Hellmüller-Sisera-Renold
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Hellmüller-Sisera-Renold

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"PRESS REVIEWS ON:"

... - www.hsr-trio.com


Discography

2006
"somewhere in may" - altrisuoni records

2009
"9 views of a landscape" - neuklang

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Bio

Individuality without Narcissism

Here is where you get to know musicians who divert their audience’s attention from themselves to their creation. The music is a symbiosis of melody, harmony, sound and rhythm which oscillates between euphoria and melancholia, and through which each musician succeeds in presenting his individual voice.

Franz Hellmüller (guitarist), Luca Sisera (bassist) and Tony Renold (drummer) met “Somewhere In May” (as the title of their 2006 debut suggests), and have been cooperating ever since: Their playing alternates between hurried and calm tempos, straight-forward and surprising approaches, bright sunlight and mysterious mists.

1975 saw the release of two ground-breaking guitar recordings: “Bright Size Life” (Pat Metheny, Jaco Patorius, Bob Moses), and “Gateway” (John Abercrombie, Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette), developing the jazz-guitar trio to include new sounds and stylistic dimensions: Elements of Country, Pop and Rock were combined with Jazz-interplay and a freer sound exploration than ever before, setting the stage for a new era of musical emancipation.

The fact that this emancipation process has not yet reached its end, and is still inspiring further creative results, is strengthened by the music of Hellmüller-Sisera-Renold, which, on “9 Views Of A Landscape”, while rich in atmosphere, is simultaneously both more compact and experimental than any of their preceding records. The way in which guest trumpeter Lars Lindvall’s performance is included is further indication for the trio’s maturing over time: One does not get the impression of a trio with a co-starring guest. Rather, the performance gives the impression of a well-played quartet which includes the trumpeter’s sparse lyricism in a very natural, homogenous way.

On this record, no individual emerges to the foreground. Indeed, the boundaries between soloists and accompanists are not always clear. Rather, the music creates the feeling of a true borderless interplay which calls to mind the famous musketeer motto: “All for one and one for all”.

(Liner-Notes Tom Gsteiger)