Generals & Majors

Generals & Majors

BandRockPunk

The heat of The Stooges, with the spit of MC5, sprinkled with a bit of The Animals.

Biography

In a stark, damp basement in downtown NYC there is a revolution brewing -- a long-awaited revival of a rock & roll sound missing from the underground for too long.

As each member of the five-person collective Generals & Majors prepares on stage, it's hard to gage exactly what you're in for during their live show. Then enter the punch-hard guitar riffs, driving bass-lines and a front man who puts any other guy who has said he's a front man to shame. Suddenly he's kicking, jumping and wailing powerfully but perfectly into the mike and you realize you want to kick, jump and wail too. This is the revolution; this is Generals & Majors. Real rock: the kind that made you even like listening to music in the first place.

The start of this collective came about in 2001 when bass-player JG General and guitarist Jesse "The General" Jones met while playing in alt-country band The Izzys. They remained band-mates on their next project Group Sounds; a NYC-area punk rock favorite that toured with Tapes n' Tapes, Hot Hot Heat and Radio 4, but they still hadn't found a way to channel the hard-hitting sound they craved. Finally, with fellow Group Sounds guitarist Rich Majors, they auditioned drummer Jimmy Majors and a man with enough intensity and voltage to command Generals & Majors: Derrick Karg aka Rat Bite (who incidentally was on antibiotics for a rat bite he got while sleeping on a friend's couch). One rock-out session later and they officially became the band that is going to take the rock music scene by crude assault.

Reigning in influences from the likes of MC5 and The Animals and tying it together with a subtle gothic lyrical style reminiscent of Steven King, Generals & Majors create lurking symbolic imagery to tell tales of the chaos and relationships we all experience. From adjusting to city-life, finding personal fulfillment or just trying to play rock without all the hype, there is a fervent rawness to each song that makes it all undeniably real.