Heavier Than Air Flying Machines
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Heavier Than Air Flying Machines

Grand Rapids, Michigan, United States | INDIE

Grand Rapids, Michigan, United States | INDIE
Band Rock Punk

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jun
16
Heavier Than Air Flying Machines @ The Hideout - Canadian Music Week

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

May
07
Heavier Than Air Flying Machines @ The Pyramid Scheme

Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Dec
23
Heavier Than Air Flying Machines @ The Pyramid Scheme

Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


For Fans Of: At the Drive In, The Skies Revolt, La Dispute

Heavier Than Air Flying Machines might always be a question mark of a band. Nothing about the gritty, high-gain debut album, Siam (released last September), is typical, nor anything about the band's spastic live performance. But then again, that's just the point of the band.

"The first conversation we had about the band, we said, ‘Let's just write music that people hate,'" said Bassist Jeremy Pyne.

"Our first show, I was surprised that people were even watching us," added Jaymes Pyne — Jeremy's brother and HTAFM vocalist — with a laugh.

But that's not to say the band is bad on any level - perhaps just less accessible to a world that thrives on hook-laden radio pop. Powered by untamed vocals, highly technical bass lines and an arsenal of college-level vocabulary words, nothing about Heavier Than Air Flying Machines is formulaic. Jaymes attributes this to the seven years the band's members spent in another band called Joy Ride.

"After that band, I was just done with music," he said. "When we started this project, we wanted it to be different. We're not going to write a song and think, ‘Oh, people might like this.'"

"We just kind of threw that stuff to the wayside," Jeremy added. "We wanted to do our own thing. We just wanted something dirty and loud. It shows in the album. It's kind of jankity music, but it's fun."

The band's refusal to conform to a formula bleeds into its live performances as well. Sets involve homemade stage lights built from old lamps. Between songs, the band doesn't speak with the audience. Instead, various dialogue audio tracks are played through the P.A. — some announcing the band's name, others with various literature references or historical quotes.

"When we're on stage, we feel like it's just the three of us there in the room," Jaymes said. "Anything we can do to insulate ourselves from feeling like there's an audience, we'll do."

Siam is available for download via Bandcamp and iTunes. See the band live May 7 with La Dispute and Cain Marko at The Pyramid Scheme. - Revue Magazine


Check out this searing track from Heavier Than Air Flying Machines new album, Siam, which came out last month.

I found it via the great blog Tympanogram. I’m sad we’re late to this party - the band massages your brain with fist pump inducing vocals and a bit harder style than we typically post here on Sirens. Coming in at only a buck forty two, “Amphibian Debt March” will get you amped - and hopefully amped for more Heavier Than Air Flying Machines. - Sirens of Decay


Yep, those are the album and track names. Pretty bizarre, though it becomes less surprising upon learning that these guys are playing their release show with Bars of Gold. This track is actually quieter than the other track you can hear [link]. The bass-dominated music actually fuses together well with some creative vocal work (A less rowdy Rody Walker? It has a similar dirty performance feel.). It’s post-punk that is, somehow, grandiose with a demo passion. Anyways, their new album SIAM is out today, September 17th, on Friction Records. [link]

- Tyler Hanan - Nothing Sounds Better


HTAFM share a similar spot in music with Iceage, only Pitchfork won’t BNM them or ever look at this year’s full length debut. The band is from the Grand Rapids, Michigan area. They are on the Michigan based label Friction (Bear Vs. Shark, Bars Of Gold, Maps And Atlases). The band has a rumbling lower end not unlike Big Black. The vocals are similar to Omar Rodrigues-Lopéz in both At The Drive In and Mars Volta. Siam is only around twenty-five minutes long, but it hits hard and fast; you will not be disappointed, if any of this description sparked your interest. You can purchase it here or on iTunes.

Check out this searing track from Heavier Than Air Flying Machines new album, Siam, which came out last month.

I found it via the great blog Tympanogram. I’m sad we’re late to this party - the band massages your brain with fist pump inducing vocals and a bit harder style than we typically post here on Sirens. Coming in at only a buck forty two, “Amphibian Debt March” will get you amped - and hopefully amped for more Heavier Than Air Flying Machines.

“Amphibian Debt March” - Heavier Than Air Flying Machines

Yep, those are the album and track names. Pretty bizarre, though it becomes less surprising upon learning that these guys are playing their release show with Bars of Gold. This track is actually quieter than the other track you can hear [link]. The bass-dominated music actually fuses together well with some creative vocal work (A less rowdy Rody Walker? It has a similar dirty performance feel.). It’s post-punk that is, somehow, grandiose with a demo passion. Anyways, their new album SIAM is out today, September 17th, on Friction Records. [link]

new heavier than air album out this summer… courtesy of friction records. this is probably going to be the best thing to ever come out on friction. so stoked! also heavier than air is playing a show with maps and atlases at the pyramid scheme june 18th i think. its going to be amazing - Tumblr


It’s amazing the amount of racket that can be made with a distorted bass guitar. Heavier Than Air Flying Machines‘ wild post-punk/post-hardcore attack has a wicked bite due to the thunderous lines laid down by bassist Jeremy Pyne. The guitars are still an integral part of debut album Siam, but vocalist/guitarist Jaymes Pyne has much more influence as the acrobatic throat of the group than a fretsman. His bombastic vocals stretch from the theatrical caterwaul of System of a Down’s work ["Follicle Gang (Green)"] to the shrieking falsetto of The Darkness (“Folio Verso”); The only constant is that they are forceful the entire time. (The group yells so often used are manically enthusiastic as well.)

That piece can be extrapolated: HTAFM is almost always forceful on Siam. The only exception is “Abacus Abacus,” which trades At the Drive-In/Death From Above 1979 comparisons for Bloc Party ones. It’s a nice break from the near-constant chaos of the album, and they connect it to their primary sound through a breakdown/chorus thing. They then slap listeners in the face with the banging sheet of distortion that is “Relativity,” just in case you were getting soft.

But while that’s the closest BP comparison, there are other dance-related elements peppered throughout. “Ascent of the Iron Talmud” throws down a nearly-funky bass groove, while “Malleable In So Far” has a staccato swagger that could pass as the dancy end of Spoon if the bass weren’t fuzzed out to the maximum.

But those are the outliers. The majority of this album is spazzy, energetic rocking, from the intimidating pacing of opener “Bedlam.Twain.Control.Towers” through the ratatat of “Vitiated/Continental” to the doomy crush of closer “Catastrophe I Castigation.” The totally sincere Heavier Than Air Flying Machines explode with a profoundly dangerous sound, and that makes Siam incredibly attractive. Rage against the machines, indeed. - Independent Clauses


It took all of 10 seconds to get hooked on “Amphibian Debt March” the new single from the Grand Rapids, MI, band Heavier Than Air Flying Machines (hereafter referred to as HTAFM). This could finally be the offshoot of At the Drive-In you were waiting for (though it isn’t), the next quasi-hardcore band that composes perfect shout-along anthemic rock tracks that make you play air guitar, jump up and down, and then hit repeat to hear the song again.

This song is not even two minutes long, and yet it has everything I like in this style of music. The guitars are thick, loud, and layered. The vocals are strong and emphatic, with plenty of opportunities to shout along with the oft-repeated “What do you say?” or “Hey!” It’s the kind of track the band would rip out three quarters of the way through a live show for that perfect moment of audience participation.

The band’s other tracks on their debut album Siam are similarly powerful (if less anthemic) noisy post-hardcore. Fans of At the Drive-In, Kudzu Wish, or labelmates Bear vs. Shark will likely love this trio from the start. And “Amphibian Debt March” is the perfect 1:40 teaser to suck you in. - Tympanogram


Heavier Than Air Flying Machines, the Michigan-based indie/pop rock trio, recently released its debut-full length album, SIAM, via Friction Records. The album was recorded at Cold War Studios and produced by by Rick Johnson (Cheap Girls, Bomb The Music Industry).

Siam is available on both CD and digital formats, but if you're re near Grand Rapids, MI, you might as well swing by a show and pick up a copy directly from the band. The new album is an often dizzying, occasionally dance-inducing and always-fun blast of 14 razor-sharp post punk tunes.
Jagged guitars dart between fuzzed-out bass riffs and twisting, tumbling rhythms while front man Jaymes Pyne barks out abstract lyrical passages that cut through the palpable low-end distortion. Heavier Than Air Flying Machines' discordant, propulsive take on indie rock may not make it the prettiest band in the room, but it sure does make it the most exciting and memorable. Recommended for fans of Death From Above 1979, Blood Brothers and At The Drive-In. - PureGrainAudio


The first time I saw these guys perform at Billy’s Lounge a year ago, my heart sweat rock, my spine grew hair and my mind exploded. The three-piece post-punk machine comprised of brothers Jaymes (vocals/guitar) and Jeremy Pyne (bass) with drummer Trevor Goldner hit the studio this past spring to record their debut album, Siam. The brothers reunited after almost a decade of a hiatus from their well-received late-‘90s punk band Joyride. Goldner and Jeremy are the current rhythm section for the locally beloved Chance Jones. Siam is a delicious buffet of buzzed-out coarse synchronicity at times channeling Death From Above 1979, At The Drive-In and the Dead Kennedys. The record makes you shake it, pump your fist and want to get your old skateboard out. Grab a dictionary for Jaymes’ lyrics; his clever wordsmith-ing puts his contemporaries on the plank, forcing them into the sea with his high-register shrills and piercingly glorious screams. Recorded at Cold War Studios by owner and Mustard Plug bassist Rich Johnson, this is the best production my ears have heard to date this year. Don’t miss the band’s CD Release Party at Pyramid Scheme with Bars of Gold and Ghostheart Sept. 17. - Recoil Magazine


Discography

Siam (LP, Friction Records, 2011)
Amphibian Debt March - (Single; Streaming Audio, PureGrainAudio.com)
Follicle Gang (Green) - (Single; Streaming Video, PureGrainAudio.com)

Photos

Bio

Heavier Than Air Flying Machines (HTAFM) is a deep spazz post-hardcore noise rock trio from Grand Rapids, MI. The band was formed by Jeremy Pyne, Jaymes Pyne, and Trevor Goldner.

Recorded and produced by Rick Johnson (Cheap Girls, Bomb The Music Industry) at Cold War Studios, Siam is available on CD and digital formats from Friction Records (www.frictionrecords.net).

Siam is an often dizzying blast of 14 razor-sharp post punk tunes. Jagged guitars dart between fuzzed-out bass riffs and twisting, tumbling rhythms while front man Jaymes Pyne barks out abstract lyrical passages that cut through the palpable low-end distortion. Heavier Than Air Flying Machines' discordant, propulsive take on indie rock may not make it the prettiest band in the room, but it sure does make it the most exciting and memorable. Recommended for fans of Death From Above 1979, Blood Brothers and At The Drive-In.