Jamara
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Jamara

Brooklyn, NY | Established. Jan 01, 2008 | SELF

Brooklyn, NY | SELF
Established on Jan, 2008
Solo Spoken Word R&B

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Apr
18
Jamara @ Hard Rock Cafe Boston

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Apr
16
Jamara @ Simmons College

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Music

Press


"Hip-Hop Can Engender Positive Change: London Bridgez"

London Bridgez, a hip-hop spoken word artist, evinces the true diversity of hip-hop as an art form. She performs a cappella, with band instrumentation or with a scratch master DJ. Bridgez fuses spoken word poetry, hip-hop, literature, and music into her performances. When one witnesses London Bridgez’s live performance, he or she can expect to engage in a multicultural and interactive event. She understands the potent influence hip-hop at its best can have on changing the world. As a hip-hop spoken word artist, Bridgez concatenates art with activism.

When one hears London Bridgez’s rhythmic words set to a hip-hop beat, it sounds highly familiar to a rapper who freestyles. Her brand of spoken word could easily be situated within the type of art offered by socially conscious rappers like Common, Mos Def, KRS-One and Talib Kweli. Although one could place her work within the same context of those aforementioned rap artists, her work still remains unique and is not intended to be viewed as rap music. In Bridgez’s work, she’s not focused on making words rhyme, as many rappers are; her work concentrates on creating rhythm from the authentic sound of joining words that divulge true meaning.

Ms. Bridgez’s art unveils serious concern for women’s social empowerment, which is ostensible from listening to her album, She (2010). Unlike many disparaging depictions of women in current hip-hop music, she presents her audiences with visions of women as nuanced, intelligent, beautiful, and valuable. Her work, therefore, resists a common proclivity in hip-hop to commodify women. London propagates a masterful counter-narrative to those works in hip-hop that seem to render the woman’s body to dehumanizing uses. From her work, one learns that she refuses to conform to limiting traditions and societal norms and expectations about who she should be as a person and artist. When she performs “She” from her album She, her audience becomes keenly aware of her opposition to embracing racial, gender, and sexual hegemonic practices and thoughts.

Although Dr. John McWhorter posits in All about the Beat: Why Hip-Hop Can’t Save Black America that hip-hop does not have the elements and qualities to extend tangible social and political value and power to black people, he appears to overlook the work of an artist like Ms. Bridgez. McWhorter’s book refers to hip-hop as if it’s only rap music, but hip-hop is a much larger artistic and cultural phenomenon than just rap music, although rap music is one of its most visible and important art forms. As London reveals to us, hip-hop is also spoken word poetry. Her spoken word poetry seeks the social justice that Dr. McWhorter asserts hip-hop lacks a serious interest in achieving. While Dr. McWhorter contends that hip-hop denigrates black women and does not offer them a meaningful space to be social and political change agents, Bridgez is being that female social and political change agent he argues hip-hop does not make possible.

London Bridgez employs her art as a vehicle to advocate for positive change for marginalized people. Her commitment to social justice is evident in her public performances at events championing the causes of the oppressed and disillusioned: the Bayard Rustin Community Breakfast sponsored by the AIDS Action Committee, a YMCA fundraiser to support the production of VDAY Lawrence, Queer Women of Color Week, Provincetown Women of Color Weekend, the Hispanic & Black Gay Coalition Panel Series, the Milwaukee PrideFest, National Day of Silence, Sister’s Talk Radio, and etc. For those looking for a positive voice in hip-hop, they may find Ms. Bridgez to satisfy their longings.

–Antonio Maurice Daniels

Antonio Maurice Daniels is a Research Associate and Ph.D. student in Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He blogs regularly for his cultural commentary blog, Revolutionary Paideia. His works have been featured widely in academic and popular online publications, including Mused Magazine, Up 4 Discussion, From Ashy to Classy, The Black Man Can, Healthy Black Men Magazine and etc. Follow him on Twitter at @paideiarebel. - Soul Train .com


"Who’s London Bridgez?"

Who’s London Bridgez?

London Bridgez is a writer and lyricist at heart who got started performing at poetry open mics. At poetry open mics I naturally incorporated audience interaction and acapella singing. I believe there is a symbiotic relationship between poetry and music. I wanted to take my performances to the next level so I began working with music producers and eventually musicians to create a live performance experience that combined spoken word, lyrics and music. London Bridgez has evolved over the past 5 years from me as a solo performer to a full band rooted in spoken word.

What are your music influences?

I love Freddie Cruger aka Red Astaire, Sy Smith, JOI. I’m a fan of Isaac Hayes, Gorillaz, KING and Janelle Monae. They are all artists who I pushed the boundaries of using music to create art experiences.



What’s your method at the time of writing a song?

Oddly enough I don’t write much down initially. I start by repeating lyrics over and over in my head and then building upon them over time until I work out the kinks in harmony and word choice. At any moment in time I’m working on 10 songs in my mind. I don’t actually pen a poem until it’s time to record it in the studio. I love that I keep all these song secrets in my head but if I died tomorrow no one would ever know all the songs I’ve created so I’ve been forcing myself to be better at archiving my pieces. My cell phone has also come in handy because I’ve been able to record lyrics, chants, melodies using the Voice Memo function.



So you are working on a new album, Color Junkie. Can you give us some insights? Any release date, title yet in mind?

Color Junkie is a special album for me. It’s a high energy album laced with lyrics I have fun performing. The title is named after a poem I call “Good Book/ Color Junkie” The opening verse goes like this



“I am a color junkie in a black & white world. Dance with me in the streets and watch our colors swirl. Ill hypnotize you with my speech. Word string you with my pearls. Can your body feel the heat of my hips unfurled? Je m’appelle London la bella belle. I am a honey soul wrapped in caramel. I wear rouge poppy on my jacket lapel. I honor those who came before me & who live in my cells”



I’m working with an amazing group of musicians Peter (Sax), Chase (Bass) Cody (Drums) Jeff Andy (guitar), and Calvin (Keys) Miguel (guitar). It’s double the pleasure when you are working with lyrics and musicians you are excited about. We recorded the album fully last month. I’m a perfectionist so I want to make a few changes so we are getting back into the studio next month with a Halloween release date and party in the works.



What’s been the funniest moment you guys have been or took part while touring?

If we told you that we would have to kill you. I’m serious.

I love the musicians I work with the laughs we have together help deal with the stress and uncertainty of the artist live.





Are there any more plans for the future?



Our goal is to keep writing, keep recording and keep booking gigs.



Where can we find more about your music?

www.londonbridgez.com www.facebook.com/londonbridgez143 www.youtube.com/londonspokenword www.twitter.com/londonbridgez.

We are performing in the Afro Punk Battle of the Bands July 25th at Free Candy in Brooklyn. Tickets can be bought online http://www.inticketing.com/events/240697



Do you feel you guys are moving on the right direction?

There is no short cut to success. I’ve had my hand on the plow for about 5 years now and I can honestly say that when you work hard and keep working on your craft it will pay off. It may not be right away but every ounce of energy you put in as an artist/ entrepreneur will pay out eventually.
- Vents Magazine


"London Bridgez: Contrary To Belief, She Isn't Falling Down"

Have you ever imagined Saul Williams as a girl? No? Well, you don’t have to, because there is someone out there who has the lyrical magnetism of the amazing Mr. Williams, but keeps it real for all the girls while being completely unique. She has a calmness and a welcoming feeling, but has a beast hidden inside, willing to die for what it believes in. She isn’t your ordinary girl. She is London Bridgez and she’s someone you need to know about, the key word being “need”.

London Bridgez is a spoken word artist with an audacity similar to the aforementioned Saul Williams, but with the unique perspective and views that could only come from an intelligent, open-minded, true-to-form female. It’s amazing how much of a difference it makes, and it makes for one awesomely fresh sounding difference. Everything she says sounds spoken from the heart, with all the meaning in the world, and every word means more than your whole last conversation. Not only that, but she’s an openly gay black woman. The reason this is absolutely awesome is because this makes her have such a special view of the world. She’s open to so much more than the normal, more closed-minded person would, and she’s preaching the beauty of this lifestyle. The beauty of being yourself and standing for what you believe in. She doesn’t speak, she PREACHES. She is such a passionate artist, and it comes across in a way that isn’t pretentious, but inspiring. Awe-inspiring at that.

Ms. London Bridgez is not only a spoken word artist, and a damn good one at that, but she uses her talents for non-profit organizations, which makes listening to her smooth jazz poems even sweeter. She advertises her self as a spoken word artist “bridging the worlds of literature, spoken word, hip hop and live music”, and doesn’t refer to her concerts as concerts, but “live art experiences”. She isn’t just another run of the mill musician, here, she’s a woman with a cause. She speaks for gay rights and for black rights, and she speaks intelligently yet is easy to understand. To get what I’m trying to say, listen to the amazing song “She”.

- Magic Chords Music Blog


""Know Who You Are": Interview with London Bridgez"

“Know Who You Are”: Interview with Spoken Word Artist London Bridgez Posted on January 31, 2011 by liveunchained|

“The entertainment business is filled with snakes. They will try to make you everything you are not if you don’t know who you are.” This is London Bridgez’s advice to emerging artists and I’m sure many can relate. As women of color continue to be mis-constructed, misunderstood and unheard, London is at work as both an artist and activist. Her social justice performance credits include The Bayard Rustin Community Breakfast sponsored by the Aids Action Committee, Queer Women of Color Week- OUTSPOKEN, Provincetown Women of Color Weekend, Provincetown Women of Color Weekend and the Aids Walk Boston Opening Ceremonies.

Here London discusses the purpose behind her forthcoming anthology, Going Public, on black women’s relationships and experiences with love, her commitments as an activist and explains the importance of integrity and planning for artists.

Can you tell us what your name, London Bridgez, represents and why you chose it?

London is my name. I added on “Bridgez” because it summed up my creative process of transforming poetry to be listened to by audiences. In my art I attempt to bridge music and poetry. I believe that if you look at music within a historic context you will find examples of poetry and music being commonly fused in the creation of opera, yone poems, choral works as well as in funk, jazz and early hip hop. It is only recently that the division has been created.

At the root of music you will find poetry and vice versa because tone,
rhythm, cadence, and lyricism, are the properties of both poetry and
music. In my personal life I find great satisfaction in bringing
people together and bridging the gaps of isolation that often separate
people.

You are an artist and an activist. What social issues are you active in addressing?

I am an openly identified gay woman of color. I support many
organizations that are tearing down strongholds for LGBTQ equality
such as Queer Women of Color, Aids Action Committee of Boston, NYC
Heritage committee, Riverside Church NYC and a long list of others.

In terms of my personal engagement, my wife and I am currently
co-editing anthology of writing called Going Public: Black Women
reflect on love, relationships and coupling. In preparation for our
wedding, we began an ongoing discussion about not knowing many Black
lesbian couples, particularly married ones. Our conversation evolved
into a deeper discussion of how marriage and indeed “coupling” is far
too uncommon within the Black community.

We thought it would be insightful to hear the stories of other Black
women who have chosen to marry whether to another Black woman or a woman of another racial/ethnic background. As legal residents of Massachusetts, we recognized how fortunate we were to even have this discussion, as most gay and lesbian people do not have the opportunity to legally marry their partners in their own states.

We went on to think about coupling in general and began doing research on this issue. Via our research we found that Black women in the U.S. are the least likely to marry or to couple regardless of sexual orientation. Whether straight or gay, black women are less likely than any other racial/ethnic group to be married or living with a partner as a couple. This anthology will not only give historical presence to the voices of black women but also reflect on the social implications that stem from these statistics of black women and marriage. It is important for the voices of black women to be heard by larger society. We are not invisible. Our stories matter. Telling the stories of black women is vital to the black community and society at large.

I mentioned how much I like your piece, SHE. How did SHE come about?

She is an interesting piece for me. I, oftentimes, secretly write
about myself in my work. SHE was the first piece that I publicly wrote
about myself. The sole message in SHE is that women do not fit nicely
into categorical boxes. It is about the intersections of diversity
that we all live at the crux of. One of my favorite lines is “She is your big sister
almighty/DJ spinning all night/The slam poet word line fighting/Mother earth rain thunder lightening POW.”

Each of us as people and more specifically as women carry with us a unique combination of likes, dislikes, interests and passions. At the end of the poem I say: “This is for the girls labeled trouble for being themselves who refuse to sit on shelves and wait for the world to give them permission to come out and play/This is for me/This is for you/Our Fuerza/Our strength/Our truth.” I believe we as women are most strong when we give ourselves permission to be all of who we are.

After all, the freedom to express who we are is our only divine right. I also have to give a shout out to an amazing producer. The music you hear on SHE is
courtesy of Fred - Live Unchained


"Festival Preview | Music festival boasts array of genres and local artists"



Jessica Bal


Published: Friday, September 12, 2008

For those who missed out on marathon summer concerts like Lollapalooza and Bonnaroo and still need their fix of live performances, the Boston Music Festival, which wraps up this Sunday with a grand finale, features more bands than you can count. The festival, a set of week-long concerts at a variety of venues in the Greater Boston area, is currently celebrating its second year running. The event draws some 8,000 people to local restaurants, bars and clubs to hear an impressive range of local musicians , including rock, Latin, classical, jazz, hip hop and folk. According to the festival’s promotional material, the Boston Music Festival involves “putting rock bands against string quartets, jazz trios against singer-songwriters, popstars against hip-hopsters.”


The brainchild of a local music school near Inman Square called School of Groove, the Boston Music Festival presents its wide range of genres only from unsigned local talent. School of Groove is an institution focused on education and exposure for up-and-coming musicians, eager to raise awareness and provide exposure to bands that haven’t made it big just yet but show promise. The range of genres allows for artists like jazz pianist Yoko Miwa, from Kobe, Japan, to mix with the likes of spoken-word extraordinaire London Bridgez, who creates “bridgez” between poetry and R&B. Former Berklee students in groups like Same Mistake Twice, who play a variety of updated pop and rock songs, are a testament to Boston-based musicianship.


- Tufts Daily News


"The journey continues"

Bay Windows Contributor
Thursday May 7, 2009


When Dr. Nancy Norman, chief medical officer of the Boston Public Health Commission, took to the stage to deliver the keynote speech at the 20th annual Bayard Rustin Community Breakfast May 2 she echoed the words of President Barack Obama’s inaugural address, urging the crowd to embrace hope in confronting the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The Bayard Rustin breakfast, held at the John F. Kennedy Library, celebrates the work of LGBT African Americans and allies to end the epidemic.

"We must choose hope over fear," said Norman, "unity of purpose over conflict and discord." In relating this message to the fight against HIV/AIDS, Norman, who is gay, expressed the notion that citizens must not only reflect on the past and how far the country has come in its fight against AIDS, but also recommit to the journey forward. Following her address, Norman was honored with an official proclamation by Mayor Denise Simmons and given a symbolic key to the city of Cambridge.

The theme of this year’s breakfast was "the journey continues," and breakfast co-chairs Herb Jones and Nia Grace told the crowd that the journey would only be complete when the epidemic is over.

"We really look forward to the day when this is the last breakfast that we have to have," said Jones to thunderous applause. He emphasized a hope that the need to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS in the African American community will soon come to an end. That end, said Grace, begins with the people.

"We want to hope that you take the message and the words that are said today, that you take them to heart, share them with someone else," said Grace. "We want to make sure that we do not have to continue to have a breakfast where we’re talking about where we’re going or what we want to do. We want to talk about more progress."

The breakfast also celebrated its past. Harold duFour-Anderson, a former AIDS Action Committee (AAC) staff member who founded the breakfast 20 years ago, discussed the breakfast’s history. He also told the crowd that he was confident that the end of the epidemic was in sight.

"When the final narrative to this epidemic is written I am convinced that with continued research and innovative programming and policies and by supporting one another we can succeed in my lifetime to vanquish HIV/AIDS," said duFour-Anderson.

Rebecca Haag, president and CEO of AIDS Action Committee, which has sponsored the breakfast for the past twenty years, discussed the importance of personal reflection, stating that as every year’s breakfast comes and goes, reflecting on the past year’s accomplishments is critical in moving forward.

Haag expressed disappointment and frustration at the ignorance that still persists among the public about HIV. She told the story of a young African American man from Baltimore who did not have any idea that black men were at increased risk for HIV infection.

"What would Bayard Rustin do?" asked Haag, referring to the black gay civil rights icon who masterminded Rev. Martin Luther King’s march on Washington and who serves as the breakfast’s namesake. "We are failing. We have to do more between breakfasts. We are not reaching everyone."

Rev. Martin McLee was presented with the Belynda Dunn Award of Recognition for his hard work in addressing the issues of HIV/AIDS, race and racism within the community. Since 2008 McLee has served as the District Superintendent for the Metro Boston Hope District of the New England Conference of the United Methodist Church, and prior to that he was pastor of the South End’s Union United Methodist Church, where he did groundbreaking outreach to the LGBT community and people living with HIV and AIDS.

The late Dr. LeBaron Moseby, who passed away in February 2009, was honored with the Bayard Rustin Award for Courage. Diagnosed with AIDS Related Complex in 1985, Moseby worked tirelessly to bring HIV/AIDS awareness to the community.

The breakfast also included performances by the Emerson Urban Dance Theatre group and by spoken word artist London Bridgez. Gary Daffin, executive director of the Multicultural AIDS Coalition, also spoke, encouraging the audience to be the change they wish to see in the fight against AIDS.

"I am a black, gay man who doesn’t have HIV and doesn’t ever plan on having HIV," said Daffin.

Memorial services for LeBaron Moseby are being held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 16 at Bigelow Chapel, Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridg
- by Rachel Kossman


"Afro Punk Poet London Bridgez To Perform At NYC Pride Fest 2010 + FREE Download"

Lesbian Afro Punk poet & soul word artist London Bridgez is one of the performers scheduled to hit the stage at NYC Pride 2010 Pride Fest.

“Pride is a special time of year for those in the LGBTQ community and those allies who support equal rights for all people,” says London. “Pride season is political and it is also a celebration. I am humbled & ecstatic to celebrate in NYC on the Pride Fest stage this year. Owwww!”

The Boston-bred artist is set to release her new album, She, next month (July 2010). It’s the follow up to her debut album, “Love Words Soft Spoken.”

London will perform her title track, “She,” at Pride Fest going down this coming Sunday, June 27 on Hudson St. & West 14th.

FREE DOWNLOAD
http://downloads.afropunk.com/album/london-brigdez - Black Gay Gossip


"Spoken Word Performer.....London Bridgez"

After coming across my twitter timeline, I noticed one of my followers announcing a great spoken word performer by the name London Bridgez will be at NYC Pride fest on Sunday June 27Th Hudson St. between Abingdon Sq. & West 14Th St. - Sunday, June 27Th, 2010, 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM. Although I've been going to Pride Week as I call it for about half my living, didn't think I was going this year due to the younger crowd and it's just not what it use to be. It wasn't until I heard London Bridgez that I quickly changed my mind and will attend this event. As I'm currently listening to her on my desktop from her website I'm even more convinced that she's what's up. I honestly appreciate her for the words that's flowing through my computer speakers as loud as they can go nodding to the graceful rhythm.

I can't front ONE of my favorites is what I have on repeat..."SHE"

SHE
LADIES AND GENTLEMAN
BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE OF ALL RAINBOW TRIBES & LIFE STAGES
THIS IS FOR THE GIRL ON THE PLAYGROUND WHO FITS INTO NO SAND OR WATER BOX
SO SHE SITS BACKWARDS ON THE SWING N SINGS TO HER OWN BEAT BOX WE QUIRKY GIRLS WE KICKS ROCKS
HER JUST A NERD GIRL GEEKILY STUDIED SCIENCE & LIBERAL ARTS
AT NIGHT SHE READS OCTAVIA BUTLER UNDER COVERS & HOROSCOPE CHARTS
SHE IS AN ASSASSIN A NIKITA A SEXY POET DIVA
BEFORE IT WAS FESTIVA, SHE SIPPED POMEGRANATE MARGARITAS
OH SHE STILL BUMPS SALT N PEPPER QUEEN & LATIFAH,
SHE IS A HEAD BOBBER TWO STEPPER FINGER TAPPER
SHE EATS PLATANOS, BLACK,BEANS WITH A SIDE OF RED SNAPPER
SHE IS THE JAM STAR THE SUPA SHERESS THE NAPPY HEADED BABY GENIUS
BIG SISTER ALMIGHTY DJ SPINNING ALL NIGHT THE SLAM POET WORD LINE FIGHTING MOTHER EARTH
RAIN THUNDER AND LIGHTNING POW
SHE IS AN UGLY DUCK WHO IS PRETTY AS FUCK
MAKING SEX LOT DOESN’T MAKE HER A SLUT
SHE ISN’T A NYMPHO BECAUSE SHE USES DILDOS
SSE LIKES THAT GOOD GOOD WHEN SHE CAN CAN
BUSY 7 DAYS OF THE WEEK
MOST OF WHICH SHE HAS TO EAT PRAY AND SLEEP
SHE IS THE FEMINIST THE LESBIAN THE DANCER THE THESPIAN
THE TEACHER THE PREACHER BEST FRIEND SECRET KEEPER
SHE IS YOUR ALPHA YOUR DELTA
YOUR SOROR LINE SISTER
YOU WISH SHE LIVED CLOSER
SHE’S YOUR FRONT & YOU MISS YOU HER
YOUR MOMMY YOUR AUNTEA YOUR PRAYER VIGILANTE
SHE IS THE VEGETERIAN WHO LIKES THE SMELL OF BBQ SHE HAS HER THOUGHTS & POINT OF VIEW
HER IPOD HAS NNEKA , TEMPTATIONS & BLINK 182
SHE IS THE WISDOM YOU NEED BEFORE AND AFTER THE STORM IS OVER
PAYS HOMAGE TO ANCESTORS KUJICHAGULIA UJIMA
SHE POPS AND LOCKS TO SWEET HONEY & THE ROCK
SHE IS UR DREAM CATCHER
YOUR LUCKY CLOVER
SHE BUILT THE BRIDGE YOU ARE CROSSING OVER
SHE IS ICY HOT MASSAGING YOUR SHOULDERS
SHE WILL DIE YOUNG SINCE SHE WAS BORN OLDER
FRONT LINE ACVTIBIST
SEAMSTRESS OF URBAN VINTAGE SUURGEON REPAIRING STICHES SHE WEARS A HARD HAT DIGGING DITCHES
NOW THAT IM MARRIED YOU CAN CALL ME MRS. LONDON BRIDGEZ
THIS IS FOR THE GIRLS LABELED TROUBLE FOR BEING THEMSELVES
WHO REFUSE TO SIT ON SHELVES AND WAIT FOR THE WORLD TO GIVE THEM PERMISSION TO COME OUT AND PLAY
THIS IS FOR ME THIS IS FOR YOU OUR FUERZA OUR STRENGTH & OUR TRUTH

SHE GIVES BIRTH TO A GRIN
LIKE A HARLOT WORKING
LIKE A MOTHER WITH TWINS
SHE HOLD SECRETS WITHIN

SUMMER FRUIT HAS THIN SKIN
HER SOUL BORN IN THE WINTER
BLIZZARDS MADE HER HER THICKER
RICHER FLICKER SWIFTER
SHES BOOMS LIKE A TEMPEST
MOVING SO FAST BLINK N ULL MISS HER
GRAVITY CANT RESIST
SHE TASTES LIKE A MILKSHAKE MADE WITH HARD LIQUOR
I TOLD YOU BEFORE AND I’LL TELL YOU AGAIN
DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF A WOMAN

creditsfrom London Brigdez, track released 31 January 2010 - Blogger


"Building Bridgez: Poetry meets Music by Rochelle Ley"

As a writer and performer London pushes the expectations of spoken word. London is her name. Bridgez represents what she does building creative bridges between spoken word and music. Catching up with this powerhouse female is tough but once it happened, this is what she had to say:
1. What does the name London Bridgez mean to you and what does it
represent?
London is my name. It is what my friends and family call me. "Bridgez" represents what I attempt to do with my stage performances. I want to build bridges and connect with my audiences. I write in a style and compose music to accompany my poems that I hope connects listener with the sound and vibrations that I feel when writing.

2. How did you get started as a spoken word artist?
I have always been surrounded by literature, theater and music growing up. I was an English major in college and spent a lot of time reading Audre Lorde, June Jordan and Bell Hooks. They are powerful women whose writing resonates with their authentic experiences. I have been greatly influence by Jazz in particular modernist jazz composers like Duke Ellington. If I can write and perform poems that authentically express who I am like Audre Lorde did and with excellence create music that brings people together like Ellington did I will die a happy poet.

3. How do you deal with adversity that may come your way amidst all
of your success?
To deal with adversity I focus on the present moment. I ask myself "In this moment what can I do?" or "Universe what is there for me to do". Even the most difficult challenges can be dealt with if we focus on the present moment and search for solutions that cater to our peace of mind and connectedness with the universe. I keep a very small group of friends around me. These people hold me up when I feel weak and their love is so strong that it refuels me.

4. How do you balance your personal life with your hectic schedule?
One of my personal goals is to NOT live a fragmented life. I want each area of my life to compliment and support each other. I prioritize my life in the following order: I take care of myself first, I provide for my family second and I care for my craft thirds. All my decisions around work life balance revolve around those statements in that order.

5. What inspires you to get up each day and do what you do?
I believe in divine purpose. I believe that I am here to be a productive earthling and to touch other people's lives.

6. What is your idea of the ideal relationship and do you have any
advice on how to achieve it?
My ideal relationship is being at peace with my self and feeling good in my skin. I believe once you love yourself deeply you will draw love in human (and non human) form towards you. In order to show some one how to love you, you must first know how to love yourself.

7. Do you have any advice for people trying to achieve their dreams
but may feel discouraged?
My advice is to trust your instinct. You know more about yourself than any one else does so trust yourself. I also say you must surround yourself with other people who are building their dreams. Their positive ambition will help you along your journey. If you have dreams and you are constantly hanging around people with no ambition their lack of drive will slow you down.


8. What is your favorite piece of work that you have created? 9. Are
there any artists or authors who have inspired you?
A few artists that I love are HKB FINN in the UK, Freddie Cruger aka Fred Astaire in Stockholm, JOI (atlanta based singer) and Sy Smith.

10. Where do you see yourself in five years?
I am busy right now and in 5 years I imagine myself doing the exact same thing. I am touring, I am writing, I am earning a living as an artists.

11. Do you have anything else you would like to say to our readers?
My new single "SHE" is available online as a free download courtesy of Afro Punk dot Com. Please visit www.londonbridgez.com to receive your free download and learn more about where I am performing next. The life of an indie artist is a grassroots effort so I value every one who supports me. - Boston Writing Examiner


"Special Commemorative Program for World AIDS Day (Dec.1)"



November 30, 2008 - 2:08pm
CCTV will present a specially produced commemorative video piece by local artist London Bridgez in honor of World AIDS Day (Dec.1). London's spoken word piece " Can’t Stop (Loving You)" pushes our expectations of the genre, building creative bridges between blues and soul. Her work mimics afro Caribbean oral traditions of story telling about love, life, and loss.

CCTV will be commemorating World AIDS Day by darkening our local cable Channel 10 and displaying a continuous scroll of names of Cambridge community members lost to HIV/AIDS along with this programming.

World AIDS Day will be recognized around the globe on December 1st with events that highlight progress, raise awareness, and remind us of how much work still needs to be done.

image credit: Alexandra @ Finch Studio : www.finchstudio.com
Categories: From other access stations, United Stations

http://www.wccatv.com/aggregator/categories/1
- Cambridge Communuty Television


"The poetry of pleasure The Art of Aural Sex puts the “oral” in art"

February 17, 2009 Literary Arts
The poetry of pleasure
The Art of Aural Sex puts the “oral� in art

by Justin Bromberg
23lit.yowza.jpg
GRAPHIC Alex Manley

Valentine’s Day took a turn for the erotic this past Saturday night at Kola Note nightclub, where a slew of Canadian and international artists took to the stage to perform their sexiest... poetry.

The third edition of Art of Performing Aural Sex undoubtedly lived up to its name, as the evening unfolded as a showcase of love-themed spoken word, rhymes, and visual naughtiness.

It was also an opportune moment for the invited artists, several of whom were young and emerging, to contribute to this risqué but amusing event. And to be sure, the evening’s host—and CEO of the Madpoetix production company that brought the event—Kym Dominique-Ferguson, had appropriately forewarned the audience:

“For the faint of heart—especially in the second half—step back, get yourself a napkin, or a tissue, ‘cause it’s going to get hot, and heavy, and sticky,� he joked, following up with an alphabetically-laced A-to-Z in S-E-X. The club’s stage was equally well dressed for the occasion, decked out with faux-romantic sofas and a silhouette-inducing dressing screen.

Opening the show was the hip-hop poetry of NYC artist London Bridgez, followed by local poet Jean-Luc Rey, who performed a debut poetry reading. Although writing now for seven years, Rey acknowledged it was “scary, but a great experience.�

“I'm pretty happy about how I did, and can’t ask for much more,� says Rey, a playwright and Concordia psychology graduate.

The scene soon went 1940s-jazz-cabaret-nightclub as singer Nandi Bynoe and pianist Ohini Byll-Cataria began their duet. Their two numbers, accompanied by soft piano notes and surreal stage lighting, were so dream-like that the hushed audience may have very well been swept off to the snowy mountain slopes in Bynoe's “Moonlight in Vermont.�

Impressive, considering the duet only had time for two rehearsals. A native of Trinidad and currently an international relations student in Boston, Bynoe has been doing solo jazz vocals for four years. And when she’s not researching Japanese postmodernism, she’s busy singing in their karaoke bars.

The heat was clearly turned up in the second half-as promised- with some erotic dance poetry that would surely make my grandmother blush, and had my date exclaiming “Yowza!�

In fact, it was nothing compared to the dance routine that came next, choreographed by local artist Shauna Roberts. What began as three couples dancing quickly led to steamy bodily movements, the removal of clothing, and me now saying the “yowzas.�

As closing time approached, on comes a lady dressed in tight, black clothing, fishnet stockings, and tall, red, high-heeled boots.

Introduced as Devon “The Split� Jones but also known as “D’Licious,� the Toronto-based poet had the men barking and the women meowing to her sexually explicit lyrics and breathless moaning in “Bent Over.�

Jones got her start in 1997 after attending her first poetry event at the University of Windsor. “I was like, ‘I wanna do that!’� she recalls, explaining that poetry is “the best way� to get her feelings out and get over them.

So how much of this performance was of a personal nature? “To an extent, it’s like living out some of your fantasies,� she laughingly admits, continuing, “You can do it over in your head twenty times.�

“Or, maybe giving other people fantasies... And being other people’s fantasies!�

Yet amidst all the adult content, the night’s real crowd-shocker came about halfway through, when host Dominique-Ferguson returned on stage to draw a prize.

Soon enough, a woman named Christine is sitting on the stage sofa, as her boyfriend Perry approaches and is handed the mic; the couple, as it turns out, are well-known friends of the host.

“I just need two minutes of your time,� Perry informs the crowd, though it’s only a matter of seconds before everyone catches on. Here we were, an audience to a genuine marriage proposal, belting out whistles and cheers mixed with cries galore: “Say yes!�

And she did.

Look out for The Art of Performing Aural Sex's upcoming performances by visiting www.aural-sx.com. - Concordia Independent Newspaper


"AIDS WALK BOSTON DRAWS OVER 12,000 WALKERS"

The crowd’s spirits were high as WCVB-TV Channel 5’s David Brown and Rebecca Haag launched the Walk from the Hatch Shell on a 6.2-mile march along Boston’s Esplanade. David Brown served as emcee before running in the Larry Kessler 5K Run. In addition, spoken word artist London Bridgez provided a poetic start to the day with an original piece. - Aids Action Committee


"Studio Noize Featured Spoken Word Artist"

Studio Noize is proud to feature London Bridgez as our first Spoken Word Artist. Her beauty is not only on the surface but it’s in the passion of her poetry. Her flow exudes lyrical light and purely defines the powerful substance of ’spoken word’.

The writer and performer London Bridgez pushes the expectations of spoken word. “London” is her name. “Bridgez” represents what she does. She builds creative bridges between spoken word and music. Her stage performance is interactive, truly building a bridge between her words, the music and the audience. Her first single “Crushing You” produced by Daniel “Oph Kiltah” Watson from Deskbangahz production is a story of a secret crush told with a smooth blend of r&b vocals, rhythmic lyrics and a sultry instrumental


http://www.studionoize.com/2010/01/18/london-bridgez-studio-noize-featured-spoken-word-artist/#ixzz0khYo8Eya
Written By: Lady Tha ProducHer

- Written By: Lady Tha ProducHer


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

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Bio

She is a lyricist whose live performance is rooted in spoken word and soul infused hip hop often accompanied by a live band or scratch master DJ. She bridges the worlds of spoken word, literature and live music and jazz creating a soul infused hip hop sound.In 2016 London will release her fourth studio album TIME AND SPACE. 

Her  performance credits include the Nuyorican, Williamsburg Jazz Center Brooklyn, Tutuma Social Club Manhattan, The Indigo Lounge Los Angeles, Manhattan Neighborhood Network TV One Different Community Voices Show, Afro Punk's FREE CANDY,  Nashville based BB KINGs Restaurant & Lounge, Boston Greenfest, Greenpoint Gallery Series NYC, The Strand Theater- Boston, Acoustic Soul Lounge- Manhattan, Alan Khazei for Senate Fundraiser, MIT, Stir It Up Jamaica Film & Music Festival, Northeastern University, National Poetry Awards- Raleigh NC, Beantown Jazz Festival and a variety of college campus tours.


Her social justice performance credits include Bayard Rustin Community Breakfast sponsored by the Aids Action Committee, a YWCA fundraiser to support the production of VDAY Lawrence, Queer Women of Color Week- OUTSPOKEN, Provincetown Women of Color Weekend, the Hispanic & Black Gay Coalition Panel Series, National Day of Silence , NYC Pridefest Stage, Boston Dyke Fest, Stargaze Conference, Sister's Talk Radio and the Aids Walk Boston Opening Ceremonies.

She is a BMI affiliated writer & publisher. She is currently a full time artist and activist. For booking please email JMW737@NYU dot EDU


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