Producer/DJ Gene King
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Producer/DJ Gene King

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The best kept secret in music

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"Gene King Interview on Afrofutures"

Gene King, a world renowned DJ, music producer, re-mixer and CEO of Shines Records, has been a mainstay in house music for over twenty years. His family are originally from St. Vincent and the Grenadines, but Gene was born and raised in Montreal where he listened to a lot of music. Tantra Zawadi caught up with Gene King and below is the little talk they had.
AF: Gene, what kind of music did you listen to when you were growing up? What were your influences?
GK: Wow! There is too much music and too many bands, musicians and producers for me to mention or to think of spur of the moment. I listened to a lot of my parents’ music when I was a boy; everything that they were into: West Indian music like Calypso (this was before Soca), Reggae, Latin and African music, Spouge (a groove from the island of Barbados that’s related to Calypso with a funk edge to it), and a lot of the soul and pop music that they were into at the time.
As an adult, now I actually appreciate the music they grew up with in the 50’s (laughter)! I hated it when I was a kid. Through my dad and my older cousins, I discovered a lot of the soul, funk and R&B stuff that was out there and that taste evolved into the music I listened to during the disco era. My influences are from generations of musicians, bands and producers from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s. People like: Billy Preston, Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Eumir Deodato, Ramsey Lewis, Herbie Hancock, Roger Troutman, Norman Whitfield, Larry Graham, Greg Rolie, Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff, the Jackson Family, Marvin Gaye circa 1970-1976 and King Curtis. Later, I discovered Jimmy Smith, Byron Lee and his excellent musicians, Frankie Mcintosh, Giorgio Moroder, Kraftwerk, George Clinton, James Brown circa 1968-1976, The JB’s, Fatback Band, War, Osibisa, Manu Dibango, Nick Martinelli, Jaques Fred Petrus and Mauro Malavasi, Jellybean Benitez (who is the guy that inspired me to get into producing being a DJ himself and becoming a superstar re-mixer/producer in the 80’s), as well as Arthur Baker and Robert Ouimet of Montreal. Honestly, there is so much music that has passed through me, it is impossible to name everything and everyone. But all of these people and more have influenced me musically throughout my life. My parents have been an influence on my life in general aside from musical influences.
AF: Given Gene’s longevity in the house music industry, I was curious about his thoughts on house music in the 21st century.
GK: That can be taken many different ways. In the 21st century, I really like the digital age for its conveniences in making the world smaller, but I think we as artists, producers and label owners are paying a price for that. Many studios, record stores, distributors and labels have closed in a short space of time, and there is no quality control anymore. Technology is great, but it has its downside. These things really hurt sales, and yes some people don’t seem to think so or understand how important circulating money is, but this is the reality whether you like it or not, or whether you disagree with me or not. I definitely miss the days of manufacturing hard product that people would pay money for instead of a virtual piece of information that can be copied, shared, pirated, altered and deleted in a split second.
I really don’t know what’s in the future and to be honest I think I am glad that I don’t know. I’ll just keep making my music as long as I am able on my own terms and my own way because now, that’s all we really have isn’t it? That is, until we start getting some big money marketing in this sub-genre. As for sub-genres, house music in the 21st century has become confusing. I am still trying to make sense out of it. There are now so many sub-genres that it’s become more segregated and cut into little pieces; so depending on what style of house music you are talking about, I can see certain genres evolving into something big and others falling into oblivion to be forgotten in the years to come. Business-wise, I am hoping that we can find ways to actually make money again to keep it going.
AF: There is a huge presence from South Africa in “house” (artists, producers and record labels). What is your take on the South African influence?
GK: It’s nice to see that there is a scene, and from what I understand, is larger than life in Africa right now. Hopefully the trend will go all over the world and bring it back to the rest of the global dance world. I love getting messages from people that enjoy what I do and it seems to come from that part of the world mostly. It’s refreshing and also nice to see that a lot of younger people are into the music over there. It’s not really the case in North America at the moment. It’s a relief to me that younger people can feel this music and their support is really keeping it alive. The onslaught of producers and artists coming out of that area is also refreshing. It just makes the music still relevant today.
AF: You are a D - http://www.afrofutures.com & www.motionfm.com


"Gene King Interview on Afrofutures"

Gene King, a world renowned DJ, music producer, re-mixer and CEO of Shines Records, has been a mainstay in house music for over twenty years. His family are originally from St. Vincent and the Grenadines, but Gene was born and raised in Montreal where he listened to a lot of music. Tantra Zawadi caught up with Gene King and below is the little talk they had.
AF: Gene, what kind of music did you listen to when you were growing up? What were your influences?
GK: Wow! There is too much music and too many bands, musicians and producers for me to mention or to think of spur of the moment. I listened to a lot of my parents’ music when I was a boy; everything that they were into: West Indian music like Calypso (this was before Soca), Reggae, Latin and African music, Spouge (a groove from the island of Barbados that’s related to Calypso with a funk edge to it), and a lot of the soul and pop music that they were into at the time.
As an adult, now I actually appreciate the music they grew up with in the 50’s (laughter)! I hated it when I was a kid. Through my dad and my older cousins, I discovered a lot of the soul, funk and R&B stuff that was out there and that taste evolved into the music I listened to during the disco era. My influences are from generations of musicians, bands and producers from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s. People like: Billy Preston, Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Eumir Deodato, Ramsey Lewis, Herbie Hancock, Roger Troutman, Norman Whitfield, Larry Graham, Greg Rolie, Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff, the Jackson Family, Marvin Gaye circa 1970-1976 and King Curtis. Later, I discovered Jimmy Smith, Byron Lee and his excellent musicians, Frankie Mcintosh, Giorgio Moroder, Kraftwerk, George Clinton, James Brown circa 1968-1976, The JB’s, Fatback Band, War, Osibisa, Manu Dibango, Nick Martinelli, Jaques Fred Petrus and Mauro Malavasi, Jellybean Benitez (who is the guy that inspired me to get into producing being a DJ himself and becoming a superstar re-mixer/producer in the 80’s), as well as Arthur Baker and Robert Ouimet of Montreal. Honestly, there is so much music that has passed through me, it is impossible to name everything and everyone. But all of these people and more have influenced me musically throughout my life. My parents have been an influence on my life in general aside from musical influences.
AF: Given Gene’s longevity in the house music industry, I was curious about his thoughts on house music in the 21st century.
GK: That can be taken many different ways. In the 21st century, I really like the digital age for its conveniences in making the world smaller, but I think we as artists, producers and label owners are paying a price for that. Many studios, record stores, distributors and labels have closed in a short space of time, and there is no quality control anymore. Technology is great, but it has its downside. These things really hurt sales, and yes some people don’t seem to think so or understand how important circulating money is, but this is the reality whether you like it or not, or whether you disagree with me or not. I definitely miss the days of manufacturing hard product that people would pay money for instead of a virtual piece of information that can be copied, shared, pirated, altered and deleted in a split second.
I really don’t know what’s in the future and to be honest I think I am glad that I don’t know. I’ll just keep making my music as long as I am able on my own terms and my own way because now, that’s all we really have isn’t it? That is, until we start getting some big money marketing in this sub-genre. As for sub-genres, house music in the 21st century has become confusing. I am still trying to make sense out of it. There are now so many sub-genres that it’s become more segregated and cut into little pieces; so depending on what style of house music you are talking about, I can see certain genres evolving into something big and others falling into oblivion to be forgotten in the years to come. Business-wise, I am hoping that we can find ways to actually make money again to keep it going.
AF: There is a huge presence from South Africa in “house” (artists, producers and record labels). What is your take on the South African influence?
GK: It’s nice to see that there is a scene, and from what I understand, is larger than life in Africa right now. Hopefully the trend will go all over the world and bring it back to the rest of the global dance world. I love getting messages from people that enjoy what I do and it seems to come from that part of the world mostly. It’s refreshing and also nice to see that a lot of younger people are into the music over there. It’s not really the case in North America at the moment. It’s a relief to me that younger people can feel this music and their support is really keeping it alive. The onslaught of producers and artists coming out of that area is also refreshing. It just makes the music still relevant today.
AF: You are a D - http://www.afrofutures.com & www.motionfm.com


Discography

(Production and Remixes 1991 - Present )

Title Artist Label
1. Freedom Lifetime OnTheMove/Debut Records(UK)
2. GK Experience Experience Contraband
3. I Need A Man Kairene Contraband/Radikal(US)
4. The Illegal E.P Infiltrate Contraband/Slip N Slide(UK)
5. C'Mon Infiltrate Contraband /KMS
6. Lies and Alibi’s Gene King Ft.T’Wan On The Move

7. 2000 Genetix Defender(UK)
8. Groove Movement Groove Movement On the Move
9. Sailaway Lifetime Wicked/Contraband
10. No More Lies DeLacy Easy Street(US)
11. Stand up be Strong Dee landez Contraband
12. I Stand Up Kairene Contraband
13. I was wrong Wild Strawberries Warner (CAN)
To Let You Go
14. Boogie Oogie
Dancin Shoes REMIX Claudja Barry Quality/Radikal(US)
15. Love Will Fix It Genetix Ultrasound
16. Real Remix West Magnetic Sounds Like Ultra
17.Love Ya life Genetix EargasmicRecordings(US)
18.Spacedust EP GK Experience Mixed signals
19.Candy Store Project 104 ft. Gentle Aura Mixed Signals
20 .Spirituality Project 104 ft Lotus Shines Records
21.Sunrise Genetix ft. Shancoy Shines Records Dream Music JAPAN
22. Yours Truly Darnell Kendricks Album (JAPAN release)
23. Can You Feel The Rhythm – DJ Pope ft.Lynette Smith - Poji Records(US)
24. Sweet Memories Plusgroove Ft. Nicole Stoffman Plusgroove Records
25.Konkrete Jungle Plusgroove Shines Records
26. From The Mind of Genetix Genetix Shines records
27. - Vincy Soul – Vincy Soul Project Shines Records
28.Get Yourself Together - Demarkus Lewis ft. Marissa Guzman- Soulstar (Eu)
29. Come Into my life Antoinette Contraband Music
30. We Belong To The Night - Suges - Soulstream Records
31. That’s Enough For Me - Gene King Ft.Sacha - Shines Records
32. Changes - Gene King Ft.Sacha - Shelter Records (USA)
33.Screwface City - Genetix -Shines Records
34.Keep On Movin - Dos Almas Ft Darnell Kendricks - Plusgroove
35 .NYTE FLYTE TO ZION Gene King Presents – Noble Square Recordings USA
36.Miss Yvonne The Look Of Love - Consortium Muzik USA
37.KOKOTSO! - Yo NURican - JellyBean Soul USA
38.Surrender - Dos Almas Ft. Jackie Ferretti - Plusgroove Records
39.Fly - Stephanie Cooke- Consortium Muzik USA
40.Light Of Love - John Crockett ft Natalie -Haus Flor Records USA
41.Suges Jam - Suges - SoulStream Records
42.Jones in My bones - Gene King pres. Darnell Kendricks - Mixed signals music
43. Love Ya Life - Genetix - Eargasmic Recordings USA
44.Your Gravity - John Crockett Ft. Natalie - Haus Flor Records USA
45 Take your Heart - DJ Aphreme & J.S.O.U.L - Seasons Recordings USA
46.Secrets of life - Nastee Nev ft Dana Byrd & Tantra Zawadi - DoItNow Records SA
47. I Get That - DJ Jozana Pres.Nancy Clayton - - Private World US
48. I Am - Gene King Pres. Jacen Duncan - DoItNow Records SA
49. Joe’s Revelation - Haneef Raisani ft DJ Roland Clark - Raisani Records Dubai
50.Juniour White Pres. Noelle - On My Way -Shines Records
51.Gene King - The Laptop EP - Exit Recordings
52.Suges ft.Michael David Dizon - I'll Be There - Soulstream Records
53.Serge Negri ft.Tasha - Night And Day - BamBoo Sound USA
54. Dovie Cote - Dance Of life - Smooth Agent Records
55.IndySoul Pres. Wayne Tennant - I'm Done - Shines Records
56. Indysoul ft Tantra-zawadi & Aleijuan Afuraka - We Are The Stars- Gotta Keep Faith Records ITALY
57.Monocles & Slezz,Room806 feat.Holi - When Im With You - Skalla Records SA
58. Deep Xcape Ft Tantra Zawadi & Dana Byrd - Fire - Deep Xcape records SA
59.Monocles and slezz ft andy compton tantra zawdi & dana byrd- my only love - Foliage Records
60. Suges ft.Deon Nathan - In Love Agaiin
61.Gene King Pres Darnell Kendricks - Good Love- Mixed Signals Music
62 . Guerilla Science ft Anume(A-New-Me) - Changes - MoreHouse Records

Photos

Bio

For bookings:
Contact@awepromotions.com

Growing up in Montreal during the 70’s and 80’s, Gene King's childhood was heavily influenced by a plethora of good, rich Music. By 1978, at the tender age of 13, King, who had already been dabbling with musical instruments, then naturally discovered the art of deejaying and hence started playing high school dances and roller-skating rinks, soon after.
From 1982 to 1987, King played at various dance clubs all over Montreal, Canada. Relocating to Toronto in 1987, Gene began playing steady gigs all around town, from well-known nightclubs, to smaller, more intimate venues and private events.
By the early 90's, Gene's love affair with studio production began. Now, over 20 years later, he has garnered love from true House Music fans across the globe by moulding an impressive discography for numerous ground-breaking Dance Music labels such as : Contraband, A&M, BMG, KMS, Defender, Slip N’Slide, Debut, Hi-Bias, Warner, Easy Street Records, Ultrasound, Philosophie Music, Priti Soul/Jellybean Records, and finally, the powerhouse 157 Shelter Records, the legendary staple out of New York City.
In October 2005, King founded his very own Shines Records imprint, which later spawned Plusgroove Records, releasing such dance-floor faves as “Sunrise" (by Genetix ft. Shanchoy), "Do with You" (by Suges ft. Limore), and many others.
The year 1993 saw King joining the ranks of Toronto's CKLN 88.1 FM, where he began deejaying "on the air" for the Midnight Madness show (later known as Soul Fusion Express). Soon enough, King branched off to create and produce his very own Vibes N Vinyl weekly radio show at CKLN, which turned into a quintessential T-dot staple for House Music fans.
Nowadays, the essential Vibes N Vinyl weekly radio show can be heard on MotionFM, Wednesdays from 6 to 8pm, EST.