Homeboy Sandman
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Homeboy Sandman

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Press


"The Source - Unsigned Hype June 2008"

check out my unsigned hype feature in the source here:

http://www.homeboysandman.com/EPK/source-scan.jpg - The Source Magazine


"The Source - Unsigned Hype June 2008"

check out my unsigned hype feature in the source here:

http://www.homeboysandman.com/EPK/source-scan.jpg - The Source Magazine


"NY Press - Hip Hop Hijack"

Homeboy Sandman wants rap to have rhythm as well as rhymes
By Hamilton Nolan

What New York hip-hop needs is a little more competence. More masters of ceremony, fewer aspiring Kings of New York so intent on spitting brand names that they might drop the mic. Less beef, more nourishment.

Lots of underground MCs deserve to be underground—because they’re trash. Homeboy Sandman is a rarer breed—a neck snapper, who can wake up those sluggish underground shows at 2 a.m., when the crowd has had its fill of knowledge gods and is ready to bounce, rock, skate and wonder, “What was that crazy shit he just said?”

Sandman admits that the album that first drew him into hip-hop was the Fresh Prince and Jazzy Jeff’s He’s the DJ, I’m the Rapper. His sound’s recipe is one part early career Fresh Prince, one part mid-career Ras Kass, two parts bionic man, four parts nitric oxide. Mix in a blender with steroids—and serve with a fried microphone.

“I was lucky to get out of New York. I went to high school in New Hampshire…so I wasn’t just Hot 97’d out,” he says. “My philosophy is…first and foremost, it’s music. You have to have rhythm. You have to have flow. Your voice needs to be another instrument on that track. Even if you wasn’t saying words—even if you were just going ‘dugga dugga dit, dugga dugga dat,’ it has to have flow, it has to have rhythm. Too much of this hip-hop has no music involved in it now. It’s just people talking, saying dumb shit.”

On his debut album, Nourishment, Sandman’s precise, manic flow lines up words back-to-back like cars in a Midtown traffic jam, over Washington Heights-based producer Ron Kain’s bright, hectic beats. In “Extreme Measures,” he’s forced to scale a building, sneak into a radio station and take hostages to get some airplay: “Spider-Man Sandman walked, crawling across the 24 floors without fallin’/Took the glass cutter, I cut the glass like warm butter/The fastest road runner brother.” When he makes it into the office “where the asinine masterminds who design airtime reside,” he pops off some shots, passes out some albums and issues a firm edict: “I want every record in this collection/On every radio getting reception/In every neck of the woods/And neighborhoods in every direction.”

Sometimes an MC’s gotta do what an MC’s gotta do. If the industry was fair, Sandman would be famous already. The ridiculously catchy “We Can Fly” (not available on the album—check homeboysandman.com) combines his ghostly breeze of a voice with a dance-worthy track that should have made it the jam of the summer. Damn those radio execs—maybe next summer.

Sandman’s hip-hop chops are drum tight, and he has a master plan: He’s currently in law school. He’s too eclectic to be labeled as the generic “positive MC,” but he knows what he likes.

“People are always like, ‘You don’t like drug [music],’” he says, scoffing before he clarifies: “I don’t like whack shit.”

- New York Press


"NY Press - Hip Hop Hijack"

Homeboy Sandman wants rap to have rhythm as well as rhymes
By Hamilton Nolan

What New York hip-hop needs is a little more competence. More masters of ceremony, fewer aspiring Kings of New York so intent on spitting brand names that they might drop the mic. Less beef, more nourishment.

Lots of underground MCs deserve to be underground—because they’re trash. Homeboy Sandman is a rarer breed—a neck snapper, who can wake up those sluggish underground shows at 2 a.m., when the crowd has had its fill of knowledge gods and is ready to bounce, rock, skate and wonder, “What was that crazy shit he just said?”

Sandman admits that the album that first drew him into hip-hop was the Fresh Prince and Jazzy Jeff’s He’s the DJ, I’m the Rapper. His sound’s recipe is one part early career Fresh Prince, one part mid-career Ras Kass, two parts bionic man, four parts nitric oxide. Mix in a blender with steroids—and serve with a fried microphone.

“I was lucky to get out of New York. I went to high school in New Hampshire…so I wasn’t just Hot 97’d out,” he says. “My philosophy is…first and foremost, it’s music. You have to have rhythm. You have to have flow. Your voice needs to be another instrument on that track. Even if you wasn’t saying words—even if you were just going ‘dugga dugga dit, dugga dugga dat,’ it has to have flow, it has to have rhythm. Too much of this hip-hop has no music involved in it now. It’s just people talking, saying dumb shit.”

On his debut album, Nourishment, Sandman’s precise, manic flow lines up words back-to-back like cars in a Midtown traffic jam, over Washington Heights-based producer Ron Kain’s bright, hectic beats. In “Extreme Measures,” he’s forced to scale a building, sneak into a radio station and take hostages to get some airplay: “Spider-Man Sandman walked, crawling across the 24 floors without fallin’/Took the glass cutter, I cut the glass like warm butter/The fastest road runner brother.” When he makes it into the office “where the asinine masterminds who design airtime reside,” he pops off some shots, passes out some albums and issues a firm edict: “I want every record in this collection/On every radio getting reception/In every neck of the woods/And neighborhoods in every direction.”

Sometimes an MC’s gotta do what an MC’s gotta do. If the industry was fair, Sandman would be famous already. The ridiculously catchy “We Can Fly” (not available on the album—check homeboysandman.com) combines his ghostly breeze of a voice with a dance-worthy track that should have made it the jam of the summer. Damn those radio execs—maybe next summer.

Sandman’s hip-hop chops are drum tight, and he has a master plan: He’s currently in law school. He’s too eclectic to be labeled as the generic “positive MC,” but he knows what he likes.

“People are always like, ‘You don’t like drug [music],’” he says, scoffing before he clarifies: “I don’t like whack shit.”

- New York Press


"The Big Hip Hop Blogs"

http://hiphopruckus.com/2008/07/home-boy-sandman-nourishment-mixtape-review.html

http://www.pardonmeduke.com/music/get-to-know-homeboy-sandman/

http://www.hiphoplinguistics.com/reviews/albums/2008/06/homeboy-sandman-nourishment

I'm on a zillion hip hop blogs and have gotten a zillion reviews, but here's 3 of the major ones, meaning 3 of the sites that get like tens of thousands of hits a day. By July 25th I will have also been featured on nahright.com, THE PREMIER HIP HOP BLOG out right now. - Pardonmeduke.com, Hiphopruckus.com, Hiphoplinguistics.com


"The Big Hip Hop Blogs"

http://hiphopruckus.com/2008/07/home-boy-sandman-nourishment-mixtape-review.html

http://www.pardonmeduke.com/music/get-to-know-homeboy-sandman/

http://www.hiphoplinguistics.com/reviews/albums/2008/06/homeboy-sandman-nourishment

I'm on a zillion hip hop blogs and have gotten a zillion reviews, but here's 3 of the major ones, meaning 3 of the sites that get like tens of thousands of hits a day. By July 25th I will have also been featured on nahright.com, THE PREMIER HIP HOP BLOG out right now. - Pardonmeduke.com, Hiphopruckus.com, Hiphoplinguistics.com


Discography

2007 - NOURISHMENT (EP)
2007 - NOURISHMENT (SECOND HELPINGS) (LP) featuring the single "Buttermilk," which is currently top 15 on the national college radio hip hop chart and still moving up. Also featuring the single "Extreme Measures" which has recieved airplay on Sirius Satellite Radio on Eminem's Shade 45 Station. The album is available at Fat Beats Record Store as well as on ITunes, Rhapsody, and Amazon MP3.
2008 - ACTUAL FACTUAL PTERADACTYL (LP) I'm releasing this next week physically at shows and at Fat Beats and soon after at all over the internet and likely some good physical distro too.

Photos

Bio

SOURCE UNSIGNED HYPE JUNE 2008.

I've only been rhyming seriously since December of '06. Before that I was always a dope emcee but I was addicted to drugs so I never really took it seriously. I always told myself that if I could ever write this dope sober then there would be nothing in the world that could stop me. I finally kicked for good in August 2006, and after 4 months of sobriety, I discovered my ability to write dope raps without reliance on mind altering substances. Now nothing can stop me.

My live show energy is out of this world. My cadences are imaginative to the point of being groundbreaking, and even when I'm ryhming 200 mph every word comes through crystal clear. Every other genre influences my hip too. Definately not one of these emcees that you could tell never listens to anything but hip hop.

My story is that of a not your average city kid who dropped out of law school to put full page flyers up on the subways at 3 in the morning until everybody in NYC knew who he was.