Ian Cocker
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Ian Cocker

Capel, Western Australia, Australia | Established. Jan 01, 2001 | SELF

Capel, Western Australia, Australia | SELF
Established on Jan, 2001
Solo Rock Adult Contemporary

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"Ian Cocker - Footprints"

Ian Cocker

Footprints

What It Is Records

Singer/songwriter Ian Cocker initially took me by surprise. On "It's Alright," the first track from this album, Cocker's voice slightly resembles that of Elvis Costello. Given the passing years, and the proliferation of male solo artists trying to fit within the John Mayer mold, you'd think that Costello's influence had pretty much faded by now. Then again, could it be merely coincidence? With Cocker's poetic ear for words, I doubt it. This is a man who is clearly well-read and most likely has deeper taste in music than the latest coffeehouse picks.

Indeed, "It's Alright" does recall Costello -- but minus the boiling rage that Costello barely keeps from pouring out. Rather, it's lightweight acoustic pop about tuning out from the world's problems and spending intimate moments with a loved one. In Costello's mind, there'd be no happy endings; however, that's not Cocker's perspective. The moody "10 Days" ventures into '70s folkie territory musically speaking, but the messages are conveyed through modern street talk: "Got 10 days to go back to my roots/And get social with my old Joey town/Huggin' this one and that/Catchin up 'where youse at?' eating out and just clowning around." The upbeat, transcendent "She'll Fly," a tribute to how we can lose ourselves in our imaginations, strikes the best note on the record. It's a tune that Dave Matthews would've loved to have written himself.

There are traces of classic Bob Dylan here as well; however, despite the limitations of the singer/songwriter genre, Cocker separates himself from the others, having his own voice and clever way with words.

What It Is Records: www.whatitisrecords.com

Kyrby Raine - Ink 19 - March 2006


"Ian Cocker - Footprints"

Ian Cocker

Footprints

What It Is Records

Singer/songwriter Ian Cocker initially took me by surprise. On "It's Alright," the first track from this album, Cocker's voice slightly resembles that of Elvis Costello. Given the passing years, and the proliferation of male solo artists trying to fit within the John Mayer mold, you'd think that Costello's influence had pretty much faded by now. Then again, could it be merely coincidence? With Cocker's poetic ear for words, I doubt it. This is a man who is clearly well-read and most likely has deeper taste in music than the latest coffeehouse picks.

Indeed, "It's Alright" does recall Costello -- but minus the boiling rage that Costello barely keeps from pouring out. Rather, it's lightweight acoustic pop about tuning out from the world's problems and spending intimate moments with a loved one. In Costello's mind, there'd be no happy endings; however, that's not Cocker's perspective. The moody "10 Days" ventures into '70s folkie territory musically speaking, but the messages are conveyed through modern street talk: "Got 10 days to go back to my roots/And get social with my old Joey town/Huggin' this one and that/Catchin up 'where youse at?' eating out and just clowning around." The upbeat, transcendent "She'll Fly," a tribute to how we can lose ourselves in our imaginations, strikes the best note on the record. It's a tune that Dave Matthews would've loved to have written himself.

There are traces of classic Bob Dylan here as well; however, despite the limitations of the singer/songwriter genre, Cocker separates himself from the others, having his own voice and clever way with words.

What It Is Records: www.whatitisrecords.com

Kyrby Raine - Ink 19 - March 2006


"Ian Cocker - Footprints"

Local singer songwriter Ian Cocker blends a surprising amount of acoustic styles into Footprints, the Bunbury artist's fourth indie release. Devoid of any discernable angst, but certainly enough heart, his casual style wanders familiar Eric Clapton ground ("She'll Fly"), a rootsy JBT line ("10 Days") and a surprising Ben Harper vocal attack on "I Can Feel It". Cocker's band of merry men, keyboardist Neville Dowling, guitarist David Papendorf, drummers Guy Slingerland (Footprints percussionist) and Cathie Bonner, combine to produce an airy, heartfelt sound and Footprints is one of the nicer sounding independently produced LPs Rip-in's sampled of late.

By Brett Ladhams - Rip-in Magazine - April 2006


"Not Me"

Not Me is tenacious Southwest Singer Songwriter Ian Cocker's fifth independent release and the guy's got something pretty cool going on. A self confessed adult contemporary artist, with a style and range traversing everything from Billy Joel - style contemporary ('Wasted Ride') through to soft pop and funky blues, you're bound to find at least one song here that'll grab you. The title track and 'All Fall Down' are flowing soft pop songswith nice little packaged choruses and a definite air of quality about them. The sombre 'Alone' is an acoustic and cello laden number (courtesy of Jennifer Tingley) offering a subtle emotive power, while 'Get Out While You Can' and 'Tonight' possess that universal jazz/caberet style of upbeat jangle songwriting you'll warm to straight away. Joining Ian is the Trio known as "The Times" or Neville Dowling (keyboards and backing vocals), Guy Slingerland (drums, percussion and backing vocals) , and Stephen Manassah (bass) and with influences such as U2, Sting and Eric Clapton, the guys know their shit. Nice voice and (more importantly) vocal style with decent songwriting is only half the appeal here. Ian plays regular gigs solo; as two-piece with Guy; or as a trio adding Steve as well, so check the gig guide for his next show, where I'm sure you'll be able to pick up 'Not Me'.

By Brett Ladhams - Rip-in Magazine (Sept 2007)


"Ian Cocker - Footprints"

'Ian Cocker'
'Footprints'

- Label: 'What It Is Records'
- Genre: 'Folk' - Release Date: '2005'


Our Rating:
Let’s promote Ian Cocker (http://www.whatitisrecords.com) to the highest rank of male soloists at the moment. General Cocker would be apt because only music this good can lead an army. Cocker is apparently classically trained, but it's his deft skills with words that make the album crackle.

"The ink has dried on the pages in your head," Cocker sings on "I Could Be," just one of many memorable lines on this disc. The man writes lyrics with the bulls eye of Robin Hood and his arrows. Each cut leaves an impression - or would that be a footprint? - that remains firmly planted even after hours the record hasn't been played. Better yet, Cocker sings them with in an easygoing style that is clear and not difficult to comprehend.

Given that his influences run towards the contemporary acoustic pop types, what his music sounds like shouldn't be a shocker. Nevertheless, he adds colour to an otherwise unimaginative genre. "10 Days" drifts on a gentle reggae beat while "I Could Be" has lush keyboards.

The consistency of "Footprints" is worthy of the loudest applause. Cocker doesn't waste our time with any filler. He is always on target, and I couldn’t take my ears away from the speakers for fear of missing brilliance.
author: Adam Harrington
www.whisperinandhollerin.com
- Whisperin and Hollerin


"Live Review 11 May 2008"

Review by Brett Ladhams - The Drum and Media May 15 2008 issue:
"Like Christmas and New Years Day,Mother's Day must be one of the toughest dates of the year to play a gig. The punters who havent't already been to lunch with Mum and thus full of sleepiness, are surely out to dinner now. With that said, Dunsborough's Altitude Bar hosted prolific Bunbury artist Ian Cocker to dust off three sets of originals and altered covers.

As a solo musician Cocker is well known, having released five ndependent albums, with number six on its way later this year. Of late, he's also found a couple of like minded blokes to form the band 3D, who you'll find punking up pop music and generally playing the guts out of Cocker's B-side stuff at Trafalgar's Hotel in Bunbury. It's a release for the casual artist most of us in the south know well as a subtle pop/acoustic soul.

With around 30 well-lubricated crew warming the inside and outside bar, Ian stepped up, acoustic in hand and started slowly with both new and covered material creeping into the set. Clapton's Layla copped the Cocker touch with a bit of an impromptu solo before Tom Petty's A Wasted Life received a spin. Even though its the main reason they fill their diaries with gigs most weeks, like fellow southwest artist Qynn, Cocker's natural performing style and warmth of sound attracts far more interest than a simple background sound. His original songs, many of which are brand new and slated for the next album, find that agreeable balance between edgy, detailed acoustic pop, and fine melodic makeup. As an acoustic vocalist, and in this small bar setting particularly, Cocker errs on the softer end of the scale with a gravely underbelly imbibing the whole deal with a "been there done that" vibe. Such a range allows him to spread his vocal wings to a host of styles. Sorry to hark on about cover songs, but his version of Tracy Chapman's Talking 'Bout A Revolution highlighted the man's more diverse performing angles.

The harmonica cops a workout often, as does the off-white Fender Stratocaster, which reared it's head, befittingly, for Hendrix's Hey Joe and a handfull of tracks beyond. A Fender still sounds better soft and muted than any other instrument in this reviewer's opinion, something Cocker no doubt worked out for himself.

All told, it was an effective set for the room and audience. With studio time slated for mid-year this quiet achiever will continue to hock his wares throughout the year so keep an eye out for him. Also, its worth noting that as winter rolls heavy, the southwest gig scene changes tune slightly to include a whole stack of smaller venues like Altitude bar hosting regular entertainment from right around the country each weekend. You have to be crafty to spot 'em though, so keep an eye on he Rip-in pages of Drum for more info."
- The Drum Media Magazine


"Live Review 11 May 2008"

Review by Brett Ladhams - The Drum and Media May 15 2008 issue:
"Like Christmas and New Years Day,Mother's Day must be one of the toughest dates of the year to play a gig. The punters who havent't already been to lunch with Mum and thus full of sleepiness, are surely out to dinner now. With that said, Dunsborough's Altitude Bar hosted prolific Bunbury artist Ian Cocker to dust off three sets of originals and altered covers.

As a solo musician Cocker is well known, having released five ndependent albums, with number six on its way later this year. Of late, he's also found a couple of like minded blokes to form the band 3D, who you'll find punking up pop music and generally playing the guts out of Cocker's B-side stuff at Trafalgar's Hotel in Bunbury. It's a release for the casual artist most of us in the south know well as a subtle pop/acoustic soul.

With around 30 well-lubricated crew warming the inside and outside bar, Ian stepped up, acoustic in hand and started slowly with both new and covered material creeping into the set. Clapton's Layla copped the Cocker touch with a bit of an impromptu solo before Tom Petty's A Wasted Life received a spin. Even though its the main reason they fill their diaries with gigs most weeks, like fellow southwest artist Qynn, Cocker's natural performing style and warmth of sound attracts far more interest than a simple background sound. His original songs, many of which are brand new and slated for the next album, find that agreeable balance between edgy, detailed acoustic pop, and fine melodic makeup. As an acoustic vocalist, and in this small bar setting particularly, Cocker errs on the softer end of the scale with a gravely underbelly imbibing the whole deal with a "been there done that" vibe. Such a range allows him to spread his vocal wings to a host of styles. Sorry to hark on about cover songs, but his version of Tracy Chapman's Talking 'Bout A Revolution highlighted the man's more diverse performing angles.

The harmonica cops a workout often, as does the off-white Fender Stratocaster, which reared it's head, befittingly, for Hendrix's Hey Joe and a handfull of tracks beyond. A Fender still sounds better soft and muted than any other instrument in this reviewer's opinion, something Cocker no doubt worked out for himself.

All told, it was an effective set for the room and audience. With studio time slated for mid-year this quiet achiever will continue to hock his wares throughout the year so keep an eye out for him. Also, its worth noting that as winter rolls heavy, the southwest gig scene changes tune slightly to include a whole stack of smaller venues like Altitude bar hosting regular entertainment from right around the country each weekend. You have to be crafty to spot 'em though, so keep an eye on he Rip-in pages of Drum for more info."
- The Drum Media Magazine


Discography

Footprints
Not Me
Polarity
Faded Memories Single

All albums are available in hard copy format from gigs and off the net (Mr www).

Check out CD Baby merch linkbelow .. go on make me famous ...

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Bio

Born in England and grew up in South Africa. Has played music since his early teens. Didn't dig classical guitar tutoring at the time - but gets it now. Raced Moto x (and crashed a lot!). Just managed to attend enough class to qualify in civil engineering. Held the rank of Lieutenant in the Infantry during National Service (way before James Blunt!!). Raced internationally on the Powerman Duathlon circuit and still maintains a reasonable level of fitness in mountain biking and running. Emigrated to Australia 18 years ago and a pround-as-punch Aussie. Can never get enough time with the guitar. Has a serious problem with seriousness.

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