Jacques Labouchere
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Jacques Labouchere

Göteborg, Sweden | Established. Jan 01, 2006 | SELF

Göteborg, Sweden | SELF
Established on Jan, 2006
Band Folk Singer/Songwriter

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This band has not uploaded any videos

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"Jacques Labouchere interview"

Well it seems like summer could be here, well for a few days at least, so what better place to talk to Jacques about his new album Bi-Polar Baby Strollers than up on the roof of my apartment. So we both braved our vertigo and headed up there to have a little chat. Here are the words he had to say about it:





Ryan: So hello there Jacques, please make sure you hold on as it wouldn’t be the ideal interview scenario if you had a little accident! Let’s crack on with this before it starts to rain ay. So having grown up in America how do you think it affected and influenced your musical style?

Jacques: Well to be honest I think it was more British music that had a bigger influence on me growing up, obviously I was/am a massive Beatles fan so their music obviously helped craft my song writing from an early age. But if I was to name an American musician then it would have to be Evan Dando of the Lemonheads, the way he wrote the songs that were coming out when I was growing up, and playing in bands from the age of 14 definitely had a massive impact on me. And American politics also had a big effect on me, both then and now, as you can imagine seeing the things that have been happening over the past 10 years can’t fail to have an effect!

R: Like the disaster in New Orleans, was that the basis for the song Old New Orleans on your new album?

J: To be honest, most of that song was written before I recorded the 1st album but I held it back as it didn’t fit in as seamlessly on that album, and of course after everything that has happened it was an obvious choice for this album, which has more of a political voice running through it. For example I Found You is a political song I wrote about the negligent government when dealing with the Hurricane Katrina disaster, which was written specifically for New Orleans, my mom and all of the people who live there.

R: So since you released your 1st album you have had the experience of bringing a new daughter in to the world, how do you think that has influenced this album?

J: Yes, that proud moment definitely influenced the album in a big way, there are a lot of questions about fatherhood on the album; how is it going to be? Am I going to cope? How will it influence me in the future? Those sorts of things, but ultimately it’s been the most amazing experience and I couldn’t be happier!

R: So is it still having an effect on any new songs you are writing?

J: To be honest it did for a while, but unfortunately my father passed away at the end of 2009 and that is undoubtedly going to change my song writing in the interim as well as everything else happening in my life. I think as I get older I place more of a focus on my lyrical content, trying to create a feeling thorough my songs so that they mean something to the people who listen to them, that I believe will be a big thing on the next record.
R: So, you have been a Göteborg local for a number of years now, and have been an important member of the music scene here, how do you think the scene is here? And how has it helped you to grow?

J: The music scene here is great, it’s more like a little society with many of the smaller bands helping each other along the way. I believe in supporting the community which is allowing you to thrive, and being a foreigner here I think it’s very important to help give something back, kind of as a way of saying: ‘thanks for all the help!’ When I first moved here I had a lot to do with Oholics, a band I have great respect for, and to be honest most of the up and coming bands here are very supportive of each other, which make for a very friendly and creative scene. And for me, Kim from Woody West has been a massive help to me throughout my career here. Unfortunately not too many of the larger bands are that supportive of the ‘up and comings’ but really I suppose that’s the way it is.

R: So then, top tips for the future?

J: Oj, that’s a toughie, there are so many that deserve to be successful, but if I was pressed to name a few!?

R: I’ll let you have 3.

J: Ok, that’s not easy!

R: Ok then, 5

J: Here goes then, I’ve already mentioned Oholics, so I’ll go for some others. The Fume, The Movements, Den Stora Vilan, The Isolation, Top Hawk, oh and Spiders.

R: 6 but I’ll let you off

R: Ok then, final question. The 1st single from your new album is Second Long Street, after Andralånggatan, why not First of Third Long Streets?

J: Ha-ha, I think it’s because it’s the place I used to hang out most when I first moved here, after a day’s busking I used to go to Kelly’s and have a beer and afterwork quite often and really it’s a place where I met a lot of the friends I have now, it’s kind of like an indie Avenyn! And I suppose for that fact, it’s kind of my reply to Håkan Hellströms: Kän Ingen Sorg för mig Göteborg, its more about ‘my Göteborg’ as I can’t ever remember driving down Avenyn with the roof down.
And on that note we unbuckle ourselve - Monthly Magazine- July 2010


"Jacques Labouchere interview"

Well it seems like summer could be here, well for a few days at least, so what better place to talk to Jacques about his new album Bi-Polar Baby Strollers than up on the roof of my apartment. So we both braved our vertigo and headed up there to have a little chat. Here are the words he had to say about it:





Ryan: So hello there Jacques, please make sure you hold on as it wouldn’t be the ideal interview scenario if you had a little accident! Let’s crack on with this before it starts to rain ay. So having grown up in America how do you think it affected and influenced your musical style?

Jacques: Well to be honest I think it was more British music that had a bigger influence on me growing up, obviously I was/am a massive Beatles fan so their music obviously helped craft my song writing from an early age. But if I was to name an American musician then it would have to be Evan Dando of the Lemonheads, the way he wrote the songs that were coming out when I was growing up, and playing in bands from the age of 14 definitely had a massive impact on me. And American politics also had a big effect on me, both then and now, as you can imagine seeing the things that have been happening over the past 10 years can’t fail to have an effect!

R: Like the disaster in New Orleans, was that the basis for the song Old New Orleans on your new album?

J: To be honest, most of that song was written before I recorded the 1st album but I held it back as it didn’t fit in as seamlessly on that album, and of course after everything that has happened it was an obvious choice for this album, which has more of a political voice running through it. For example I Found You is a political song I wrote about the negligent government when dealing with the Hurricane Katrina disaster, which was written specifically for New Orleans, my mom and all of the people who live there.

R: So since you released your 1st album you have had the experience of bringing a new daughter in to the world, how do you think that has influenced this album?

J: Yes, that proud moment definitely influenced the album in a big way, there are a lot of questions about fatherhood on the album; how is it going to be? Am I going to cope? How will it influence me in the future? Those sorts of things, but ultimately it’s been the most amazing experience and I couldn’t be happier!

R: So is it still having an effect on any new songs you are writing?

J: To be honest it did for a while, but unfortunately my father passed away at the end of 2009 and that is undoubtedly going to change my song writing in the interim as well as everything else happening in my life. I think as I get older I place more of a focus on my lyrical content, trying to create a feeling thorough my songs so that they mean something to the people who listen to them, that I believe will be a big thing on the next record.
R: So, you have been a Göteborg local for a number of years now, and have been an important member of the music scene here, how do you think the scene is here? And how has it helped you to grow?

J: The music scene here is great, it’s more like a little society with many of the smaller bands helping each other along the way. I believe in supporting the community which is allowing you to thrive, and being a foreigner here I think it’s very important to help give something back, kind of as a way of saying: ‘thanks for all the help!’ When I first moved here I had a lot to do with Oholics, a band I have great respect for, and to be honest most of the up and coming bands here are very supportive of each other, which make for a very friendly and creative scene. And for me, Kim from Woody West has been a massive help to me throughout my career here. Unfortunately not too many of the larger bands are that supportive of the ‘up and comings’ but really I suppose that’s the way it is.

R: So then, top tips for the future?

J: Oj, that’s a toughie, there are so many that deserve to be successful, but if I was pressed to name a few!?

R: I’ll let you have 3.

J: Ok, that’s not easy!

R: Ok then, 5

J: Here goes then, I’ve already mentioned Oholics, so I’ll go for some others. The Fume, The Movements, Den Stora Vilan, The Isolation, Top Hawk, oh and Spiders.

R: 6 but I’ll let you off

R: Ok then, final question. The 1st single from your new album is Second Long Street, after Andralånggatan, why not First of Third Long Streets?

J: Ha-ha, I think it’s because it’s the place I used to hang out most when I first moved here, after a day’s busking I used to go to Kelly’s and have a beer and afterwork quite often and really it’s a place where I met a lot of the friends I have now, it’s kind of like an indie Avenyn! And I suppose for that fact, it’s kind of my reply to Håkan Hellströms: Kän Ingen Sorg för mig Göteborg, its more about ‘my Göteborg’ as I can’t ever remember driving down Avenyn with the roof down.
And on that note we unbuckle ourselve - Monthly Magazine- July 2010


"Jacques Labouchere - "2nd Long Street""

Victor Lindbom hittade den här gången guldet i sin egen hemstad. Och konstaterar att Jacques Labouchere aldrig kommer att förnya det svenska popspråket som Håkan Hellström har gjort – men det är fortfarande Göteborgspop som träffar rakt i hjärtat. Både en och två gånger

Ibland krävs det någon utifrån, som med otämjda ögon tillåts skildra landet och samtiden vi lever i. Cornelis Vreeswijk är kanske det mest talande exemplet. Nationalskalden som aldrig blev svensk medborgare (- enligt sägnen för att han saknade intyg om sina kunskaper i svenska).

Ett annat exempel är Jacques Labouchere, amerikanen som flyttade till Göteborg för fyra år sedan.

Labouchere behärskade tidigt ukulele, gitarr och bas. Som 15-åring blev han utsparkad från skolan för att ha druckit sprit på skolgården, därefter följde ett kringflackande liv som tog honom till England, och så småningom till Sverige och Göteborg.

I Göteborg började Labouchere spela på gator och torg och snart lärde han känna andra musiker, några hemmahörande i både Detektivbyrån och Oholics. Plötsligt föll allt på plats. När Labouchere läste i NY Times att Göteborg var ”den coolaste och hippaste staden i världen” bekräftades hans uppfattning. ”Göteborg var hemmet han alltid letat efter”, som han skriver på sin hemsida.

Nu har Göteborgske amerikanen spelat in en hyllningslåt till världens coolaste stad, och den bartäta Andra långgatan i synnerhet. Medan Håkan Hellström allt mer kommit att skildra vemodet, nostalgin och baksmällan är det uppfriskande med någon som finner kärlek och extas i staden som den är i dag.

Jacques Labouchere kommer aldrig förnya det svenska popspråket som Hellström gjort, men hans låt 2nd long street är pur Göteborgspop som träffar en rakt i hjärtat. - Devotion Magazine June 8th, 2010


"Italian album review"

Questo disco è come un sacchetto in cui il candyman di turno, sulle strade frequentate dai golosi di musica pop, ha sì messo quelle caramelle che vi piacciono tanto, ma ne ha messe troppo poche. Il candyman in questione- nulla c'entrano i Grateful Dead, meglio chiarirlo fin da subito- è Jacques Labouchere, americano del Connecticut di stanza a Göteborg, che nei soli 29 minuti di Bi-polar Baby Strollers condensa la sua intera biografia di ex senzatetto neopadre bipolare, come recita nelle note di presentazione la sua etichetta, l'inglese Popjinx. I singolari attributi di questo curioso personaggio sono dovuti alla sindrome bipolare da cui è afflitto (un disturbo che comporta periodi di eccitabilità alternati ad altri di depressione), e dal suo avventuroso girovagare con la chitarra a tracolla per le strade di mezza Inghilterra, prima di trovare la sua personale Itaca in Svezia dove ha messo su famiglia ed ha trovato il giusto sfogo alla sua ispirazione. Il tema di fondo di Bi-polar Baby Strollers è un pop rock british oriented- Labouchere dice di essere sempre stato innamorato dei Beatles, ma si direbbe che ci sia anche il santino dei Kinks sul suo comodino- in cui gli intrecci ad orologeria di chitarre, piano e batteria creano atmosfere coinvolgenti e solari.

In tal senso eloquente è l'uno-due iniziale, da applausi: Old New Orleans, vitale omaggio alla città della madre, e 2nd long street, primo singolo che celebra festosamente Göteborg, «la casa che ho sempre cercato», in cui pare di ritrovare certe armonie dell'ultimo Lightspeed Champion. Sulla stessa falsariga si muovono l'ottima When you go, vertice del disco, irresistibile power pop a tutta velocità, in cui la batteria gioca benissimo con i vocalizzi di Labouchere e dei suoi coristi, For esperanza e la stessa title-track in cui riflette con autoironia, inseguito dal brillante piano di Gimstedt, sulla recente paternità. Non mancano le digressioni, tutte ben riuscite: il funk di Strange, la sognante Sister Dragonfly (starebbe a pennello nel songbook di Badly Drawn Boy) o ancora la malinconica ballata pianistica Dear Dr, dove si trovano echi evidenti di David Gray.

L'episodio più originale è comunque la chitarrosa Best Company, che a un certo punto si ferma e prende d'improvviso la via della California anni 70 salvo poi rientrare sul finale verso territori già esplorati in precedenza. In chiusura, con I found you, si torna al punto di partenza: New Orleans, questa volta tra le pieghe della canzone di protesta anni '60, con Labouchere che rimette i panni del busker e contesta armato di chitarra acustica la gestione negligente del governo americano in occasione dell'uragano Katrina. Alla fine, pur compiaciuti, non si può fare a meno di meravigliarsi che il disco sia già finito e dare mezzo punto in meno perché va bene la sintesi della pop song, ma 10 minuti in più di Bi-polar Baby Strollers ci stavano alla grande. Tant'è: questa volta il candyman Labouchere tanto ha voluto elargire e, se siete golosi di questa roba, fatevela bastare perché il godimento è assicurato.
(Gianuario Rivelli) - Roots Highway


"Italian album review"

Questo disco è come un sacchetto in cui il candyman di turno, sulle strade frequentate dai golosi di musica pop, ha sì messo quelle caramelle che vi piacciono tanto, ma ne ha messe troppo poche. Il candyman in questione- nulla c'entrano i Grateful Dead, meglio chiarirlo fin da subito- è Jacques Labouchere, americano del Connecticut di stanza a Göteborg, che nei soli 29 minuti di Bi-polar Baby Strollers condensa la sua intera biografia di ex senzatetto neopadre bipolare, come recita nelle note di presentazione la sua etichetta, l'inglese Popjinx. I singolari attributi di questo curioso personaggio sono dovuti alla sindrome bipolare da cui è afflitto (un disturbo che comporta periodi di eccitabilità alternati ad altri di depressione), e dal suo avventuroso girovagare con la chitarra a tracolla per le strade di mezza Inghilterra, prima di trovare la sua personale Itaca in Svezia dove ha messo su famiglia ed ha trovato il giusto sfogo alla sua ispirazione. Il tema di fondo di Bi-polar Baby Strollers è un pop rock british oriented- Labouchere dice di essere sempre stato innamorato dei Beatles, ma si direbbe che ci sia anche il santino dei Kinks sul suo comodino- in cui gli intrecci ad orologeria di chitarre, piano e batteria creano atmosfere coinvolgenti e solari.

In tal senso eloquente è l'uno-due iniziale, da applausi: Old New Orleans, vitale omaggio alla città della madre, e 2nd long street, primo singolo che celebra festosamente Göteborg, «la casa che ho sempre cercato», in cui pare di ritrovare certe armonie dell'ultimo Lightspeed Champion. Sulla stessa falsariga si muovono l'ottima When you go, vertice del disco, irresistibile power pop a tutta velocità, in cui la batteria gioca benissimo con i vocalizzi di Labouchere e dei suoi coristi, For esperanza e la stessa title-track in cui riflette con autoironia, inseguito dal brillante piano di Gimstedt, sulla recente paternità. Non mancano le digressioni, tutte ben riuscite: il funk di Strange, la sognante Sister Dragonfly (starebbe a pennello nel songbook di Badly Drawn Boy) o ancora la malinconica ballata pianistica Dear Dr, dove si trovano echi evidenti di David Gray.

L'episodio più originale è comunque la chitarrosa Best Company, che a un certo punto si ferma e prende d'improvviso la via della California anni 70 salvo poi rientrare sul finale verso territori già esplorati in precedenza. In chiusura, con I found you, si torna al punto di partenza: New Orleans, questa volta tra le pieghe della canzone di protesta anni '60, con Labouchere che rimette i panni del busker e contesta armato di chitarra acustica la gestione negligente del governo americano in occasione dell'uragano Katrina. Alla fine, pur compiaciuti, non si può fare a meno di meravigliarsi che il disco sia già finito e dare mezzo punto in meno perché va bene la sintesi della pop song, ma 10 minuti in più di Bi-polar Baby Strollers ci stavano alla grande. Tant'è: questa volta il candyman Labouchere tanto ha voluto elargire e, se siete golosi di questa roba, fatevela bastare perché il godimento è assicurato.
(Gianuario Rivelli) - Roots Highway


"On The Roof with Jacques"

Interview. Ryan Cook caught up with American/Gothenburg musician Jacques Labouchere for a chat about his latest album, the local music scene and some up and comers to keep an out for.

Well it seems like summer could be here, for a few days at least. So what better place to talk to Jacques Labouchere about his new album Bi-Polar Baby Strollers than up on the roof of my apartment. We both braved our vertigo and headed up there to have a little chat.

Ryan: So having grown up in America how do you think it affected and influenced your musical style?

Jacques: Well to be honest I think it was more British music that had a bigger influence on me growing up, obviously I was and am a massive Beatles fan so their music obviously helped craft my song writing from an early age. But if I was to name an American musician then it would have to be Evan Dando of the Lemonheads, the way he wrote the songs that were coming out when I was growing up, and playing in bands from the age of 14 definitely had a massive impact on me. And American politics also had a big effect on me, both then and now, as you can imagine seeing the things that have been happening over the past 10 years can't fail to have an effect!

R: Like the disaster in New Orleans, was that the basis for the song Old New Orleans on your new album?

J: To be honest, most of that song was written before I recorded the 1st album but I held it back as it didn't fit in as seamlessly on that album, and of course after everything that has happened it was an obvious choice for this album, which has more of a political voice running through it. For example I Found You is a political song I wrote about the negligent government when dealing with the Hurricane Katrina disaster, which was written specifically for New Orleans, my mom and all of the people who live there.

R: So since you released your 1st album you have had the experience of bringing a new daughter in to the world, how do you think that has influenced this album?

J: Yes, that proud moment definitely influenced the album in a big way, there are a lot of questions about fatherhood on the album; how is it going to be? Am I going to cope? How will it influence me in the future? Those sorts of things, but ultimately it's been the most amazing experience and I couldn't be happier!

R: So is it still having an effect on any new songs you are writing?

J: To be honest it did for a while, but unfortunately my father passed away at the end of 2009 and that is undoubtedly going to change my song writing in the interim as well as everything else happening in my life. I think as I get older I place more of a focus on my lyrical content, trying to create a feeling through my songs so that they mean something to the people who listen to them, that I believe will be a big thing on the next record.

R: So, you have been a Gothenburg local for a number of years now, and have been an important member of the music scene here, how do you think the scene is here? And how has it helped you to grow?

J: The music scene here is great, it's more like a little society with many of the smaller bands helping each other along the way. I believe in supporting the community which is allowing you to thrive, and being a foreigner here I think it's very important to help give something back, kind of as a way of saying: ‘thanks for all the help!' When I first moved here I had a lot to do with Oholics, a band I have great respect for, and to be honest most of the up and coming bands here are very supportive of each other, which makes for a very friendly and creative scene. And for me, Kim from Woody West has been a massive help to me throughout my career here. Unfortunately not too many of the larger bands are that supportive of the ‘up and comers' but really I suppose that's the way it is.

R: So then, top tips for the future?

J: Oj, that's a toughie, there are so many that deserve to be successful. I've already mentioned Oholics, so I'll go for some others. The Fume, The Movements, Den Stora Vilan, The Isolation, Top Hawk, oh and Spiders.

R: Ok then, final question. The 1st single from your new album is Second Long Street, after Andralånggatan, why not First of Third Long Streets?

J: Ha-ha, I think it's because it's the place I used to hang out most when I first moved here. After a day's busking I used to go to Kelly's and have a beer and afterwork quite often and really it's a place where I met a lot of the friends I have now, it's kind of like an indie Avenyn! And I suppose for that fact, it's kind of my reply to Håkan Hellströms: Känn Ingen Sorg för mig Göteborg, its more about ‘my Göteborg' as I can't ever remember driving down Avenyn with the roof down.

And on that note we unbuckle ourselves from our safety harnesses, climb back inside and head off out towards Andra Långatan. - Göteborg Daily June 22nd, 2010


"Album reviews"

???? out of 5 — Kudos to Jacques Labouchere, the Connecticut-born singer/songwriter who’s overcome more obstacles than most in carving out a career. An expatriate who spent a great deal of time in London and now calls Sweden home, Labouchere’s oddly titled “Bi-Polar Baby Strollers” is a musical exploration of his life. Billing himself as a formerly homeless bi-polar new-father-of-one, Labouchere pours his life experiences into these excellent 10 songs. From his feelings for adopted hometown Gothenburg (catchy first single “2nd Long Street”), to his ongoing battle with depression (“Dear Dr.”) to odes to his young child (“Bi-Polar Baby Stroller”) and loving wife (“I Found You”), every aspect of Labouchere’s life is fair game. It’s a testament to his talent that he manages to make it all come together so seamlessly. (JS)? - The Daily News, outisde Pittsburgh, PA. Saturday August 7th, 2010


"Album reviews"

???? out of 5 — Kudos to Jacques Labouchere, the Connecticut-born singer/songwriter who’s overcome more obstacles than most in carving out a career. An expatriate who spent a great deal of time in London and now calls Sweden home, Labouchere’s oddly titled “Bi-Polar Baby Strollers” is a musical exploration of his life. Billing himself as a formerly homeless bi-polar new-father-of-one, Labouchere pours his life experiences into these excellent 10 songs. From his feelings for adopted hometown Gothenburg (catchy first single “2nd Long Street”), to his ongoing battle with depression (“Dear Dr.”) to odes to his young child (“Bi-Polar Baby Stroller”) and loving wife (“I Found You”), every aspect of Labouchere’s life is fair game. It’s a testament to his talent that he manages to make it all come together so seamlessly. (JS)? - The Daily News, outisde Pittsburgh, PA. Saturday August 7th, 2010


"Jacques Labouchere / Bi-polar Baby Strollers (album review)"

From the first notes, Bi-polar Baby Strollers, and felt it was an unpretentious, soul-baring, infectiously pleasing alt-pop / alt-rock album. Jacques Labouchere, originally from Connecticut, now living in Sweden, is a husband and new dad who also suffers from depression. Jacques really tells it like it is for him suffering from this difficult illness. Yet through all the suffering, it’s obvious he’s persevering and also enjoying the good things in his life, such as his wife in “I Found You” and his new baby in “Bi-polar Baby Stroller”. In this 30-minute, 10-song album, he tells us stories about both the bad and good things in his life, and sometimes goes into painfully private places. But his lyrics were delivered in such an honest and conversational way that the album instantly grabbed me. After the first listen, I was looking forward to the second time around. I ended up listening 5 times over a few days, and enjoying it very much each time.



The music with which Jacques accompanies these lyrics covers an equally diverse territory. He reminded me a bit of Paul Westerberg in the way he crafted his songs. Very pop, quite catchy, and quite original in lyrical as well as musical content. I can truthfully say that this album touched me immediately because Jacques is so good at writing both lyrics and music. He’s able to relate a personal tale and have the listener really feel what it’s like to be him, with the musical content somehow blending perfectly with the lyrics. For me, it’s not often that an artist can make me pay attention to the lyrics at the same time as the music itself. But Jacques succeeded. There were songs where the lyrics were such an essential part of the whole feel of the song, that it was impossible for me not to listen to them. Of course, his singing voice is very clear and his music acts as the perfect foil to it. All in all, these songs are very easy to listen to and like.


A good example of Jacques’ tales of difficult times is his song “Dear Dr”, which is about the relationship with his therapist. “Doctor, how do I explain the years I’ve suffered all this pain, no matter how many pills I take, or how many prescriptions you make for me? You could be most definitely my only friend. Problem goes left in bed, still lonely. You could be most definitely my only friend..........Problem goes left unsaid, still growing.” Whoa! How could one not be touched by that? It sounds absolutely real, yet at the same time, it’s so poetically expressed.

At the same time, in the last track “I Found You”, he talks about all the things that are bad in the outside world, which is pretty depressing, but he’s still happy that he found his wife. And he combines these lyrics with music so upbeat and positive, perfectly reflecting his resolve to make the best of a challenging situation. It was a very cool song, and a very cool way to end the album.



In the end, I can’t help but like and admire Jacques Labouchere. I mean, a week ago I didn’t even know who he was, and now I’m feeling relieved that he’s still hanging in there, and with a lot to be thankful for. I feel like I know him because of how much he revealed about himself. Wow! I think this is a top-notch album by a top-notch singer/songwriter, tackling difficult and sometimes painfully personal subjects in such a compelling manner. Any fan of alt-pop/alt-rock would certainly enjoy listening to this album and I heartily recommend it.

....by realrockergirl - AltSounds


"Jacques Labouchere / Bi-polar Baby Strollers"

If you were to glance upon the title of this album by accident you might think Jacques to be a strange and twisted individual, but it does actually reflect both the big 'moments' of his life as well as the themes of the album as a whole.
The album starts with bar-room tinkering worthy of The Hold Steady, after which we are treated to some more mellow and introspective songs. It's a tidy little mixture of hope and fear lasting only 28 minutes in total; the overall feeling is that Jacques is powering through life. He is bitter but he's trying to make a wholesome break: "I hope you're very happy, and in love, the both of you" he sings on standout track 'When You Go'. Lyrically he strays into a more pop, saccharine area with the title track 'Bi-polar Baby Stroller' but it is a song for his new born child after all.
Jacques has brought together a very human clutch of songs based around his globetrotting, amidst which he is diagnosed with bi-polar disorder, crestfallen in love, built up again and finally becomes a father with a loving wife.
Though it may seem like a very simple formula it works well. It's mostly based around acoustic guitars but has its more rumble-tumble songs as well as sunshine swagger. There is no one emotion; just as in life, it is an eclectic mixture of success and disappointment (displayed poignantly with sombre pianos in 'Dear Dr'). One of only a handful of criticisms is that there isn't enough here to satisfy the appetite - you will find your belly growling for seconds. The man has plenty more to mine from his experiences and, indeed, his future. - Soundblab...Reviewed by Nathan Fidler


"Jacques Labouchere / Bi-polar Baby Strollers"

If you were to glance upon the title of this album by accident you might think Jacques to be a strange and twisted individual, but it does actually reflect both the big 'moments' of his life as well as the themes of the album as a whole.
The album starts with bar-room tinkering worthy of The Hold Steady, after which we are treated to some more mellow and introspective songs. It's a tidy little mixture of hope and fear lasting only 28 minutes in total; the overall feeling is that Jacques is powering through life. He is bitter but he's trying to make a wholesome break: "I hope you're very happy, and in love, the both of you" he sings on standout track 'When You Go'. Lyrically he strays into a more pop, saccharine area with the title track 'Bi-polar Baby Stroller' but it is a song for his new born child after all.
Jacques has brought together a very human clutch of songs based around his globetrotting, amidst which he is diagnosed with bi-polar disorder, crestfallen in love, built up again and finally becomes a father with a loving wife.
Though it may seem like a very simple formula it works well. It's mostly based around acoustic guitars but has its more rumble-tumble songs as well as sunshine swagger. There is no one emotion; just as in life, it is an eclectic mixture of success and disappointment (displayed poignantly with sombre pianos in 'Dear Dr'). One of only a handful of criticisms is that there isn't enough here to satisfy the appetite - you will find your belly growling for seconds. The man has plenty more to mine from his experiences and, indeed, his future. - Soundblab...Reviewed by Nathan Fidler


"Jacques Labouchere’s latest album title, Bi-Polar Baby Strollers, may just sum him up to a tee"

“Love”, “emotion” and “feeling” are words that can best sum up Jacques Labouchere’s new album, Bi-Polar Baby Strollers, which was released this past summer. Labouchere is a captivating artist who has had the chance to live in three different countries and each has in fact become synonymous with a specific stage in his life. The U.S. was a place of experimentation, the U.K. is where he rebelled and Sweden is where he has found peacefulness and happiness. His new album is a reflection of his life, which is now filled with happiness, thanks particularly to his baby daughter. As I write this review, I’m watching the official video for his track “2nd Long Street,” which is the perfect reflection of what his music is about: friends and family spending quality time together. The 10-track album is worth listening to as the rhythm, vocals and lyrics are all in harmony with one another.
Q: Your album is very well harmonized. For instance, “Dear Dr.” is a very instrumental piece with a solo piano playing, so when writing songs, which comes easier to you – composing the music or composing the lyrics?
A: Harmonized – Wow, thanks! That’s a first! Well, “Dear Dr.” is not really just a solo instrumental piece, if you listen closely in the background you will hear some synth sounds pinging and also, more audible, there is cello beginning from the start of the first chorus thorughout ’till the end of the song. The music or the melody usually comes to me first from built up emotions and are then qucikly released and followed by a lyrical rhythm of mumbled words ’till I feel where to place them naturally. The content of the lyrics takes form as I continue to play the melody over and over and over again, while concentrating on things that are on my mind and in my heart. Songwriting for me is, most of the time, not a lenghty process, nor do I like it to be. I feel like, if you spend too much time thinking about a song and its message, you tend to miss out on the feeling of the song and the honesty of its story. I think that most of the best songs I have written have been written in the course of a few hours. I think the most challenging part of songwriting is the arranging; where to put the bridge or chorus, where to repeat or not repeat your lyrics. All in all, songwriting is meditation to me and medication for my soul and body – it comes to me without thinking about composition. It’s not a thought process, but a mirror to my emotions in space and time.
Q: The songs on the new album mirror a variety of subjects, such as love and pain – Is there a theme that comes easier to you when composing? And what is your main source of inspiration?

A: There is no particular theme that comes to me easier when writing a song. It all depends on how I’m feeling at that given moment. I don’t sit there and think, “Ok, I’m gonna write a sad song, or I gotta write a happy song.” However, I’d have to say that these days more happy thoughts and positive thinking have found their way into my songwriting. It’s difficult to be sad, or dwell upon things that are making me angry or depressed when I have such an adorable baby daughter who just laughs and smiles all the time! My daughter and my partner are both major inspirations in my music, as well as family, friends and my battle with manic depression, but my one main source of inspiration is always love.
Q: You have lived in the U.S., U.K. and Sweden, s0 is there one particular country that has inspired you the most?
A: That is hard to say, really. I have three favorite albums too, but I couldn’t rank them, just as I couldn’t say that any of these countries have inspired me more or less than the others, musically. They all have had an enormous impact on my life and my songwriting. I have learned many valuable lessons and matured more, if that’s a good thing, in each place I have lived. Oddly enough, as I have grown, I literally have continued to move east from the U.S. to the U.K. to Sweden and further up in regards to latitude. Perhaps I’ll grow old in the Middle East or Asia?
In the U.S. I was never really welcomed into any music scene and had difficulty finding the right band chemistry, so that inspired me to spend more time playing, reflecting and listening to music and learning about different areas of the music industry from working in local clubs and just hanging out. I spent my early teen years, like everyone else at the time, as a follower of the plaid-clad grunge Seattle sound and actually began playing bass at the age of about 12, covering Nirvana songs until I discovered Evan Dando and returned to my acoustic guitar.
I spent my later teen years growing up in London, during the mid to late ’90s when Brit pop was storming the nation and was greatly influenced by such bands as Pulp, Suede, Blur, The Verve and others. This period of my life was a bit like our parent’s generation of the ’60s. It was a period of revolution, ecstasy and uncertainity about the future, the approaching 20 - The Rock & Roll Reort..October 1, 2010 by Katherine Miller-Rowan


"Jacques Labouchere’s latest album title, Bi-Polar Baby Strollers, may just sum him up to a tee"

“Love”, “emotion” and “feeling” are words that can best sum up Jacques Labouchere’s new album, Bi-Polar Baby Strollers, which was released this past summer. Labouchere is a captivating artist who has had the chance to live in three different countries and each has in fact become synonymous with a specific stage in his life. The U.S. was a place of experimentation, the U.K. is where he rebelled and Sweden is where he has found peacefulness and happiness. His new album is a reflection of his life, which is now filled with happiness, thanks particularly to his baby daughter. As I write this review, I’m watching the official video for his track “2nd Long Street,” which is the perfect reflection of what his music is about: friends and family spending quality time together. The 10-track album is worth listening to as the rhythm, vocals and lyrics are all in harmony with one another.
Q: Your album is very well harmonized. For instance, “Dear Dr.” is a very instrumental piece with a solo piano playing, so when writing songs, which comes easier to you – composing the music or composing the lyrics?
A: Harmonized – Wow, thanks! That’s a first! Well, “Dear Dr.” is not really just a solo instrumental piece, if you listen closely in the background you will hear some synth sounds pinging and also, more audible, there is cello beginning from the start of the first chorus thorughout ’till the end of the song. The music or the melody usually comes to me first from built up emotions and are then qucikly released and followed by a lyrical rhythm of mumbled words ’till I feel where to place them naturally. The content of the lyrics takes form as I continue to play the melody over and over and over again, while concentrating on things that are on my mind and in my heart. Songwriting for me is, most of the time, not a lenghty process, nor do I like it to be. I feel like, if you spend too much time thinking about a song and its message, you tend to miss out on the feeling of the song and the honesty of its story. I think that most of the best songs I have written have been written in the course of a few hours. I think the most challenging part of songwriting is the arranging; where to put the bridge or chorus, where to repeat or not repeat your lyrics. All in all, songwriting is meditation to me and medication for my soul and body – it comes to me without thinking about composition. It’s not a thought process, but a mirror to my emotions in space and time.
Q: The songs on the new album mirror a variety of subjects, such as love and pain – Is there a theme that comes easier to you when composing? And what is your main source of inspiration?

A: There is no particular theme that comes to me easier when writing a song. It all depends on how I’m feeling at that given moment. I don’t sit there and think, “Ok, I’m gonna write a sad song, or I gotta write a happy song.” However, I’d have to say that these days more happy thoughts and positive thinking have found their way into my songwriting. It’s difficult to be sad, or dwell upon things that are making me angry or depressed when I have such an adorable baby daughter who just laughs and smiles all the time! My daughter and my partner are both major inspirations in my music, as well as family, friends and my battle with manic depression, but my one main source of inspiration is always love.
Q: You have lived in the U.S., U.K. and Sweden, s0 is there one particular country that has inspired you the most?
A: That is hard to say, really. I have three favorite albums too, but I couldn’t rank them, just as I couldn’t say that any of these countries have inspired me more or less than the others, musically. They all have had an enormous impact on my life and my songwriting. I have learned many valuable lessons and matured more, if that’s a good thing, in each place I have lived. Oddly enough, as I have grown, I literally have continued to move east from the U.S. to the U.K. to Sweden and further up in regards to latitude. Perhaps I’ll grow old in the Middle East or Asia?
In the U.S. I was never really welcomed into any music scene and had difficulty finding the right band chemistry, so that inspired me to spend more time playing, reflecting and listening to music and learning about different areas of the music industry from working in local clubs and just hanging out. I spent my early teen years, like everyone else at the time, as a follower of the plaid-clad grunge Seattle sound and actually began playing bass at the age of about 12, covering Nirvana songs until I discovered Evan Dando and returned to my acoustic guitar.
I spent my later teen years growing up in London, during the mid to late ’90s when Brit pop was storming the nation and was greatly influenced by such bands as Pulp, Suede, Blur, The Verve and others. This period of my life was a bit like our parent’s generation of the ’60s. It was a period of revolution, ecstasy and uncertainity about the future, the approaching 20 - The Rock & Roll Reort..October 1, 2010 by Katherine Miller-Rowan


"Groove (Swedish) Review Issue #4 2007"

"Jacques är precis vad som behövs- någon som kan blanda soul och pop utan att allt blir falsettmissbruk á la Moneybrother. Samtidigt känns han nära besläktad med en herre som Lars Bygdén, med båda fötterna djupt förankrade i myllan och en röst som känns så där förtjusande hemtrevlig. En röst som är på riktigt, med väl sammanhållet låtmaterial. Lagom mycket tamburiner och upptempo för att vara en perfekt söndagsfrukostskiva. Jag kan inte värja mig. Jacques Labouchere självbetitlade album gör mig glad och positiv. Några låtar in på skivan faller Jacques in i något slags godmodig lunk som förvisso är behaglig, men som har svårt att hålla intresset fullt lika högt. Efter nog många genomlyssningar framstår dock den här skivan som en gammal god vän, en sådan som man vet att man kan vara ifrån i tio år utan att något har förändrats när man ses nästa gång. En sådan som man trivs så fruktansvärt bra med".

Emma Rastbäck, Groove 4, 2007 - Groove


"Groove #4 (In English)"

Jacques is just what is needed- someone who can blend soul and pop without abusing falsetto!

A voice that is genuine, with well constructed song material. Just the right amount of tambourine and up tempo enough to be the perfect Sunday breakfast record.

After enough listens, the record begins to seem like a good old friend, one that you know you can go without seeing for ten years without much changing when you meet again.

- Emma Rastbäck, 2007 - Groove


"Review of self titled debut release 2007"

Jacques Labouchere has been through a hell of journey. He has tested happiness everywhere. And yet never felt better received than in Gothenburg. The journey began when he was 15 and left New England for London and met an explosive music scene in Camden Town. Suede, Jarvis Cocker and a load of other indie idols doing their best to out-do each other. Jacques caught the music bug and since then hasn't been able to stop, despite wanting to several times.

"Yeah, I wanted to quit a few times. I thought 'that's enough' and took a job in a store. But I kept moving and found a place in a new city's music scene, only to tire again and move on" -he explains intensively. London, Boston, New York, Washington DC, Baltimore- he has lived all over and now finally settled in Gothenburg.

The record contains guitar-driven pop music with in the Beatles and probably above all George Harrison's 70s work, a comparison which Jacques is proud of. The lyrics are about his early times in Gothenburg and mostly full of hope.

-Daniel Claeson, Göteborgs-Posten March 31st, 2007 - Göteborg Posten


"Monthly Magazine Novemebr 2007"

The other day I came across a wonderful CD called Jacques Labouchere. It bears the French name of it’s creator who is an American living in Göteborg. Jacques Labouchere makes simple, melodic songs about love and life. Modest and ambitious at the same time. If I’m forced to make a comparison I would say very much in the spirit of Damon Gough. I sat down with Jacques at Språkcaféet the other day where we talked about his music and the life in Göteborg:

"I came here almost two years ago. I was studying Swedish in the beginning because I couldn’t get a work permit. I then found myself playing in the streets to make money. I started working with different bands in town but I hadn’t really thought of getting into recording. But last winter I talked to Martin Molin from Detektivbyrån and said: Let’s get together. Originally it was supposed to be a solo album; just me and my guitar but in the seven days we recorded it, it became a full instrumentation. We also asked Anders Thunarf of the Oholics to play sitar on couple of tracks."

Monthly: You made it in only seven days?

"Well we spent some weeks planning, you know, getting together and talking about it, Martin and myself. But he’s so busy recording and then of course with Detektivbyrån so we put aside seven days and then we had three days mixing and mastering."

Monthly: I heard someone have been comparing you with George Harrison...

"Yeah! That makes me very happy, it’s a huge compliment. I don’t know about that though. I have always been a Beatles fan and I’ve always loved Harrison’s songs. But I was pretty much raised on the Beatles. Evan Dando from Lemonheads is also a really big influence of mine. But I love so much music. You know – you want to sound like a certain band and you say: I want to capture this sound. But while doing that you completely destroy every option of a song just happening. So I don’t know about influences but that’s a wonderful compliment. Lou Reed is also one of my main attractions. I love the simplicity of his songs and the presence they embody".

Monthly:Tell me about Göteborg...

"I think it is a very warm and friendly city. I read an article in the NY Times where they said that Göteborg is the hippest, coolest place in the world, and I was telling everybody that at the time when I moved here. Not because I was living here but because I started to meet some great musicians, like Detektivbyrån and Oholics. People who wanted to create a community where there wasn’t so much of a competition. You know, bands that wanted to get together and help to promote and support one another whether it’s getting upon stages and playing an extra instrument or just being up there in the front row and bringing more people out. I think that the town is really nice in that sense for the artistic community and everybody being so supportive of one another."

Monthly: You’ve been making music and playing around town. What’s your favourite venue to play?

"I think the best venue is Pustervik. And it’s world renowned! I know a lot of touring acts from the US, friends from bands that always mention it as the best venue in Sweden. I don’t know much about the clubs in Stockholm, but in Göteborg I think definitely Pustervik. And I think one of the best culture clubs / club nights to go to in town is Koloni. It brings a great mixture of bands from many different countries, people that you’ve never heard of so you never know what to expect when you go to a night at Koloni."

Monthly: But you’re settling in Sweden?

"Yes, this is definitely my home. I have thought about it many times if I could move back to the US but there is nothing really there for me any more. I am very happy here and I’ve met so many great friends. In Sweden everybody is such a great listener and communicates so much better than in America. You know, in the States you can express your opinion but it always turns into an argument. Here people tend to listen more – I think it’s more of a European thing. But I want to make it more of a home here and try to make more of an effort to speak the language. I’ve only been here two years and it takes a longer time than that…"

-Hjörtur Einarsson - Monthly


Discography

Jacques Labouchere (self titled)-indepently released 2007
Bi-polar Baby Stroller- released 2010 through Popjinx/Lojinx Records

Photos

Bio

Unquestionably a pioneer of true Americana in Scandinavia, Jacques Labouchere's work ethic combined with an impressive body of live performances set him apart from his indie contemporaries. Perhaps more poignantly his empathetic songwriting of heart-wrenching and compassionate life-stories mark him as the last of a dying breed of artists in the current music industry where a photo of someone is worth more than a musician reaching out to connect emotionally with his audience. Jacques can confidently claim to have done the latter.

Raised on the U.S. East Coast and a born wanderer, Jacques took his guitar with him through the
Appalachians, Connecticut, Boston and Washington DC before moving to London in his youth and then finally Gothenburg, Sweden where he settled down and started a family. Often alienated by language and struggling to find work, he constantly and maniacally played the streets daily to make ends meet before well-known local musicians approached  him wanting to make music together. Labouchere has long been a proud contributor to his local music scene and community, offering his veteran advice to less experienced Swedish artists and giving them a platform for touring and releasing music abroad.

In spring 2006,
following the independent release of his début album, Jacques toured Sweden, Denmark and the UK with an ever-evolving ine-up of some of Gothenburg’s best local musicians. It was during this period that Jacques developed a faster, louder and more effervescent approach than the softer pop, psych and folk ballads of his first album. In 2010 Jacques signed with Popjinx Records, then a sister label of Lojinx Records, to release his sophomore album: “Bi-polar Baby Strollers”. Jacques was invited to perform at Gothenburg’s International Film Festival in 2011 sharing the bill with local Jose Gonzalez’s band Junip, and accompanied by Den Stora Vilan’s Thomas Frank and Christian Dyresjö on stage. This constellation was the latest and most enduring line-up aiding Jacques in building up a new repertoire and co-producing what would be Jacques’ now imminent 3rd release.




. It is noteworthy that he has independently booked all of
his shows, which include 3 tours of the UK, 3 tours of Germany and
several stays in NYC and Brooklyn where he held 3 weekly residencies in 3
different venues. Immediately before embarking on his trip to NYC, he
received an invitation to open up for Arlo Guthrie at a sold out show in
Gothenburg.


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Jacques has opened for acts such as
Arlo Guthrie, Quilt, The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Daniel Norgren,
Withred Hand and shared the stage with Ken Stringfellow (Big Star) and
Jose Gonzalez (Junip).
 





Band Members