James Stevens
Gig Seeker Pro

James Stevens

| SELF

| SELF
Band Rock Pop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Feb
23
James Stevens @ Red Fish (acoustic duo w/ Cap)

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Feb
18
James Stevens @ Staccato (acoustic w/ Idle Ride)

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Feb
16
James Stevens @ Red Fish (acoustic duo w/ Cap)

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Baltimore, Maryland, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


earBuzz Review: James Stevens' CD "all the Songs I told my friends I'd Play" begins with a track, "Color", which gracefully paints a picture of racial division. Stevens is in love with a woman who from a different racial background - the parents don't understand, "can parents who love you fear that you've found true love". Poignant and recorded well - the chorus is mp3'd here as a clip - and the separation and overdubs blend beautifully.
The 10th track, "Man on the Hill", is a piercing lyrical assault on the narcissists of the world. Stevens sing, "I don't know anyone who thinks about himself more than you do, yet I don't know anyone who knows themself..less than you do". The tune, with nylon stringed guitar, is a delight to the ears. .with brushes of vocal influences mentioned below and even a little Chapman thrown in.
One of the nice qualities about Stevens approach to his music is his talent to put very narrative lyrics to music. The lyrics tell more of a story than that of a poem - and Stevens uses his vocal inflections and phrasings to make the lines work - providing interesting musical passages while driving home the lyrical message with clarity.
Here we have a singer/guitarist who has a vocal ability that reminds us of a blend of Simply Red and George Michael. The CD is all vocal and guitar - no other instruments that we could detect. The guitar playing is solid and the vocals occupy their own bare space in them mix - we would love to hear more instruments. .some of the tunes, such as "Such a Lady" is aching for a bass line and supportive drums. Perhaps Stevens has these recorded with a band as well - and this is the 'unplugged' version of the tunes. That's not to say that the CD is not gorgeous sounding - it is - the overall production is spot on - and Stevens vocals and lyrics are compelling. - DK - Don Kimenker


Feat. 12 great NEW Songs from this young passionate, deep hearted singer-songwriter...for everyones CD collection!!  You won't want to take it out of your CD player!
- Michael Sheppard


Stevens's soaring vocals stand out on the acoustic "Color," a punchy track reminiscent of John Mayer and Ben Harper. - Washington Post


"Acoustic rock with a strong emphasis on strong, melodic vocals." - David Jackson- moderator


James Stevens is one of our gems. He captivated us with his comfortable heartfelt songs.  We loved his voice so much we made one of his songs the theme song for the show.
- PD Thomas


James Stevens plays a mean guitar, sings like a tenor Scott Weiland, and recently had his song "Color" named a Washington Post MP3’s "Editor’s Pick." - Kristin Kovner


Discography

Grove Street- Behind the Smile (full length) 2003

James Stevens- All the Songs I Told My Friends I'd Play (full length) 2004 (tracks 3,7, and 10 featured on Garageband.com)

Oasis Acoustic Vol. V Number 1 (compilation) 2005- Features James Stevens' 'Recollection of a Life'

Whispers From Snowden Crossing (compilation) 2005- Features 'Recollection of a Life' and 'Oceans Apart' (co-written and performed with Raquel Rosser)

Millennium Music Conference 9 (compilation) 2005- Features James Stevens' 'Color'

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

James Stevens is a young man from Washington, DC pursuing a burgeoning career as a singer/songwriter. This pursuit began at Yale University, where he was a prominent member of the highly competitive a cappella group The Baker’s Dozen before moving his focus to composing and performing his own music. Senior year saw the release of his band Grove Street’s album “Behind the Smile”, for which he provided the majority of the songwriting and vocals (both lead and back-up), half of the guitar work, and even some percussion. These accomplishments were punctuated by his singer/guitarist/dancer role in “Record”, a student-produced and directed play. The production featured an engaging synthesis of his past musical work, as he performed his Baker’s Dozen solo (“It’s So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday” by Boyz-2-Men) as well as a Grove Street song (“Never”).
Since his graduation in the Spring of 2003, James has been even more active on the music front, playing open mics and benefits, releasing his first solo album (“All the Songs I Told My Friends I’d Play”- produced by Michael Sheppard) , and writing an album’s-worth of new material since his last visit to the studio. Major musical influences for this body of work range from Stone Temple Pilots to Eric Clapton, The Black Crowes to Babyface, Boyz-2-Men to Billy Joel. James’ eclectic musical taste has contributed to his unique musical style. However, with all these musical influences, when James is asked to draw a comparison between another musical artist and himself, he simply draws a blank.
Since childhood, James has prepared himself to be a potent creative force, studying voice (including opera), guitar (including classical), piano, drums, violin, cello, and saxophone among others. These creative pursuits have been by no means, limited to music. He has sought to satisfy and enrich his creative drive by studying performing arts such as stage acting and Tango dancing; visual arts such as painting, graphic design, and 3-D animation; and writing media such as playwriting, screenwriting, fiction, and poetry. His fiction is comedic, his poetry is tragic, and his music reflects this duality. His songs are sometimes dark and moody, sometimes romantic and seductive, sometimes witty and sarcastic, but ultimately bring to life the personal tragedy he has overcome and the optimistic outlook he has managed to retain and strengthen through it all.
James’ personal philosophy and his consolation to friends in distress are one and the same: “I’ve been through a lot of experiences that were painful at the time. But I’m happy with my life; There’s always something to be happy about; And if these trying experiences had never occurred, I wouldn’t be enjoying my life as it is now- it would be irrevocably different. I wouldn’t take anything away or bring anyone back. All of this has made me stronger and easily able to cope with issues that were once dismal but now seem trivial. I want my only regret to be that I spent so much time regretting in the past.”