Greg Gardner & Voodoo Cowboy
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Greg Gardner & Voodoo Cowboy

Texarkana, Arkansas, United States | SELF

Texarkana, Arkansas, United States | SELF
Band Country Americana

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Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


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Discography

"Hard Liquor and a Handgun"-released 2006
"Juan Ton Dually"-released 2007
"139504"-released 2009

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

Over 15 years ago, Greg Gardner strapped a guitar over a shoulder that had supported an oversized chip for quite some time. Music became the means of transforming a bad attitude into outlaw art. Following in the renegade footprints of Willie, Waylon and Billy Joe Shaver, Gardner honed his honky-tonk talents in the smoky bars of Texas and Arkansas, eventually headlining shows like the Freedom Festival in front of nearly ten thousand fans. He has shared the stage with such musical luminaries as Billy Joe Shaver, Pat Green, Jack Ingram, Delbert McClinton, Ray Price, Charlie Robinson, David Allan Coe, Cross Canadian Ragweed, Confederate Railroad, T. Graham Brown, Dwight Yoakam, .38 Special and many others. Greg's country-rock dreams became firmly rooted in reality with the formation of his band, Voodoo Cowboy. The Texarkana-based group is known for high-energy, take-no-prisoners drive, strong harmonies and a beat that defies listeners to sit still. The band features Rod Liechti on guitar, Jake Gathright on fiddle, with the bottom end is held down by David Jones on bass and drummer Keith Calhoun. All of the songs that are written or co-written by Gardner are as powerful as the band that performs them. Working class anthems about "Truck Stop Love", "Three Dollar Wine", and that familiar longing of anyone who's ever felt trapped in a dead hometown or a dead-end job: "Gotta Get Out Of Here". The lyrics plow the rich dirt of Americana country, propelled by the band's gritty rock undercurrent, much in the flavor of Steve Earle's hard-driving blue collar best.