Jahan Nostra
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Jahan Nostra

Mount Vernon, NY | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | SELF

Mount Vernon, NY | SELF
Established on Jan, 2010
Solo Hip Hop Soul

Calendar

Jan
17
Jahan Nostra @ Station House Bar and Grille

Norwalk, Connecticut, United States

Norwalk, Connecticut, United States

Aug
17
Jahan Nostra @ Cantine Field

Saugerties, New York, United States

Saugerties, New York, United States

Aug
10
Jahan Nostra @ Foufounes Électriques

Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Aug
04
Jahan Nostra @ National Black Theatre Inc

New York, New York, United States

New York, New York, United States

Jun
29
Jahan Nostra @ The State House

New Haven, Connecticut, United States

New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Jun
22
Jahan Nostra @ Chicago, IL

Chicago, Illinois, United States

Chicago, Illinois, United States

May
07
Jahan Nostra @ Kill Your Idol

Miami Beach, Florida, United States

Miami Beach, Florida, United States

May
03
Jahan Nostra @ Petit Campus

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Apr
23
Jahan Nostra @ The Social Butterfly

New York, United States

New York, United States

Feb
23
Jahan Nostra @ The State House

New Haven, Connecticut, United States

New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Feb
09
Jahan Nostra @ The Rough Draft

Hamden, Connecticut, United States

Hamden, Connecticut, United States

Feb
01
Jahan Nostra @ Cafe 9

New Haven, Connecticut, United States

New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Dec
22
Jahan Nostra @ Ashford & Simpson's Sugar Bar

New York, New York, United States

New York, New York, United States

Nov
21
Jahan Nostra @ YWCA

Yonkers, New York, United States

Yonkers, New York, United States

Oct
26
Jahan Nostra @ The Rough Draft

Hamden, Connecticut, United States

Hamden, Connecticut, United States

Sep
02
Jahan Nostra @ Rockwall Studios

Ridgewood, New York, United States

Ridgewood, New York, United States

Jul
20
Jahan Nostra @ Caffeine Underground

Bushwick, New York, United States

Bushwick, New York, United States

Jul
15
Jahan Nostra @ The Old Greenwich Social Club

Greenwich, Connecticut, United States

Greenwich, Connecticut, United States

Jun
24
Jahan Nostra @ Gramercy Theatre

New York, New York, United States

New York, New York, United States

Jun
22
Jahan Nostra @ Fort Greene Park

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Jun
21
Jahan Nostra @ Stamford Old Town Hall

Stamford, Connecticut, United States

Stamford, Connecticut, United States

Jun
21
Jahan Nostra @ Columbus Park

Stamford, Connecticut, United States

Stamford, Connecticut, United States

May
17
Jahan Nostra @ TuneCore (Brooklyn, NY)

New York, United States

New York, United States

May
12
Jahan Nostra @ CONFERENCE: East Coast Music Conference (VA)

Norfolk, Virginia, United States

Norfolk, Virginia, United States

Mar
19
Jahan Nostra @ tavern lounge

woodhaven, New York, United States

woodhaven, New York, United States

Mar
16
Jahan Nostra @ SXSW

Austin, Texas, United States

Austin, Texas, United States

Music

Press


Jahan Nostra and Ceschi join forces over Maulskull’s bellicose production, bringing to life an anthem that sounds as though it might serve as the sonic backdrop to the bubbling up – and inevitable eruption – of an all out social revolution. “El Chapo” is laden with social and political commentary as both artists fill their respective verses with impassioned commentary on subject matter one can very clearly tell hits close to home for Nostra and Ramos – immigration, deportation, the prison industrial complex, widespread corruption and a number of other injustices littering today’s social, economic and political climate.

Nostra and Ceschi, both unique visionaries and creatives in their own right, bring distinctive energies to “El Chapo.” While the CT-based artists step up with full-hearted and feverish prose, their flows are juxtaposed wondrously, resulting in a natural fidelity between two otherwise uncommon deliveries. The ways in which the artists come together on “El Chapo” serves to accentuate the overall message radiating from the ESP single.

In a way only music can, “El Chapo” provides a voice for the voiceless, bringing attention to – and raising awareness of – the countless individuals who are, every day, faced with the fear of deportation at the hands of the ICE and other government agencies. As families are torn apart over imaginary lines literally drawn in the sand, Jahan Nostra and Ceschi help to shine some light on the real human beings who are left with little to no defense against the powers that be. Released in conjunction with an immigrant rights group, the Henry Gelperin-directed “El Chapo” features clips of meetings and protests that were filmed at the U.S.-Mexico border. Interwoven with shots of Nostra and Ceschi rocking through the track, viewers witness the endless fight our brothers and sisters are forced to take part in just to keep their family together.

Jahan Nostra drops visuals for “El Chapo” just prior to the upcoming re-release for the track next month. Nostra’s ESP is available now on all major streaming platforms, including Spotify and Apple Music. Ceschi’s Factor Chandelier-produced Sad, Fat Luck drops Thursday, April 4th, and he’ll be touring around the country with some friends in support of the new project. Tickets to those shows are available here. - Triple HQ (Atlanta, GA)


In honor of César Chávez Day, Jahan Nostra and Ceschi Ramos have united for the “El Chapo” video, a potent piece of media that finds both MCs reflecting on topics such as immigration reform and the prison industrial complex.

Filmed, edited and directed by Henry Gelperin, the visual brings Jahan and Ceschi’s powerful words to life. It was also produced in partnership with an immigrant rights group based in the Greater New Haven, Connecticut area.

The scenes depicted in the “El Chapo” video were pulled from footage provided by the ULA that were filmed at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Roughly two weeks after the video shoot was completed, the news broke 21 Savage had been arrested and detained by ICE, something Jahan addressed in a press release.

“At the ULA meeting and video shoot, I met several individuals who were facing deportation or whose family members were facing deportation,” Jahan says. “Since they aren’t celebrities, we don’t hear most of their stories in the news.

“When news broke about 21 Savage, I really felt for him and his family. It’s a very unjust situation. 21 Savage has three children who are all US Citizens and the government is trying to deport their father who came to the U.S. as a child. There are thousands of cases just like his. I only hope his story can help raise awareness.”

Watch the “El Chapo” video above. - HipHopDX


Jahan Nostra - El Chapo (feat. Ceschi) [Video Review]
APRIL 05, 2019 IN MUSIC, MUSIC VIDEOS, RAP, HIP-HOP
Rating: 5 out of 5

“Songs carry a power to entertain, educate and enlighten and this song carries that three-pronged torch well.

The production and delivery are solid here, but this track is about the message and emotion.

Reminiscent of Kendrick Lamar this is music with something to say. And say it well as cartel leader El Chapo is not glorified here, but rather used as a metaphor of political protest.”
— Travis Erwin (LA On Lock Blogger) - LA On Lock (Los Angeles, CA)


Jahan Nostra – “El Chapo” Ft. Ceschi (Video)
Posted by: undergroundhiphopblog April 3, 2019

Paying homage the late Civil Rights activist and American labor leader Cesar Chavez, Jahan Nostra links with Ceschi and release a new video, “El Chapo”. A potent record covering a wide range of issues varying from immigration policy to the prison industrial complex. Both standout emcees go bar for bar over a hard hitting beat delivering a message with tense emotion that must be heard. - Underground Hip Hop Blog


The first shot we see is a long pan: two fences in two countries, with activists and law enforcement on each side of both. Synth hums and a siren sounds in the distance. Then the musicians appear, a mix of camouflage and green with worn jeans. Behind them, the backdrop keeps shifting: New Haven’s Union Station, New Haven's Winchester Arms Factory, a grassroots meeting for immigrant rights in First & Summerfield Church. The city keeps expanding.

That’s the story in Jahan Nostra’s new video for “El Chapo,” a song he penned in political protest in 2016, then commissioned a video for earlier this year. On the piece, produced by Hamden native Henry Gelperin, Nostra shares the mic with New Haven musician Ceschi, who is dropping his own new album at The State House and Cafe Nine this Friday. Nostra released the video April 1, in honor of César Chávez’s birthday last weekend.

The idea for “El Chapo” began well before the 2016 election, when Nostra saw a series of tweets fired off by then-candidate Donald Trump reacting to drug kingpin Joaquín Guzmán’s—a.k.a. El Chapo—escape from prison in 2015. In a small Twitter tirade, Trump insisted that El Chapo was not only dangerous, but a living example of the need for a border wall, which became one of his signature campaign promises. As he did in later tweets calling MS-13 gang members “violent animals,” Trump conflated El Chapo with all immigrants crossing the border, raising false cause for alarm.

“I understand that this is a game, it’s politics,” Nostra said in a recent interview at Cedarhurst Cafe. “But the danger in it was that he was using El Chapo as a fear tactic. And when I saw that, I was like ‘woah, this is a buzzword.’”

Nostra watched as a Twitter user who said he was Guzmán’s brother fired back at Trump, taking him to task for the remark. He began writing the track, calling it “one of the more rebellious things I’ve done.” He also reached out to Ceschi, who he'd met while doing a Hip-Hop for the Homeless show in New Haven. A year before, the two had found themselves talking about “the way the prison industrial complex benefits off people.” To Nostra, it was exactly the voice that was missing.

“In hip-hop, you have mainstream and you have what you call the streets,” he said. “And the streets wanted this song.”

On the track, Nostra takes the first verse, yoking the injustices of deportation with some of those that Americans see in their own cities, disproportionately taken out against people of color. He takes on Trump (“Trump Towers? Homeboy I’ll pull your Trump card/Teleprompters got you gettin’ fake applause.”), sews in references to both current news and pop culture, then hits the chorus running.

Truth lies behind these walls/El Chapo
Free for my love and my cause/El Chapo
Tryin’a make it to the U.S./El Chapo
Working me and mine to death/El Chapo

Wait is my only choice/El Chapo
For my peoples I’m the voice/El Chapo
Fam imma be a’ight soon/El Chapo

But it is when Ceschi steps in that the piece’s heartbeat accelerates, conjuring images of the U.S.’s own prison industrial complex alongside a series of atrocities at the border. In the track, his voice cuts in clean and clear, listeners doing a mental sprint to keep up with every word.

They’ll never take me out/Show me dead thrice/Shut my mouth
Told me I’d never be anything but who’s laughing now?
Never had much of a privilege but education
So at least I know I’m getting fucked for the system on a constant basis

Drones overhead/One made Christopher Dorner dead
So I’m hiding underground to make my life work instead
Push weight of many men/To taste freedom
Lock me down once/Shit won’t ever happen again

Climb my way out of a cell if I have to
C.O.s like Rick Ross get paid off then we take off and we make do

Those words come to life a second time in the video, in which Nostra and Ceschi bounce between New Haven’s Union Station, the old Winchester Repeating Arms Factory, New Haven's Science Park neighborhood, and a meeting of Unidad Latina en Acción (ULA) at First and Summerfield United Methodist Church, where immigrant Nelson Pinos has been seeking sanctuary since November 2017. With the release, he yanks the lyrics into Trump’s presidency and an ongoing humanitarian crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Shots ground the viewer in New Haven, taking them on a tour of the city (literally starting with Union Station) where affordable housing and immigration reform are both implicated through setting. Some of the most moving scenes unfold at First and Summerfield, as Nostra performs the piece at ULA’s weekly meeting, then poses with Pinos, his family, and members of the local activist community to sing the final chorus.

Working with activist and artist Vanesa Suarez, Gelperin also spliced in Suarez’ own footage from Tijuana, where she traveled in January of this year to provide translation services and case management to immigrants and asylum seekers fleeing Honduras. She plans to go back to provide more aid and is currently raising funds to do so.

“I offered it because I was like, ‘this should be public information, what is happening down here,’” said Suarez in an interview Tuesday, adding that her trip was the first time she saw firsthand how the U.S. and Mexican governments collaborate to keep immigrants from passing safely into the U.S. “We’re thinking of our migrant brothers and sisters at the border, and when I was looking into that, it was crazy to see how they were treated.”

Suarez said that when Nostra approached ULA, she was impressed that he wanted to get to know the group, instead of swooping in to document an action and leaving immediately. She and Pinos listened to the track together, playing it several times. She translated it into Spanish, to explain the premise to members of the group who speak little or limited English.

And then in February, Nostra joined the group for one of its regular Monday night meetings, recording the final chorus with members toward the end of the meeting. As the shot unspools on film, it feels brave and triumphant: activists embrace, Pinos pumping his fist on the right side of the group, with his young son Brandon holding his hand and singing. But for Suarez, it also doubled as a moment to reflect on ULA’s work within New Haven, looking at it through outside eyes.

“I think he [Jahan Nostra] saw so much value in a space that we’ve gotten very used to every Monday,” she said. “To step back and see the value of folks taking time to organize, it really reminded us that’s that’s part of the struggle too.”

That’s part of the video’s greater spirit, Nostra said. While he was still envisioning the message he wanted to send, the 38-year-old tried to add a local component to a song that is meant to have national implications. Raised in Stamford, Nostra became interested in writing when he was young, inspired by music that ranged from Tupac to Bob Dylan to the soundtrack for Les Miserables. He said he loved “the ability to put poetry to music,” a tactic he tries to take in the song while also getting the message across.

It’s not meant to come off as unpatriotic, he said. To the contrary, he's trying to use criticism as a catalyst for social change.

“I love America,” he said. “It’s like a woman being with a guy and she knows he can do better. The constitution is real. I believe in it. I believe in justice for all. I think Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln were visionaries. But we need to tweak it to handle the moral standards, the moral values of this country.” - New Haven Arts Council


Jahan Nostra seeks to be the epitome of indie artistry and storytelling, and is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Born in Norwalk, CT and raised in Mount Vernon, NY, Nostra has made a career of putting himself in the right spaces with the right people, while making music that attracts the attention of hip-hop fans and industry legends — as evidenced by a Smif-N-Wessun feature on his current project, ESP. The album, released in 2016, was mastered by Daddy Kev, a Grammy-nominated engineer to artists like Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar.

With his latest endeavor, Nostra flexes a new muscle, wearing the hat of co-director and joining forces with videographer Shane McLellan for his latest video, “Embrace the Rain.”

“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In a social and political climate seemingly filled with bad days, both the song and its accompanying video blend a dose of solid hip hop lyricism with a hopeful message.

The video follows its lead, Alex Manon, through moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon — a talented DJ and producer fresh off the Everybody’s Tour (US & Europe) with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo — makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s poignant subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

StandUp for Kids, the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

On why the role in a video with a message was exciting for him, Manon states: “I really enjoyed working on this project with Jahan. I had to get my acting on a little bit which I’ve never done, but I’m always down to try new things.”

To his own credit, Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

Nostra is currently hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Upcoming tour dates will soon be on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth.

For more on Nostra, follow him @jahannostra and visit: http://jahannostra.com/About/. - Huff Post


Jahan Nostra Freestyle on Hot 97 with Drewski 2018 - Hip Hop Video World


A King (Combat Jack Show) Interviews Jahan Nostra at A3C Festival 2017 - https://soundcloud.com/jahan-nostra-1/jahan-nostra-interview-with-a-king-combat-jack-show-a3c-2017

[Recorded October 2017 / Published December 2017]

Rest In Peace Combat Jack. - A King (Combat Jack Show)


Exclusive: Shanika Simmons of Broke2Dope Interviews Jahan Nostra at SXSW 2018
[Visual Interview: http://www.broke2dope.com/2018/04/jahannostra-talks-embrace-rain-and.html / https://youtu.be/7d5qg9zREtU] - Broke2Dope (Atlanta, GA)


Had a new LP float across my desk this week, ESP by Jahan Nostra — an emcee mounded by Stamford, Connecticut and Mount Vernon, New York. Now, the project isn’t new per say, as it initially dropped in 2016, and was remastered late last year. Regardless, I made it my movement music for a week.

Here’s the breakdown.

Sonically, it’s difficult to put my finger on. The beats don’t quite hit the mark of what’s going on in-game today, not even quite from a backpacking 90s perspective. So it has this kind of literal timeless feeling to it. From the jazzy big-city New York vibe of “Welcome Home,” he sets a great vibe. It’s fully consistent, but it’s not a bad thing. He does maintain a keep it moving, maintain, and make it to the top theme for the first half of the LP songs like “Embrace The Rain.”


The features on the LP are quite impressive. Philly mainstay Tone Trump hops on the super atmospheric “Whole Life,” and Brooklyn legends Smif N Wessun hop on the album highlight “No Stress.” The Rey Vega featured “One of Them Days” is way too understated, though. It’s probably one of my fave songs on the project, basically following him as he hits up ATL.

The second half of the LP has a few gems; “El Chapo” with Ceschi, “Time” featuring Kyro & Wednesday Atoms, and “Bricks and Sponsorship” all give more insight into Jahan as a street guy—without being at all explicit. The latter record, explores the cause and effect of street-life, with a running commentary on the prison system in the US.

At 16-songs in length, there is a lot to love. He’s a project boy who puts a lot into this music shit; everything about him suggests quality—right down to the photography. He has an excellent package. Looking forward to new material.

Early.
---------------

Written by Riley
Riley here — father, artist, videographer, professional writer and SERIOUS hip-hop head. I'm a member of the Universal Zulu Nation, and I think everything is better on vinyl. Add me on Twitter! @specialdesigns - Above Average Hip Hop


Philly FAME TV Interview: Jahan Nostra(CT/NY) Speaks on Working w/ Tone Trump, Growing up in Connecticut vs NY + More - https://youtu.be/h21fRuwbN1E

[Published December 2017] - Philly FAME TV (Philadelphia, PA)


Jahan Nostra seeks to be the epitome of indie artistry and storytelling, and is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Born in Norwalk, CT and raised in Mount Vernon, NY, Nostra has made a career of putting himself in the right spaces with the right people, while making music that attracts the attention of hip-hop fans and industry legends — as evidenced by a Smif-N-Wessun feature on his current project, ESP. The album, released in 2016, was mastered by Daddy Kev, a Grammy-nominated engineer to artists like Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar.

With his latest endeavor, Nostra flexes a new muscle, wearing the hat of co-director and joining forces with videographer Shane McLellan for his latest video, “Embrace the Rain.”

“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In a social and political climate seemingly filled with bad days, both the song and its accompanying video blend a dose of solid hip hop lyricism with a hopeful message.

The video follows its lead, Alex Manon , through moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon — a talented DJ and producer fresh off the Everybody’s tour with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo — makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s poignant subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

StandUp for Kids , the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

On why the role in a video with a message was exciting for him, Manon states: “I really enjoyed working on this project with Jahan. I had to get my acting on a little bit which I’ve never done, but I’m always down to try new things.”

To his own credit, Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post ; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

Nostra is currently hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Fall tour dates will soon be up on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth and children impacted by HIV/AIDS. - Hip Hop Headquarters / TripleHQ (Atlanta, GA)


Jahan Nostra seeks to be the epitome of indie artistry and storytelling, and is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Born in Norwalk, CT and raised in Mount Vernon, NY, Nostra has made a career of putting himself in the right spaces with the right people, while making music that attracts the attention of hip-hop fans and industry legends — as evidenced by a Smif-N-Wessun feature on his current project, ESP. The album, released in 2016, was mastered by Daddy Kev, a Grammy-nominated engineer to artists like Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar.

With his latest endeavor, Nostra flexes a new muscle, wearing the hat of co-director and joining forces with videographer Shane McLellan for his latest video, “Embrace the Rain.”

“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In a social and political climate seemingly filled with bad days, both the song and its accompanying video blend a dose of solid hip hop lyricism with a hopeful message.

The video follows its lead, Alex Manon, through moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon — a talented DJ and producer fresh off the Everybody’s Tour (US & Europe) with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo — makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s poignant subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

StandUp for Kids, the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

On why the role in a video with a message was exciting for him, Manon states: “I really enjoyed working on this project with Jahan. I had to get my acting on a little bit which I’ve never done, but I’m always down to try new things.”

To his own credit, Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

Nostra is currently hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Upcoming tour dates will soon be up on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth and children impacted by HIV/AIDS.

For more on Nostra, find his full bio here: http://www.jahannostra.com/About/ - The Fresh Committee (California)


New York Said Podcast: November 2017
Recorded live from Tompkins Square Park, today’s guest on the show is Jahan Nostra. Jahan talks poverty, what it means to be thorough, having faith in yourself, musical influences, hope and moral equity.
Stay Up to Date with Jahan Nostra

Official Website: http://jahannostra.com/
Instagram @JahanNostra: https://www.instagram.com/jahannostra/
iTunes link for ESP album: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/jahan-nostra/537539901 - New York Said (New York)


Latest album ‘ESP’ by the wonderful Jahan Nostra is truly amazing.

In his sixteen-track album, the highly talented and simply amazing Jahan Nostra showcases to us why he is the name to follow in the world of music with terrific vocals and splendid writing, that many could only envy.

The album contains quite a few favourites, ours being ‘No Stress’ and ‘El Chapo’ both that seem to embed the intense, powerful and simply majestic vibe of Nostra who embeds it into the tone of the album early on. ‘No Stress’ is a powerful and energetic song in which Nostra and his collaborator Smif-N-Wessun dominate each lyric and bar with rawness and intensity pleasing flow, a true gift for the ears and soul.

Furthermore, the intensity and message-driven lyrics that are embedded throughout in the album are clear in ‘El Chapo’, a powerful message-relating song in the current political climate. ‘El Chapo’ is a true gift for those looking to switch from Kanye’s questionable twitter timeline and those that really want to understand the struggle of the working class in North America.

Overall, this album is simply, gold. Nostra doesn’t just showcase vocal talent but genuine lyrical talent which in the end transfers well with the messages he sets out to send throughout his simply dynamic and top-notch album ‘ESP’

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/jahannostra
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jahannostra/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jahannostramusic/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/jahannostra
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/2fgLSRLR1RBMrJMB7pQfpc
Apple Music: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/jahan-nostra/537539901
Bandcamp: https://jahannostra.bandcamp.com/
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/jahan-nostra-1
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm9530946/
Website: https://www.jahannostra.com/ - Sound of Now (UK)


Host: Vic XL

Atlanta Radio Veteren Vic XL Brings His Brand To Blogtalk to Give The Listeners Whats Next In Hiphop and R&B and Talk we Promise To Bring You Tommorrow's Movers and Shakers First

Guest: Janah Nostra

Jahan Nostra is a talented MC from Stamford, CT and Mount Vernon, NY. In his early childhood, Jahan lived in Mount Vernon, NY – hometown to Pete Rock , Heavy D and Sean “Diddy” Combs. Jahan’s musically talented neighbors inspired him to begin rhyming at 9 years old. After moving to the inner-city of Stamford, CT, Jahan continued to develop his lyrical talent and at age 13, he was signed to the label, BMX Entertainment in Brooklyn.

In high school, Jahan showcased his talent on the independent music scene, recording freestyles on mixtapes. He and his partner Kyro also recorded tracks with Producer Raydar Ellis (who went on to work under Dr. Dre at Aftermath).

After high school, Jahan moved to North Carolina to study Journalism. During college, Jahan worked at Duke University Radio with 9th Wonder who introduced him to Big Pooh and Phonte . During these years - the early stages of Little Brother - Jahan even had to face-off in a battle with Phonte at the famed Cat’s Cradle. After returning to CT, Jahan recorded and released the Bedtime Street Album (2012) and Sleepwalking (2013) - produced by Poppa Pill . He spent 2014 touring with the Vans Warped Tour and the Full Blast Summer Tour. In 2016, Jahan released his latest album, ESP - remastered by Daddy Kev - with features from Smif-N-Wessun and Tone Trump . In 2017, Jahan freestyled with RZA at the City Winery in NY, he performed at Spotify’s US HQ in NY and he traveled throughout the US and Canada for interviews to promote ESP.

With respect to his creative influences, Jahan credits Tupac Shakur as an inspiration for “his ability to paint pictures - Vic XL (via Blog Talk Radio) (Atlanta, GA)


Jahan Nostra - ESP

Jahan Nostra has just released, ESP, an engaging and kaleidoscopic work that has a modern vibe and timeless energy.

This talented artist is inspired by old-school hip-hop, but his sound has a contemporary edge as well, blurring the lines between warmth grit and focused punch. Like some of the best rappers out there, he has a strong sense of storytelling, which he uses to create an engaging and captivating narrative flow. The first thing that I noticed about ESP was the artist’s searing lyrical flow and great production value, blurring the lines between R&B and rap music.

The next thing that’s certainly worthy of being mentioned is the quality of the mixes. The production aesthetics are absolutely spot on. Each track is very well-balanced, with all the elements in the right place. In particular, the low-end frequency is fat and rich to support the weight of each song. This release features 16 original songs, including an intro and two final bonus tracks. The first song on this release serves as a perfect introduction, exposing the most melodic side of the artist’s whose spoken-word lyrics fall in perfectly with the beautiful piano melodies of this release. The song track, “Welcome Home”, kicks in with some jazz and funk-inspired samples making for a very cool old-school feel. One of my favorite tracks on this release is certainly “El Chapo” (feat. Ceschi). This song has a really heavy flow with a cool west coast vibe, where the lush melodic soundscapes blend in with a modern and powerful beat. The gritty and energetic vocal performance is one of the best on the record.

These are only a few highlights from an album that’s got so much to offer. To truly pick up on all the subtle details and intricate features on ESP, I’d totally recommend using your favorite headphones or a set of good speakers, as this music is best enjoyed when you can actually feel all of the nuances in the music. This is a particularly great release for every fan of authentic hip-hop artists, from Biggie Smalls and Nas, to Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole.

Find out more about Jahan Nostra, and do not miss out on ESP and other exciting releases, events, and activities from this performer:

ttps://open.spotify.com/album/1WHxdUHcbRyi43JZuL4YAn (Spotify)

https://jahannostra.bandcamp.com/album/esp (Bandcamp)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/esp/1140297248 (Apple Music)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/esp/1140297248 (iTunes)

https://play.google.com/store/music/album/Jahan_Nostra_ESP?id=Btmkmftqvo6agj6dleg55kozsdu(Google Play)

https://www.amazon.com/ESP-Explicit-Jahan-Nostra/dp/B01JLLLL6A (Amazon) - Down Beatz


@JahanNostra Drops Off Visuals To "Embrace The Rain"
https://youtu.be/XNDVUQzIgE4 - Broke2Dope (Atlanta, GA)


While a lot of mainstream hip-hop is taking a turn for the ratchet, there are indie artists like New York-based rapper Jahan Nostra providing a counterbalance with down-to-earth lyrics and real-life topics. His most recent full-length project, 2016's ESP, showcased his talent and skill at telling interesting and engaging stories through rhyme. But he doesn't just limit his storytelling to wax, taking to the co-director's chair for his latest video, "Embrace The Rain." And we here at SoulBounce are happy to bring you your first look at the clip.

The song itself invites listeners to power through the many storms that may come in life. "When the sun don't come, just embrace the rain," he spits on the chorus. "That's the only way that things will change." The encouraging message is one that everyone needs to hear at one point, especially during the hard times. “If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” Jahan said of the track. For the song's video, Jahan tapped DJ Alex Manon to make his acting debut as a homeless teen. We watch as he makes it through moments of the day — searching for food in the garbage, aimlessly wandering the streets of Brooklyn and hanging around the subway. Though he's going through hard times, he still manages to find time to show kindness by returning a little girl's cherished toy, a move that eventually helps him to make moves out of his situation. It's a message and story that usually isn't included in music videos, but one that is very welcome.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he said in a statement about why he chose the subject. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

While those are sobering statistics, Jahan's message of hope in "Embrace The Rain" is definitely one way to shed light on the subject. Check out the video below and be sure to pick up Jahan's ESP now via iTunes. For more info about what you can do to help homeless youth, check out StandUp For Kids and Robin Hood Foundation, whom Jahan consulted when making the video. - Soulbounce (Washington D.C.)


Ms. Lashaun Turner Interviews Jahan Nostra on Cali's Best Radio Show 01/17/2018
(Cali's Best Radio Show Airs on CNBC/NBC affiliate radio station KCAA on 102.3FM & 106.5FM in California) - Cali's Best Radio Show (Airs on CNBC/NBC affiliate radio station KCAA on 102.3FM & 106.5FM) (California)


IGGY Magazine (Paris, France) - 25 JANVIER 2018
Depuis la fin des années 70 aux Etats-Unis, le début des années 90 en France, le hip-hop connaît un succès retentissent auprès d’un large public, occupant avec aisance les classements de meilleurs ventes d’albums. Comme tous les arts, il compte en son sein de nombreux courants qui ne partagent pas les mêmes attentes et messages mais le hip-hop arrive aujourd’hui à trouver un écho en chacun d’entre-nous quelque soit le style. En effet, plus que jamais, le hip-hop est est traversé depuis quelques années par un courant plus dansant, ambiançant, au dépend d’une rigueur musicale ou du texte. Certes, tout n’était pas philosophie, style et talent mais cette branche du hip-hop – qu’on considérait conscient – occupait une large place dans les médias spécialisés. Même si nous déclarons à longueur d’articles ne pas vouloir catégoriser les artistes, nous pouvons tout de même sans nous tromper affirmer que Jahan Nostra se classe dans cette lignée. Celle des Nas, A Tribe Called Quest représentée aujourd’hui par des artistes Kendrick Lamar, J Cole et d’autres.

Jahan Nostra est un artiste new-yorkais que nous venons de découvrir et le moins que l’on puisse dire est que son univers nous intéresse. Beaucoup de raisons à cela. Une musique bonne qui parle aux amateurs de hip-hop que nous sommes, un message intéressant qui mérite d’être partagé, c’est en tout cas de cela dont il est question dans Embrace The Rain. Cette chanson revient sur la problématique des sans-abri. «Les gens croient souvent que c’est un problème qui ne touche que les personnes âgées » – explique-t-il. Elle continue : « mais en réalité, il y’a 1,7 million de jeune qui souffrent de ce problème aux Etats-unis. 50 000 enfants dorment dans la rue pendant six mois ou plus chaque année… ». Même si le système social français est présenté comme l’un des plus généreux en matière d’aide à la personne, mettant à la disposition des sans-abri un toit pour la nuit, (il faut appeler le 115), la dernière étude connue montre que 16% de ceux qui appellent le numéro de téléphone 115 pour bénéficier d’un toit dans la nuit ont moins de 25.

Pour écrire son texte, Jahan Nostra ne s’est pas contenté de se poser derrière son ordinateur puisqu’il s’est rapproché d’une association qui s’appelle StandUp for Kids pour avoir des renseignements plus précis et narrer une situation grave qui touche de nombreuses personnes. Dans le clip vidéo de Embrace The Rain, on suit le quotidien d’un jeune sans abri dont la vie bascule dans une station de métro.

Selon nos informations, l’artiste serait en train de travailler sur un nouveau projet dont on ne connaît pas la date de sortie. Une chose est sûre, nous allons restés connectés pour en savoir un peu plus et vous devriez faire de même en le suivant sur les réseaux sociaux.

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English Version (Translated from the Original Article in French)
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"Jahan Nostra addresses the issue of homelessness in Embrace The Rain's video clip"

Since the late 70s in the United States, the early 90s in France, hip-hop is a hit with a wide audience, occupying with ease the rankings of best selling albums. Like all the arts, there are many currents within it that do not share the same expectations and messages, but hip-hop today manages to find an echo in each of us whatever the style. Indeed, more than ever, hip-hop has been crossed for a few years by a current more danceable, ambiant, at the expense of a musical rigor or text. While not everything was philosophy, style and talent, but this branch of hip-hop - which was considered conscious - occupied a large place in the specialized media. Even if we declare at length that we do not want to categorize the artists, we can safely say that Jahan Nostra ranks in this lineage. The Nas, A Tribe Called Quest represented today by artists Kendrick Lamar, J Cole and others.

Jahan Nostra is a New York area artist we have just discovered and the least we can say is that his universe interests us. Many reasons for this. Good music that speaks to the hip-hop fans we are, an interesting message that deserves to be shared, is in any case what is discussed in Embrace The Rain. This song returns to the problem of the homeless. "People often think it's a problem that only affects older people," he explains. He continues: "But in reality, there are 1.7 million young people who suffer from this problem in the United States. 50,000 children sleep on the street for six months or more each year ... " Even if the French social system is presented as one of the most generous in terms of personal assistance, putting at the disposal of the homeless a roof for the night (it must be called 115), the last known study shows that 16% of those who call 115 for roommates at night are under 25.

To write his text, Jahan Nostra did not just sit down behind his computer, he got closer to an association called StandUp for Kids to get more precise information and to discuss a serious situation that is affecting many people. In the Embrace The Rain video clip, we follow the daily life of a homeless youth whose life changes in a subway station.

According to our information, the artist is working on a new project whose release date is unknown. One thing is for sure, we will stay connected to learn a little more and you should do the same by following him on his social networks.
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Translation from the Original Article (in French) published in IGGY Magazine: http://www.iggymagazine.com/jahan-nostra-clip-video-de-embrace-the-rain/ - IGGY Magazine (Paris, France)


In this new entry in our ‘Diamonds In The Rough’ category, we want to introduce you to Stamford, CT-artist Jahan Nostra and his latest single and music video titled “Embrace The Rain”.

Listen and watch below: https://youtu.be/XNDVUQzIgE4 - FRESH! Hip-Hop and R&B


Connecticut emcee and hiphop lifer Jahan Nostra recently dropped his incredible new music video for his track “Embrace the Rain”!! The video tracks its lead, Alex Manon, through various moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon, just as a background, is a talented DJ and producer fresh off the “Everybody’s” tour with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo, and makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s touching subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States…“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In today’s social and political climate, seemingly filled with bad days for most, both the song and video meld together a much needed dose of pure & solid hip hop lyricism with a really uplifting message that we really dig a whole lot!!

Check out the video here: https://youtu.be/XNDVUQzIgE4

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.” StandUp for Kids, the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

“Embrace The Rain” was lifted from his inspiring 2016 album “ESP” available right here: https://jahannostra.bandcamp.com/

Also available on:
–iTunes —
–Spotify —
–Amazon —
-Google Play –

Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

For more information and to stay in touch, these are the spaces:
Instagram: @jahannostra
Facebook: @jahannostramusic
Twitter: @jahannostra
Spotify: Jahan Nostra
SoundCloud: Jahan-Nostra-1
Website: http://jahannostra.com/

Currently, Nostra is hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Fall tour dates will soon be up on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth and children impacted by HIV/AIDS.

We really can’t wait to see what he has in-store for us in the future and really look forward to hearing his new works!!

Enjoy! ~dhh - Do Hip Hop (South Africa)


NEW ARTIST SPOTLIGHT-
Jahan Nostra @CalisBestRadio 1/17/18 @JahanNostra @MsLashaunTurner

Jahan Nostra is a talented MC from Stamford, CT and Mount Vernon, NY. In his early childhood, Jahan lived in Mount Vernon, NY – hometown to Pete Rock, Heavy D and Sean “Diddy” Combs. Jahan’s musically talented neighbors inspired him to begin rhyming at 9 years old. After moving to the inner-city of Stamford, CT, Jahan continued to develop his lyrical talent and at age 13, he was signed to the label, BMX Entertainment in Brooklyn.

In high school, Jahan showcased his talent on the independent music scene, recording freestyles on mixtapes. He and his partner Kyro also recorded tracks with Producer Raydar Ellis (who went on to work under Dr. Dre at Aftermath).

After high school, Jahan moved to North Carolina to study Journalism. During college, Jahan worked at Duke University Radio with 9th Wonder who introduced him to Big Pooh and Phonte. During these years – the early stages of Little Brother – Jahan even had to face-off in a battle with Phonte at the famed Cat’s Cradle. After returning to CT, Jahan recorded and released the Bedtime Street Album (2012) and Sleepwalking (2013) – produced by Poppa Pill . He spent 2014 touring with the Vans Warped Tour and the Full Blast Summer Tour. In 2016, Jahan released his latest album, ESP – remastered by Daddy Kev – with features from Smif-N-Wessun and Tone Trump. In 2017, Jahan freestyled with RZA at the City Winery in NY, he performed at Spotify’s US HQ in NY and he traveled throughout the US and Canada for interviews to promote ESP.

With respect to his creative influences, Jahan credits Tupac Shakur as an inspiration for “his ability to paint pictures with great emotion and put poetry in motion while still being true to himself.” Taking his craft seriously, Jahan has an artist statement that he lives by: “To uplift for the future, reflect reality and prove that I’m the illest.”

JAHAN WILL BE CALLING IN TO @CalisBestRadio JAN 17, 2018 BETWEEN 7 & 8 PM #TUNEIN - Lashaun Turner PRESS Magazine (California)


Jahan Nostra, born Jamil Hannibal Wilson, is an up and coming artist in the hip-hop community who is bringing a fervent passion and unique style to the business. Taking his professional moniker from an acronym (Just Another Human Angels Near) as well as a combination of his name, Nostra hails from a diverse background and a childhood surrounded by big names in the entertainment industry.

Born in Norwalk, Connecticut to a family of African American, Caribbean, Indian (both Cherokee and Blackfoot) and even Anglo-Saxon heritage, Nostra actually spent most of his early years living in Mount Vernon, New York. It was on Lincoln Avenue in Mount Vernon that Nostra was surrounded by and exposed to big names in the industry like Heavy D and Pete Rock. In fact, his father, an independent businessman, actually sold suits to Sean “Diddy” Combs mother, and Nostra can remember being in Comb’s house and witnessing first hand his rise to success. Even at his own home Jahan couldn’t escape the call of music as he and his family resided in the same apartment building as renowned jazz saxophonist Najee. Growing up in a mecca of big names and even bigger dreams, it is no wonder that young Jamil would aspire to become great himself.

It was in Mount Vernon that a young Nostra would get his first real taste of music. During a normal summer barbeque, the song “The Show” being played by Slick Rick and Dougie Fresh mesmerized Nostra. It left such a lasting impression, that Nostra can still recall it has being his first distinctive experience of music. After that, Nostra paid close attention to the fact that he was growing up close to the “mecca of music” and he paid closer attention to the records his parents played throughout his house. Artists like the Beatles, Marvin Gaye, and Patti Labelle were the sounds that would inspire him to build his own unique sound.Jahan in shades tan jacket2

Music left such an impacting impression on young Nostra that he went on to sign his first deal at the age of 12 with BMX Entertainment. During his time on the label, Nostra would absorb as much knowledge of the music industry as he could. It was during this time that he learned about royalties and doing things on your own from ASCAP to BMI to promotion. Then at the ripe young age of fourteen, he released a song entitled “The Shorty” that would play throughout college radio and the rest as they say is history.

In the early 2000’s, a teenage Jahan attended college at North Carolina’s Durham Tech and also took some courses at UNC. During these “college years”, Nostra worked at the WXDU Duke University Radio every Friday night on a program entitled “DJ DaddyRich House of Hits.” He also took the opportunity to perform at the Cat’s Cradle and really began honing his stage presence. During this time he worked with DJ Samps (who is still at the station today), as well as 9th Wonder, Bog Pooh, Phonte, and the rest of the Justice League. While Nostra can’t truly recall the first song he ever sang, he can remember that he “felt free and at home like I could do it all the time”.

As an artist, Nostra draws inspiration from a well of resources. Taking influence from artists that he dubs, “real men that put words together”, like Stevie Wonder and Tupac, as well as philosophies and culture, he has developed a sound that is relatable as well as fun to listen to.

Asides from other artists, Nostra draws inspiration from creativity and ideas. Things like culture, fashion, history, and current events help Nostra create an outlet for his own feelings as well as others around the globe. Nostra is also inspired by places including his home in Connecticut, the Middle East and its history, Africa and its deep roots, and Egypt. Basically anywhere where people are affected and moved by the spirit of greatness and love.

Though he may draw inspiration from the world around him and many other respected artists, Nostra strives to be original and fresh. Like he says, “my image is me: artistic, stylish, fashionable, and yet aware.” He does not allow himself to become another “manufactured” artist, claiming, “When you meet me, what you see is what you get!” This “no gimmicks” attitude is a breathe of fresh air in an oversaturated music market full of “auto-tunes” and “synthesizers”.

While music was always Nostra’s main dream and aspiration, he is much more than a musician. Claiming his “heart is in writing”, Nostra one day hopes to have movies, screenplays, and a couple of books under his belt. He has already expanded his brand by modeling for one of his favorite brands, Inshallahclothing. It is evident that music is just one of his many passions, and it would not be too surprising to see Nostra’s name pop up in various industries and fields. After all, he is driven to succeed through his mission statement, “Reflect reality, prove that I’m the illest, and uplift for the future.”

Jahan Hendrix no shadesOutside of the business world, Jahan keeps his personal goals simple: to be upstanding and respectful and to inspire others and spread love throughout. Whether it is music, writing, radio, or fashion, he hopes that whatever he goes on to do, he leaves his mark upon it and has an everlasting impact. As long as he is healthy and blessed he is happy.

This relaxed outlook on life is the meaning behind Nostra’s phrase (and the title to one of his most popular songs) “sipping green tea”. It is basically slang for doing whatever it is that makes you feel good. Whether it is going to church or hanging with friends, whatever you do to feel great means “sipping green tea”. The idea is literally the product of Nostra sipping green tea and working on new ideas. He quickly turned it into a song and the phrase really caught on. It is truly an easy idea and mantra to get behind.

Currently, Jahan is six songs into his upcoming album, ESP. According to Nostra, the vibe for the album comes from the feeling of ESP or Extra Sensory Perception. It is that feeling of something being gleaned or sensed through the mind rather than through a physical sense (sort of like a 6th sense). Like Nostra says, “When Lebron James throws a pass to Dwayne Wade cutting to the basket; that’s ESP.” That feeling of knowing something before it happens or without having to be told is the inspiration for this album. Listeners can expect a more organic sound than Nostra’s last album “Sleepwalking” (although that album is phenomenal in its own right and well worth a listen). You can expect to laugh, cry and dance as you experience the album and you can most definitely expect soulful music, great lyrics, and of course stories. The album is expected no later than February of 2016, though Nostra plans to have new music out before then.

To find out more about Jahan Nostra and to discover the music of this talented artist visit www.jahannostra.com



Written by: Joshua Henry

Interview by: M.J. Leigh, Entertainment Liaison - The City Insight (North Carolina)


Jahan Nostra "Welcome Home (The Return)" - https://youtu.be/xePdKjVnq2Q

Cruising along Stamford’s Ursula Place on a hazy January afternoon, Jamil Hannibal Wilson spotted the pale blue and white house — No. 7, his late friend Tyree’s crib — near where he and his friends spent the afternoons talking about hip-hop and history and honing their rap skills.

He rolled up the driveway in his silver Acura TSX and turned off the engine. Wrapping himself in his black leather Inshallah brand varsity jacket, Wilson approached “the spot” — the base of a grass-laden hill leading up to the cliff-set campus of the former Clairol headquarters. It was at that moment that Wilson was transported back in time, some 18 years ago, when the name “Jahan Nostra” was born.

“This is it right here,” he says. “I’m getting nostalgia. I can feel the vibes. The name Nostra was created right here.”

Wilson was referring to his stage name, conferred upon him by his friend, Buke, in high school. Back in those days, Wilson would “hold court,” schooling his friends on the teachings of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., the authors Joseph Campbell and Gary Null, and the history of World War II and the Tuskegee airmen. Wilson’s backyard salons and flair for weaving literary and historical references into his rhymes earned him a reputation as a street scholar — and the name “Nostra.”

“One day, I told Buke about Nostradamus — this prophet, this seer. He said, ‘Yo, that’s you,’” Nostra says. “It stuck: I always had these powers of perception.”

From his days on Ursula Place, through the release of two full-length albums, including his latest, “ESP,” to his performances across Connecticut, Nostra has lived up to his name. Armed with a fluent, lava-like delivery, Nostra, whether through autobiographical narratives or reflections on pressing social and political issues, aims to enlighten. His reach is national. But Nostra’s most rapt audience can be found in Stamford, in the city he proudly calls home.

More Information
WATCH THE VIDEO:

https://youtu.be/xePdKjVnq2Q

“My music is universal — the flip side is you live where you live and you can still embrace it and you can still have that pride,” he says. “I’ve always had a strong connection to this city — the city that gave me my name.”

“ESP,” which is set to be released March 7, Nostra’s birthday, has a double meaning, encapsulating both his third-eye awareness and his Stamford-set origin story. On the one hand, it’s a reference to his instinctual and observational prowess. “Think of Lebron James throwing a no-look pass to Kyrie Irving — that’s ESP,” Nostra says, referring to the Cleveland Cavaliers starting power forward and point guard, respectively.

It also refers to Stamford’s East Side, the neighborhood where he grew up, which is known by many residents as the ESP. “My friends and I called ourselves East Side Posse, East Side Power, East Side Perception,” Nostra says.

“Welcome Home,” the lead single off “ESP,” is at once a love letter to and rallying cry for the City That Works. “East Coast, West Coast, Dirty South and Midwest / all across the world / Europe, Africa, South America: Hip Hop’s taking over / But I am from Stamford, Connecticut: South Side, Southfield, West Side, High Ridge, Long Ridge, Glenbrook, East Side,” he raps over a triumphant, soul-infused beat by Bridgeport producer Symphony.

The accompanying video to the track, shot by New Haven-based Shane Films, fittingly features Nostra’s Stamford haunts: Revolution Training (where he and his brother boxed as kids), Atlantic Avenue (where he met the legendary hip-hop artist and area native, Rakim) and West Beach (where he played Little League). In the video, Nostra trains alongside U.S. boxing champ Chordale Booker — scenes that reflect the hard work put in by the independent, unsigned artist throughout his career.

“The reason I highlight Stamford is that this album marks my return to the scene” after taking a year away from the studio to go on East Coast and national tours, Nostra explains. “You’re nothing without your roots. It has everything to do with what you have now.”

Nostra also intended “Welcome Home” to be an anthem that the residents of Stamford, a city in a constant state of transition, could unite behind.

“Welcome home is really what we need right now,” says Nostra, who was born in Norwalk and lived in Mount Vernon, N.Y., but spent most of his life in Stamford.

“ESP” is about Nostra rediscovering his roots. But as autobiographical as the album is (the songs “Time,” “Joseph Campbell” and “Living Your Life” also speak to that dimension), it also reflects Nostra’s omniscience: He has a keen grasp of, and an urge to educate on, the issues affecting his community. “El Chapo” deals with the social and economic plight of immigrants, “Bricks and Sponsorships” focuses on the criminal justice system and life in the streets and “Champagne Life” centers on “the pain we feel over losing loved ones and the transition into the afterlife,” says Nostra, whose musical heroes include the socially conscious hip-hop artists Nas and 2pac.

Sonically, Nostra takes a slam-dunk leap forward on “ESP.” Recorded at EXD Studios in Stamford, the album is more polished, forceful and musically layered — including vintage soul music samples, live piano and even Spanish guitar — than “Sleepwalking,” Nostra’s grittier debut album.

The guest list is more star-studded: Nationally known artists Smif-N-Wessun and Tone Trump are featured, as are local musicians Ceschi, of New Haven, and Omar Wilson, of Norwalk. While he’s East Coast bred, Nostra was very much inspired by the musically intricate, “live” sound of many ’90s-era West Coast hip-hop artists.

“I wanted people to feel the personal nature of this music, and I think the live instruments help give it that feeling,” Nostra says.

“ESP” is the culmination of a 20-year grind that began when Nostra was living in Mount Vernon. It was there, in a city inhabited by the likes of P. Diddy, Heavy D and DMX, that the adolescent Nostra caught the musical bug. He manifested talent at a young age, inking a record deal with the independent label BMX Entertainment, and releasing his first single, “Da Shorty,” at 13. After high school, he moved to North Carolina, attending Durham Technical Community College and working at the WXDU Duke University Radio on its Friday night program, “DJ DaddyRich House of Hits.” Since then, he has released myriad singles, EPs and mixtapes while performing at local venues, including Two Boots and Acoustic Cafe, both in Bridgeport, and touring across the United States. To pay the bills, Nostra works in facilities at Tudor Investment Corp. in Greenwich.

“I always feel like the underdog,” Nostra says. “Stamford fits my identity perfectly.”

Since he was young, the performer has pursued his career like a man possessed; even his eyes bulge to madman-sized proportions when performing or opening up about his craft. What has guided Nostra, he says, is the power of intuition — his ESP, the ability to “use and trust your instincts to bring you down the path of what you want to achieve.” It is that same ability that led Nostra back to his hometown, to the pale blue and white house where he earned the name Nostra.

“ESP is like having a sixth sense,” Nostra says. “It’s knowing things without having a formulaic strategy. That’s the way I went about doing this album. On ‘Welcome Home,’ I rap, ‘Had to feel my way through / ESP here.’ It’s all about instinct.”

---Scott Gargan is a freelance journalist who has covered the arts in Fairfield County for seven years. He lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., but misses Connecticut dearly.

[Published in several Hearst Media News outlets throughout Connecticut: CT Post; Stamford Advocate; Greenwich Time; The Hour; News Times]
-http://www.ctpost.com/living/article/Jahan-Nostra-straight-outta-Stamford-6857031.php
-http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/living/article/Jahan-Nostra-straight-outta-Stamford-6857031.php
-http://www.greenwichtime.com/living/article/Jahan-Nostra-straight-outta-Stamford-6857031.php
-http://www.thehour.com/living/article/Jahan-Nostra-straight-outta-Stamford-6857031.php
-http://www.newstimes.com/living/article/Jahan-Nostra-straight-outta-Stamford-6857031.php - Hearst Media: CT Post; Stamford Advocate; Greenwich Time; The Hour; News Times


Jahan Nostra seeks to be the epitome of indie artistry and storytelling, and is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Born in Norwalk, CT and raised in Mount Vernon, NY, Nostra has made a career of putting himself in the right spaces with the right people, while making music that attracts the attention of hip-hop fans and industry legends — as evidenced by a Smif-N-Wessun feature on his current project, ESP. The album, released in 2016, was mastered by Daddy Kev, a Grammy-nominated engineer to artists like Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar.

With his latest endeavor, Nostra flexes a new muscle, wearing the hat of co-director and joining forces with videographer Shane McLellan for his latest video, “Embrace the Rain.”

“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In a social and political climate seemingly filled with bad days, both the song and its accompanying video blend a dose of solid hip hop lyricism with a hopeful message.

The video follows its lead, Alex Manon, through moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon — a talented DJ and producer fresh off the Everybody’s Tour (US & Europe) with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo — makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s poignant subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

StandUp for Kids, the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

On why the role in a video with a message was exciting for him, Manon states: “I really enjoyed working on this project with Jahan. I had to get my acting on a little bit which I’ve never done, but I’m always down to try new things.”

To his own credit, Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

Nostra is currently hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Upcoming tour dates will soon be up on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth and children impacted by HIV/AIDS.

For more on Nostra, please find his full bio here: http://www.jahannostra.com/About/ - Vintage Media Group


Jahan Nostra seeks to be the epitome of indie artistry and storytelling, and is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Born in Norwalk, CT and raised in Mount Vernon, NY, Nostra has made a career of putting himself in the right spaces with the right people, while making music that attracts the attention of hip-hop fans and industry legends — as evidenced by a Smif-N-Wessun feature on his current project, ESP. The album, released in 2016, was mastered by Daddy Kev, a Grammy-nominated engineer to artists like Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar.

With his latest endeavor, Nostra flexes a new muscle, wearing the hat of co-director and joining forces with videographer Shane McLellan for his latest video, “Embrace the Rain.”

“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In a social and political climate seemingly filled with bad days, both the song and its accompanying video blend a dose of solid hip hop lyricism with a hopeful message.

The video follows its lead, Alex Manon, through moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon — a talented DJ and producer fresh off the Everybody’s Tour (US & Europe) with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo — makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s poignant subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

StandUp for Kids, the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

On why the role in a video with a message was exciting for him, Manon states: “I really enjoyed working on this project with Jahan. I had to get my acting on a little bit which I’ve never done, but I’m always down to try new things.”

To his own credit, Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

Nostra is currently hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Winter tour dates will soon be up on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth and children impacted by HIV/AIDS.

For more on Nostra, please find his full bio here: http://www.jahannostra.com/About/

Instagram: @jahannostra https://www.instagram.com/jahannostra/
Facebook: @jahannostramusic https://www.facebook.com/jahannostramusic/
Twitter: @jahannostra https://twitter.com/jahannostra
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/jahannostra
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/2fgLSRLR1RBMrJMB7pQfpc
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/jahan-nostra/537539901
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/jahan-nostra-1
Website: http://jahannostra.com/ - Daily-HipHop (Switzerland)


Jahan Nostra seeks to be the epitome of indie artistry and storytelling, and is no stranger to doing whatever it takes to make that happen. Born in Norwalk, CT and raised in Mount Vernon, NY, Nostra has made a career of putting himself in the right spaces with the right people, while making music that attracts the attention of hip-hop fans and industry legends — as evidenced by a Smif-N-Wessun feature on his current project, ESP. The album, released in 2016, was mastered by Daddy Kev, a Grammy-nominated engineer to artists like Flying Lotus and Kendrick Lamar.

With his latest endeavor, Nostra flexes a new muscle, wearing the hat of co-director and joining forces with videographer Shane McLellan for his latest video, “Embrace the Rain.”

“If you’re having a bad day or feeling down, it’s an uplifting song,” says Nostra of the track’s meaning. In a social and political climate seemingly filled with bad days, both the song and its accompanying video blend a dose of solid hip hop lyricism with a hopeful message.

The video follows its lead, Alex Manon, through moments in his life as a homeless teen. Manon — a talented DJ and producer fresh off the Everybody’s tour with Logic, Joey Bada$$ and Big Lenbo — makes his acting debut in the video, bringing to life the clip’s poignant subject matter. Nostra chose the concept after learning staggering facts about homelessness in the United States.

“Being homeless is usually thought of as being something that impacts older people,” he says. “But in reality, there are 1.7 million youth experiencing homelessness in this country. There are 50,000 kids who sleep on the streets for six months or more each year. And 1 in every 5 children between the ages of 10 and 18 will run away from home.”

StandUp for Kids the organization with whom Nostra spoke when researching his video concept, aims to end youth homelessness and Nostra hopes the message in his video will not only bring awareness, but also hope.

On why the role in a video with a message was exciting for him, Manon states: “I really enjoyed working on this project with Jahan. I had to get my acting on a little bit which I’ve never done, but I’m always down to try new things.”

To his own credit, Nostra continues to make consistent and strategic moves in his career: he boasts the accolade of being the first rapper ever profiled by his hometown Connecticut Post; he made a recent stop by Spotify as a feature in their Hip Hop Hacks series; and just returned from a promo tour through Montreal.

Nostra is currently hard at work in the studio on a new project he describes as “fun and energetic.” Fall tour dates will soon be up on his website along with the announcement of his next Hip Hop Hacks event. He’s also in the initial stages of planning a fundraising event to benefit homeless youth and children impacted by HIV/AIDS.

For more on Nostra, please find his full bio here: http://www.jahannostra.com/About. - Bay Area Network: Doperaps (California)


Everyone goes through adversity at some point in their life. While most bemoan their trials and tribulations, rapper Jahan Nostra has a different approach. In his new video, he advises “When the sun don’t come, just Embrace The Rain.” Taking instances from his own life, Nostra talks about how his struggle made him more thorough in his life’s journey. It’s inspirational but realistically so. Things don’t always go your way, but how you deal with the bad days really defines you as a person. He literally shouts his message from the rooftops in the video. This is intercut with scenes that show how a homeless young man creates an opportunity through himself by being a good person despite his situation in life. This is the perfect song and message to get you through Friday Junior.

Jahan Nostra "Embrace The Rain" - https://youtu.be/XNDVUQzIgE4 - Vocabulary Spills (New York)


Jahan Nostra provides positive vibes in his new visual directed by Shane Films.

New York emcee Jahan Nostra, puts together a remarkable visual for his single "Embrace The Rain." His visual conceptualizes what it's like being a homeless teen, but within Nostra's visual you'll see why you should never give up even when times get rough.

Embrace the rain below, and don't forget to spread the NOiZE! - iLLA NOIZE (Chicago, IL)


Directed by Shane Films

“Embrace The Rain” from the full length album “ESP” by Jahan Nostra

Jahan Nostra "Embrace The Rain" - https://youtu.be/XNDVUQzIgE4 - Indie Rap Blog (Los Angeles, CA)


Le Journal » Actualités » Jahan Nostra – Embrace The Rain
Publié le 6 octobre 2017 à 19h23 - Le Journal Du Hip Hop (Montréal, Québec, Canada)


Jahan Nostra has an extensive career in Hip-Hop. Rocking the mic since his early teens, Nostra honed his skills in hot beds of Hip-Hop – New York and North Carolina. The Stamford, Connecticut emcee has a few projects under his belt that have led him to the release of his most avant-garde album yet, ESP.

Scheduled for a mid-March release, ESP is produced by Symphony, Jay All Day, Mr. Perclivitive, B. divine, Kaptain Kirk, D.M.T. Music, and Maulskulls. The album features appearances by Smif-N-Wessun, Ray Vega, Tone Trump, Ray Kyro, Samira Gibson, Omar Wilson, Ceschi, Cindy Rose, Puma Simone, MeLa Machinko, Groove U, and Groove U Kids.

Jahan Nostra spoke to The Real Hip-Hop about cultivating his craft throughout the east coast, a chance encounter with a Basketball Hall of Famer, and his new album, ESP.

TRHH: Why did you name your new album ESP?

Jahan Nostra: It’s actually a double meaning. ESP is also known as East Side Power. It’s kind of the part of town where I’m from in Stamford. I’m also from Mount Vernon, New York. I always lived on the east side so ESP kind of represents the part of town that I’m from. On a mass level the literal acronym stands for Extrasensory perception, which is kind of like having a sixth sense. That’s kind of how I did the album, too. It wasn’t so structured; it was more about a mood and a feeling, kind of like how Stevie Wonder plays the keys. If I gave an example of what ESP was about it’s like when LeBron James has the ball and he passes to Kevin Love or somebody. When he passes he doesn’t look, he just kind of knows Kevin Love is there on the fast break, that’s having ESP.

TRHH: So you feel like you were in a zone recording this album?

Jahan Nostra: Well yes, because it was more than just “I’m going to write this down” or strategically thing of this. My last album Sleepwalking was very strategic. It was cranium driven, music is more of a feeling. When I say cranium driven I don’t mean that in a bad way I just mean I sat down, took the beats home, structured them, and had a process and a really accurate flow. This album is very cohesive, don’t get it twisted, but a lot of it was based on raw emotion. Being that it represents where I’m from and ESP represents a certain part of my life it’s very introspective in many ways. The process was more doing things off of emotion as opposed to doing this off of mentality. It was like a sixth sense when I was doing it because it was very organic. I went into the studio and had ideas, production, and the stuff I wanted to use, but I laid a lot of the stuff right there. I laid a lot off of a reoccurring emotion that made it like the tactic of ESP. The same way Extrasensory perception works is the same technique in which I recorded the album, Sherron.

TRHH: What inspired the single Living Your Life?

Jahan Nostra: Wow, look around us, man. I know a lot of people need inspiration out there. You speak about what inspires me, well I’m usually inspired by what inspires people — what moves people. Living Your Life is basically a song about being yourself no matter what and kind of conveying your unique personality to the world. At the same time living free and speaking up on things that are not necessarily just what’s accustomed to you in the world. “Life used to be about dreams, now life is all about memes,” and a lot of that song is a shout out to all the individuals out there prospering in the struggle and trying to live everyday life. What I like about Living Your Life is it can relate to anybody, whether you’re rich, poor, down and out, white, black, whatever. The real aspect of it is to live your life no matter who you are. Progress and be you, most of all. Don’t try to be nobody else, just be who you are. I also give a shout out to a lot of people that are fallen from being in jail or have either lost their way on the path, I’m hoping they live their life too. I give a personal shout out to four or five people that are close to me that kind of got the rough path. It’s a concoction of both of those things.

Jahan Nostra "Living Your Life (feat. Omar Wilson)" - https://youtu.be/HcIe09_IW_o

TRHH: How is this album different from your last album, Sleepwalking?

Jahan Nostra: We day dream every day and dream every night so we’re all sleepwalkers. Sleepwalking’s subject matter dealt with the actual visualization of dreams, lucid dreams, how we live by them, and how we can bring our dreams to fruition. ESP is more introspective than Sleepwalking. Sleepwalking has maybe one or two introspective songs. One is called Who’s There and there is another one. I really just scratched the surface but it kind of leaves you intrigued for more. ESP is way more introspective. I talk a lot more about my life on songs like Time, songs like Whole Life, and even Living Your Life. The songs are more autobiographical, more introspective, and have a lot more instrumentation on the production side on ESP. Sleepwalking is a little more Hip-Hop sample based. Also, I think there is a lot more piano because I was inspired a lot by Stevie Wonder on ESP. I also play piano. Like I said, the process in which I wrote it was more on the spot and more feeling. Sleepwalking was more brain-driven, even though it’ll still make you move. ESP is more emotion-driven.

TRHH: You have a long history in Hip-Hop despite being a young guy; tell me about your time in North Carolina and your battle against Phonte.

Jahan Nostra: [Laughs] Yeah man shout out to Phonte, 9th Wonder, Little Brother, The Justus League, and Cesar Comanche. Those guys are my OG’s. They’re veterans to me in many ways. They’re all pretty much older than me by a couple of years. I started in Hip-Hop when I was 14. I had my first indie label, BMX Entertainment when I was 14-years old up here. I did mixtapes and was pretty popular in high school for music. By the time I was 18 going on 19 I moved to North Carolina. I went to UNC for a while and I also went to Durham Technical Community College. I lived in Durham with my aunt, which was a 5-to-10 minute walk from Duke University. On Friday night’s I worked on Duke University Radio with this guy named Michael Samps and Daddy Rich. I was on a show called Daddy Rich’s House of Hits. I was kind of a disc jockey. It was dope because it gave me an insight into songs and what would be played. From 19-to-23 every Friday night after my studies that was my only recreation for most of those years. 9th Wonder, Phonte, Big Pooh, Cesar Comanche, and the Justus League were forming their alliance. This was before any of them got on or anything. They had a show that came on before mine on Duke University Radio. My show came on at 11 and their show came on around 10. It was 9th Wonder and DJ Samps. We would chop up Hip-Hop. They would be down in the basement on Okayplayer trying to construct and get their selves out there to people like ?uestlove. Later on ?uestlove heard their music. I was there when they were trying to press hard. There was many events that I was involved in. I had an outlet with the radio and I would freestlye over instrumentals and do songs and mixtapes.

There was a competition at this place called Cat’s Cradle in Chapel Hill by UNC. They had an event that was a like 30 standoff MC battle. It was dope because it wasn’t an Eminem type battle where you just tear people down. You had three phases of a battle where you freestyle, spit an exclusive verse, and they switch the beat up on you and you could flow. They’d grade you on those three processes. Phonte was in that challenge and so was a guy named J Gunn. I passed the first two rounds and me and Phonte faced off against each other in the third. We both did our thing. Phonte was full of energy at that time. Phonte is a dope emcee. We went through the three phases and the judges ranked it. I think it was like 9/8, 10/7, and 10/9. He beat me slightly by the judges and we had a real tight relationship after that. We worked with each other at the radio station. He showed me a lot in that battle. He used a lot of energy. He’s always been lyrically efficient, but not as much as he is now. North Carolina is his home, I was an outsider, and he was very engaging and got the people involved with hype-ness. He used a good technique. He’s a pretty smart guy. Neither of us won the competition. The guy who won the competition was a young cat named J Gunn. He got a chance to have his stuff played on radio. Hip-Hop was in the building back in North Carolina at the time. I heard The Listening before anyone knew what it was. I was there when The Listening was being conceptualized. When The Listening was being made I was in the studio. I heard most of it before it ever hit the world and blew up. I respect those dudes. They’re real Hip-Hop aficionados. They helped me a lot.

TRHH: I know nothing about Connecticut so when I think of Stamford I think of rich people. What’s Stamford like and what’s the Hip-Hop scene there like?

Jahan Nostra: That’s a great question. You’re out of Chicago and a lot of people have that perception and it is financially sound. Bridgeport had the highest murder rate in the country in 2007 and beyond. It’s about twenty minutes from me and there was killing left and right. They was beating Chicago at one time. You have different areas of Connecticut that are richer like Greenwich which is like Beverly Hills. As far as certain areas there are patchworks of areas that are very crazy. Bridgeport, Hartford, and New Haven – they call it Pistol wavin’ New Haven, have a pretty high murder rate. Where I’m from, Stamford, it’s both. We’re all intellectual. There is a good school system and I’m happy about that. I’m also from Mount Vernon, New York so I know the lifestyle of living in different areas. We call Stamford “The City That Works.” It has both sides. You have people that are successful because there are a lot of businesses there now. it’s actually grown from when I was a kid. Stamford pretty much has at least five to six inner-city projects. They’ve been built up now but it definitely has an urban presence.

When it comes to Hip-Hop they’re very much into lyrics. They are educated in certain ways but we do have patches of streets. What I always say about Connecticut artists is what differentiates them from other cities and areas is their jargon. The sharpness of their tongue, even more than New York, they’re a little more native north eastern in tongue. The S’s are sharp and their words can come off as proper. Maybe even like an Eminem in some ways. They have these areas where a brand new sound comes out of because we have education, we have access to very good things to help us learn, but we still have an urban presence. So it’s kind of like a mix which makes for dope emceeing. I think a lot emcees feel you can only be hood or this and that, but you have the hood, you have the diversity, and you have a concoction of both. While I’m in the inner-city I can go downtown and see things that I wanted to achieve so it kept me inspired. There are other places in the country like that. I think Oakland and a lot of the Bay is like that. You have your areas of hood stuff and a certain amount of education and things that you can see. I would say the scene is a concoction of intellectuals but ones with an urban presence. Especially when you’re from those patches of Stamford.

The rich rappers are the rich rappers and there is not too many of them here. A lot of them aren’t put on to the culture. They’re probably working at a hedge fund or something like that. The ones that are interested in the culture that are right here make some great music because they’re very broad. That’s if you apply it. Some people from Stamford are heavily influenced by New York and want to sound like that. They haven’t really found themselves, but that’s usually not experienced rappers. The hierarchy of the Stamford Hip-Hop scene, and not to brag but I’m one of them, we’ve kind of created this sound that’s crossover intellectual. It’s really making for a new sound. I think it’s going to capture the world by storm. You’re hearing something new. It’s like when Nelly came out. People knock Nelly, and I’m not the biggest Nelly fan in the world but what made him really pop was the uniqueness coming from where he was from. He stuck to those roots and made impact and I think Hip-Hop needs that right now. Everybody sounds the same, everybody is trappin’, and everybody sounds like they’re from New Orleans. My parents live in Atlanta. A lot of people sound like they’re from Atlanta and they’re from somewhere else. I’m not knocking that if that’s what you feel but I think the originality is gone and Connecticut brings something new.

TRHH: The song Welcome Home has an upbeat sound and an uplifting message. Is it indicative of your personality?

Jahan Nostra: Oh wow, Sherron that’s a great question. Yeah, sometimes – most of the time. I have this style where I can be this up tempo funny rapper with a positive energy vibe. People are telling me this and I’m just doing me. I’m actually learning things because I learn things from my music. I would say yes. I used to box and I’m heavy on adrenaline. Everything about that video is real. Even though whole ESP thing. The reason why I’m the trainer and my brother is boxing in the video is because we actually used to do that as kids. When you look at it that fit the adrenaline of the song. As far as my personality, that song comes straight from my personality. Also, I wanted to be able to harness that energy because I wanted to touch people. I think it’s important to hit people with impact. I’m not always like that, I’m a pretty laid back guy. I have this real high strung adrenaline side of me and I would definitely say that it reflects my personality. You can hear upliftment in Living Your Life which is a slower pace but the feeling is upbeat and inspirational. It’s definitely part of my personality, it’s not the only part. I think people can feel that through the music. I think that’s one of my number one attributes. You can feel the authenticity and the genuineness and I think that comes from me being happy about being me, no matter what.

Jahan Nostra "Welcome Home (The Return)" - https://youtu.be/xePdKjVnq2Q

TRHH: On the song Vitamin D you said you chilled courtside with MJ. What was your interaction with Michael Jordan at the Garden like?

Jahan Nostra: It’s funny because yesterday on YouTube I looked up David Lee’s last section shot. That’s what game I was at. It was December 21, 2006. By day I was working with a hedge fund and I have a pretty good relationship with a lot of people in high places. On that day they gave me tickets to go to the Knicks game courtside. The Knicks were playing the Bobcats that game. I was basically in the celebrity row. I actually have footage of this. Michael Jordan was at the game. Q-Tip from A Tribe Called Quest was to the right of me, to the left of me was John Starks, Patrick Ewing, Michael Jordan, and Ahmad Rashad. My seat enabled me to be closest to Michael Jordan. David Lee did something that still hasn’t been topped. The Knicks were in double overtime and he ended up winning on a tip in. During the first half Michael Jordan was up in a box, he’s real good friends with Patrick Ewing. He decided to come down at the end of the second quarter before halftime. He sat in the celebrity row. The only reason he had a seat in front of me is because this dude pulled out a chair and sat down on the floor. He wanted to be amongst New York. Jordan is extremely competitive and he’s even more when you meet him. He was grabbing Emeka Okafor’s jersey saying, “Go underneath the basket, they can’t guard you underneath there!”

People call Michael Jordan arrogant but he wasn’t in my experience. I can talk to anybody and I have upbeat energy, but when he sat next to me he looked at me because I was clapping for Stephon Marbury. I’m pretty passionate about my sports teams. I’m a Knicks fan regardless of all the pain. I went to the John Starks/Doc Rivers camp out here in Stamford. Stamford is about 30 minutes from New York. Stamford is a different part of Connecticut. If you go to Hartford they probably don’t go to New York on a regular basis, I digress. Michael Jordan sees me clapping for Marbury and goes, “I don’t know what you’re clapping for, you ain’t gonna win.” It’s funny because my boys were asking me how can I compete with Michael Jordan. They look at him as a God. You’re talking to a guy who is a stone cold Knicks fan — John Starks the dunk, Charles Oakley, I’m Knicks all day. When he said that to me I looked him right in the eye and said, “Whatever Mike, whatever. We’ll see what happens.” Mike is a psychological guy. He’s very smart. I see why cats say he talks junk, but even when he talks junk its strategic. We ended up having a dialogue all night. I just happened to be in those seats for fortunate situations and I think he was feeling it. He was really one of the guys.

Somebody passed me a camera down and asked me to take a picture. I said, “Yo, this lady wants a picture. I don’t want a picture.” He said, “I guess you can take the picture. I ain’t gonna smile or nothing.” He said, “What you need to be doing is focusing on this game.” I don’t know if you saw Chamillionaire when he met Michael, but it was nothing near that experience. He didn’t diss me, he wasn’t harsh or anything. We were just going back and forth. One thing he said to me I’ll never forget, he said “Stephon Marbury needs to take those cheap ass sneakers off,” I was dying. He said, “The Knicks are not going to win because you guys don’t have anybody to penetrate the hole. That’s why you can’t win. If you have no Michael Jordan or Kobe Bryant you can’t win.” I said, “You know Mike, I’m not even going to argue with that one.” I laughed because I knew I couldn’t chop it up with him strategically. It was divine intervention. I was there, I was feeling good, and it was a hot time in the Big Apple.

The game goes into double overtime and there was .1 seconds on the clock. Basically they had to inbound the ball but if they caught it they couldn’t come down with it. If not we were going into a third overtime. The only way to win was to heave the ball from out of bounds and somebody had to catch it on an alley oop tip in. I think it was Jamal Crawford who inbounded the ball and somehow David Lee got behind the defense and tipped the ball in with his left hand to win with .1 seconds left. If you look at the video when David Lee tips the ball in everybody goes crazy and the camera goes to Michael Jordan. When the camera goes to Michael Jordan you see me, I had a Ecko hoodie on, I get up and I’m in Jordan’s face saying, “I told you, I told you! We’re winning baby. You’re outta here. You lost!” Mike was like, “Yeah, yeah, whatever.” He had a black leather on. They showed that clip on SportsCenter all night. I actually sold more mixtapes off of that. I got a lot of notoriety off of that. It was pretty exciting. I met Mike and not only did I meet Mike, I beat Mike, B.

TRHH: What will fans hear when they buy ESP?

Jahan Nostra: They will hear extremely great production as far as live instrumentation. What they will hear most of all for me is an organic, authentic artist — one of the realest, ever. 2pac is one of my favorite emcees. I’m lyrical and I have other attributes. I’m a writer. I went to school for journalism. I’m deeper than just a rapper. I’m a writer like you’re a writer, but I do it in song. Eventually I’m going to write books. The reality is what you’re going to hear is a great narrative. On the musical side you’re going to hear great music to match it. There are eight producers on ESP. It wasn’t like they just sent me tracks. In an old-school kind of a way these producers were involved with the songs from the starting process to the ending process. The engineer and mastering engineer that I have is Daddy Kev who is a Grammy nominated engineer for work on a Kendrick Lamar and Flying Lotus song. First you’re going to hear clarity. You can believe that. The mixing and mastering on this is no joke.

You’re going to hear authentic, organic consistent sounds that are really potent. And then you’re going to hear a buffet of production that matches each song. Most of all you’re going to hear songs. You hear me? Songs. You have a lot of rappers out there and I tip my hat to them. A lot of people can rap, but songwriting is a whole different thing. You’re going to hear great song structure on ESP – bridges, riffs, intros, outros, and the production to go along with it. The music is so sophisticated. As a songwriter I’ve just grown so much. To be young I’m a veteran in the music because I been at it so long that I do things to challenge myself. Songs like Whole Life have three different people on the hook. You’re going to hear some great songs. I wasn’t inspired just by rap on this album I was inspired by Stevie Wonder, Portishead, and stuff like that. I’m just inspired by good music. You’re going to hear great music and that’s why I’m happy because that’s what people are waiting for.

I don’t have the label pressures of having to make a hit. Don’t get it twisted there are some songs on there that have single status, but it’s just good music. I didn’t have to live in a prison, my brother. I was able to come independently with what I have and everything is real. I think people are looking for that. I think that’s missing in a lot of areas and I’m not saying that because it’s me, I’m going by what the people say. The people keep telling me what’s missing and I’m glad I’m able to promote it. They are going to hear authentic great music that’s complicated. It’s on a level of anybody that’s putting good music out there, including the so-called industry people. I am semi-industry but the reality of it is with the machine, the technology, and internet we’re basically on an even playing field. It’s all about the art. I’m really proud of what I put into this record. - The Real Hip-Hop


If you ask any serious hip-hop head what the golden age of the genre is, they will most likely tell you it was somewhere in the 90s. It was a time where rappers had moved past the fun and often cheerful roots of the genre and were using it more as a tool to describe the dark and troubled realities they were living. This new representation of reality was paired with advancements in production, allowing for a cleaner and more accessible sound, as seen with artists like Biggie Smalls, Outkast, Jay-Z and more.

Today hip-hop seems to be going through yet another reinvention of itself, moving away in part from the criteria laid down by the “gangster rappers” of the 90’s in favor of a more diverse and positive output. Hip-hop as a whole recognizes its influence, and as a result people like Kendrick Lamar, Logic, and Chance The Rapper have risen to challenge what a rapper can be, and by extension the message they can promote.

Caption: Local hip-hop artist Jahan Nostra performs work from his new album ESP. Photo by Bob Albert
Caption: Local hip-hop artist Jahan Nostra performs work from his new album ESP. Photo by Bob Albert

Once again this new narrative has been met with new possibilities in the beats rappers can spit on. The transition to digital production has opened up a whole new world for producers, allowing them to work closely with their artists to create sonic experiences on a scale that was simply not possible before. Together these progressions in the genre provide a unique opportunity for hip-hop to once again become a driving force for social change, and a motivator for people who feel lost in a world where the odds seem stacked against you.

Enter mumble rap, the new form of party music that has overtaken the hip-hop mainstream. Party music is nothing new to the genre: in the mid 2000s the sounds of the southern strip clubs saw mainstream success, as seen with crunk king Lil Jon. Today Mumble rap has also utilized digital production to create some of the hardest hitting, and most immersive music that radio and clubs have ever seen.

While this music has a time and a place, the problem comes from it being constantly shoved down the throats of listeners, lowering the bar for the genre, and by extension, what we expect from our youth. Gone are the positive lyrics about personal growth and creating a better world, instead near inaudible lyrics about money, clothes, and hoes become the focus, further perpetuating the stereotype that parts of society have come to expect from a community that has worked so hard to exemplify its diversity.

With some much life-changing music available, it SHOCKS me that this watered down garbage is what has been pushed to the forefront of people’s reality. Thankfully, with the power of the Internet we have the ability to promote the music that can really make a difference in a world that seems to be in a downward spiral. If you are a fan of good music, I implore you to do a little digging, to share what you find, and to help bring to light the new golden age of hip-hop that is just waiting to be discovered. - Housatonic Horizons (Connecticut)


Sandra Wilson Interviews Hip Hop Artist Jahan Nostra - Sandra Wilson Show (via Blog Talk Radio) (South Carolina)


What is your name and what city do you rep?

"Jahan Nostra. I rep Stamford, CT."

What is unique about you and your music?

"Authenticity and depth."

What shaped your music?

"Many things: the streets of Mount Vernon, NY and Stamford, CT, Literature, Fashion, Music."

When did you realize you were going to make music professionally?

"When I had my first record deal at 14 years old: BMX Entertainment in Brooklyn."

What type of music do you listen to?

"Jazz. Soul. Anything by Stevie Wonder. I listen to all genres of music though. Great music is great music."

Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

"First of all, most artists are undervalued, but if I had to choose one, it would be Robert Johnson."

How do you prepare for your performances?

"It depends on the city and the vibe. I could be watching anything from James Brown to a theatrical play."

What ignites your (song) writing flow?

"Top-notch production, critical moments, poetry, traveling"

What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

"I model for Inshallah Clothing. I also enjoy reading, cooking, working out, going to sporting events, and being active in the community."

Success to you is…

"Being Happy."

What do you wish you were told when you first started rapping that you think would help artists starting out?

"Good music does not necessarily equal financial success."

Any upcoming projects?

"Yea. I am working on an album with my Producer Symphony. I would describe this project as fun, energetic and live."

Where do we find your music / music project?

"My latest album ESP features Smif-N-Wessun and Tone Trump and it can be found on Spotify, Apple Music, iTunes and all other digital outlets."

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jahannostra/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/JahanNostra
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jahannostramusic/
YouTube: https://goo.gl/t6kULY
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/1WHxdUHcbRyi43JZuL4YAn
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/jahan-nostra-1
Bandcamp: https://jahannostra.bandcamp.com/
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/jahan-nostra/id537539901
Website: http://jahannostra.com/ - ThisIs50 (New York)


Joey Batts, a hip hop artist and American literature teacher in a Hartford public high school, pays attention to what’s going on around him as well as what is going on inside his own mind.

“I never liked the holidays,” he said, “and back in 2014 I was feeling the need to give back to the community” around this time of year. He noticed there were teenagers and adults alike who were “displaced” and “struggling.”

“Everyone thinks of the archetype of the homeless person as an old man, but I had never thought about it affecting teenagers until then.”

He put “two and two together” and decided to organize Hip Hop for the Homeless, a series of shows in different Connecticut towns that would raise money for a specific homeless shelter or charity in that town.

The first year of Hip Hop for the Homeless, he did seven shows in a row. Since 2015 he has changed it to six shows — Thursday through Friday over the course of two weeks — “so I don’t wear myself out,” Batts said. He enlists the help of his friends in the hip hop community to perform. He asks for donations, from money and canned goods to clothing. He also sells shirts and sometimes has raffles. According to Batts, each year’s series of shows has raised at least $2,000.

Friday night’s show at Pacific Standard Tavern on Crown Street was the second to last one of the year (the final one being in Jewett City on Saturday) and included ten acts, as well as DJ Mo Niklz and Batts as host. Some of the acts had performed in these shows every year. Some performed at multiple shows in one year.

“Many of these people have been there from the beginning. I like to stay loyal,” Batts said. Batts has even had students volunteer to help at an all-ages event. “They’re excited to give back too,” he said.

Before the show began, Batts and Niklz bantered a bit onstage. (“This is special,” Batts said. “I love New Haven.”) Batts also announced that all money made on Friday was going to Columbus House.

The show began with music from Wolf Largis from San Francisco manipulating sound boards on a table in front of Niklz, creating everything from otherworldly sounds to more traditional beats, all without lyrics. But he took a moment at the end of his short set to tell the crowd to “give Joey Batts your money.”

Local artist Sese L Boogie and Gambit offered words with a back beat provided by Niklz that got the crowd moving, with Jimmy Vo of NYC also getting people closer to the stage and clapping along during his set.

Two local acts, Muggsy and Old Self, each brought their own style to the stage, the former jumping off the stage to dance with a couple of women in the audience during one of his numbers while the latter sat for part of his lyrically strong and often humorous set, delivering songs with lyrics as varied as “Do Unto Others” and “Relationship Fat.” He even went behind the curtain at the back of the stage to rap at the people walking by the front window of the bar on Crown Street, all while letting the audience know how they were responding.

Nu Irth and AQMNI — part of the Hartford-based hip hop group UZOO along with Batts — combined their talents onstage while passing the mic to each other to take turns fronting each song in their high-energy set.

Jules Baxter told the crowd Hip Hop for the Homeless was “a near and dear cause to my heart.” He said that he himself had “been homeless numerous times in my life,” offering lyrics such as “I got a dollar to my name and I’m hollering for change and nobody’s hollering back.” He thanked his friends for coming to hear him at his first show in a while. “I’m trying new beats,” he noted.

Sketch tha Cataclysm, who has performed all four years of the series at multiple venues, also noted that he was homeless during the first two years of the series. “Yeah, I was couch hopping” he said — certainly not as dire as it could have been — but it also drove home the need for him to be involved in helping others in the same situation. Sketch’s lyrically intricate explored personal experiences (“I dig into my pocket all my money is spent / A third goes to taxes, a third for the rent”) and the universality of the human struggle. The past couple of years since that tentative period had been fruitful for his writing, he said, and he would not only be releasing a new EP in early 2018, but re-releasing a previous album and a book of poetry.

The final performer of the evening, Jahan Nostra — another who had performed at this series previously and at multiple venues — offered a song he said was written about youth homelessness called “Embrace the Rain,” and though the crowd had thinned by then, he gave his all to convey his words and the meaning behind them.

“This is not all about raising money, it’s about raising awareness, too,” Batts said before the show began. “I’m extremely pleased it’s been going on for four years now. I didn’t think it would get as big as it has.”

He’s also still paying attention and thinking ahead. “How cool would it be to help a family in each city?” he said with a big, warm smile. According to Batts, this show raised $300 to add to the total, $1,664 as of Friday.

“I’m a numbers guy. I always want to raise more,” he said. “But whatever we do is something.” - New Haven Independent (New Haven, CT)


The Stamford based rapper/hip hop artist known as Jahan Nostra released his new video "Welcome Home (The Return)" on Friday, November 20th. Beautifully shot by Shane Films, Mr. Nostra's video "Welcome Home (The Return)," features many locations inside the city of Stamford, including: Revolution Fitness, Stamford Town Center, The Stamford Innovation Center (the former location of The Stamford Town Hall), several shots of the city's skyline in Downtown Stamford, the soccer fields at West Beach as well as beautiful views of the Stamford waterfront at Cove Island Park and Cummings Beach. To view the full video, please visit: http://j.mp/Rapper_JahanNostra

Mr. Nostra, who has lived in Stamford for most of his life, makes reference to the city of Stamford in "Welcome Home (The Return)," and in many of the lyrics from his most recent album Sleepwalking (Ever So Prominent Records: 2013). In the following excerpt from the track, "Shadow of Doubts,"(Sleepwalking, Ever So Prominent: 2013), Mr. Nostra proudly announces where he is from:

"East Coast, West Coast, Dirty South and Mid West...all across the world...Europe, Africa, South America: Hip Hop's taking over...But I am from Stamford, Connecticut: South Side, Southfield, West Side, High Ridge, Long Ridge, Glenbrook...East Side..."

As you may have guessed, Mr. Nostra also mentions Stamford in his track, "Welcome Home (The Return)," off his upcoming album, ESP (Extra Sensory Perception), which will be released in the next few months on the independent label Ever So Prominent.

Here are some still frames of Jahan Nostra's video "Welcome Home (The Return)," which was filmed in Stamford, Connecticut in September of 2015:

Still Frame 1 (Revolution Fitness: Stamford, CT):
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-cMRF_vbWNOw/VlIlyCITqQI/AAAAAAABmIA/KS-K_MCGfuw/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.19.22%2BPM.png

Still Frame 2 (West Beach Soccer Fields: Stamford, CT):
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IA45fJXTvnc/VlIl9YIlBMI/AAAAAAABmII/l8TQ6b71Abw/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.20.33%2BPM.png

Still Frame 3 (West Beach Soccer Fields: Stamford, CT):
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-94R5LwwW5lQ/VlImBy6kswI/AAAAAAABmIQ/-LYC9lyfuEk/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.21.44%2BPM.png

Still Frame 4 (Downtown Stamford: Stamford, CT):
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-_9ReVrBL9pI/VlImMD5CiuI/AAAAAAABmIY/3uDj2k27gR0/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.22.44%2BPM.png

Still Frame 5 (Jahan Nostra at Revolution Fitness: Stamford, CT):
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6A9H6kgsURs/VlImRcuD8jI/AAAAAAABmIg/H6WgWFDsc2Y/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.25.02%2BPM.png

Still Frame 6 (Cove Island Park: Stamford, CT):
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/--zz0loQz1tQ/VlImTRXQNvI/AAAAAAABmIk/hk1ohZbX_Jo/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.24.10%2BPM.png

Still Frame 7 (Boxer Training at Cove Island Park: Stamford, CT):
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o9o4DnfKtB0/VlImagIJeCI/AAAAAAABmIs/ao44t6y4lNE/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.28.14%2BPM.png

Still Frame 8 (Boxer Training at Cove Island Park: Stamford, CT):
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-lkK6lXyrUH8/VlImdBezBjI/AAAAAAABmI0/afGCaV3ieaM/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.28.38%2BPM.png

Still Frame 9 (Downtown Stamford: Stamford, CT):
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4UyoYBmMo3I/VlImfnVjBwI/AAAAAAABmI8/Rl0hnzl32ng/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.29.09%2BPM.png

Still Frame 10 (Stamford Innovation Center: Stamford, CT):
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TE5wFa1VR80/VlImlsC12QI/AAAAAAABmJE/aOFZmnG4Y-8/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.29.19%2BPM.png

Still Frame 11 (Boxer Training at Cove Island Park: Stamford, CT):
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-aDXVh3dfGXE/VlImoVgW87I/AAAAAAABmJI/BT-AIub2SWg/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.29.36%2BPM.png

Still Frame 12 (Boxer at Revolution Fitness: Stamford, CT)
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-L2aMlWrR3bs/VlImwQ521TI/AAAAAAABmJQ/gEMyOurVWPE/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.30.56%2BPM.png

Still Frame 13 (Jahan Nostra & Boxer at Revolution Fitness: Stamford, CT):
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-yTKvMNeCjow/VlIm4jVmoFI/AAAAAAABmJY/_QJoXBHMOD8/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.34.54%2BPM.png

Still Frame 14 (Jahan Nostra: Connecticut):
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-p5S3EwBJ9GA/VlInBN7SnsI/AAAAAAABmJg/8gX1Z4KrPbc/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.21.18%2BPM.png

Still Frame 15 (Jahan Nostra at Cummings Beach: Stamford, CT):
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-h6DGOp3jFCM/VlInHzaIKmI/AAAAAAABmJk/LwCvS_FGeXk/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.22.05%2BPM.png

Still Frame 16 (Downtown Stamford: Stamford, CT): http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5i75KImutMI/VlInSFD3m4I/AAAAAAABmJs/3GpqZCmi2Qg/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.23.12%2BPM.png

Still Frame 17 (Downtown Stamford: Stamford, CT): http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-nQwsA_rX8EU/VlInViRCqjI/AAAAAAABmJ0/slOQVErf2WY/s1600/Screen%2BShot%2B2015-11-22%2Bat%2B2.30.10%2BPM.png


"Welcome Home (The Return)," will be released on Jahan Nostra's latest album ESP (Extra Sensory Perception), which will be available on iTunes soon. For now, you can listen to the track and watch the video on YouTube at: http://j.mp/Rapper_JahanNostra. To learn more about Jahan Nostra, please visit his website: http://www.jahannostra.com. You may also learn more about Jahan Nostra, his record label, and his music at the following links.

Jahan Nostra - Links

Website - http://www.jahannostra.com
Instagram - @jahannostra
Facebook - jahannostramusic
Twitter - @JahanNostra
YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/user/jahannostra
'Welcome Home' Video (via YouTube) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xePdKjVnq2Q
Spotify - https://play.spotify.com/artist/2fgLSRLR1RBMrJMB7pQfpc
iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/jahan-nostra/id537539901 - I Love Stamford (Stamford, CT)


Paulo Coelho’s 1988 novel, “The Alchemist,” tells the story of a young Andalusian shepherd named Santiago who, after having recurring dreams of finding treasure in Egypt, travels to the Middle Eastern country in search of the foretold riches.

Santiago might fit the description of what Jahan Nostra calls a “sleepwalker.”

For the Stamford emcee, a sleepwalker is someone who “takes their vision, whatever their dreaming, and turns it into reality.”

Nostra is in pursuit of that same state of being on “Sleepwalking,” his debut studio album, which he celebrates with a listening party at SoNo Lounge, 11 Washington St., Norwalk on Thursday, June 20 from 9 p.m. to closing.

Recorded at Smoke House Studios in Bridgeport and the home recording studio of Stamford resident Poppa Pill, who also produced the record, “Sleepwalking” (EVER So Prominent Records) is a loose concept album exploring the significance of dreams — both in the our sleeping and waking states.

Jahan Nostra - Sleepwalking album cover image resized“Throughout history, dreams have been the curiosity of many philosophers and humanity,” said Nostra, who cites Coehlo, investigative journalist Gary Webb and film director Antoine Fuqua as influences on the album. “I’ve always been curious about dreams. We dream every day and dream every night.”

The concepts (Nostra also touches on love, social justice and the struggle of the independent emcee) are coupled with dense, gritty beats; chopped, eerie vocal and sound samples; and flourishes of live instrumentation, including Nostra’s own turn at the keys.

“I’m very inspired by Stevie Wonder,” said Nostra, who also counts 2-Pac and Nas among his musical influences.

Although “Sleepwalking” marks first full-length LP as Jahan Nostra, Nostra has been rapping since he was a teenager; at 13, he signed a record deal with the independent label BMX Entertainment to release his first album, “Da Shorty.” Since then, he has been growing his career bit-by-bit, releasing singles, EPs and mixtapes independently, while performing at local venues, including Two Boots and Acoustic Cafe in Bridgeport, and in New York City. His day job? Working in facilities at Tudor Investment Corporation in Greenwich.

On his journey in “The Alchemist,” Santiago meets an old king, Melchizedek, who tells him of the Personal Legend — “what you have always wanted to accomplish.”

“When you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it,” the king tells him.

With “Sleepwalker,” Nostra sees himself inching ever closer to finding his Personal Legend, to making his dream a reality.

“Success stories come from diligence,” he said. “With this album, I see heavy buzz, label interest. I see heavier notoriety — enough to catapult me to where public will say this album deserves to be heard.” - Hearst CT News Blog (Connecticut)


Discography

ESP (2016) - https://open.spotify.com/album/1WHxdUHcbRyi43JZuL4YAn

1. Intro

2. Welcome Home

3. Embrace The Rain (feat Puma Simone)

4. Vitamin D

5. Whole Life (Cruising) [feat. Tone Trump, GrooveU, Cindy Rose & Groove U Kids]

6. Living Your Life (feat. Omar Wilson)

7. One of Them Days (feat. Rey Vega)

8. No Stress (feat. Smif-N-Wessun)

9. El Chapo (feat. Ceschi)

10. Time (feat. Kyro & Wednesday Atoms)

11. Bricks and Sponsorships

12. Hershe (feat. Samira Gibson & Symphony Swingg)

13. Whatchasayin (feat. Kyro & Emma Rabid)

14. Champagne Life (feat. Kyro & Mela Machinko)

15. Bonus - Joseph Campbell

16. Bonus - Whole Life (Original)    

Sleepwalking (2013) - https://open.spotify.com/album/3lWF9HGbv53rIAQU1QwBga

1.  Sleeping Pill

2.  Shadow of Doubts

3.  Trance

4.  Days Are Gone

5.  Twenties

6.  Truthfully

7.  The Misleading

8.  Mixd Feelings

9.  Late Bloomer (5411)

10.  Who's There

11.  Secrets

12. All In

13.  Slumber Cipher 

14.  Pigs In a Blanket 

15.  Good Ol' Dreams 

16.  GWB (feat. Hakim Green)

17. Side Flip Pillow

18.  The Walkman

Bedtime Street Album (2012) - https://open.spotify.com/album/5S8r6tTPPt8LiQfFkxlWz0

1.  Green Tea

2. Dutchies Dipped Red Wine (feat. Groove U)

3. Rewindable Midnight (feat. OD Ent)

4. Show Ya How

5. Living The Lie (feat. Shanieka Butler)

6. Hands Ain't Tied (feat. Hood Holla)

7. Flash Me Slow

8. Bedtime Story

9. More Things Change(MC)

10.  No Choice (feat. Kyro)

11. Twenties (feat Old Head)

12.  Loyalty Is Everything (feat. Karma)    

Photos

Bio

Jahan Nostra is a talented MC / Hip Hop Artist from Stamford, CT and Mount Vernon, NY. In his early childhood, Jahan lived in Mount Vernon, NY – hometown to Pete Rock, Heavy D and Sean “Diddy” Combs. Jahan’s musically talented neighbors inspired him to begin rhyming at 9 years old. After moving to the inner-city of Stamford, CT, Jahan continued to develop his lyrical talent and at age 13, he was signed to the label, BMX Entertainment in Brooklyn. 

In high school, Jahan showcased his talent on the independent music scene, recording freestyles on mixtapes. He and his partner Kyro also recorded tracks with Producer Raydar Ellis (who went on to work under Dr. Dre at Aftermath). 

After high school, Jahan moved to North Carolina to study Journalism. During college, Jahan worked at Duke University Radio with 9th Wonder who introduced him to Big Pooh and Phonte. During these years - the early stages of Little Brother - Jahan even had to face-off in a battle with Phonte at the famed Cat’s Cradle. After returning to CT, Jahan recorded and released the Bedtime Street Album (2012) and Sleepwalking (2013) - produced by Poppa Pill. He spent 2014 touring with the Vans Warped Tour and the Full Blast Summer Tour. In 2016, Jahan released his latest album, ESP - remastered by Daddy Kev - with features from Smif-N-Wessun

and Tone Trump. In 2017, Jahan freestyled with RZA at the City Winery in NY, he performed at Spotify’s US HQ in NY and he traveled throughout the US and Canada for interviews to promote ESP.  In 2018, Jahan released an exclusive freestyle on Hot 97 with Drewski, he performed at The Ryan Show (Queens, NY), TuneCore (Brooklyn, NY), the East Coast Music Conference (Norfolk, VA), The Gramercy Theatre (New York, NY), Brooklyn Music Week (Brooklyn, NY) and Ashford & Simpson's Sugarbar NYC.  Jahan has also won several awards for his role as the Director of his music video, "Embrace The Rain"-including the Best Music Video Award at The Nassau Film Festival, the NYC International Infest Festival, and the Miami Short International Cinefest. During the Spring/Summer of 2019, Jahan travelled and performed throughout the US & Canada to  do shows with Smif-N-Wessun, Hakim Green (Channel Live) and Das EFX, and Jahan also performed at several festivals, including the Daze Summit Festival (Brooklyn, NY), Kalmunity Music Week (Montréal, QC Canada), Hip Hop Film Festival (Harlem, NY), Under Pressure International Graffiti & Hip Hop Festival (Montréal, QC Canada) and the Hope Rocks Festival (Saugerties, NY).

Throughout his career, Jahan Nostra has been interviewed by Doctor Dre (Yo! MTV Raps), A-King (formerly of the Combat Jack Show), New York Said, and he has been featured on media outlets, including: HipHopDX, Hot 97, Underground Hip Hop Blog, Huff Post, Soulbounce, Broke2Dope, LA On Lock, The Word Is Bond and Philly FAME TV among others.

With respect to his creative influences, Jahan credits Tupac Shakur as an inspiration for “his ability to paint pictures with great emotion and put poetry in motion while still being true to himself.” Taking his craft seriously, Jahan has an artist statement that he lives by: “To uplift for the future, reflect reality and prove that I’m the illest.”

Band Members