Sir Charles
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Sir Charles

Jacksonville, Florida, United States | INDIE

Jacksonville, Florida, United States | INDIE
Band EDM Hip Hop

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Dec
31
Sir Charles @ Gibbson Valley Winery

None, None, New Zealand

None, None, New Zealand

Dec
02
Sir Charles @ The Granada

Lawrence, Kansas, USA

Lawrence, Kansas, USA

Dec
01
Sir Charles @ Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

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Music

Press


The Rex Theater is located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s historic South Side. On a Friday night, East Carson Street is populated by scantily clad women and club-going partiers dressed for nightclubs, dive bars, or late night fast-food joints.

With just over 300 people in attendance, the venue was comfortable; a short wait for drinks at the bar and for the bathrooms and plenty of room at the back of the dance floor for hula hoping, poi, and just plain dancing your ass off.

The evening kicked off with an opening set from Daniel Zook also known as Degree-Z. He is a local from Pittsburgh who studied music at the University of Pittsburgh and got his groove in the San Francisco Bay area. His current influences include Galactic, Dumstaphunk, Pretty Lights and Lotus. Degree-Z played several remixes as well as a few bumping originals.

At 10pm, Eliot Lipp began performing, setting the attitude for the night. Lipp could have done the show alone but the live drummer, Steve Bryant provided some extra percussion with a bass drum, high-hat, crash/ride cymbal, and two snare drums. The combination of Lipp and Bryant was at times touch-and-go: Lipp usually plays his shows solo and I feel like Bryant was having a hard time keeping up. Lipp was using his Korg synthesizer and midi keyboard to pump out old school funky beats and warm analog tones.

The track “Glasspipe” off of album Tacoma Mockingbird featured many of these retro funk sounds generated through frequency modulation and voltage controlled oscillation by means of vintage Korg equipment made in late 1970’s. The vibrations coming from the speakers on this song are unnatural and hard to believe. After coming on the microphone to ask the crowd “What’s up guys, you guys good?” he dropped the groovy beat for “Beamrider” and unrelentingly continued to play a surprising remix of the track off of his album Peace Love Weed 3D. With blissful melodies and sliding bass lines, “Beamrider” was a definite crowd pleaser. Eliot Lipp also samples lyrics from hip-hop, uniquely fusing electronic music with rapping. Eliot Lipp’s contemporary, retro feel led right into the pleasing style of music that oozes from BoomBox’s Zion Godchaux and Russ Randolph.

BoomBox’s live show has a sound that resonates in your body hours after the music stops. The two-piece band does not have a predetermined set-list; instead they feed the off the energy of the crowd and the vigor of the venue in order to select their jams in the moment.

Zion Rock Godchaux was dressed like a funky disco pimp from the 70’s sporting his customary black leather vest, a yellow and orange fuzzy marabou feather boa, a pink shag bucket hat and gold pimp shades. Godchaux, the son of Keith and Donna Jean formerly of the Grateful Dead, specializes in funky rhythms and low frequency guitar wobbles. Russ “the Captain” Randolph also has a musical upbringing and was previously a producer for the albums of many popular artists. Randolph is the DJ, drummer, and sound engineer, the beat mastermind for BoomBox.

The most memorable performance of the night and my ultimate favorite BoomBox rendition, “Shakedown Street” was accompanied by a kaleidoscope of colors on stage and a barrage of glow-sticks from the crowd. Everyone was dancing with everyone, singing along with the lyrics and mesmerized by the design spotlights that illuminated the stage, ceiling and walls. The shakedown jam turned into “Tonight,” a jazz and funk inspired track in the midst of 300 sweaty fans dancing and clapping along to the leisurely melody of the tune.

After “Tonight” from Visions of a Backbeat, the stage went dark and Randolph dropped the clap cadence and the piano track for the next song and wildness immediately ensued. A slow, trippy jam, “Midnight on the Run” inspired the crowd to let loose and really get down.

Following what might be my second favorite BoomBox song, “Stereo,” the opening track from Visions of a Backbeat began with stage lights coming from behind creating the essence of shadowy figures of the on stage artists. Those who decided to stay for the entire set were treated to an assortment of their heavier, more progressive tracks like “Mr. Boogie Man” and others from their latest album Downriverelectric.

The night wasn’t finished just yet. After a 15 minute drive on the highway and down a mile long winding dirt road, it concluded, however with Dregree-Z performing at an undisclosed location with a select group of fans in attendance. By way of a fully stocked fridge full of beer and liquor, the party was prolonged just a few more hours in the basement of this party-house, deep in the woods. - The Untz


The Rex Theater is located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s historic South Side. On a Friday night, East Carson Street is populated by scantily clad women and club-going partiers dressed for nightclubs, dive bars, or late night fast-food joints.

With just over 300 people in attendance, the venue was comfortable; a short wait for drinks at the bar and for the bathrooms and plenty of room at the back of the dance floor for hula hoping, poi, and just plain dancing your ass off.

The evening kicked off with an opening set from Daniel Zook also known as Degree-Z. He is a local from Pittsburgh who studied music at the University of Pittsburgh and got his groove in the San Francisco Bay area. His current influences include Galactic, Dumstaphunk, Pretty Lights and Lotus. Degree-Z played several remixes as well as a few bumping originals.

At 10pm, Eliot Lipp began performing, setting the attitude for the night. Lipp could have done the show alone but the live drummer, Steve Bryant provided some extra percussion with a bass drum, high-hat, crash/ride cymbal, and two snare drums. The combination of Lipp and Bryant was at times touch-and-go: Lipp usually plays his shows solo and I feel like Bryant was having a hard time keeping up. Lipp was using his Korg synthesizer and midi keyboard to pump out old school funky beats and warm analog tones.

The track “Glasspipe” off of album Tacoma Mockingbird featured many of these retro funk sounds generated through frequency modulation and voltage controlled oscillation by means of vintage Korg equipment made in late 1970’s. The vibrations coming from the speakers on this song are unnatural and hard to believe. After coming on the microphone to ask the crowd “What’s up guys, you guys good?” he dropped the groovy beat for “Beamrider” and unrelentingly continued to play a surprising remix of the track off of his album Peace Love Weed 3D. With blissful melodies and sliding bass lines, “Beamrider” was a definite crowd pleaser. Eliot Lipp also samples lyrics from hip-hop, uniquely fusing electronic music with rapping. Eliot Lipp’s contemporary, retro feel led right into the pleasing style of music that oozes from BoomBox’s Zion Godchaux and Russ Randolph.

BoomBox’s live show has a sound that resonates in your body hours after the music stops. The two-piece band does not have a predetermined set-list; instead they feed the off the energy of the crowd and the vigor of the venue in order to select their jams in the moment.

Zion Rock Godchaux was dressed like a funky disco pimp from the 70’s sporting his customary black leather vest, a yellow and orange fuzzy marabou feather boa, a pink shag bucket hat and gold pimp shades. Godchaux, the son of Keith and Donna Jean formerly of the Grateful Dead, specializes in funky rhythms and low frequency guitar wobbles. Russ “the Captain” Randolph also has a musical upbringing and was previously a producer for the albums of many popular artists. Randolph is the DJ, drummer, and sound engineer, the beat mastermind for BoomBox.

The most memorable performance of the night and my ultimate favorite BoomBox rendition, “Shakedown Street” was accompanied by a kaleidoscope of colors on stage and a barrage of glow-sticks from the crowd. Everyone was dancing with everyone, singing along with the lyrics and mesmerized by the design spotlights that illuminated the stage, ceiling and walls. The shakedown jam turned into “Tonight,” a jazz and funk inspired track in the midst of 300 sweaty fans dancing and clapping along to the leisurely melody of the tune.

After “Tonight” from Visions of a Backbeat, the stage went dark and Randolph dropped the clap cadence and the piano track for the next song and wildness immediately ensued. A slow, trippy jam, “Midnight on the Run” inspired the crowd to let loose and really get down.

Following what might be my second favorite BoomBox song, “Stereo,” the opening track from Visions of a Backbeat began with stage lights coming from behind creating the essence of shadowy figures of the on stage artists. Those who decided to stay for the entire set were treated to an assortment of their heavier, more progressive tracks like “Mr. Boogie Man” and others from their latest album Downriverelectric.

The night wasn’t finished just yet. After a 15 minute drive on the highway and down a mile long winding dirt road, it concluded, however with Dregree-Z performing at an undisclosed location with a select group of fans in attendance. By way of a fully stocked fridge full of beer and liquor, the party was prolonged just a few more hours in the basement of this party-house, deep in the woods. - The Untz


The Rex Theater is located in the heart of Pittsburgh’s historic South Side. On a Friday night, East Carson Street is populated by scantily clad women and club-going partiers dressed for nightclubs, dive bars, or late night fast-food joints.

With just over 300 people in attendance, the venue was comfortable; a short wait for drinks at the bar and for the bathrooms and plenty of room at the back of the dance floor for hula hoping, poi, and just plain dancing your ass off.

The evening kicked off with an opening set from Daniel Zook also known as Degree-Z. He is a local from Pittsburgh who studied music at the University of Pittsburgh and got his groove in the San Francisco Bay area. His current influences include Galactic, Dumstaphunk, Pretty Lights and Lotus. Degree-Z played several remixes as well as a few bumping originals.

At 10pm, Eliot Lipp began performing, setting the attitude for the night. Lipp could have done the show alone but the live drummer, Steve Bryant provided some extra percussion with a bass drum, high-hat, crash/ride cymbal, and two snare drums. The combination of Lipp and Bryant was at times touch-and-go: Lipp usually plays his shows solo and I feel like Bryant was having a hard time keeping up. Lipp was using his Korg synthesizer and midi keyboard to pump out old school funky beats and warm analog tones.

The track “Glasspipe” off of album Tacoma Mockingbird featured many of these retro funk sounds generated through frequency modulation and voltage controlled oscillation by means of vintage Korg equipment made in late 1970’s. The vibrations coming from the speakers on this song are unnatural and hard to believe. After coming on the microphone to ask the crowd “What’s up guys, you guys good?” he dropped the groovy beat for “Beamrider” and unrelentingly continued to play a surprising remix of the track off of his album Peace Love Weed 3D. With blissful melodies and sliding bass lines, “Beamrider” was a definite crowd pleaser. Eliot Lipp also samples lyrics from hip-hop, uniquely fusing electronic music with rapping. Eliot Lipp’s contemporary, retro feel led right into the pleasing style of music that oozes from BoomBox’s Zion Godchaux and Russ Randolph.

BoomBox’s live show has a sound that resonates in your body hours after the music stops. The two-piece band does not have a predetermined set-list; instead they feed the off the energy of the crowd and the vigor of the venue in order to select their jams in the moment.

Zion Rock Godchaux was dressed like a funky disco pimp from the 70’s sporting his customary black leather vest, a yellow and orange fuzzy marabou feather boa, a pink shag bucket hat and gold pimp shades. Godchaux, the son of Keith and Donna Jean formerly of the Grateful Dead, specializes in funky rhythms and low frequency guitar wobbles. Russ “the Captain” Randolph also has a musical upbringing and was previously a producer for the albums of many popular artists. Randolph is the DJ, drummer, and sound engineer, the beat mastermind for BoomBox.

The most memorable performance of the night and my ultimate favorite BoomBox rendition, “Shakedown Street” was accompanied by a kaleidoscope of colors on stage and a barrage of glow-sticks from the crowd. Everyone was dancing with everyone, singing along with the lyrics and mesmerized by the design spotlights that illuminated the stage, ceiling and walls. The shakedown jam turned into “Tonight,” a jazz and funk inspired track in the midst of 300 sweaty fans dancing and clapping along to the leisurely melody of the tune.

After “Tonight” from Visions of a Backbeat, the stage went dark and Randolph dropped the clap cadence and the piano track for the next song and wildness immediately ensued. A slow, trippy jam, “Midnight on the Run” inspired the crowd to let loose and really get down.

Following what might be my second favorite BoomBox song, “Stereo,” the opening track from Visions of a Backbeat began with stage lights coming from behind creating the essence of shadowy figures of the on stage artists. Those who decided to stay for the entire set were treated to an assortment of their heavier, more progressive tracks like “Mr. Boogie Man” and others from their latest album Downriverelectric.

The night wasn’t finished just yet. After a 15 minute drive on the highway and down a mile long winding dirt road, it concluded, however with Dregree-Z performing at an undisclosed location with a select group of fans in attendance. By way of a fully stocked fridge full of beer and liquor, the party was prolonged just a few more hours in the basement of this party-house, deep in the woods. - The Untz


Few venues in the area provide the level of intimacy with band like Musica can, and it was the perfect host for BoomBox’s Ohio Halloween bash.
So far, this show had the best turnout I’ve witnessed at Musica yet, and nearly everyone in attendance came dressed for the occasion. It wasn’t long before BoomBox had Gumby, Mexican drug cartel, Deadmau5, teddy bears and air traffic controllers dancing all night long.
BoomBox hit the stage around 10 p.m., after a noteworthy performance by the Akron jam group Hayden Calling, and tore through plenty of new material. Most of the new jams, which included the new single “Lost Ya” and “Dark End of the Street,” can be found on the Alabama duo’s upcoming EP, titled Dark End of the Street, which is due to drop soon.
As a fan from the early days, I’m really digging the momentum this band has as of late. They seem to be in the groove, with a good chunk of new material, an impressive live show and a developed guitar style on singer/guitarist Zion Godchaux’s part that seamlessly transitions into some mega house music breakdowns from DJ Russ Randolph. They’ve also done well at revamping songs from the early days of Visions of Backbeat to keep them fresh and interesting. Kudos to you, BoomBox, and keep it going. It works wonderfully.
Stay tuned. Nasty Fancy conducted an on-camera interview with the guys and filmed a good chunk of the show. We’ll have an exclusive video for y’all and a nice photo slideshow, but be patient. These things take time and precision. - Nasty Fancy


Few venues in the area provide the level of intimacy with band like Musica can, and it was the perfect host for BoomBox’s Ohio Halloween bash.
So far, this show had the best turnout I’ve witnessed at Musica yet, and nearly everyone in attendance came dressed for the occasion. It wasn’t long before BoomBox had Gumby, Mexican drug cartel, Deadmau5, teddy bears and air traffic controllers dancing all night long.
BoomBox hit the stage around 10 p.m., after a noteworthy performance by the Akron jam group Hayden Calling, and tore through plenty of new material. Most of the new jams, which included the new single “Lost Ya” and “Dark End of the Street,” can be found on the Alabama duo’s upcoming EP, titled Dark End of the Street, which is due to drop soon.
As a fan from the early days, I’m really digging the momentum this band has as of late. They seem to be in the groove, with a good chunk of new material, an impressive live show and a developed guitar style on singer/guitarist Zion Godchaux’s part that seamlessly transitions into some mega house music breakdowns from DJ Russ Randolph. They’ve also done well at revamping songs from the early days of Visions of Backbeat to keep them fresh and interesting. Kudos to you, BoomBox, and keep it going. It works wonderfully.
Stay tuned. Nasty Fancy conducted an on-camera interview with the guys and filmed a good chunk of the show. We’ll have an exclusive video for y’all and a nice photo slideshow, but be patient. These things take time and precision. - Nasty Fancy


BoomBox was back in Colorado after seeing them at Bisco Inferno (read review here) and River Beats (read review here). After stopping at The Eldo in Crested Butte, CO, Russ “the Captain” Randolph and
Zion Rock Godchaux headed up to The Aggie in Fort Fun to tickle our ears with aural pleasure. With The Aggie providing a more intimate setting than Red Rocks or State Bridge, we soon learned it wasn’t the only difference between prior performances.
BoomBox, true to its jam band nature, takes the stage without a game-plan. Their strategy is to play to the individuality of the crowd, venue and environment; with this in mind their set is always different from the last. Their rock-n-roll attitude combined with an electro-funk psychedelic sound turns BoomBox’ performances into a living, breathing organism. With an expected EP coming out anytime, their set was a blend between crowd-favorite songs and newer, entrancing beats. Their musical talents baffle our minds as each has a multitude of abilities. Both members on drums, Randolph on keys, and Godchaux on guitar, bass and vocals they are wonderful entertainers that take the electronic show to the next level. Their lighting set-up was one not to be forgotten; for a small theater the billowing beams of light rained down upon the entire crowd gratifying our visual needs while simultaneously complimenting the music. It was an impressive set-up for the intimate venue, especially on a Wednesday night.
As enchanting as the music was, we couldn’t speak as highly for the rest of the show…Maybe The Aggie Theater was not at its prime, but more displaying characteristics of the quintessential college freshman. The unorganized single entry line baffled our minds; regardless of if you were a ticket holder, re-entry, or purchasing at the door we were all herded into a cluster-fuck of an entryway. This made for an over-hour line just to catch a glimmer of light from the inside. Why is it that the closer you get to anything in life, the pushier you get? If you are in the way back you’re content with spreading out and succumbing to the knowledge of eternity in waiting. But then when you are fifty feet or closer joining the Donner Party and eating one-another doesn’t sound so bad…
Needless to say we made it in, swooped up a tall-boy and wedged our way to the front just in time for a few welcoming words from BoomBox. From minute one this duo put the “fun” in funk and we never stopped dancing. Well that is until our first bathroom trip when we caught a strange glimpse of flip-flop footed ladies rigorously cleaning their feet. It wasn’t until we rounded the corner and realized the poop on the floor called for such sanitization efforts. WTF!? Why is there shit on the floor? Oh, and another bathroom favorite is when that one girl shoves her way through line sharing, “I just need to look in the mirror!” You see her approach and try to “fix” herself and at the same time it’s hard not to share with her that there’s no amount of Aggie Theater touch-up that will fix her sweaty, make-up smeared, glitter-ridden face. You’re at a show and the bathroom is utilized for many a reason but trying to fix your mangy appearance should be the last reason you leave your dancing post, overall you look dumb when you’re trying to look pretty.
Touring the venue to make sure we take in the entirety of the event we found ourselves behind the soundboard for the remainder of the show. Here we were able to soak up the last bits of sound and stomping our feet to the beat. Showing us that they are committed to growing as artists and continually maturing their performance we look forward not only to their upcoming EP but future appearances in Colorado. - Swaager


BoomBox was back in Colorado after seeing them at Bisco Inferno (read review here) and River Beats (read review here). After stopping at The Eldo in Crested Butte, CO, Russ “the Captain” Randolph and
Zion Rock Godchaux headed up to The Aggie in Fort Fun to tickle our ears with aural pleasure. With The Aggie providing a more intimate setting than Red Rocks or State Bridge, we soon learned it wasn’t the only difference between prior performances.
BoomBox, true to its jam band nature, takes the stage without a game-plan. Their strategy is to play to the individuality of the crowd, venue and environment; with this in mind their set is always different from the last. Their rock-n-roll attitude combined with an electro-funk psychedelic sound turns BoomBox’ performances into a living, breathing organism. With an expected EP coming out anytime, their set was a blend between crowd-favorite songs and newer, entrancing beats. Their musical talents baffle our minds as each has a multitude of abilities. Both members on drums, Randolph on keys, and Godchaux on guitar, bass and vocals they are wonderful entertainers that take the electronic show to the next level. Their lighting set-up was one not to be forgotten; for a small theater the billowing beams of light rained down upon the entire crowd gratifying our visual needs while simultaneously complimenting the music. It was an impressive set-up for the intimate venue, especially on a Wednesday night.
As enchanting as the music was, we couldn’t speak as highly for the rest of the show…Maybe The Aggie Theater was not at its prime, but more displaying characteristics of the quintessential college freshman. The unorganized single entry line baffled our minds; regardless of if you were a ticket holder, re-entry, or purchasing at the door we were all herded into a cluster-fuck of an entryway. This made for an over-hour line just to catch a glimmer of light from the inside. Why is it that the closer you get to anything in life, the pushier you get? If you are in the way back you’re content with spreading out and succumbing to the knowledge of eternity in waiting. But then when you are fifty feet or closer joining the Donner Party and eating one-another doesn’t sound so bad…
Needless to say we made it in, swooped up a tall-boy and wedged our way to the front just in time for a few welcoming words from BoomBox. From minute one this duo put the “fun” in funk and we never stopped dancing. Well that is until our first bathroom trip when we caught a strange glimpse of flip-flop footed ladies rigorously cleaning their feet. It wasn’t until we rounded the corner and realized the poop on the floor called for such sanitization efforts. WTF!? Why is there shit on the floor? Oh, and another bathroom favorite is when that one girl shoves her way through line sharing, “I just need to look in the mirror!” You see her approach and try to “fix” herself and at the same time it’s hard not to share with her that there’s no amount of Aggie Theater touch-up that will fix her sweaty, make-up smeared, glitter-ridden face. You’re at a show and the bathroom is utilized for many a reason but trying to fix your mangy appearance should be the last reason you leave your dancing post, overall you look dumb when you’re trying to look pretty.
Touring the venue to make sure we take in the entirety of the event we found ourselves behind the soundboard for the remainder of the show. Here we were able to soak up the last bits of sound and stomping our feet to the beat. Showing us that they are committed to growing as artists and continually maturing their performance we look forward not only to their upcoming EP but future appearances in Colorado. - Swaager


BoomBox was back in Colorado after seeing them at Bisco Inferno (read review here) and River Beats (read review here). After stopping at The Eldo in Crested Butte, CO, Russ “the Captain” Randolph and
Zion Rock Godchaux headed up to The Aggie in Fort Fun to tickle our ears with aural pleasure. With The Aggie providing a more intimate setting than Red Rocks or State Bridge, we soon learned it wasn’t the only difference between prior performances.
BoomBox, true to its jam band nature, takes the stage without a game-plan. Their strategy is to play to the individuality of the crowd, venue and environment; with this in mind their set is always different from the last. Their rock-n-roll attitude combined with an electro-funk psychedelic sound turns BoomBox’ performances into a living, breathing organism. With an expected EP coming out anytime, their set was a blend between crowd-favorite songs and newer, entrancing beats. Their musical talents baffle our minds as each has a multitude of abilities. Both members on drums, Randolph on keys, and Godchaux on guitar, bass and vocals they are wonderful entertainers that take the electronic show to the next level. Their lighting set-up was one not to be forgotten; for a small theater the billowing beams of light rained down upon the entire crowd gratifying our visual needs while simultaneously complimenting the music. It was an impressive set-up for the intimate venue, especially on a Wednesday night.
As enchanting as the music was, we couldn’t speak as highly for the rest of the show…Maybe The Aggie Theater was not at its prime, but more displaying characteristics of the quintessential college freshman. The unorganized single entry line baffled our minds; regardless of if you were a ticket holder, re-entry, or purchasing at the door we were all herded into a cluster-fuck of an entryway. This made for an over-hour line just to catch a glimmer of light from the inside. Why is it that the closer you get to anything in life, the pushier you get? If you are in the way back you’re content with spreading out and succumbing to the knowledge of eternity in waiting. But then when you are fifty feet or closer joining the Donner Party and eating one-another doesn’t sound so bad…
Needless to say we made it in, swooped up a tall-boy and wedged our way to the front just in time for a few welcoming words from BoomBox. From minute one this duo put the “fun” in funk and we never stopped dancing. Well that is until our first bathroom trip when we caught a strange glimpse of flip-flop footed ladies rigorously cleaning their feet. It wasn’t until we rounded the corner and realized the poop on the floor called for such sanitization efforts. WTF!? Why is there shit on the floor? Oh, and another bathroom favorite is when that one girl shoves her way through line sharing, “I just need to look in the mirror!” You see her approach and try to “fix” herself and at the same time it’s hard not to share with her that there’s no amount of Aggie Theater touch-up that will fix her sweaty, make-up smeared, glitter-ridden face. You’re at a show and the bathroom is utilized for many a reason but trying to fix your mangy appearance should be the last reason you leave your dancing post, overall you look dumb when you’re trying to look pretty.
Touring the venue to make sure we take in the entirety of the event we found ourselves behind the soundboard for the remainder of the show. Here we were able to soak up the last bits of sound and stomping our feet to the beat. Showing us that they are committed to growing as artists and continually maturing their performance we look forward not only to their upcoming EP but future appearances in Colorado. - Swaager


This summer, the silky sounds of Zion Godchaux's voice have been merging with the light dance groove provided by BoomBox bandmate Russ Randolph on festival stages around the country. Fresh off the release of this summer's downriverelectric, BoomBox has been pounding the pavement and is continuing on a big Fall tour.

The duo met when Godchaux's mother, Donna Jean Godchaux-McKay, and the rest of the Heart of Gold Band were in the process of redesigning their home studio. Randolph, a producer based in Muscle Shoals, AL was brought on to help with the modifications, but stayed to help cut what would become "At the Table," featuring tracks with Zion. Godchaux and Randolph began messing around with drum machines and simple programs, and eventually put out their first album "Visions of Backbeat" without ever having played a show. - The Untz


This summer, the silky sounds of Zion Godchaux's voice have been merging with the light dance groove provided by BoomBox bandmate Russ Randolph on festival stages around the country. Fresh off the release of this summer's downriverelectric, BoomBox has been pounding the pavement and is continuing on a big Fall tour.

The duo met when Godchaux's mother, Donna Jean Godchaux-McKay, and the rest of the Heart of Gold Band were in the process of redesigning their home studio. Randolph, a producer based in Muscle Shoals, AL was brought on to help with the modifications, but stayed to help cut what would become "At the Table," featuring tracks with Zion. Godchaux and Randolph began messing around with drum machines and simple programs, and eventually put out their first album "Visions of Backbeat" without ever having played a show. - The Untz


"A two-man show that can transform at any moment and take on any shape they want to." - Charlie Owen (July '08)


"A two-man show that can transform at any moment and take on any shape they want to." - Charlie Owen (July '08)


"BoomBox shares this ethos, and as a result, ends up giving fans a memorable experience." - Wynn Sammons (June '08)


"BoomBox shares this ethos, and as a result, ends up giving fans a memorable experience." - Wynn Sammons (June '08)


"Their music is a unique blend of electronica, funk and southern rock, the likes of which I've never quite seen before. Bringing in crowds of both rock and electronica fans, BoomBox is getting bigger all the time." - Sam Halloway (Aug '08)


"Their music is a unique blend of electronica, funk and southern rock, the likes of which I've never quite seen before. Bringing in crowds of both rock and electronica fans, BoomBox is getting bigger all the time." - Sam Halloway (Aug '08)


"When opening sequences for The World began to play, not one inch of that venue was standing still. The party was on! Their neverending range of music and songs kept the party until early morning even though it could have gone on forever. Never once did BoomBox lose that energetic vibe felt from their fans throughout the set." - Chicago Music Guide


"When opening sequences for The World began to play, not one inch of that venue was standing still. The party was on! Their neverending range of music and songs kept the party until early morning even though it could have gone on forever. Never once did BoomBox lose that energetic vibe felt from their fans throughout the set." - Chicago Music Guide


"BoomBox is the rare brand of midnight love that has enough depth to stand up to a daytime rendezvous. And they're innovative enough that we can still claim America's best electro act is based in Alabama." - Black and White


"BoomBox is the rare brand of midnight love that has enough depth to stand up to a daytime rendezvous. And they're innovative enough that we can still claim America's best electro act is based in Alabama." - Black and White


"Overall, I had a blast seeing these guys play a style of jamtronica that never got boring. It also didn't hurt that BoomBox's audience at the Tap Room was 75% female. You don't see that at many jam band shows." - Glide Magazine


"Overall, I had a blast seeing these guys play a style of jamtronica that never got boring. It also didn't hurt that BoomBox's audience at the Tap Room was 75% female. You don't see that at many jam band shows." - Glide Magazine


BoomBox has a huge following all around the US. I have personally been a fan of theirs for three years, even since another relatively obscure band (Particle) introduced me to them. I’ve been hooked ever since! They rarely come to the Pacific Northwest, so when I learned of their show here in Portland, at The Crown Room, I jumped at the opportunity to see them live and to get to meet them!

We were set to meet with them right after sound check, around 7:30pm. When we arrived, they had just gotten there from their previous show in Seattle. We all know how horrible traffic on I-5 southbound can be sometimes! So we reassured them of the normality of it all and told them to let us know when they were going to be ready for us. Sound check happened and then a quick trip to the green room downstairs to grab wallets and van keys, and we were off! We joined them for a quick bite to eat at a local burger joint around the corner from the venue and immediately hit it off! Zion and Russ and their crew were genuinely interested and mesmerized by the facts and figures and little bit of trivia Josh and I gave them about Portland and they sincerely wished they could stay for a couple of days after the show to take in the scene and the local people. They promised us that the next time they come around, they will!

Their opening act, Ana Sia, started playing and the room was bumpin’! Pretty close to a packed house an hour or so before BoomBox was even supposed to start. We took advantage of the down time after dinner to ask them a few questions downstairs in the green room. Read on below for the interview.

One last note. If you have never heard of BoomBox, know this: two members, Zion on guitar and voice, Russ on synthesizers and other complicated equipment that makes their sound what it is. They are genuinely peaceful and sweet people who do what they love. Dance, house, trance, techno—whatever you want to call their style—it’s live and always fresh. Light shows always accompany their performances, making it not only pleasing to the heart, soul, and ears, but to the eyes too. They play everywhere from smaller venues like The Crown Room in Portland to giant festivals like 10000 Lakes! Give them a listen and be sure to put them on your concert calendar for their next show! You will NOT regret it!

Melophobe: How has the tour been so far???

BoomBox: The tour has been good, interesting. Trying to break in new markets and new promoters and getting everyone to know BoomBox. The sound is very important to us, we are perfectionists and our performances can be affected by sound problems. We played a gig in southern Oregon where the venue was on noise ordinance probation and we got shutdown! Another show was in Seattle where the venue did not have enough power and the power kept going out. It was tough for us and for our fans.

Melophobe: Do you get to mingle with your opening artists?

BoomBox: We do, occasionally. The schedules are really tight and by the time we get to a venue, get setup, do sound check, immediately we have to do the things we have to do. A lot of the times, by the time we finish getting ready, the opener is already on. There are times we get to hang out though. Festivals are really good for that. We get to hang out backstage and catch up with other musicians. It’s cool that Ana Sia is opening for us on this tour and to have a constant opening act.

Melophobe: Were you impressed by any bands that were completely new to you? ??

BoomBox: We try hard to promote our local music scene (Muscle Shoals, AL), there is a lot of talent coming out of there. We try to educate off of what we have learned and help the bands pave a road out of town on to their own thing. As we learn, covering so many bases, our goal is to develop the record label and help develop talent. We feel like we’re part of a movement in Muscle Shoals, and it’s really cool to feel that.??

Melophobe: What are some of the cool sights across the US that you have been able to see on your tours?

BoomBox: A boat. We did a boat party in NYC that was crazy, get on the boat at midnight and play out to the Statue of Liberty. It’s crazy! Getting paid to play at the feet of the Statue of Liberty. There’s another cool cruise in Boston that we like: Harper’s Ferry. The festivals are cool; the small ones usually fall under the radar until you hear about them from another band. We are really blessed that basically every city we roll into we get to meet really solid people and a cool scene.
?We stay in hotels now, but four years ago we would couch surf in the cities that we played in. We would book one show and stay in the city for a couple of days after, just to get to know the people and the city. It’s a unique perspective that you can’t get from a normal job.

??Melophobe: What’s next for BoomBox?

BoomBox: The New album! Downriverelectric should be out in early 2010. The first record was sold out of the trunk of a car! This new record will - Melophobe


BoomBox has a huge following all around the US. I have personally been a fan of theirs for three years, even since another relatively obscure band (Particle) introduced me to them. I’ve been hooked ever since! They rarely come to the Pacific Northwest, so when I learned of their show here in Portland, at The Crown Room, I jumped at the opportunity to see them live and to get to meet them!

We were set to meet with them right after sound check, around 7:30pm. When we arrived, they had just gotten there from their previous show in Seattle. We all know how horrible traffic on I-5 southbound can be sometimes! So we reassured them of the normality of it all and told them to let us know when they were going to be ready for us. Sound check happened and then a quick trip to the green room downstairs to grab wallets and van keys, and we were off! We joined them for a quick bite to eat at a local burger joint around the corner from the venue and immediately hit it off! Zion and Russ and their crew were genuinely interested and mesmerized by the facts and figures and little bit of trivia Josh and I gave them about Portland and they sincerely wished they could stay for a couple of days after the show to take in the scene and the local people. They promised us that the next time they come around, they will!

Their opening act, Ana Sia, started playing and the room was bumpin’! Pretty close to a packed house an hour or so before BoomBox was even supposed to start. We took advantage of the down time after dinner to ask them a few questions downstairs in the green room. Read on below for the interview.

One last note. If you have never heard of BoomBox, know this: two members, Zion on guitar and voice, Russ on synthesizers and other complicated equipment that makes their sound what it is. They are genuinely peaceful and sweet people who do what they love. Dance, house, trance, techno—whatever you want to call their style—it’s live and always fresh. Light shows always accompany their performances, making it not only pleasing to the heart, soul, and ears, but to the eyes too. They play everywhere from smaller venues like The Crown Room in Portland to giant festivals like 10000 Lakes! Give them a listen and be sure to put them on your concert calendar for their next show! You will NOT regret it!

Melophobe: How has the tour been so far???

BoomBox: The tour has been good, interesting. Trying to break in new markets and new promoters and getting everyone to know BoomBox. The sound is very important to us, we are perfectionists and our performances can be affected by sound problems. We played a gig in southern Oregon where the venue was on noise ordinance probation and we got shutdown! Another show was in Seattle where the venue did not have enough power and the power kept going out. It was tough for us and for our fans.

Melophobe: Do you get to mingle with your opening artists?

BoomBox: We do, occasionally. The schedules are really tight and by the time we get to a venue, get setup, do sound check, immediately we have to do the things we have to do. A lot of the times, by the time we finish getting ready, the opener is already on. There are times we get to hang out though. Festivals are really good for that. We get to hang out backstage and catch up with other musicians. It’s cool that Ana Sia is opening for us on this tour and to have a constant opening act.

Melophobe: Were you impressed by any bands that were completely new to you? ??

BoomBox: We try hard to promote our local music scene (Muscle Shoals, AL), there is a lot of talent coming out of there. We try to educate off of what we have learned and help the bands pave a road out of town on to their own thing. As we learn, covering so many bases, our goal is to develop the record label and help develop talent. We feel like we’re part of a movement in Muscle Shoals, and it’s really cool to feel that.??

Melophobe: What are some of the cool sights across the US that you have been able to see on your tours?

BoomBox: A boat. We did a boat party in NYC that was crazy, get on the boat at midnight and play out to the Statue of Liberty. It’s crazy! Getting paid to play at the feet of the Statue of Liberty. There’s another cool cruise in Boston that we like: Harper’s Ferry. The festivals are cool; the small ones usually fall under the radar until you hear about them from another band. We are really blessed that basically every city we roll into we get to meet really solid people and a cool scene.
?We stay in hotels now, but four years ago we would couch surf in the cities that we played in. We would book one show and stay in the city for a couple of days after, just to get to know the people and the city. It’s a unique perspective that you can’t get from a normal job.

??Melophobe: What’s next for BoomBox?

BoomBox: The New album! Downriverelectric should be out in early 2010. The first record was sold out of the trunk of a car! This new record will - Melophobe


BoomBox :: 04.09.09 :: Fox Theatre :: Boulder, CO

BoomBox :: 04.09 :: Fox
It was a cool, nippy Thursday afternoon in Boulder when BoomBox pulled past the Fox Theatre marquee. They rushed in for soundcheck then tucked themselves away in the artist's nook, i.e. the crimson box, the downstairs backstage area, for the duration of the day. DJ/Producer Russ Randolph and his "Spawn of The Dead" partner in crime Zion Rock Godchaux relaxed and de-stressed until showtime, focusing their heads on what inevitably manifested into another stellar set for the pair.

Beneath the dance floor, Godchaux was chilling on a couch, guitar in hand, wearing a relaxed yet focused expression on his face while Randolph engaged in conversation with friends. We congregated for a bit, sharing a few words before Godchaux casually slipped into the bathroom, quickly emerging like Superman from a phone booth, completely transformed into his psychedelic, funk-hop god attire. Decorated with a fuzzy blue hat resembling a custom Kangol cap one would find in a pimp's closet, a pearl shaded boa, Adidas track pants, sleeveless jersey, a robe and funky shades, Godchaux looked like a perfectly primped rock star. Also avoiding plain attire, Randolph's shirt depicted a man smoking a cigar with the smoke from the burning ember dissipating into an entire galaxy, similar to their music, which begins slow and steady with the low thump of a beat, then is joined by tranquil guitar licks, soon fully blossoming into a brightly textured constellation of sound.

When Godchaux and Randolph began playing, the floor became a basket of snakes as groovers twisted and squirmed. When the house lights went out, the scene from backstage was multicolored and magnificent, as ornamented BoomBoxers with luminescent glow sticks worn as necklaces, headbands, armbands and anklets shined like lightening bugs. Like at any other BB show, the fans showed their love by dressing up extra funky for the Kaossilator-clad pair. Plenty of interesting makeup jobs (including my own), boas and endless amounts of glitter could be spotted dressing up sweaty faces and wide-mouth grins throughout the crowd.

Zion Rock Godchaux :: 04.09 :: Fox
The vibe is so pleasantly mellow during a BB show that it's hard not to get swept up in the groove. Godchaux's serene guitar playing accompanies and accentuates his gentle, soothing vocals. The music hangs dense in the air, lulling you into a trance as you sway to and fro, enchanted, and at times overwhelmed by the sensual wah-heavy psychedelic funk-hop playing, like the most incredible soundtrack to a porno that's yet to be made.

This particular concert showcased some sensational new tunes and was filmed for an upcoming music video promoting the group's new album, so cameramen were speckled throughout the theatre, large image capturing devices in hand, eager to seize and record every exciting moment on film.

BoomBox's set contained tunes from their anomalous debut album, Visions of Backbeat, such as "Stereo." Additionally, covers of songs by Michael Jackson, The Beatles, the Grateful Dead and Nu Shooz, along with new material, were tested on the Colorado crowd, while still leaving room for a fair amount of extended jamming. A few gems from the night included "Mr. Boogie Man," "Billie Jean," "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" "Shakedown Street" and "I Can't Wait."

The music was so fun and exciting I was eager to run backstage after the show and acquire a setlist from the boys. Unfortunately, there was no setlist for me to obtain - it was all created and concocted onstage by the musical minds of Randolph and Godchaux. Similar to many of my favorite artists, BoomBox's sets are created special each night, built of both their own songs as well as covers, and bound together with solid, perfectly executed improvisation. Their mission has always been to remain true to the music, especially the live show aspect of it, to let their sound continually evolve, designing and writing their albums one foot forward, which is also what they strive for their concerts to reflect. If you enjoy dreamlike, genre bending, funktronica, then it's highly suggested you check out a BoomBox show, most likely playing soon in a town near you.

BoomBox tour dates available here.

JamBase | Colorado
Go See Live Music!

http://www.thisisboombox.com/ - Jambase


BoomBox :: 04.09.09 :: Fox Theatre :: Boulder, CO

BoomBox :: 04.09 :: Fox
It was a cool, nippy Thursday afternoon in Boulder when BoomBox pulled past the Fox Theatre marquee. They rushed in for soundcheck then tucked themselves away in the artist's nook, i.e. the crimson box, the downstairs backstage area, for the duration of the day. DJ/Producer Russ Randolph and his "Spawn of The Dead" partner in crime Zion Rock Godchaux relaxed and de-stressed until showtime, focusing their heads on what inevitably manifested into another stellar set for the pair.

Beneath the dance floor, Godchaux was chilling on a couch, guitar in hand, wearing a relaxed yet focused expression on his face while Randolph engaged in conversation with friends. We congregated for a bit, sharing a few words before Godchaux casually slipped into the bathroom, quickly emerging like Superman from a phone booth, completely transformed into his psychedelic, funk-hop god attire. Decorated with a fuzzy blue hat resembling a custom Kangol cap one would find in a pimp's closet, a pearl shaded boa, Adidas track pants, sleeveless jersey, a robe and funky shades, Godchaux looked like a perfectly primped rock star. Also avoiding plain attire, Randolph's shirt depicted a man smoking a cigar with the smoke from the burning ember dissipating into an entire galaxy, similar to their music, which begins slow and steady with the low thump of a beat, then is joined by tranquil guitar licks, soon fully blossoming into a brightly textured constellation of sound.

When Godchaux and Randolph began playing, the floor became a basket of snakes as groovers twisted and squirmed. When the house lights went out, the scene from backstage was multicolored and magnificent, as ornamented BoomBoxers with luminescent glow sticks worn as necklaces, headbands, armbands and anklets shined like lightening bugs. Like at any other BB show, the fans showed their love by dressing up extra funky for the Kaossilator-clad pair. Plenty of interesting makeup jobs (including my own), boas and endless amounts of glitter could be spotted dressing up sweaty faces and wide-mouth grins throughout the crowd.

Zion Rock Godchaux :: 04.09 :: Fox
The vibe is so pleasantly mellow during a BB show that it's hard not to get swept up in the groove. Godchaux's serene guitar playing accompanies and accentuates his gentle, soothing vocals. The music hangs dense in the air, lulling you into a trance as you sway to and fro, enchanted, and at times overwhelmed by the sensual wah-heavy psychedelic funk-hop playing, like the most incredible soundtrack to a porno that's yet to be made.

This particular concert showcased some sensational new tunes and was filmed for an upcoming music video promoting the group's new album, so cameramen were speckled throughout the theatre, large image capturing devices in hand, eager to seize and record every exciting moment on film.

BoomBox's set contained tunes from their anomalous debut album, Visions of Backbeat, such as "Stereo." Additionally, covers of songs by Michael Jackson, The Beatles, the Grateful Dead and Nu Shooz, along with new material, were tested on the Colorado crowd, while still leaving room for a fair amount of extended jamming. A few gems from the night included "Mr. Boogie Man," "Billie Jean," "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" "Shakedown Street" and "I Can't Wait."

The music was so fun and exciting I was eager to run backstage after the show and acquire a setlist from the boys. Unfortunately, there was no setlist for me to obtain - it was all created and concocted onstage by the musical minds of Randolph and Godchaux. Similar to many of my favorite artists, BoomBox's sets are created special each night, built of both their own songs as well as covers, and bound together with solid, perfectly executed improvisation. Their mission has always been to remain true to the music, especially the live show aspect of it, to let their sound continually evolve, designing and writing their albums one foot forward, which is also what they strive for their concerts to reflect. If you enjoy dreamlike, genre bending, funktronica, then it's highly suggested you check out a BoomBox show, most likely playing soon in a town near you.

BoomBox tour dates available here.

JamBase | Colorado
Go See Live Music!

http://www.thisisboombox.com/ - Jambase


Over the past few years, Zion Godchaux and Russ Randolph have toured and recorded as BoomBox. The House-mix/Jamband duo features Godchaux on guitar and Randolph on a range of sound-producing apparatus. A recent electrifying performance at the Crossroads in Huntsville, Alabama saw the duo effortlessly roll on from one song to another, touching such favorites as “Round and Round,” “Couldn’t Get It Right,” “India,” “ Who Killed Davey Moore,” “Stereo” and an amazingly mellow yet psychedelic version of “Shakedown Street” that the band has recently incorporated into their set.

“Shakedown” is certainly a fitting selection as Zion is the son of The Grateful Dead’s Keith and Donna Godchaux, and a veteran of his mom’s Heart of Gold Band. However, BoomBox has carved out its own identity over the past few years, through steady gigging as well as the release of its 2005 debut recording Visions of the Backbeat. A new disc, downriverelectric is set to hit shortly, as they explain in this interview, which took place after their crackling Crossroads show. Godchaux and Randolph also discuss the origins of their music and look to future plans.

BT: For starters, where did you meet? Muscle Shoals?

RR: Yeah, actually I was living there, Z was living out in California. His folks have a studio there in the Shoals and hired me to come out and kind of help them upgrade studio equipment and engineer a record.

Zion Godchaux: We were recording this record under the band name Heart of Gold Band.

RR: A record called At the Table. Cool record, we’re really proud of that record.

ZG: We were making that, kicking it in the studio for six months and that was kind of just ultimately passing through. I was going to record some music and take it to Europe and then me and Russ started putting our heads together. We were both tired, we were both frustrated with traditional band structure, you know, bass, drum, guitar, keyboard kind of thing. It was a pain in the ass getting that many people together.

ZG: You know, it’s like a needle in a haystack in the chemistry with numerous musicians, especially with this kind of stylized music. I never really could get, I tried but I could never really find players who thought like that.

RR: So Z just happened to have one of the drum machines that we’re using live, and he’d been writing tracks with the drum machine. And then we get together and thinking that we could develop these tracks and if we put two drum machines together we could transition mix the way a DJ would, you know, between tracks and we just snowballed from there. That was four or five years ago now.

BT: From that original impetus, was it like that (snaps)?

RR: Oh yeah. Once we realized we really could make this thing happen, we got similar ideas. It’s like, one door opens and like a hundred doors swung open, it’s like that, it’s like

BT: Like exponential growth

RR: Yeah. I mean, we did spend probably a year in the studio before we ever played our first gig. Once we had the first idea and we thought this thing through, it took us a while to kind of logistically figure out exactly how we were going to pull this off. Transitioning from machine to machine.

ZG: But we knew that once we connected those first initial dots, you know, we knew that it was on, it was just a matter of

BT: Drawing the rest of the picture.

ZG: Yeah, kind of keeping our ears open, listening for like the next information to come down the pipe.

BT: Speaking of that besides normal heightened consciousness that you may experience from the interaction between audience and band, do you eve sense that you’re tapping into something deeper?

RR: We’re always open to that but lightning doesn’t always strike. I mean, that magic is obviously bigger than us and we try to do our best to be the best conduit that we can; some nights, lightning strikes and it’s a magical thing. Some nights, it’s a good time, but it’s not that magicalsomething bigger than us, it’s truly working us, and it’s truly magical.

ZG: The idea is, the idea is to, uh, to make room for God to walk in, you know what I mean? So we’re always trying to kind of get out of the way; we play better and things come from more of a real place, the more we kind of get out of the way.

RR: We try not to force anything and we try to put a lot of space in the music so that the room and the collective energy, the collective God or whatever it is that people call this thing that everybody’s connected to, that can kind of take hold and do its thing.

ZG: We come off the stage on a really good night and we feel like we’ve taken a shitload of psychedelics, (after) three and a half hours of disappearing into thatthe onenessthe whole room kind ofyou know

BT: Zion, would you say Jimi (Hendrix) or Jerry (Garcia) was the bigger influence?

ZG: Garcia taught me, you know, how to explore and Jimi taught me how to cut heads off, well, at least, attempt to(laughs)

RR: I try to look at - Jambands.com


Over the past few years, Zion Godchaux and Russ Randolph have toured and recorded as BoomBox. The House-mix/Jamband duo features Godchaux on guitar and Randolph on a range of sound-producing apparatus. A recent electrifying performance at the Crossroads in Huntsville, Alabama saw the duo effortlessly roll on from one song to another, touching such favorites as “Round and Round,” “Couldn’t Get It Right,” “India,” “ Who Killed Davey Moore,” “Stereo” and an amazingly mellow yet psychedelic version of “Shakedown Street” that the band has recently incorporated into their set.

“Shakedown” is certainly a fitting selection as Zion is the son of The Grateful Dead’s Keith and Donna Godchaux, and a veteran of his mom’s Heart of Gold Band. However, BoomBox has carved out its own identity over the past few years, through steady gigging as well as the release of its 2005 debut recording Visions of the Backbeat. A new disc, downriverelectric is set to hit shortly, as they explain in this interview, which took place after their crackling Crossroads show. Godchaux and Randolph also discuss the origins of their music and look to future plans.

BT: For starters, where did you meet? Muscle Shoals?

RR: Yeah, actually I was living there, Z was living out in California. His folks have a studio there in the Shoals and hired me to come out and kind of help them upgrade studio equipment and engineer a record.

Zion Godchaux: We were recording this record under the band name Heart of Gold Band.

RR: A record called At the Table. Cool record, we’re really proud of that record.

ZG: We were making that, kicking it in the studio for six months and that was kind of just ultimately passing through. I was going to record some music and take it to Europe and then me and Russ started putting our heads together. We were both tired, we were both frustrated with traditional band structure, you know, bass, drum, guitar, keyboard kind of thing. It was a pain in the ass getting that many people together.

ZG: You know, it’s like a needle in a haystack in the chemistry with numerous musicians, especially with this kind of stylized music. I never really could get, I tried but I could never really find players who thought like that.

RR: So Z just happened to have one of the drum machines that we’re using live, and he’d been writing tracks with the drum machine. And then we get together and thinking that we could develop these tracks and if we put two drum machines together we could transition mix the way a DJ would, you know, between tracks and we just snowballed from there. That was four or five years ago now.

BT: From that original impetus, was it like that (snaps)?

RR: Oh yeah. Once we realized we really could make this thing happen, we got similar ideas. It’s like, one door opens and like a hundred doors swung open, it’s like that, it’s like

BT: Like exponential growth

RR: Yeah. I mean, we did spend probably a year in the studio before we ever played our first gig. Once we had the first idea and we thought this thing through, it took us a while to kind of logistically figure out exactly how we were going to pull this off. Transitioning from machine to machine.

ZG: But we knew that once we connected those first initial dots, you know, we knew that it was on, it was just a matter of

BT: Drawing the rest of the picture.

ZG: Yeah, kind of keeping our ears open, listening for like the next information to come down the pipe.

BT: Speaking of that besides normal heightened consciousness that you may experience from the interaction between audience and band, do you eve sense that you’re tapping into something deeper?

RR: We’re always open to that but lightning doesn’t always strike. I mean, that magic is obviously bigger than us and we try to do our best to be the best conduit that we can; some nights, lightning strikes and it’s a magical thing. Some nights, it’s a good time, but it’s not that magicalsomething bigger than us, it’s truly working us, and it’s truly magical.

ZG: The idea is, the idea is to, uh, to make room for God to walk in, you know what I mean? So we’re always trying to kind of get out of the way; we play better and things come from more of a real place, the more we kind of get out of the way.

RR: We try not to force anything and we try to put a lot of space in the music so that the room and the collective energy, the collective God or whatever it is that people call this thing that everybody’s connected to, that can kind of take hold and do its thing.

ZG: We come off the stage on a really good night and we feel like we’ve taken a shitload of psychedelics, (after) three and a half hours of disappearing into thatthe onenessthe whole room kind ofyou know

BT: Zion, would you say Jimi (Hendrix) or Jerry (Garcia) was the bigger influence?

ZG: Garcia taught me, you know, how to explore and Jimi taught me how to cut heads off, well, at least, attempt to(laughs)

RR: I try to look at - Jambands.com


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

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Bio

Currently at a loss for words...