Ginger Brown
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Ginger Brown

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"Music from Elsewhere"

Because I've been listening to some old Sixties vinyl -- Sam the Sham, Paul Revere, La De Das, the McCoys etc -- this album by a Wellington outfit which is driven by the organ playing of Lawrence Taula has captured my attention.

There's real Sixties pop quality about the songwriting, Taula also sings like less addled Jim Morrison in places, the guitars of Matthew Armitage perhaps unintentionally reference some of those acts mentioned above, and the whole things swings along with a real r'n'b energy that was common four decades ago.

Hmmm. Very interesting indeed.
Who Scared Who review / Graham Reid, elsewhere.co.nz
- elsewhere.co.nz


"Simon Sweetman review"

Ginger Brown is a lively trio promoting the sound of the Hammond organ, specifically the 1960s swirls. Carnival rhythms collide against one another as tunes fall in and out of rock, jazz and psychedelic-pop – and really, at times, it is very easy to imagine you are listening to Shaman-less version of The Doors. That’s not a bad thing, though, and transcending that obvious comparison, Ginger Brown has proved itself an live group. The album Who Scared Who is a short, sharp burst (less than half an hour long) of what the band does best. Boston Dance, in many ways the centrepiece of the album, demonstrates all that is good about the group: surf organ and circus guitar stabs mingling with a wild array of Carney-screams and a lively bit of drum – thunder. It’s very much in the vein of Alabama Song – The Doors, the organ being poked and prodded, the drums tap dancing behind the vocals but, even on record, Ginger Brown sounds like a group having fun. I definitely recommend seeing the group live. - Dom Post 22/May/09


"Put on your acid glasses, baby, this one’s for the trippers."

A swinging ‘60’s psychedelic album that would sit perfectly as the sound track to every Tarantino film ever made, ‘Who Scared Who’ is the first full-length album for the Wellington act. With a live EP already out, I had been gagging for more and was well pleased when this new one fell on my lap.

‘Who Scared Who’ was recorded at Island Bay Studios, a converted church, and thanks to the acoustics of the room they have produced an incredible sound, refreshing compared to the generic wash of today’s polished studio tones. The production is really special and I was very impressed with some of the keyboard sounds they created. The album as a unit is complete, cohesive and...real choice.
- Fleur Jack, Groove Guide


"Who Scared Who"

This is the debut album for a Wellington outfit known for
their freaky and electric live performances in bars, lounges,
masquerade parties, practically anywhere you can lug a Hammond
organ. With a live recording circulating in the underground
for a few years and a bit of radio play here and there Ginger
Brown have built up a strong and mysterious rep and must have
wanted to get an album out there pretty quick. The huge
psychedelic carnival sound is captured well thoughout ‘Who
Scared Who’ with the skill of Nic McGowan from Island Bay
Studios, but does setle at times in that difficult area of
translating an energetic live performance into a mastered
studio album. The skill of Lawrence Taula on organ is hard to
ignore as is his vocal range stretching from high and forlorn
to howling and deranged. Joe Dobson kicks out a diverse and
talented sound on drums and must go through a few skins, while
Matthew Armitage completes the trio on guitar with solid ‘60s
rockabilly respectability. A slight tease of instruments
feature, showing promise for these guys to deliver more sans
vocals. Songs such as Boston Dance, It’s The Wekend and
Blinded by Light deliver a real show of power for Ginger Brown
and make them easily one of the most unique and
modern/nostalgic bands about at present. I think in the
future they could better focus on creating different music for
their studio albms, possibly going a bit ‘concept’ and then,
when they feel the need, record a live one. - Rhys Morgan, NZ Musician


Discography

2007 - Live at Indigo EP
2008 - Who Scared Who - Studio Album.

Photos

Bio

Simon Sweetman review – Dom Post 22/May/09 Ginger Brown is a lively trio promoting the sound of the Hammond organ, specifically the 1960s swirls. Carnival rhythms collide against one another as tunes fall in and out of rock, jazz and psychedelic-pop – and really, at times, it is very easy to imagine you are listening to Shaman-less version of The Doors. That’s not a bad thing, though, and transcending that obvious comparison, Ginger Brown has proved itself an live group. The album Who Scared Who is a short, sharp burst (less than half an hour long) of what the band does best. Boston Dance, in many ways the centrepiece of the album, demonstrates all that is good about the group: surf organ and circus guitar stabs mingling with a wild array of Carney-screams and a lively bit of drum – thunder. It’s very much in the vein of Alabama Song – The Doors, the organ being poked and prodded, the drums tap dancing behind the vocals but, even on record, Ginger Brown sounds like a group having fun. I definitely recommend seeing the group live.