bass player Ron Holmes Jr. sit very tidily with material from Lonnie Liston Smith, Charlie Hunter, John Coltrane and Nat Adderley. As a consequence the entire collection drips with 70s style nostalgia but in doing so never sounds out of date……

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- Various


"Espresso Yourself Music Café (EYMC) is where it was “happening” last Friday night with three different musical groups. I arrived about 8:30 PM in the middle of the performance by the Fo Mo Deep jazz band which was loud and wonderful. "
- EYMC Customer Blog, Espresso Yourself Music Café (Jan 20, 2009) - EYMC Customer Blog


"I only heard three songs and was blown away by the heavy, very artistic bass play by front man Ron "Fat cat" Holmes, not only did he excite you with his obvious love and talent of music, but he drew you in with touching on slightly familiar bass licks from decade or so ago.. "
- Don Lloyd, DLloyd Designs (Jun 08, 2009) - Don Lloyd, DLloyd Designs (Jun 08, 2009)


Comfest 2010: two views
Pared-back Comfest is once again fun -

By John Petric
Published: Thursday, July 1, 2010 12:39 PM EDT
Fo/Mo/Deep on the jazz stage: a huge crowd happily drunk on the groove of a hot group of musical roots doctors doing a communal funk-soul. These moments were among the best of the entire weekend.
The cats were improvising with fire, the rhythm section was as supple and as firm as Lady Ga-Ga’s fake ass. Michael Goetke’s “Expand Your Mind” vibe was exemplary, containing everything Comfest loves to be about—a good-natured trip backward into the ’60s, politically and philosophically.

“The revolution will not be televised,” he quoted Gil Scott-Heron, and then added, “Maybe that’s why black folk are afraid to turn off the television.” Nice updating, Mike.
- John Petric, The Other Paper, Columbus, OH


Ron, you guys sure did tear it up. Everyone loved it!!! I see now that your group needed the set up time. I should have allowed for that. It's just business that I try to get several groups through. Next time let's allow 30 min set up and 90 min play time OK? You are so worth it. Thanks for playing my place. I will recommend you to anyone and everyone..... - Eric Ahlteens


Discography

The Groovy Goodness (2014)
A Beautiful Bang (2012)
Eclecticism (2010)

Photos

Bio

fo/mo/deep = An Eclectic Groove Oriented – Funky Jazz Collective.

Greetings, 

Best known for their sizzling live performances, the fo/mo/deep groove is rooted in the experimental school of the 70s…a time when jazz, soul and funk were one and the same. Seeking to defy the ordinary, this diverse collective of seasoned pros keeps things stirred up with unpredictable energy that moves. 

The music harkens back to the days when super groups hypnotized the world with bass driven ensembles and a full-bodied sound that reigned supreme.  fo/mo/deep plays music like it’s meant to be…hot, incalculable and emotionally satisfying and fun for all ages. 

Now they are releasing their most eclectic work yet, “TheGroovyGoodness” on June 3rd, 2014. Brent Black of criticaljazz  wrote “A release as deep and rich as the cover art, I’m hooked…” Robert Young of the Vertical Spin says “Columbus, OH native composer/bassist Ron “FatKat” Holmes returns with his band fo/mo/deep to enhance their distinctive mark on another riveting contemporary jazz offering titled “TheGroovyGoodness.” 

Both “A Beautiful Bang” (June 2012) their sophomore CD release AND their first CD, “Eclecticism,” (August 2010) was received with rave reviews. Rob Young of The Urban Flux declared, “Their unique groove uncoils with a twist of eclectic jazz/funk rhythms that’s not heard often enough these days.” 

Formed back 2007 by Bassist/Bandleader, Ron “Fatkat” Holmes, Jr., they are now known for their intelligently energetic and unpredictable shows, created a formidable reputation for this jazz-funk-world infused band. 

Amazingly, their music masterfully transfers the insatiable energy of the band’s live performances to the recording studio. The songs engrave the canvas of the record with sizzling bursts of improvisation, while also capturing the emotional essence of more delicate instrumental conversations.  

Tastefully varied but cohesively melded, the music lives in the moment. 

fo/mo/deep members include:

Ron Holmes, Basses
Keith Newton, Saxes / Flute
Andre Scott, Drums
Josh Boyd, Piano / Organ / Keyboards

 

Thank you for your consideration – For more information, booking, interviews, etc….

Please contact: 

Ron "Fatkat" Holmes
email - fomodeep@gmail.com
web - www.fomodeep.com
facebook - www.facebook.com/fomodeep
listen at - soundcloud.com/fomodeep

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Some of our notable past performances from the last 6 years include:


Columbus Jazz & Rib Festival, Columbus, OH
Capital Jazz Fest (after-party), Columbia, MD
Blue Wisp Jazz Club, Cincinnati, OH
Lansing JazzFest, Lansing, MI
SXSW 2013,  Austin, TX
Jazz in the Park, Milwaukee, WI
The African American Culture Festival, Raleigh, NC
Nighttown, Cleveland, OH
Opening for Roy Ayers in Baltimore, MD & Columbus, OH
Jazz in the Park Festival, Forest Park, OH
Heritage Concert Series, Columbus, OH
Easton “Sounds on the Town" Summer Concert Series, Columbus, OH
Creekside Blues & Jazz Festival, Gahanna, OH
Columbus Arts Festival, Columbus, OH
Comfest, Columbus, OH
Dick’s Den, Columbus, OH
Vonn Jazz, Columbus, OH

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Band Members