Hungry March Band
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Hungry March Band

New York City, New York, United States | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
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Dec
30
Hungry March Band @ Many upcoming gigs! hungrymarchband.com, facebook.com/hungrymarchband, myspace.com/hungrymarchband

Northeast and beyond..., New York, USA

Northeast and beyond..., New York, USA

Dec
31
Hungry March Band @ Private Show

None, None, USA

None, None, USA

Dec
31
Hungry March Band @ Please check our website!

New York City, New York, USA

New York City, New York, USA

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Press


link to original article:
http://www.thevillager.com/villager_200/thehungrymarchband.html

Volume 76, Number 40 | February 28 - March 6, 2007

The Hungry March Band are metal heads of another sort

By Brooke Edwards

Calling all trombone players: The Hungry March Band is looking for one talented musician to join its forces. Interested applicants must not be afraid of practicing long hours for little or no pay, of wearing eccentric costumes in front of large crowds and of marching between enthusiastic belly dancers and fire-spinners.

Needless to say, they’re not your typical marching band.

The Hungry March Band, out of Brooklyn, has been entertaining crowds with its original songs and bizarre performances for nearly a decade. They are hoping the fourth time’s a charm, as they prepare to produce album number four and set out on their fourth European tour.

At the core of the band are 25 members who play brass and percussion instruments, including trumpets, trombones, saxophones, sousaphones, tubas, snare drums, bass drums, cymbals and a washboard.

“Most marching bands do mostly covers, but we do a lot of originals,” said Theresa Westerdahl, known in the band as Tara Fire Ball. Westerdahl is the band’s tom-tom player and managing director. “We have several composers in the group,” she said.

H.M.B.’s musical influences include, according to their Web site, “Eastern European Gypsy brass, Bollywood film scores, New Orleans second line, Jamaican ska, Balkan beats, jazz, punk, Afro-Cuban, Middle Eastern, Latin flava and hip-hop.”

And the band members are as diverse as the sounds they produce.

“We have big people, small people, gay people, straight people…” Westerdahl’s voice trailed off.

The band’s youngest player is Sammy Fairey, the 10-year-old son of saxophonist Emily Fairey. Sammy plays the drums.

The band also has Canadian and Japanese members, and has recently incorporated two “refugee” musicians from New Orleans: J.R., who plays the trumpet, and Don, who plays the helicon. Both are in a group called Panorama, which is struggling to survive after Hurricane Katrina.

H.M.B. played in New Orleans one year before Katrina. Westerdahl was pregnant at the time, and wasn’t able to go.

“We haven’t been able to go back down there since,” she said, citing a lack of resources and housing. “Katrina took that away from me.”

But Westerdahl has been able to travel with H.M.B to Italy, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands and France. In fact, she says, “I have a 3-year-old and she was made on our first trip to Europe.”

As they prepare to return to Europe, Westerdahl said, “We’re a little bit of celebrities there,” crediting the overseas popularity of the film “Short Bus,” where H.M.B. made an appearance.

She says that the filmmakers “were looking for an authentic New York experience, and that’s us.” She sent them a demo tape and they contacted the band a few months later.

Since H.M.B doesn’t need an electric amplification system, they are able to play practically anywhere, carrying what they need on their backs. This has led to performances in a wide variety of venues.

H.M.B. has performed at film festivals, art gallery openings, subway cars, funerals, weddings, protests, rallies, festivals, clubs, circuses and parades, both human and canine, to name a few.

The band is usually booked solid, with as many as five shows in one weekend, though they took this past Sunday off in honor of the Academy Awards.

On Friday night H.M.B played at the Brooklyn Academy of Music Café between performances by a family vaudeville circus, whose talents included walking on glass and spinning a 9-pound top in the palms of their hands.

Wearing a blend of traditional band costumes and 1920s-style suits and skirts — with a trumpet player dressed as a Trojan soldier and a washboard player sporting a giant bird head with purple feathers thrown in the mix — the band marched through the crowd and crammed all of its members onto the small stage. H.M.B. then got the otherwise-mellow crowd dancing and cheering, making it clear why they are in such high demand.

They’re well known in the Lower East Side and East Village, where they recently were the orchestra for a performance piece, “Once There Was a Village,” based on the book by Yuri Kapralov, at La MaMa theater on E. Fourth St. They also recently played at the ceremony for the co-naming of E. Ninth St. and Avenue B after the late Armando Perez, who was the creative director of the former CHARAS/El Bohio.

“It’s getting to the point where people can’t make every gig,” Westerdahl said. She said they are looking for backup players for each instrument.

In addition to the 25 regular band members, when H.M.B. performs at bigger events, their numbers can swell to as many as 100. This includes a second line of musicians and an entourage known as the Pleasure Society.

“My husband and 3-year-old daughter are in the Pleasure Society,” said W - The Villager


link to original article:
http://www.thevillager.com/villager_200/thehungrymarchband.html

Volume 76, Number 40 | February 28 - March 6, 2007

The Hungry March Band are metal heads of another sort

By Brooke Edwards

Calling all trombone players: The Hungry March Band is looking for one talented musician to join its forces. Interested applicants must not be afraid of practicing long hours for little or no pay, of wearing eccentric costumes in front of large crowds and of marching between enthusiastic belly dancers and fire-spinners.

Needless to say, they’re not your typical marching band.

The Hungry March Band, out of Brooklyn, has been entertaining crowds with its original songs and bizarre performances for nearly a decade. They are hoping the fourth time’s a charm, as they prepare to produce album number four and set out on their fourth European tour.

At the core of the band are 25 members who play brass and percussion instruments, including trumpets, trombones, saxophones, sousaphones, tubas, snare drums, bass drums, cymbals and a washboard.

“Most marching bands do mostly covers, but we do a lot of originals,” said Theresa Westerdahl, known in the band as Tara Fire Ball. Westerdahl is the band’s tom-tom player and managing director. “We have several composers in the group,” she said.

H.M.B.’s musical influences include, according to their Web site, “Eastern European Gypsy brass, Bollywood film scores, New Orleans second line, Jamaican ska, Balkan beats, jazz, punk, Afro-Cuban, Middle Eastern, Latin flava and hip-hop.”

And the band members are as diverse as the sounds they produce.

“We have big people, small people, gay people, straight people…” Westerdahl’s voice trailed off.

The band’s youngest player is Sammy Fairey, the 10-year-old son of saxophonist Emily Fairey. Sammy plays the drums.

The band also has Canadian and Japanese members, and has recently incorporated two “refugee” musicians from New Orleans: J.R., who plays the trumpet, and Don, who plays the helicon. Both are in a group called Panorama, which is struggling to survive after Hurricane Katrina.

H.M.B. played in New Orleans one year before Katrina. Westerdahl was pregnant at the time, and wasn’t able to go.

“We haven’t been able to go back down there since,” she said, citing a lack of resources and housing. “Katrina took that away from me.”

But Westerdahl has been able to travel with H.M.B to Italy, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands and France. In fact, she says, “I have a 3-year-old and she was made on our first trip to Europe.”

As they prepare to return to Europe, Westerdahl said, “We’re a little bit of celebrities there,” crediting the overseas popularity of the film “Short Bus,” where H.M.B. made an appearance.

She says that the filmmakers “were looking for an authentic New York experience, and that’s us.” She sent them a demo tape and they contacted the band a few months later.

Since H.M.B doesn’t need an electric amplification system, they are able to play practically anywhere, carrying what they need on their backs. This has led to performances in a wide variety of venues.

H.M.B. has performed at film festivals, art gallery openings, subway cars, funerals, weddings, protests, rallies, festivals, clubs, circuses and parades, both human and canine, to name a few.

The band is usually booked solid, with as many as five shows in one weekend, though they took this past Sunday off in honor of the Academy Awards.

On Friday night H.M.B played at the Brooklyn Academy of Music Café between performances by a family vaudeville circus, whose talents included walking on glass and spinning a 9-pound top in the palms of their hands.

Wearing a blend of traditional band costumes and 1920s-style suits and skirts — with a trumpet player dressed as a Trojan soldier and a washboard player sporting a giant bird head with purple feathers thrown in the mix — the band marched through the crowd and crammed all of its members onto the small stage. H.M.B. then got the otherwise-mellow crowd dancing and cheering, making it clear why they are in such high demand.

They’re well known in the Lower East Side and East Village, where they recently were the orchestra for a performance piece, “Once There Was a Village,” based on the book by Yuri Kapralov, at La MaMa theater on E. Fourth St. They also recently played at the ceremony for the co-naming of E. Ninth St. and Avenue B after the late Armando Perez, who was the creative director of the former CHARAS/El Bohio.

“It’s getting to the point where people can’t make every gig,” Westerdahl said. She said they are looking for backup players for each instrument.

In addition to the 25 regular band members, when H.M.B. performs at bigger events, their numbers can swell to as many as 100. This includes a second line of musicians and an entourage known as the Pleasure Society.

“My husband and 3-year-old daughter are in the Pleasure Society,” said W - The Villager


Village Voice - Best of NYC
-Best Anarchist Parade Group -Jason Gross

Born from a group of non-musicians who wanted to participate in the Mermaid Parade (where they've marched into the ocean), the HUNGRY MARCH BAND now have a repertoire that includes bhangra, Latin, and Gypsy music. You'll find them not only at Lincoln Center and Lollapalooza, but also at a dog parade, a gay underwear party, a Harlem block party, and numerous benefits (gardens, food co-ops, art communities). Oh, and they're available for weddings! - Village Voice


Village Voice - Best of NYC
-Best Anarchist Parade Group -Jason Gross

Born from a group of non-musicians who wanted to participate in the Mermaid Parade (where they've marched into the ocean), the HUNGRY MARCH BAND now have a repertoire that includes bhangra, Latin, and Gypsy music. You'll find them not only at Lincoln Center and Lollapalooza, but also at a dog parade, a gay underwear party, a Harlem block party, and numerous benefits (gardens, food co-ops, art communities). Oh, and they're available for weddings! - Village Voice


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http://www.extra-action.com/_spin/spin1.jpg - Blood On The Sousaphone


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http://www.extra-action.com/_spin/spin1.jpg - Blood On The Sousaphone


Stefano Idili, 27 giugno 2005
La "Hungry March Band" non è solo una banda: è una parata, un party migrante.....put the dancing shoes! (indossate le scarpe da ballo!) è il consiglio spassionato che l’ensemble di artisti di New York offre al pubblico
La “Hungry March Band” da New York al Poco Loco di Alghero
ALGHERO – La street ensemble “Hungry March Band” venerdì 1 luglio farà tappa ad Alghero. La fantastica “banda di strada” composta da un ventina di elementi sarà di scena nel locale algherese nel prossimo fine settimana. La "Hungry March Band" è, nei dintorni di Brooklyn New York City, la "Brass Band" (banda di fiati) più grande di tutti i tempi. Composta da 20 elementi, vive e opera stabilmente nella metropoli statunitense dal 1997. Girovaghi metropolitani, la HMB attinge la sua ispirazione dalle musiche delle diverse culture e dei diversi paesi, come una mega melting pot dell'era post-tecnologica. «We are the music of the people», così si definiscono, infatti essere la musica della gente per la HMB significa portargliela direttamente nelle strade, nelle autostrade, nei bar, nelle navi, negli autobus, negli uffici postali..e nel caso di Alghero nel Centro Storico, dove la band si esibirà oltre che nello show del Poco Loco. Non solo di fiati e percussioni, la HMB, infatti, è composta anche dalla Pleasure Society: una parte della band che si dedica solo ed esclusivamente al divertimento e al coinvolgimento del pubblico con gag, danze e canti. La "Hungry March Band" non è solo una banda: è una parata, un party migrante.....put the dancing shoes! (indossate le scarpe da ballo!) è il consiglio spassionato che l’ensemble di artisti di New York offre al pubblico. - Alguer


Stefano Idili, 27 giugno 2005
La "Hungry March Band" non è solo una banda: è una parata, un party migrante.....put the dancing shoes! (indossate le scarpe da ballo!) è il consiglio spassionato che l’ensemble di artisti di New York offre al pubblico
La “Hungry March Band” da New York al Poco Loco di Alghero
ALGHERO – La street ensemble “Hungry March Band” venerdì 1 luglio farà tappa ad Alghero. La fantastica “banda di strada” composta da un ventina di elementi sarà di scena nel locale algherese nel prossimo fine settimana. La "Hungry March Band" è, nei dintorni di Brooklyn New York City, la "Brass Band" (banda di fiati) più grande di tutti i tempi. Composta da 20 elementi, vive e opera stabilmente nella metropoli statunitense dal 1997. Girovaghi metropolitani, la HMB attinge la sua ispirazione dalle musiche delle diverse culture e dei diversi paesi, come una mega melting pot dell'era post-tecnologica. «We are the music of the people», così si definiscono, infatti essere la musica della gente per la HMB significa portargliela direttamente nelle strade, nelle autostrade, nei bar, nelle navi, negli autobus, negli uffici postali..e nel caso di Alghero nel Centro Storico, dove la band si esibirà oltre che nello show del Poco Loco. Non solo di fiati e percussioni, la HMB, infatti, è composta anche dalla Pleasure Society: una parte della band che si dedica solo ed esclusivamente al divertimento e al coinvolgimento del pubblico con gag, danze e canti. La "Hungry March Band" non è solo una banda: è una parata, un party migrante.....put the dancing shoes! (indossate le scarpe da ballo!) è il consiglio spassionato che l’ensemble di artisti di New York offre al pubblico. - Alguer



By DAN AQUILANTE January 20, 2004
Brooklyn phenomena the Hungry March Band, who've played their brand of bad-ass brass to save firehouses, free community gardens and entertain dogs, captures their parade/party experience on their new CD "On the Waterfront."

This 23-member band is a contender for the top do-it-yourself career achievement of the year, with a record that runs the gamut from traditional high school march music to latin mambos, classical interludes and even the nod to klezmer for their fans in Brighton Beach.

The best of this disc is the band's cover of the Crescent City classic "St. James Infirmary," which breaks out of the dirge and into the second line with the power of a Bourbon Street hurricane. - New York Post



By DAN AQUILANTE January 20, 2004
Brooklyn phenomena the Hungry March Band, who've played their brand of bad-ass brass to save firehouses, free community gardens and entertain dogs, captures their parade/party experience on their new CD "On the Waterfront."

This 23-member band is a contender for the top do-it-yourself career achievement of the year, with a record that runs the gamut from traditional high school march music to latin mambos, classical interludes and even the nod to klezmer for their fans in Brighton Beach.

The best of this disc is the band's cover of the Crescent City classic "St. James Infirmary," which breaks out of the dirge and into the second line with the power of a Bourbon Street hurricane. - New York Post


Discography

A new CD is currently in the works. The following self-released titles are available in iTunes and via CDBaby:

Portable Soundtracks for Temporary Utopias (2007)
Critical Brass (2004)
On the Waterfront (2003)
Hungry March Band Official Bootleg (2001)

'Portable Soundtracks for Temporary Utopias', (produced by Grammy-winner Danny Blume, and co-produced by Matt Moran of Slavic Soul Party) presents a phenomenal collection of original songs as wild and eclectic as the band itself. The HMB specializes in surprise radical encounters that transform the mundane into the miraculous. 'Portable Soundtracks for Temporary Utopias' set the tempo for a week of hi-jinks & pranks, HMB's Seven Days of 23 minute Utopias, destined to explode in music and create utopias throughout New York City, resulted in widespread surprise and joy along with a few tickets for disturbing the peace, all of which were dismissed, as at the time the peace needed disturbing.

'Critical Brass' was recorded at Loho Studios, NYC, in the Spring of 2004 merely days after returning from a very successful European tour. 'On the Waterfront' (2003) was recorded in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and dedicated to the hallowed grounds upon which the tunes were wrought. The virgin debut, 'Hungry March Band Official Bootleg', (2001) consists of a series of live recordings and is considered an historical reference for exercises in wind, percussion and fluid dynamics

We also appear on the following compilations:

Mehanata New York Gypsymania (2005)
Sorryeverybody.com (2005)
LES Garden Compilation (2005)
Sbandata Romana Festival Compilation (2004)

Photos

Bio

The Hungry March Band performs at a huge variety of fine venues and celebrated events. Such planned and spontaneous performances have included mermaid parades, guerrilla art events, rural raves, subway parties, eccentric weddings, community affairs, protests, high art events, the Staten Island Ferry, Coney Island boardwalks, Museum of Modern Art- NYC, Lincoln Center- Washington DC, playing themselves in the final scene of John Cameron Mitchell's film "Shortbus" and many other forays into the territories of free spirit.

Our musical repertoire consists of original compositions written by band members as well as scores selected from our multi-cultural world community. These songs range from New Orleans street bands, European brass traditions, Gypsy/Roma classics, wedding brass bands from India, the jazz world and the global community of NYC. The band is an ever evolving musical experiment influenced and inspired from Brooklyn's backyard with Latin flavor, punk rock noise, hip hop beats and music of the streets.

We have been featured in articles in the New York Times, The Village Voice, London Times, New York Post, Time Out New York, New York Press, Tokyo Times, various European publications and have countless mentions in blogs, various zines and web articles. We have appeared on several TV networks including Lifetime, CNN, NY1, march bys on the fly with ABC, NBC, CBS as well as appearances in several documentaries including an HMB feature Rockumentary, 'A Cat in a Bag'. We are available to play festivals, parties, parades, community celebrations, clubs, conventions, birthdays, weddings, bar mitzvahs, and remain open to suggestion!

HMB Pleasure Society are a few urban dancers and performers with the band. For larger NYC parades and events, this could expand to 75 'Second Line' performers adding so much spice with their vibrant dancing, costumes, baton twirling, fire spinning, hoola-hooping, gymnastics, stilt walking, and puppeteering.