Homage
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Homage

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Q: Can you guys first state your name and your position in the band.

A: Jon, Emmett and Spencer play guitar and bass, Waley plays sm58 and Travis plays drums.

Q: How did you all become a band?

A: At a Grade 8 talent show: Waley, Emmett and Jon covered Silverstein then started jamming with a bunch of different guys on drums, and then we met Spencer in a field in high school. After us four started jamming, we started writing our own music, then we released Insignificant and found Travis.

Started from the bottom, now we here.

Q: How long have you been together as a band?

A: We’ve been together for six years.

Q: Why did you guys name the band Homage?

A: We looked it up in the dictionary and realized it had a lot of meaning and represents our views pretty well. We also look at it is paying our respects to everyone we look up to; music, family and friends. Everything and everyone.

hom·age

/'(h)ämij/

noun

special honor or respect shown publicly.

formal public acknowledgment of feudal allegiance.

synonyms

obeisance - tribute - respect - honor - honour

Q: How many times have people asked you guys how to say your band’s name?

A: No one asks, they just say it however they want.

Q: Why is the EP titled Insignificant?

A: We took it from the lyrics of Integral; it’s a simple way of giving the listener an idea about the theme of the EP.

Q: What’s the story behind Emmett’s picture becoming the album cover?

A: It was a joke at first, but we realized it was the complete antithesis of the theme of the EP. A kid is everything but insignificant.

Q: Was making an EP harder or easier than you all expected?

A: It was easy because everyone was well prepared. We had a lot of time because we were a new band. The second one (the split) was done in 2 weeks, it felt rushed but we’re really happy with the end result.

Q: What’s the specific reason you chose that quote from “Twin Peaks" to become the intro to the EP?

A: It fits well with the message of the EP. It’s also a few members favourite show.

Q: The lyrics in your songs are some pretty powerful stuff, what inspires them?

A: Life; seems pretty general, but everyone goes through the motions and feels differently almost every day. Sometimes it’s hard, and sometimes it seems like a lot of fun. They stem from our personal views of the world.

Q: Can you give me a step-by-step breakdown of how Homage makes a song?

A: Someone comes up with a guitar riff, then we structure it either together or on our own. We all bring different ideas to the table. Waley and Spencer write lyrics after the song is done.

For you guitar nerds: here’s a breakdown by Homage

D——————————————————

A——————————————————

F———————————————————

C——————————————————-

G-0-0-0-0-0——————0—0-0———————-

C-0-0—0-0-0————0-0-0—————————-

Q: What are the future plans for Homage?

A: We plan on finishing school, trying to make enough money to sustain ourselves on tour and trying to save money for a full length. We want to try and do everything our own way for whatever we can, we’re trying to steer clear of shady business people. We just want to play as much as we can.

Q: I know I’ve already talked about the split with Altona but did you guys want to add anything?

A: It was rushed and pretty cool. We’re glad we did it with them. We were short on time, we had the songs written, but as far as production, we didn’t spend much time on them. SHOUTS OUT TO SAM GUIANA FROM KING STREET STUDIOS; check out his band July if you pop punk and not pills.

Q: You told me before how you caught a really big break opening for Counterparts, what’s the story behind that?

A: We’re friends with some of them, and they are very supportive of their friends (and our band) so they helped us get on the bill.

Q: Can each one of you to give me your favourite artist/band as of right now?

A: - Jon: Suicidal Tendencies

- Waley: Deafheaven and Whirr

- Spencer: Citizen

- Emmett: Converge

- Travis: Young and in the Way, and Shai Hulud

Q: What’s the most embarrassing artist you have your iPod right now?

A: Homage.

Q: If you could go on tour with your dream line-up, who would that include?

A: Queen, Brand New then any other band we listen to, just so we can make friends and see good bands for free.

LINKS

Insignificant EP
http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/insignificant
Homage/Altona split
http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/altona-homage-split - Turn That Shit Down


Q: Can you guys first state your name and your position in the band.

A: Jon, Emmett and Spencer play guitar and bass, Waley plays sm58 and Travis plays drums.

Q: How did you all become a band?

A: At a Grade 8 talent show: Waley, Emmett and Jon covered Silverstein then started jamming with a bunch of different guys on drums, and then we met Spencer in a field in high school. After us four started jamming, we started writing our own music, then we released Insignificant and found Travis.

Started from the bottom, now we here.

Q: How long have you been together as a band?

A: We’ve been together for six years.

Q: Why did you guys name the band Homage?

A: We looked it up in the dictionary and realized it had a lot of meaning and represents our views pretty well. We also look at it is paying our respects to everyone we look up to; music, family and friends. Everything and everyone.

hom·age

/'(h)ämij/

noun

special honor or respect shown publicly.

formal public acknowledgment of feudal allegiance.

synonyms

obeisance - tribute - respect - honor - honour

Q: How many times have people asked you guys how to say your band’s name?

A: No one asks, they just say it however they want.

Q: Why is the EP titled Insignificant?

A: We took it from the lyrics of Integral; it’s a simple way of giving the listener an idea about the theme of the EP.

Q: What’s the story behind Emmett’s picture becoming the album cover?

A: It was a joke at first, but we realized it was the complete antithesis of the theme of the EP. A kid is everything but insignificant.

Q: Was making an EP harder or easier than you all expected?

A: It was easy because everyone was well prepared. We had a lot of time because we were a new band. The second one (the split) was done in 2 weeks, it felt rushed but we’re really happy with the end result.

Q: What’s the specific reason you chose that quote from “Twin Peaks" to become the intro to the EP?

A: It fits well with the message of the EP. It’s also a few members favourite show.

Q: The lyrics in your songs are some pretty powerful stuff, what inspires them?

A: Life; seems pretty general, but everyone goes through the motions and feels differently almost every day. Sometimes it’s hard, and sometimes it seems like a lot of fun. They stem from our personal views of the world.

Q: Can you give me a step-by-step breakdown of how Homage makes a song?

A: Someone comes up with a guitar riff, then we structure it either together or on our own. We all bring different ideas to the table. Waley and Spencer write lyrics after the song is done.

For you guitar nerds: here’s a breakdown by Homage

D——————————————————

A——————————————————

F———————————————————

C——————————————————-

G-0-0-0-0-0——————0—0-0———————-

C-0-0—0-0-0————0-0-0—————————-

Q: What are the future plans for Homage?

A: We plan on finishing school, trying to make enough money to sustain ourselves on tour and trying to save money for a full length. We want to try and do everything our own way for whatever we can, we’re trying to steer clear of shady business people. We just want to play as much as we can.

Q: I know I’ve already talked about the split with Altona but did you guys want to add anything?

A: It was rushed and pretty cool. We’re glad we did it with them. We were short on time, we had the songs written, but as far as production, we didn’t spend much time on them. SHOUTS OUT TO SAM GUIANA FROM KING STREET STUDIOS; check out his band July if you pop punk and not pills.

Q: You told me before how you caught a really big break opening for Counterparts, what’s the story behind that?

A: We’re friends with some of them, and they are very supportive of their friends (and our band) so they helped us get on the bill.

Q: Can each one of you to give me your favourite artist/band as of right now?

A: - Jon: Suicidal Tendencies

- Waley: Deafheaven and Whirr

- Spencer: Citizen

- Emmett: Converge

- Travis: Young and in the Way, and Shai Hulud

Q: What’s the most embarrassing artist you have your iPod right now?

A: Homage.

Q: If you could go on tour with your dream line-up, who would that include?

A: Queen, Brand New then any other band we listen to, just so we can make friends and see good bands for free.

LINKS

Insignificant EP
http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/insignificant
Homage/Altona split
http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/altona-homage-split - Turn That Shit Down


Kids on album art, huh? It seems like the new big thing. Out of the few reviews TTR has managed to scrape together so far, a grand total of two kids have made an appearance on the blog. Go figure, huh… So anyways, Homage is a melodic hardcore band from Toronto, Canada with a bunch of influences originating from scenes and soundscapes both here and there. To sum things up in a very rough (and hungry) way, think up a big loaf of The Carrier with a side of metal influenced hardcore, such as Shai Hulud. Add a wee pinch of modern metalcore such as The Ghost Inside (at least their Returners album) and you’re in for a generous meal of Homage’s debut EP - Insignificant.

Opening with a quote from the 1990’s series Twin Peaks about justice, love and strength, we get hints that this is going to be a very heart-felt couple of songs. We are not mislead as Homage provides. With influences like said, The Carrier and Shai Hulud, it’s not a big surprise at all really. The trick is, after all is said and done, to do it right, and by “right" I mean right from the heart. A sledge-hammer blow straight to the gut. The first few tracks, the score of notes this quintet of dudes have managed to push out, the jimmies are rustled and rustled bad, so to say. In a positive, hardcore way of course.

The really soft and full-bodied production is surprisingly well done for a debut EP, the instruments are all clear and never make any irritating noise. It’s quite obvious what good this does for a band in the early stages; a really effective tool of fan-base building. In some cases though, this also has unfortunate downsides, which shows on some of these songs. It’s a well-known fact that resonance and “false" feedback noise produce a sad feeling to the listener. The absence of this factor grinds some of these songs down. The Carrier exemplify the masterly package the usage of this instrumental variety can create. The vocals, while great, could also do well with some variation. It feels like the vocalist has an important message to put across, which is specifically notable in the lyrics, but never delivers to full potential in vocal execution.

Separately, these five songs are extremely well put together, and although not very memorable, they’re all in all a decent listen. I feel like we’re not far from a top grade here, considering a few adjustments are to be made, but unfortunately we land three points off. Now, I say ‘unfortunately’ because I truly mean that it is unfortunate, that such potential can’t always make it the entire way. At the end of the day - this is a good EP one should go back and listen to, not one, but two times.

Tiny Talk Reviews gives this EP a strong 7/10.

Tracklist:

1. Groundwork

2. Albeit

3. Definitive

4. Release Relief

5. It’s Becoming An Integral Part - Tiny Talk Reviews


Kids on album art, huh? It seems like the new big thing. Out of the few reviews TTR has managed to scrape together so far, a grand total of two kids have made an appearance on the blog. Go figure, huh… So anyways, Homage is a melodic hardcore band from Toronto, Canada with a bunch of influences originating from scenes and soundscapes both here and there. To sum things up in a very rough (and hungry) way, think up a big loaf of The Carrier with a side of metal influenced hardcore, such as Shai Hulud. Add a wee pinch of modern metalcore such as The Ghost Inside (at least their Returners album) and you’re in for a generous meal of Homage’s debut EP - Insignificant.

Opening with a quote from the 1990’s series Twin Peaks about justice, love and strength, we get hints that this is going to be a very heart-felt couple of songs. We are not mislead as Homage provides. With influences like said, The Carrier and Shai Hulud, it’s not a big surprise at all really. The trick is, after all is said and done, to do it right, and by “right" I mean right from the heart. A sledge-hammer blow straight to the gut. The first few tracks, the score of notes this quintet of dudes have managed to push out, the jimmies are rustled and rustled bad, so to say. In a positive, hardcore way of course.

The really soft and full-bodied production is surprisingly well done for a debut EP, the instruments are all clear and never make any irritating noise. It’s quite obvious what good this does for a band in the early stages; a really effective tool of fan-base building. In some cases though, this also has unfortunate downsides, which shows on some of these songs. It’s a well-known fact that resonance and “false" feedback noise produce a sad feeling to the listener. The absence of this factor grinds some of these songs down. The Carrier exemplify the masterly package the usage of this instrumental variety can create. The vocals, while great, could also do well with some variation. It feels like the vocalist has an important message to put across, which is specifically notable in the lyrics, but never delivers to full potential in vocal execution.

Separately, these five songs are extremely well put together, and although not very memorable, they’re all in all a decent listen. I feel like we’re not far from a top grade here, considering a few adjustments are to be made, but unfortunately we land three points off. Now, I say ‘unfortunately’ because I truly mean that it is unfortunate, that such potential can’t always make it the entire way. At the end of the day - this is a good EP one should go back and listen to, not one, but two times.

Tiny Talk Reviews gives this EP a strong 7/10.

Tracklist:

1. Groundwork

2. Albeit

3. Definitive

4. Release Relief

5. It’s Becoming An Integral Part - Tiny Talk Reviews


There is not a great deal we can tell you about Canadian melodic hardcore band Homage, the band sketchy in the extreme with their information but with their EP Insignificant, the Toronto quintet make the only truly important declaration, of just how promising a band accomplished a band they are. The five track release is the evidence of a band evolving into a creative and expressive force and though like most releases it has flaws there is nothing which excuses thoughts of not being impressed.

Consisting of Emmett Johnston, Jon Lundrigan, Spencer Schiralli, Travis Dupuis, and Waley Gao, Homage opens up the EP with the evocative Groundwork. Entering with a lone melodic stroking of the guitar amidst a vocal sample and brewing ambience, the track stretches its arms to weave an agitated wash of sonic beckoning and carefully crafted melodic flames against which passionate boisterous group vocals squall their intent. It is a brief introduction which sets up the following fierce encounter, Albeit. Imposing muscular rhythms open up the ear allowing the harsh caustic vocals growls and scowls to intimidate and stake their claim on the senses before leading the elevated intense charge of the track. As the guitars spiral within the almost bleak intrusive voice of the song their skill and sonic persuasion is impacting and emotive, forging the perfect temper to the aggressive vocals and grasping energy. As the track continues to shift its gait and mass through elegance and ferocity with the drums and basslines matching with firm and complimentary craft, the band dish thoughts and satisfaction a filling meal.

Definitive is an immediate brawl upon the senses in sound, vocals, and intent. The ravaging dual vocal attack grazes the surface of the listener to lay foundations for the throaty bass and crisp unforgiving drums to bruise further. As previously the guitars create a compelling web of acidic melodic enterprise and sonic intrusion which settle the nerves if not the burdening intensity of the track. Like its predecessor the song as it brings in great group vocals and at times an addictive djent/tech metal manipulation, ignites real interest in and pleasure from the inventive abrasion.

As Release Relief unveils its sensitive and emotive caress, the band shows a strength in songwriting and diversity which seamlessly fits alongside the previous confrontations but offers an expansive element to their invention. Certainly the track is forceful and imposingly demanding but there is a groove and infectious breath to the song which sets it apart and to the fore of the whole release. The bass work is again excellent, a realisation which actually creeps up in many ways and is finally declared openly at this point, whilst the guitars continue to impress and sculpt impassioned aural paintings with their imaginative flourishes and sword like sharp touches.

Closing with It’s Becoming An Integral Part, a furnace of a song where shadows and emotive fires collide into a tempest of intensity, passion, and uncompromising attitude. As the whole release, the track leaves one in no doubt that Homage is a band with as much potential as they have passion, and that is a well with a deep bottom. It is also a band in evolution one feels, their unique voice still to be found but there is little to doubt going by Insignificant that they will not realise it. Aside from the lack of a defining element or hook within songs to lift the band away from the head of the pack and for personal tastes a further diversity within the vocal bruising, the EP raises keen anticipation for what comes next from Homage, it is destined to be noteworthy at the very least if this release is a gauge.

The Insignificant EP is available as a name your own price download @ http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/insignificant

www.facebook.com/homageband

http://www.homageband.com/

7.5/10 - Ring Master Reviews


There is not a great deal we can tell you about Canadian melodic hardcore band Homage, the band sketchy in the extreme with their information but with their EP Insignificant, the Toronto quintet make the only truly important declaration, of just how promising a band accomplished a band they are. The five track release is the evidence of a band evolving into a creative and expressive force and though like most releases it has flaws there is nothing which excuses thoughts of not being impressed.

Consisting of Emmett Johnston, Jon Lundrigan, Spencer Schiralli, Travis Dupuis, and Waley Gao, Homage opens up the EP with the evocative Groundwork. Entering with a lone melodic stroking of the guitar amidst a vocal sample and brewing ambience, the track stretches its arms to weave an agitated wash of sonic beckoning and carefully crafted melodic flames against which passionate boisterous group vocals squall their intent. It is a brief introduction which sets up the following fierce encounter, Albeit. Imposing muscular rhythms open up the ear allowing the harsh caustic vocals growls and scowls to intimidate and stake their claim on the senses before leading the elevated intense charge of the track. As the guitars spiral within the almost bleak intrusive voice of the song their skill and sonic persuasion is impacting and emotive, forging the perfect temper to the aggressive vocals and grasping energy. As the track continues to shift its gait and mass through elegance and ferocity with the drums and basslines matching with firm and complimentary craft, the band dish thoughts and satisfaction a filling meal.

Definitive is an immediate brawl upon the senses in sound, vocals, and intent. The ravaging dual vocal attack grazes the surface of the listener to lay foundations for the throaty bass and crisp unforgiving drums to bruise further. As previously the guitars create a compelling web of acidic melodic enterprise and sonic intrusion which settle the nerves if not the burdening intensity of the track. Like its predecessor the song as it brings in great group vocals and at times an addictive djent/tech metal manipulation, ignites real interest in and pleasure from the inventive abrasion.

As Release Relief unveils its sensitive and emotive caress, the band shows a strength in songwriting and diversity which seamlessly fits alongside the previous confrontations but offers an expansive element to their invention. Certainly the track is forceful and imposingly demanding but there is a groove and infectious breath to the song which sets it apart and to the fore of the whole release. The bass work is again excellent, a realisation which actually creeps up in many ways and is finally declared openly at this point, whilst the guitars continue to impress and sculpt impassioned aural paintings with their imaginative flourishes and sword like sharp touches.

Closing with It’s Becoming An Integral Part, a furnace of a song where shadows and emotive fires collide into a tempest of intensity, passion, and uncompromising attitude. As the whole release, the track leaves one in no doubt that Homage is a band with as much potential as they have passion, and that is a well with a deep bottom. It is also a band in evolution one feels, their unique voice still to be found but there is little to doubt going by Insignificant that they will not realise it. Aside from the lack of a defining element or hook within songs to lift the band away from the head of the pack and for personal tastes a further diversity within the vocal bruising, the EP raises keen anticipation for what comes next from Homage, it is destined to be noteworthy at the very least if this release is a gauge.

The Insignificant EP is available as a name your own price download @ http://homageband.bandcamp.com/album/insignificant

www.facebook.com/homageband

http://www.homageband.com/

7.5/10 - Ring Master Reviews


Homage are a five piece melodic hardcore band reigning from Toronto. They recently released their beautiful five track EP titled Insignificant and boy, is it a killer record.


First track Groundwork introduces the band in a simple yet perfect way. Melodic instrumentals build up while a heart warming sample plays over the top, 40 seconds in and the drums are delivered, adding an extra impact to the melodies that currently surround and build up into a repeated chant. Generic, but great! That’s when second track Albeit gets a chance to kick in. This is where it happens: the Marmite vocals. The loved or hated. Some people will probably feel as if the vocals don’t follow the usual sort found within the genre but that doesn’t stop them from being good. Each line is delivered with absolute precision and power.

Definitive is the third track to bless your ears and it shows off the upbeat side to Homage. Head pounding drums clash meld together with well written guitar lines to create an almighty song which you just have to nod your head to. Fourth track Release Relief completely contradicts the previous song and is, in my opinion, the best track on the record. The tracks seems takes a sort of slower feel and seems to be built purely upon emotion. Each lyrical line is delivered with great pronunciation and proves to be from the heart. Final track It’s Becoming An Integral Part takes influences from all the precedent tracks. It contains the darker feel of the first two, the upbeat feel of Definitive and the ending feels just as emotionally built as Release Relief. An ending you’re never going to forget. - Phil Haines at New Junk


Homage are a five piece melodic hardcore band reigning from Toronto. They recently released their beautiful five track EP titled Insignificant and boy, is it a killer record.


First track Groundwork introduces the band in a simple yet perfect way. Melodic instrumentals build up while a heart warming sample plays over the top, 40 seconds in and the drums are delivered, adding an extra impact to the melodies that currently surround and build up into a repeated chant. Generic, but great! That’s when second track Albeit gets a chance to kick in. This is where it happens: the Marmite vocals. The loved or hated. Some people will probably feel as if the vocals don’t follow the usual sort found within the genre but that doesn’t stop them from being good. Each line is delivered with absolute precision and power.

Definitive is the third track to bless your ears and it shows off the upbeat side to Homage. Head pounding drums clash meld together with well written guitar lines to create an almighty song which you just have to nod your head to. Fourth track Release Relief completely contradicts the previous song and is, in my opinion, the best track on the record. The tracks seems takes a sort of slower feel and seems to be built purely upon emotion. Each lyrical line is delivered with great pronunciation and proves to be from the heart. Final track It’s Becoming An Integral Part takes influences from all the precedent tracks. It contains the darker feel of the first two, the upbeat feel of Definitive and the ending feels just as emotionally built as Release Relief. An ending you’re never going to forget. - Phil Haines at New Junk


Some say sincerity is lacking in today’s music scene. Hardcore music at its finest has done an amazing job at lyrically expressing hope and understanding to the masses while bottling it up in chugging guitar lines and hard hitting percussion. Homage from Toronto, Canada is no exception that rule with signs of astonishing work to come. The band’s latest EP Insignificant captures the band as they take their greatest influences and put it to test with their own melodic assertions and sound. The result is an EP showcasing solid musicianship and the universal feeling of needing to move forward, hurt, and a bit of confusion towards the world we live in. The tension can be felt by any listener and easily lands the band a glowing spot on our list of bands to look out for in the new year. - Unsigned and Unleashed


Some say sincerity is lacking in today’s music scene. Hardcore music at its finest has done an amazing job at lyrically expressing hope and understanding to the masses while bottling it up in chugging guitar lines and hard hitting percussion. Homage from Toronto, Canada is no exception that rule with signs of astonishing work to come. The band’s latest EP Insignificant captures the band as they take their greatest influences and put it to test with their own melodic assertions and sound. The result is an EP showcasing solid musicianship and the universal feeling of needing to move forward, hurt, and a bit of confusion towards the world we live in. The tension can be felt by any listener and easily lands the band a glowing spot on our list of bands to look out for in the new year. - Unsigned and Unleashed


This might be my favourite ‘comes-out-of-nowhere-release’ of 2012. These guys make some of the most passionate music I’ve heard in a long time. To be honest, I was kinda stepping a bit away from the whole melodic hardcore genre (‘cause of the lack of originality), but Homage made me realise there’s still hope. The best band I can compare them with is Hundredth; if you’re into them, you’ll definitely dig Homage. From the goosebump-giving music to the quality lyrics and passionate vocals: they have it all! - Music Approved By A Banana


This might be my favourite ‘comes-out-of-nowhere-release’ of 2012. These guys make some of the most passionate music I’ve heard in a long time. To be honest, I was kinda stepping a bit away from the whole melodic hardcore genre (‘cause of the lack of originality), but Homage made me realise there’s still hope. The best band I can compare them with is Hundredth; if you’re into them, you’ll definitely dig Homage. From the goosebump-giving music to the quality lyrics and passionate vocals: they have it all! - Music Approved By A Banana


Insignificant is the first EP from Toronto melodic-hardcore band Homage.

The album opens with a sorrowful and musing guitar followed by a quote from Twin Peaks. The quote is espousing how love and pacifism can always overcome violence or aggression. I am sure that this was entirely intended because a lot of the album is about how love changes us, and how we all need a guiding light in our lives, but we also must realize that that light must come from inside.

The guitar work in Insignificant is sorrowful and pondering. At moments the guitar is a floating and winding melody that cuts though the drumming and vocals. The variation in style of play adds a dynamic aspect to the album, the way that Jon Lundrigan, Spencer Schiralli, and Emmett Johnston play drives the album by both building and releasing tension by seamlessly flowing between a minimalist and wandering style and a fast paced and punk influenced style. The emotion of the guitar often closely matches the emotions of Waley Gao’s lyrics and vocal. In the song Release Relief the guitar is primarily the higher register, sorrowful sound, which matches the topic of letting go of a loved one, while in a song such as Albeit, which is about struggling with a sense of self, the guitar is more fast paced and driving. Tyler Nassiri does perfectly to both support and drive many of the songs. In Release Relief Tyler Nassiri opens the song with intelligently placed fills and forceful, yet tasteful drum work, but as soon as the vocals begin to come in Nassiri breaks into a rapid and brief explosion which aligns perfectly with the driving guitar and vocal. Tyler Nassiri manages to be both simple and extremely tasteful

Waley Gao uses primarily a strained, heavy-hearted sounding mid which allows him to capture both the emotions of sadness and discomfort perfectly. The lyrics of this album are of such a quality that they could be read as poetry without the backing by the band. Lyrics such as

"i’ve been confined by these walls of glass
told to accept mediocrity
firmly built but just as fragile, lined with blind faith and fate, then what to be made of ourselves"

capture the emotionality of the album perfectly.


For people who like Being As An Ocean, The Ghost Inside, La Dispute and Pianos Become The Teeth.
Overall wonderful EP 8.5/10 - Far Side Of The Sternum


Insignificant is the first EP from Toronto melodic-hardcore band Homage.

The album opens with a sorrowful and musing guitar followed by a quote from Twin Peaks. The quote is espousing how love and pacifism can always overcome violence or aggression. I am sure that this was entirely intended because a lot of the album is about how love changes us, and how we all need a guiding light in our lives, but we also must realize that that light must come from inside.

The guitar work in Insignificant is sorrowful and pondering. At moments the guitar is a floating and winding melody that cuts though the drumming and vocals. The variation in style of play adds a dynamic aspect to the album, the way that Jon Lundrigan, Spencer Schiralli, and Emmett Johnston play drives the album by both building and releasing tension by seamlessly flowing between a minimalist and wandering style and a fast paced and punk influenced style. The emotion of the guitar often closely matches the emotions of Waley Gao’s lyrics and vocal. In the song Release Relief the guitar is primarily the higher register, sorrowful sound, which matches the topic of letting go of a loved one, while in a song such as Albeit, which is about struggling with a sense of self, the guitar is more fast paced and driving. Tyler Nassiri does perfectly to both support and drive many of the songs. In Release Relief Tyler Nassiri opens the song with intelligently placed fills and forceful, yet tasteful drum work, but as soon as the vocals begin to come in Nassiri breaks into a rapid and brief explosion which aligns perfectly with the driving guitar and vocal. Tyler Nassiri manages to be both simple and extremely tasteful

Waley Gao uses primarily a strained, heavy-hearted sounding mid which allows him to capture both the emotions of sadness and discomfort perfectly. The lyrics of this album are of such a quality that they could be read as poetry without the backing by the band. Lyrics such as

"i’ve been confined by these walls of glass
told to accept mediocrity
firmly built but just as fragile, lined with blind faith and fate, then what to be made of ourselves"

capture the emotionality of the album perfectly.


For people who like Being As An Ocean, The Ghost Inside, La Dispute and Pianos Become The Teeth.
Overall wonderful EP 8.5/10 - Far Side Of The Sternum


Discography

Insignificant EP (2012)
Altona/Homage Split (2013)

Photos

Bio

Melodic Hardcore from Toronto, Ontario.