Fusion Jazz Trio
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Fusion Jazz Trio

Allentown, PA | Established. Jan 01, 2002 | SELF

Allentown, PA | SELF
Established on Jan, 2002
Band Jazz Pop

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Aug
14
Fusion Jazz Trio @ PPL Plaza

Fountain Hill, Pennsylvania, United States

Fountain Hill, Pennsylvania, United States

Aug
03
Fusion Jazz Trio @ Musikfest -BB&T Jazz Caberet Stage

Fountain Hill, Pennsylvania, United States

Fountain Hill, Pennsylvania, United States

May
26
Fusion Jazz Trio @ Ag Hall

Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States

Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States

Music

Press


"Band Review"

The Jazz Fusion Trio will be celebrating two firsts on Friday. It will be the first time the group performs in the Allentown Symphony's jazz cabaret series. And it will be celebrating the release of its new CD, ''Fusion.''

Drummer Vern Mobley says the trio, formed in 2002, has passed up other opportunities to record because it wanted to record all original material. Mobley says the CD's wide range includes traditional, Latin and funky jazz and even a bit of reggae.

Despite its name, the group does not play heavy, rock-based ''fusion'' jazz. And although Mobley has called the music ''smooth,'' it is not the over-produced and equalized product you hear on many radio stations. ''It's not over the top like some fusion, but it won't put you to sleep either,'' he says.

What the trio does do is lively and swinging music that combines originals with covers by artists ranging from Stevie Wonder to Dave Brubeck.
When you add up the music careers of Mobley, bassist Brian Bortz and pianist David Kinkaid, it totals more than 100 years.

Mobley started when he was young in religious music. He still works as a church organist.

He says that over time the three have ''gotten inside of each other's minds. We are comfortable knowing where we are going, and we can do a lot of exploring because of that.''

Fusion will remain a trio at Symphony Hall, although it has a guest sax on some gigs or even an extra bassist or two. You can hear cuts from live shows on its Web site. This summer the trio will play its second consecutive year at Musikfest. - Dave Howell


"Review of CD Fusionistic"

Fusion Jazz Trio has composed some very technically involved compositions that are able to achieve widespread appeal. This work is clean and the production is as near to perfect as I have ever heard. The instrumentation and ear for tone is nothing less than spectacular. The CD has compositions that feature impressionable melodies, complex harmonization, constantly shifting themes and grooves, and lively rhythms that grab your attention and keep it by not repeating too long before the next change. FJT has a certain type of psychological mastery that knows just how long to work an idea before it is time to move on to the next idea. And, he has a similar mastery in balancing involved, guitar-intensive, speedy sections with slower melodic sections. There is so much thought put into these elements that I wonder if most listeners can appreciate FJT’s depth and energy they put into each number.

Some of the greats including Miles Davis, Al Di Meola, Pat Metheny, George Duke and Stanley Clarke can be compared favorably with what I have heard on this offering. The exceptionally clean production on this CD “Fusionistic – Live at Symphony Hall” give it a studio feel not often heard on a live effort.

“Night in Tunisia” has a nice simple flow between the keys and percussions that is pleasant and appealing. “Moondance” is a nice classic that is done very smooth and a pleasure to listen to. Usually I hate pop elements in Jazz, but this is a rare case when good musicianship compensates to override the pop-oriented sound. “Odyssey” has a nice Billy Cobham feel to it. The percussions are awesome!

“Shelter House” flows cleanly throughout with a flavor of the great George Benson incorporated in it. “Island Sunset” is a nice progressive style number that is greatly enhanced by David Kincaid’s awesome work on the keys. “Take Five” is timeless great with a nice funky flair FJT adds some nice originality to this awesome rendition.

“Jasmine” has a nice upbeat blend in the mold of a Jean Luc Ponty. Vern Mobley’s solo makes this tune groove! “Ann Street” is an exceptional original that has a nice straight rhythm and ivories that do the talking. Awesome bass solo! “Georgia” is masterful. This Hoagy Carmichael original is done with heart and feeling that would make the master blush.”Black Ice”is a nice up-tempo number that incorporates some soft keys, precise percussions and smooth rhythms. This is one of my favorites on this CD. - Michael Mckenna


"Review of CD Entitled "Fusionistic", Review written by Michael Mckenna September 14, 2010"

Fusion Jazz Trio has composed some very technically involved compositions that are able to achieve widespread appeal. This work is clean and the production is as near to perfect as I have ever heard. The instrumentation and ear for tone is nothing less than spectacular. The CD has compositions that feature impressionable melodies, complex harmonization, constantly shifting themes and grooves, and lively rhythms that grab your attention and keep it by not repeating too long before the next change. FJT has a certain type of psychological mastery that knows just how long to work an idea before it is time to move on to the next idea. And, he has a similar mastery in balancing involved, guitar-intensive, speedy sections with slower melodic sections. There is so much thought put into these elements that I wonder if most listeners can appreciate FJT’s depth and energy they put into each number.

Some of the greats including Miles Davis, Al Di Meola, Pat Metheny, George Duke and Stanley Clarke can be compared favorably with what I have heard on this offering. The exceptionally clean production on this CD “Fusionistic – Live at Symphony Hall” give it a studio feel not often heard on a live effort.

“Night in Tunisia” has a nice simple flow between the keys and percussions that is pleasant and appealing. “Moondance” is a nice classic that is done very smooth and a pleasure to listen to. Usually I hate pop elements in Jazz, but this is a rare case when good musicianship compensates to override the pop-oriented sound. “Odyssey” has a nice Billy Cobham feel to it. The percussions are awesome!

“Shelter House” flows cleanly throughout with a flavor of the great George Benson incorporated in it. “Island Sunset” is a nice progressive style number that is greatly enhanced by David Kincaid’s awesome work on the keys. “Take Five” is timeless great with a nice funky flair FJT adds some nice originality to this awesome rendition.

“Jasmine” has a nice upbeat blend in the mold of a Jean Luc Ponty. Vern Mobley’s solo makes this tune groove! “Ann Street” is an exceptional original that has a nice straight rhythm and ivories that do the talking. Awesome bass solo! “Georgia” is masterful. This Hoagy Carmichael original is done with heart and feeling that would make the master blush.”Black Ice”is a nice up-tempo number that incorporates some soft keys, precise percussions and smooth rhythms. This is one of my favorites on this CD.
- Michael McKenna


"Band of the Week: Fusion Jazz Trio"

Band of the Week: Jazz Fusion Trio
March 14, 2009
The Jazz Fusion Trio will be celebrating two firsts on Friday. It will be the first time the group performs in the Allentown Symphony's jazz cabaret series. And it will be celebrating the release of its new CD, ''Fusion.''

Drummer Vern Mobley says the trio, formed in 2002, has passed up other opportunities to record because it wanted to record all original material. Mobley says the CD's wide range includes traditional, Latin and funky jazz and even a bit of reggae.

Despite its name, the group does not play heavy, rock-based ''fusion'' jazz. And although Mobley has called the music ''smooth,'' it is not the over-produced and equalized product you hear on many radio stations. ''It's not over the top like some fusion, but it won't put you to sleep either,'' he says.

What the trio does do is lively and swinging music that combines originals with covers by artists ranging from Stevie Wonder to Dave Brubeck.
When you add up the music careers of Mobley, bassist Brian Bortz and pianist David Kinkaid, it totals more than 100 years.

Mobley started when he was young in religious music. He still works as a church organist.

He says that over time the three have ''gotten inside of each other's minds. We are comfortable knowing where we are going, and we can do a lot of exploring because of that.''

Fusion will remain a trio at Symphony Hall, although it has a guest sax on some gigs or even an extra bassist or two. You can hear cuts from live shows on its Web site. This summer the trio will play its second consecutive year at Musikfest.
- Dave Howell - The Morning Call Newspaper


"The Sounds of Success"

Eleven years of growth pushed the Lehigh Valley Music Awards into Allentown's Symphony Hall late Tuesday. And a good thing it did.

The six-hour ceremony had the largest crowd -- 822 people, a 60 percent increase in the past two years -- the most volunteers, most sponsors and most involvement by both performers and the community in its history, said Gloria Domina, who co-directed the ceremony with Amanda Zaniesienko.

In addition, the ornate venue added sophistication to the event for performers, Domina said. It was the first time limousines pulled up in front of the show, and some of the crowd was in evening wear.

''We wanted to showcase them in the light they deserve,'' Domina said. The show even included opera for the first time, with a performance by Lane Conklin.

But none of that meant the show was staid or stuffy.

''We're just here for the music, not the dress,'' Domina said.

The ceremony, which handed out more than 60 awards chosen by online voting, started with an appropriately loud and abrasive version of Jefferson Airplane's ''Somebody to Love'' by Easton School of Rock's Bank Street Band, a bunch of middle-schoolers who apparently understand the heart of rock 'n' roll.

''It brought a tear to my eye,'' Ian Bruce said.

The band won Best Teenage Band or Solo Artist.

Bruce, the awards founder, is general manager of the group Lehigh Valley Music Awards. It's run by a board of directors; Bruce stepped down as a director last year.

Bruce also added a rebellious element to the night, starting with a spoof on Country Joe McDonald's famous ''Fish Cheer'' from the Woodstock festival.

''Gimme an 'F,' gimme a 'U,''' he shouted, before finishing with ''gimme an 'N.' What's that spell? Fun -- music should be fun.''

One thing that didn't change with the awards was blues singer Sarah Ayers' role as top winner.

Ayers, who won 10 awards two years ago and seven last year, again took home seven Tuesday, including Best Female Vocalist, Best Blues Vocalist, and the local music industry's Best Female Vocalist -- for at least the seventh time in a row.

She also won Best Singer/Songwriter, Best Blues Vocalist, Best Original Song for ''I've Got Something To Say,'' Best Lyricist, Best Live Blues Performance and, with her Sarah Ayers Band, Best Live Band Jam Performance.

''I love this, this is great,'' Ayers said in her acceptance speech. She attributed her success to her band members. And her fans.

''Your faith in me is staggering,'' she said. ''I love you people.''

But her four-year run as Best All Around Entertainer ended. That award went to Tony Zito, with whom she shared it last year.

The ceremony's heavy focus on performance -- 15 on the single stage -- meant not all the awards were announced from the stage, and Ayers was among the few winners who gave acceptance speeches.

The awards were chosen by online voting. Fans living in the Lehigh Valley region voted for 32 of them, while musicians and industry professionals in the region cast votes for 24. A record of 4,014 votes were cast -- up 50 percent from last year.

Several awards were won by acts that gave great performances at the ceremony.

Fusion Jazz Trio, who won Best Live Jazz Performance, cut loose for an even hotter set than their great performance two nights ago at the A Lehigh Valley Christmas show. The audience gave them hearty cheers and clapped along with their jam.

The same was true for James Supra Band, which had the crowd clapping. Supra won Best Harmonica Player.

At last year's 10th anniversary awards, on three floors of Allentown's Brew Works, Domina said she was delighted the audience danced for the first time at the show.

It happened again Tuesday, though in a limited fashion. After former ''American Idol'' finalist Ian Holmes won three awards -- Best Singer/Songwriter, Best Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music Solo Artist and Best Live Christian Band -- he took the stage with his Holmes Family band for an amazing vocal performance that drew spontaneous applause from the crowd.

And spontaneous dancing.

The late night ended with an all-star cast singing a ragged but impassioned version of Christina Aguilera's ''Soar'' at midnight.
- John J. Moser of The Morning Call


"Get Into the Act Series: Get Into the Act"

I love to play music."

Vern Mobley is likely to say that many times in a conversation. You can tell it's true when he plays with his Fusion Jazz Trio, which has been performing for two years at Valley nightspots.

Mobley's influences go beyond jazz to gospel, R&B, funk and classical. On any given night you might hear covers of songs by Herbie Hancock, Marvin Gaye, the Doobie Brothers, the Beatles or Louis Armstrong.

The group also plays originals written by their two main electric keyboardists, Dave Kincaid and Barry Sames. Drummer Mobley uses different musicians depending on availability. The bassists that share the stage with him most often are Brian Bortz or Mobley's brother Warren Mobley.

Mobley describes the group's songs as "the things that you would hear on a smooth jazz radio station." But heard live, the music surpasses much of the overly synthesized fare on the airwaves. Each band member is an accomplished soloist, and the interaction on stage give the music more kick.

Mobley, who moved to the Valley 12 years ago, feels good about the local jazz scene. "There is a great audience for jazz here, and it has started to grow. There has been more going on in the past six months than in the last 10 years."

"It's all about enjoyment," adds Mobley. "Our audiences enjoy it because we do."

Dave Howell - The Morning Call Newspaper


"Smooth Jazz Sets the Beat at Edge"

A fiery flow of smooth jazz, combined with a delicious assortment of appetizers, made media night at Edge Restaurant featuring the Fusion Jazz Trio a memorable one.

Fusion Jazz Trio, based in the Lehigh Valley, invited members of the media to hear the sounds while enjoying a peaceful night at a Bethlehem restaurant Oct. 21



''We wanted to introduce the Fusion Jazz Trio to the public as smooth jazz music,'' said Vern Mobley, the band's drummer. ''This just happens to be one one of our favorite places to be.''

Fusion Jazz Trio formed over three years ago, but Mobley said the members have known each other for awhile. Together, they decided it was time to make some music.

''There are not too many bands in the Lehigh Valley that play this sort of stuff,'' Mobley said. ''Our set list includes music from Marvin Gaye to Stevie Wonder to the Beatles. The way smooth jazz goes, we play a little R&B, funk to rock.''

The night at Edge Restaurant featured Mobley, a resident of Coopersburg, on drums, Brian Bortz of Bethlehem on the bass and David Kinkaid of Reading on the keyboard.



Other musicians in the band include Mobley's brother, Warren Mobley, on bass and Barry Sames on piano. More musicians have also stepped forward to showcase their talents with the band.

Fusion Jazz Trio plays at Edge Restaurant, in Liberty Center at 74 W. Broad St., usually every other Friday from 9 p.m. to midnight.

Fran Mantz, general manager of Edge, said the group has always been a success.

''They work out very nice,'' he said. ''They happen to be one of our popular groups. They have a nice following.''

Following their mantra, ''Music is an understanding,'' the Fusion Jazz Trio will make sure their listeners have a good time
- Kelly Mitchell-The Bethlehem Chronicle


"Fusion Jazz Trio mixes it up for live taping"

The “fusion” in Fusion Jazz Trio can mean different things: the group’s incorporation of different musical styles, its use of electric instruments and a drum kit expanded from the average jazz setup or its combination of the intricacy of jazz with the excitement of rock.

Decide for yourself Jan. 11 when Fusion Jazz Trio performs in the Jazz Upstairs Series at Miller Symphony Hall in Allentown.

The trio, which won its 10th consecutive Lehigh Valley Music Award in 2017, is decidedly jazz. Drummer Vern Mobley uses unusual time signatures, keyboardist George Grund takes elaborate melodic explorations and Brian Bortz plays supercharged lead as much as rhythm with his electric basses.

But for the songs, Mobley says, “It depends on your definition of jazz. We pick good music. We don't want to be limited to one genre.”

He says, “My favorite movie of all time is ‘The Muppet Movie.’ It brings everyone to a happy place. We were playing ‘Rainbow Connection’ once and half the people in the restaurant got up and began to dance. It resonates with people.”
Vern Mobley
Vern Mobley founded Fusion Jazz Trio in 2002. (HUB WILLSON /CONTRIBUTED PHOTO)

At a recent show at Easton’s Lafayette Bar, the group played a jazzed-up version of “Frosty the Snowman” and the theme from “Sesame Street,” along with “My Favorite Things,” Weather Report’s “Birdland,” the funky “Pick Up the Pieces,” and originals “Jasmine” and “Shelter House.” They interacted with an appreciative audience, stretching out on the tunes while adding accomplished solos.

The group likely will play more of its own compositions on Jan. 11, the group’s third visit to Symphony Hall. It will be Mosley’s 10th appearance in the Jazz Upstairs series, including a Stevie Wonder tribute in 2017 with the Paul Kendall Quartet.

Like the other two Fusion Jazz Trio shows, this one will be recorded. Mobley plans to use it for a CD release to be called “Out of The Shadows.” The title came from his miraculous recovery when he walked away from his overturned car about a month ago. “That accident should have killed me,” he says.

Mobley says for a live recording, “There is more danger, but there is an opportunity for magic to happen.” Their first Symphony Hall appearance generated the CD “Fusionistic.”

The show will include guests Joe Mixon on guitar and Chet Brown on vocals. Bortz will be bringing his fretless six-string bass, a five-string and probably a four-string, along with many foot pedals. Grund will use a rack with a Hammond SK-1 keyboard and a Casio electric piano.

Mobley formed the Fusion Jazz Trio in 2002. Bortz has been a member since the first few years when he replaced Mobley’s brother Warren, who found it difficult to commute from Philadelphia.

“The musical relationship is real obvious when the two of us play together,” Mobley says. “People always say, ‘We can tell you guys are having a great time up there.’ ” The group has had a few keyboardists. Grund has played with the group for about two years.

Bortz says the Fusion Jazz Trio is different because it was “built from the bottom up instead of the top down,” meaning that it was formed around a rhythm section instead of a piano or saxophone. “The music is complex. There’s a lot of stuff going on. But there’s no single lead instrument.”

Bortz won the Lehigh Valley Music Award for Bass Guitarist three times. He says he made a breakthrough in his playing after many years when he decided, “I’m not worrying about what people think of me. I stopped thinking about it.” Among many other projects, he is in the Last Thursday Band, so called because it appears the last Thursday each month at the Hotel Bethlehem.

Grund, a native of the Lehigh Valley who moved back from Arizona, was the pianist for the Rob Stoneback Big Band 1993 to 2008. He has performed with the Coasters, the Drifters, Ben E. King, Lee Oskar, Lisa Simone and the Glenn Miller Orchestra.

Mobley has been the organist at Community Fellowship Cathedral of Allentown for 24 years. He has written many scores for plays and dance groups, and coaches women’s basketball. Bortz, currently at Bethlehem Community Fellowship Church, has been playing in church bands for over 20 years.

“I’ve been given a gift to play and I want to share it with as many people as possible,” Mobley says. “Music affects people like nothing else can.”

DETAILS

Fusion Jazz Trio

What: Lehigh Valley group records a live album with guests Joe Mixon, guitar, and Chet Brown, vocals

When: 7:30 p.m. Friday

Where: Miller Symphony Hall, Rodale Room, 23 N. Sixth St., Allentown

How much: $30 adv.; $35 door, includes light fare

Info: 610-432-6715, millersymphonyhall.org

jodi.duckett@mcall.com

Twitter @goguidelv

610-820-6704

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"Fusion Trio recording CD at ‘Jazz Upstairs’ concert"

Fusion Trio recording CD at ‘Jazz Upstairs’ concert
Thursday, January 10, 2019 by GEORGE VANDOREN Special to The Press in Focus

The Fusion Jazz Trio Miller Symphony Hall concert, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 11, marks the second time the trio has recorded a CD in the Rodale Community Room “Jazz Upstairs” series.

The ensemble of Vernon Mobley, drums; Brian Bortz, bass, and George Grund, keyboards, are joined by Joe Mixon, guitar, and Chet Brown, vocals.

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Fusion Jazz Trio recorded its first CD, “Fusionistic,” at Miller Symphony Hall.

Says Mobley, “I love recording in the studio, but there’s something special when there’s a crowd there. It ups everyone’s game. There’s a little bit of danger, but always the possibility of some magic happening.”

Mobley, who hails from Philadelphia, started the trio in 2002 with his brother Warren as primary bass player. Mobley was new to the Lehigh Valley jazz scene:

“I happened to meet Brian Bortz by chance at a church concert. We exchanged numbers and eventually I needed a bass player. He’s now been with the trio close to 13 years.”

Grund is also a long-time member of the trio.

Says Mobley, “I like the opportunity to play with the same guys. The more you play with a musician, the more you know about them and you can play with them in a very comfortable way. We have a lot of versatility. Brian and George always tend to say yes to my crazy musical ideas.”

Mixon has taught at the college level for more than 30 years. He has performed in music genres, from classical, to blues with the The Blue Professors, to reggae with The Big Wahu Caribbean Band. Mixon also heads the Artisan Jazz Trio. Bortz is bassist with the trio, as well.

Bortz plays with Philadelphia-based James Gerard Orchestra, the Last Thursday Band at Hotel Bethlehem, The Lehigh Valley Soul Project, Key Largo ... The Band, and the Brian Bortz Jazz Group. Most weekends he can be found with Praise Team at New Covenant Christian Community Church, Bethlehem.

Grund received a BA in Music Theory from West Chester University. He served with the 399th and 3rd Infantry Division Army Bands. Grund has played with the Coasters, Drifters, Ben E. King, Lisa Simone, Buzz Jones Big Band, Glenn Miller Orchestra, and Rob Stoneback Big Band.

Brown has long been a part of the Philadelphia music scene. He plays with the James Gerard Orchestra and is on the staff of Lehigh Valley Charter High School for the Arts.

Of the “Jazz Upstairs” concert, Mobley says, “It will be a mix. Of course, we’ll do ‘Out of the Shadows,’ the title track. There will be some original compositions and songs that aren’t ours but that I think capture the personality of the musician who is featured.

“I want people to have an opportunity to experience these incredible musicians and their personalities, to understand a few things about these musicians. It’s my honor to share a stage with them.”

Concerning the trio’s “fusion” moniker, Mobley says, “For me, the fusion part comes from the idea that many jazz musicians have a jazz background and dabble in other thing. That’s not the case with any of the guys in this band. They are unique musicians with very different backgrounds, and we apply jazz principles to our songs.

“My background is gospel and R&B. George and Brian have different backgrounds. We wrap all this together.

“We’ll take a song that people are familiar with, that’s a good song, and apply our backgrounds in a jazz way.

“You’ll have a different experience with that song. There may be some magic that happens in the song. I want to make sure my audience is always intrigued.”

Tickets: Miller Symphony Hall box office, 23 N. Sixth St., Allentown; allentownsymphony.org; 610-432-6715 - George Vandoren


"REVIEW: Fusion Jazz Trio leads a funky jazz party in Allentown"

Fusion Jazz Trio has made a lot of fans in its 17 years, and many of them filled the Rodale Community Room of Miller Symphony Hall Friday night. The Jazz Upstairs show, led by drummer Vern Mobley, combined complex, intricate jazz with a good natured party atmosphere that even featured Mobley leading the audience in a group wave.

To begin, keyboardist George Grund led the stately. moving song “Total Praise,” dedicated to the late Bishop Iris Smith of the Community Fellowship Cathedral of Allentown, where Mobley has been the organist for 24 years.

With Brian Bortz on bottom heavy five string bass, Grund on synth-like trippy keys and Mobley beating strong rhythms with cymbal flourishes, “Tu Tu” and “Gigabyte,” were so funky, the upstairs room would have been shut down if funk was illegal.

Guest Joe Mixon did bright, rock flavored guitar work on “Before You Go” and breakneck riffs on the late period Miles Davis “Black Satin.” Mobley announced a change of pace to end the first set with a rocking version of the “Sesame Street” theme.

Bortz did a melodic solo on the Yellowjackets’ “One Family” with his six string fretless bass, with a speed and dexterity that even few guitarists could match.

“Out of the Shadows” will be the title track for the live CD that will come from the recording of this show. Mobley explained it was named for his remarkable recoveries from cancer and a recent auto accident. Appropriately, it was an intense and spiritual tune.

Vocalist Chet Brown came on in a smooth, happy style with Al Jarreau’s “Mornin',” Bill Withers’ “Ain't No Sunshine,” and “On Green Dolphin Street,” using hand gestures and his whole body to enthusiastically communicate the songs.

Another surprise came at the end, as the trio shifted from Mobley’s “Jasmine” into Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean” and “Shake Your Body.”

There was a lot going on in Fusion Jazz’s music, with involved chord changes and time signatures. It’s not pop music, but it was totally accessible coming from the spirit and good times the musicians had onstage and with the audience.

Dave Howell is a freelance writer.

jodi.duckett@mcall.com

Twitter @goguidelv

610-820-6704

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Discography

Out of the Shadows 2019

Reverse Phycology 2012

Fusionistic 2010


Photos

Bio

Fusion Jazz Trio (FJT) was formed in 2002. This smooth jazz trio blends bold percussion, funky and innovative bass lines, and electrifying keyboard refrains into a refreshing musical signature sure to please any discerning audience. FJT has been featured at corporate and charitable affairs, at notable restaurants, as well as many professional associations and private engagements throughout the Lehigh Valley and beyond.

Drawing from their own personal backgrounds, rhythmic influences and passion for playing, the members of Fusion Jazz Trio Vern Mobley, Brian Bortz and George Grund are consummate, dedicated musicians eager to share their mellow tones and sultry sounds with new listeners. Whether you have a special occasion to celebrate or simply want to be entertained, Fusion Jazz Trio is your fusionistic passport to great vibes and good times.

The trio, which won its 10th consecutive Lehigh Valley Music Award in 2017, is decidedly jazz. Drummer Vern Mobley uses unusual time signatures, keyboardist George Grund takes elaborate melodic explorations and Brian Bortz plays supercharged lead as much as rhythm with his electric basses.


Band Members