At first blush, there doesn't seem to be much connection between Alberta's Peace Country and the Mississippi Delta. With a debut album that sets evocative stories of northern life to a backdrop of honest and gritty blues-rock, Ghostkeeper makes that link undeniable and unforgettable. Children of the Great Northern Muskeg is the product of a long journey, one which began in High Level and the Paddle Prairie Metis Settlement. Inspired by the likes of Creedence Clearwater Revival and Robert Johnson, self-taught musicians Shane Ghostkeeper (vocals, guitar, songwriting) and Sarah Houle (drums, vocals, songwriting) travelled south to Calgary to follow their artistic muses. Their from-the-heart sound captured the interest of that city’s musical community, including producer Lorrie Matheson, who took them under his wing and into the studio. With guitarist Jay Crocker and bassist Scott Munro filling out their ranks, the group creates raw, real roots music with a powerful kick and a unique viewpoint. While Shane and Sarah’s lyrics focus on the everyday truths of life in a remote Metis community — family, work, spirituality, the burdens of the past — they nevertheless have a universal resonance. It’s hard not to identify with the youthful romance in “Skipping Church” or the potent ties that bind in “Three More Springs” and “The Boxes and The Bottles”. “If you prefer bonfires to television, lakes over swimming pools, the aurora borealis to fireworks, and wild soulful sincere ragged romantic rhythm ’n’ blues music to slick, clean, play-acted angst- pop, then chances are you'll love the band Ghostkeeper.” Jesse Powell, Beatroute Magazine, February 2007


Ghostkeeper and the Children of the Great Northern Muskeg