Hannah Miller
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Hannah Miller

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | SELF

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | SELF
Band R&B Soul

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Dec
31
Hannah Miller @ Please check www.hannahmillermusic.com for current tour dates!

None, None, USA

None, None, USA

Jun
30
Hannah Miller @ Hendershot's Coffee Bar

Athens, Georgia, USA

Athens, Georgia, USA

Jun
29
Hannah Miller @ Eddie's Attic

Decatur, Georgia, USA

Decatur, Georgia, USA

Music

Press


"Hannah Miller released her first album in 2008, setting the tone for what would become her one-of-a-kind soulful style. The artist hasn’t seemed to have taken a break since, delivering three EP’s over the last three years, along with extensive touring schedules. Doubters and Dreamers, released this past June, may be Miller’s best work yet – the six track effort puts the musician’s skill at the forefront, allowing Hannah’s crooning voice to swoon listeners into her dreamy, beautiful world."
- OurVinyl.com


"We arrived a little late to the party for Nashville singer/songwriter Hannah Miller -- but let's just say we're not leaving anytime soon. Though she's been releasing her own particular brand of bluesy and seductive folk/pop for more than five years it wasn't until her EP O Black River last year that she hit our DC Radar. On "Just Like Him", the excellent opener to Doubters and Dreamers -- the third in a trilogy of EP's -- Miller sings of her father "he chooses his words carefully, hardly ever shows his hand", a description that could also be applied to her own airy, almost dispassionate vocal style. Miller and producer and instrumentalist Neilson Hubbard quicken the pace on half of the EP's six tracks -- particularly on the inspired reading of Elton John's "Sorry Seems to Be The Hardest Word." But damn if it's not the elegantly melancholic ballads that really do a number on us. Like Miller herself, the gospel tinged "Little Bit"...co-written with Hubbard, gracefully swings with it's own gentle and understated soulfulness." - Direct Current


"Hannah Miller’s textured blend of classic pop and Americana is developing rapidly as she releases indie EP after EP. “O Black River” is a slow-burning collection of soulful, southern Gothic meditations on sin, redemption, failure and solace that may be my favorite indie record of the year and should win Miller many new fans." - ThinkChristian.net


Earlier this year, Hannah Miller released a pleasant four-song EP called Journey to the Moon, notable for its easygoing, downhome sound delivered through Miller’s rich vocals. Though the songs were single-minded in their focus on love, the tunes were eye-opening and Miller herself proved to be a revelation. Now she is back with another EP, O Black River — and the results are even better.

The six tracks on River display greater depth and variety than her last release, eschewing the love theme almost entirely. “Elijah” sounds like a cross between a ragtime ditty and something a chain gang would sing along to, and when Miller’s haunting vocals repeat the refrain “Elijah was a man just like us,” there is something about the mixture of all these elements which makes the song incredibly weighty. “Refuge” is a bluesy number about the struggle to keep going on when life is getting you down, and the title track is an almost mournful stomper filled with Miller’s desire to be made clean and new again.

Miller sounds like a stronger version of Miranda Lee Richards when she sings, and boy does she know how to cast a spell on you. The unexpected part is that she rarely relies on hitting overly loud or extended show-stopping notes; most of the album is so languid you would expect to not pay attention as much as you end up doing — but that’s how she wins you over. Miller is subtle and strong all at once, and even when she sings “Baby I won’t bleed out/ I won’t bleed out,” in a generally even-keeled manner on “Bleed Out,” there is something hypnotic about the way she does this.

O Black River is not overly energetic and the content isn’t exactly super happy and fun material, but it draws you in with its earthy beauty and Miller’s stellar vocals guide you along with all the confidence of a seasoned tour guide as she traverses the dry and weary landscapes of the soul. O Black River is a stunner.

Brian Palmer

- Stereo Subversion


"Alabama-raised, Nashville-based singer/songwriter Hannah Miller has quietly built a reputation and growing following for her thoughtful, lovingly rendered folk/pop that also taps into her roots of gospel and soulful Americana. Miller's almost dispassionate vocal style, reminiscent at times of the languid cool of Cowboy Junkies' Margot Timmons, communicates as simply and effectively as a knowing glance. Miller doesn't reveal much as she sings in the gorgeous hymn "O Black River" but the result is surprisingly to draw the listener closer, an invitation to swim below the serene surface to discover the finely nuanced layers and textures in her voice..." - Direct Current


"Miller’s voice can best be described by the three “S”s: sexy, sultry, and soulful. It contains the beauty of an Emmylou Harris, but also the hint of danger and remorse that are exemplified by Jolie Holland or Feist." - Atlanta Music Guide- Al Kaufman


Raised by ex-hippies that left the movement to follow Jesus, Hannah Miller grew up inspired by love, simplicity, and gospel, all of which resonate in her songs. Her music is soulful and honest, sympathetic and breezy, with the touching sincerity of a songwriter who wears her heart on her sleeve."



- Performer Magazine


Click the link to read the whole article! - Performer Magazine


"A graceful, genre-defying treat...By the end of it all, Miller proves that she can gather a diverse palette of genres - pop, Americana, jazz, R&B - and blend them effortlessly for a satisfying 16 minutes that fly by all too fast."

- Performer Magazine


"...her voice, a source of wonderment, has and indefatigable presence, a draw."

-Otis Taylor - The State Newspaper


"-here is a female vocalist who cannot be fitted into some designated slot. Her debut EP "Storms of Summer" finds her in a soulful, sultry tone one song, and then a wistful, breathy voice the next. It doesn't hurt that she can write one heck of a song either."

-Tug Baker - Free Times


"Like Norah Jones but with a touch more twang and a wistful lilt like Basia Bulat, Miller is nothing but winning charm and grace on stage."

-T. Baker - Free Times


Into the Black is indeed a better record—better than Miller’s previous work, and better than much of what one can hear on commercial radio, though several songs would probably fit in well on certain formats. The noncommercial and college radio stations that have already started playing the new disc have all picked up on the same song, “In So Deep,” which with its upbeat, breezy pop-jazz sound is probably the most refreshingly atypical song Miller has ever done.

Read the complete interview at:

www.kevinoliver.wordpress.com - Music Matters (www.kevinoliver.wordpress.com)


"What makes Miller's approach so enticing is the way she carries melodies, holding onto a syllable a bit longer than expected or lavishing her range on an unexpected note. Her voice, breathy and delicate, conjures Rachel Yamagata and Feist, but Miller's individuality is undeniable."

Read the complete article at:

www.http://www.thestate.com/weekend/story/281443.html - The State Newspaper, Columbia, SC


Hannah Miller, one of Columbia’s many fine singer/songwriters, stands out from the pack for the singular power of her voice—a husky, sonorous instrument that has the ability to cast a spell over the listener, regardless of instrumental accompaniment, or lyrical content (think Cat Power). For evidence, just look back to her first, rough-cut EP Storms of Summer or the eclectic, polished folk-pop of her full-length Into the Black.

Her latest, an EP entitled Somewhere in Between, features a set of songs that are the equal or better her past work. Recorded in an acoustic format (with very few other instruments giving the songs minimal color) on an economical budget, it is, in spite of itself, an equally strong statement to the big-budget Into the Black. Her spellbinding abilities are deliciously intact as she runs through seven new tunes that suggest that Miller is only getting stronger as both a songwriter and performer.

The opening number, entitled “Honesty,” is the most light-hearted song in her catalog, but also one of her best. It’s essentially a laundry list of what Miller likes in a relationship, with a tongue-in-cheek conclusion in the chorus that “it’s really rather easy to make me happy.” The song gets bonus points for the kazoo choir in the bridge. Numerous highlights abound, including the urgent plea to a flighty friend “Diana” and the impatient, desperate “Restless.” But Miller truly shines on the ballads, where her voice can achieve the greatest emotional resonance. Witness the title cut or the closing “At My Best,” both of which are elegantly wrought accounts of the ups (in the latter) and downs (the former) of a relationship. - Scenesc.com


"Like Brandi Carlile and Rachael Yamagata, Southern songstress Hannah Miller is blessed with a modern old-timey sound. Instantly captivating whether gently summoning strength ("Angel"), reassurance ("Keep It Simple"), or forgiveness for her lover's return ("In the Yard"), Miller makes every note count. An irresistible melodic riff fuels sunniest romp "In So Deep", whose inevitable folly is ignited by her best line: "How much harm can one kiss really do?" Miller's trembling delivery an quirkily crafted acoustic vignettes shimmer under Mitch Dane's spare, lucent production. Suffused with a meditative, near elegaic quaility, Into the Black blends an inviting spookiness with delicate potency as Miller dives deep enough to deliver a gorgeous set of vibrant scenes." - Performing Songwriter


"The arrangements are stunning, and Miller's singing and guitar playing are smooth and polished. Miller's sultry voice is rich with feeling, shimmering with grace and faith. Her music, such as the captivating track, "In So Deep," with it's blistering drums and ornamental keys and guitars, grabs the listener's soul, setting one up for a beautiful listening experience."

Read the whole review at:
http://www.performermag.com/sep.recordedreviews.0803.php - Southeast Performer Magazine


Discography

Doubters and Dreamers, June 2012
O Black River, EP, Sept. 2011
Journey to the Moon, EP, 2010
Somewhere In Between, EP 2009
Into The Black, LP 2008
Storms of Summer, EP 2006

Photos

Bio

In the modern haystack of independent art Hannah Miller’s needle shines. With songs as soulful as the deep south, as soothing as a glass of rich red wine, and as sultry as an August evening in her native Alabama, her music is slowly finding its way. Miller’s song “Keep It Simple” was licensed by NBC for the prime-time medical drama Mercy and outfits like American Songwriter, Performing Songwriter Magazine, Lilith Faire, MTV, The International Songwriting Competition and iTunes’ “Indie Spotlight” have all taken notice.
Miller’s literate style blends blues, folk and gospel which, when led by her disarmingly intimate alto, feel immediately familiar and compelling. Numerous magazines and blogs have taken note. Reviewers have fallen over themselves looking for comparisons. Names like Neko Case, Feist, Rachel Yamagata, Liz Phair, Brandi Carlile and Basia Bulat are regularly referenced. She has held her own when opening for Langhorne Slim, Landon Pigg, Elizabeth Cook, and others and has cultivated a passionate following around the country. Miller successfully funded an ambitious multi-year release plan through her growing tribe of faithful fans. The series will include three EPs (the third of which, Doubters and Dreamers, released June, 2012) and a forthcoming vinyl compilation. Miller has worked with several acclaimed producers, including Ian Fitchuk, Justin Loucks, Neilson Hubbard and Grammy Award winner Mitch Dane. She writes with many of Nashville’s finest and has her sights set on a long and meaningful career.

Winner, MTV/Ourstage.com Needle in the Haystack Competition
Winner, Lilith Fair Talent Search Competition
Finalist, International Songwriting Competition
Feature, Itunes Indie Spotlight
Feature, American Songwriter "Daily Discovery"
Feature, Performing Songwriter "DIY Picks"
Feature, Cover Story, Performer Magazine Feb. 2011 issue

FULL LENGTH BIO:
In the modern haystack of independent art Hannah Miller’s needle shines. With songs as soulful as the deep south, as soothing as a glass of rich red wine, as stirring as a wept prayer in a rural chapel and as sultry as an August evening in her native Alabama, her music is slowly finding its way.
Miller’s song “Keep It Simple” was licensed by NBC for the prime-time medical drama Mercy and outfits like Performing Songwriter Magazine, Lilith Faire, MTV, The International Songwriting Competition and iTunes’ “Indie Spotlight” have all taken notice. “I’m in no hurry,” she says of the five year journey that has seen the release of three EPs and one full-length LP and hundreds of live concerts throughout the south, southwest and Midwest, “But I am eager.” Having relocated to Columbia, South Carolina after college, she called that area home until relocating to Nashville in 2010. “These years have been about development,” she adds. “I’ve learned a lot about perfecting both the craft and the business of a career in the music industry, but in a lot of ways I feel like I’m just getting started." 
Miller’s literate style blends blues, folk and gospel which, when led by her disarmingly intimate alto, feel immediately familiar and compelling. Numerous magazines and blogs have taken note. Reviewers have fallen over themselves looking for comparisons. Names like Neko Case, Feist, Rachel Yamagata, Liz Phair, Brandi Carlile and Basia Bulat are regularly referenced. She has held her own when opening for Langhorne Slim, Landon Pigg, Elizabeth Cook, Josh Joplin, Shannon Whitworth and others and has cultivated a passionate following around the country. Drawing inspiration from many of her heroes’ music as well as their tenacity in the face of a declining music industry, Miller is genuinely grateful to have a seat at the table. "This new world for artists is very exciting. I know there is always a lot to learn and I know I’m definitely not the first to walk in these shoes, but they do feel like a right fit for me.” 
The audience seems to agree. Miller successfully funded an ambitious multi-year release plan through her growing tribe of faithful fans. The series will include three EPs (the second of which, O Black River, releases Sept 27th) and a forthcoming vinyl compilation. Leaving no virtual stone unturned she has diligently employed every on-line tool available to her. Her first two videos have turned heads on YouTube with a sense of style and production value that seem positively major-label in their quality. “I’m amazed at the response we’ve seen to the videos and the Kickstarter campaign,” she says. “It’s great to know that the work I’ve put in so far is so appreciated, and to have the next year all laid out for me.”
Miller has worked with several acclaimed producers, including Ian Fitchuk, Justin Loucks, Neilson Hubbard and Grammy Award winner Mitch Dane. She writes with many of Nashville’s finest and has her sights set on a long and meaningful career. While she is always open to discussions with record labels, publishers, booking agents and managers,