GreenTaRA

GreenTaRA

 Vancouver, British Columbia, CAN
SoloR&BSinger/Songwriter

Armed with a rare voice, a red guitar and bass-heavy beats, GreenTaRA launches "sonic-shrapnel bombs of positivity."

Band Press

Exclaim! Magazine – Ryan B. Patrick/Del F. Cowie

"Global Baby gets listeners bodied with a chunky, funky soul sound and an intriguing mix of singing, rap and spoken word. The reggae/dub-tinged track “Controller” and “From the Moment We Drop” speak from a historical perspective, while the gospel-flavoured funk of “Get Up” and the Motown-meets-hip-hop “Revolution Time” feature an unapologetic funked-up feel. Global Baby manages to go weighty on social commentary without being overly preachy or heavy-handed. It’s an ambitious musical salve for the soul." - Ryan B. Patrick (2007)

"There’s an innate intimacy that comes across in GreenTaRA’s personal politics; whether she’s singing or slipping into her occasionally rhymed verses, her willingness to address her own internal issues (“Sexual Reality”) or encouraging self worth (“Deadly ‘Til You Die”) all come across so genuinely, it’s pointless to be cynical listening to such refreshingly executed music." - Del F. Cowie (2005)

Toronto Star – Ashante Infantry

GreenTaRA fuses reggae and soul with sassy Jill Scott-style ruminations about love, life and historical figures such as abolitionist Harriet Tubman.

MTV – Pat Taylor

Her unique voice is versatile with an incredible range. Her songs are heartfelt and take a stance in support of the environment and humankind.

The Cyberkrib – Nehal

The best phrase I could come up with to describe her musical genre is "music of the people" - all the influences she draws from have the roots in social and political forms of expression.

TaRA’s voice is compelling - she has no aspirations to vocal pretensions; and as a performer, it seems to me that she knows her voice and how to use it to her advantage. Her mastery of the lyrics is intriguing - some words she lets slide off her tongue; others she expels with puffs of air; still others she plays with, teasing them a little before letting them escape.

NOW Magazine – Jason Richards/Addi Stewart

"GreenTaRA might be described as equal parts Ursula Rucker, N’Dea Davenport and Bahamadia. This steadily rising BC native’s organic artistry has been growing since 1996, and she’s now at the top of her game. She’s toured four continents independently, acoustic guitar in tow, invading the minds of the unsuspecting with sonic shrapnel bombs of positivity." - Addi Stewart (2008)

"Somehow, her voice evokes both Alanis Morissette and Jill Scott. With the sass of both, she frequently drops jewels about the science of life, sex, Jah and globalization, leaving the listener full of thought..." - Jason Richards (2005)

Terminal City – Amil Niazi

GreenTaRA has created a beautiful and diverse album with her "Music For A Mixed Nation". An attempt to capture the mosaic of Canada's mixed scene, Tara is helping to redefine the changing landscape of soul, funk and hip hop.

AnEvibe – Kindah Mardam Bey

A unique blend of African-America, Cherokee and Scottish roots, GreenTaRA seems to embody the music scene emerging from the West Coast Canadian music hub of Canada; with socially conscious songs like ‘Controller’ that speaks of Harriet Tubman, a former slave who became a conductor on the underground railway to eventually bring over 300 hundred slaves to freedom, and an edgy multi-cultural perspective, with a diverse synthesis of music ranges.

CD Baby "Global Baby" Review – Brad Bush - Music Editor

"I'm an average woman in my abnormality." It's lyrics like this that flow throughout this album and make for a refreshing take on funk-laced neo soul. She really runs the gamut on this collection of full bodied songs, incorporating horns, keys, scratching, and an unending array of rhythmic elements that leave no groove unturned.

Reminiscent of 70's soul but lavishly updated with a stylistically modern hip hop and R&B feel, the songs can't help but have a wide appeal. Moving from densely layered choruses to driving verses that embrace complex harmonies and even some rapping, the vocal intricacies alone are enough to make this record stand out. Add to that some intensely fluid playing by her accomplished backing band, and you've got an all out celebration of life, love and expression.

As the title implies, the songs are ambitious in their scope, delving into the of history on modern times and an ongoing search for ways to make the world a better place. With this album, she's undoubtedly doing her part.

Vue Weekly – Brian Birtles

Efficiency when it comes to touring goes a long way towards getting GreenTaRA’s tightly crafted sonic offerings—which blend funk, R&B, hip hop and a not insignificant amount of Motown—out into the air for people to hear...Perhaps more integral than Motown to GreenTaRA’s sound is a current of political activism that moves through her music.

Global Baby CD & Concert Reviews – Various

"If you like India.Arie or Erykah Badu, then you’ll love GreenTaRA. Her lyrics are chock full of her history, social commentary on everything from plastic surgery to racism, and, of course, relationship woes. She boasts an incredible range in both her singing and rapping skills, particularly on the standout track “Life Can Be Sweeter”, featuring Belladonna." - Sarah Leavitt, The Fulcrum (2007)

"It’s a good thing, GreenTaRA’s childhood dream of becoming an obstetrician did not pan out, as she went on to become an enchanting musician. Instead of delivering babies to the masses, this talented and socially conscious artist, delivers soul-moving jazz, funk and R&B tunes that reach the listener at a prolific level. Her latest album is called Global Baby and features such Motown numbers as Revolution Time and Reggae-inspired tracks as Controller." - Anila Umar, Urban Mixer (2007)

"Mixed race and adopted, the Vancouver soul singer known as GreenTaRA snubs music industry standards while attracting worldwide attention with her passionate pleas for social justice...The governing musical vibe of Global Baby sits somewhere between acid jazz and the silky vernacular of '70s soul." - Adrian Mack, Shared Vision Magazine (2008)