Jamestown Revival
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Jamestown Revival

Austin, Texas, United States | SELF

Austin, Texas, United States | SELF
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Zach Chance and Jonathan Clay formed Jamestown Revival, an Austin-based folk-rock group, earlier this year. (Photo courtesy of Jamestown Revival)
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Austin, Jamestown, energy, A, Business, guitarist and vocalist, Jonathan Clay, keyboardist and vocalist

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Published 16 Oct 2011 at 10:17 PM
By Ali Breland
Austin-founded group Jamestown Revival is on its way to becoming a big deal in music. Since the release of Knives and Pipes, Jamestown’s rise has occurred within a relatively meteoric time frame, especially given that its genre — folk — hasn’t given way to a lot of mainstream talent in recent years. The group’s story is very “Walden”-esque. The members describe the core idea behind their group as transcendence, and much of their inspiration comes from keyboardist and vocalist Zach Chance and guitarist and vocalist Jonathan Clay spending time on Clay’s 1,200-acre expanse of land.

Daily Texan: You guys don’t like to use the term “duo?” Is there another word you attribute to yourselves?
Jonathan Clay: It’s a duo, but we don’t use duo in the traditional sense, when you think of two people with guitars or something, like Simon and Garfunkel. While it does have that element to it, there’s a lot more going on. It’s a lot more rockin’ at times. We’re a very high-energy duo. We also play with other musicians. Like tonight, we’re playing with a drummer. Sometimes we play with a bass player. I think the transcendent thing is Jamestown Revival. The idea of what it stands for. It’s Zach and I’s creation. I think we’re both open to bringing other musicians in and playing with other people and helping things evolve.

DT: What’s the transcendent idea of Jamestown Revival?
Clay: We were solo artists. I’ve been doing this [music] for five or six years now. I felt like throughout my solo career I felt like I was always conforming to what I thought I needed to be, what I thought I needed to bring success. Jamestown Revival was finally about [Zach and I] coming together. To just what feels good and sing about what feels good to physically play. To just get back to the basics of why we love music. Jamestown Revival is about all of those things. There are some repetitive themes throughout our music. A call back to the wild and getting in touch with earth and nature.

DT: When did you make the transition from being an Austin band to a nationally touring act?
Clay: The life span of our solo stuff was more from when we were in Texas. We actually only started Jamestown Revival eight or 10 months ago. I think when you’re doing something truthful, it picks up momentum a lot more naturally than when you’re doing something contrived. I feel like Jamestown is the most natural thing I’ve done in my life.

DT: Folk music isn’t the only genre of music you guys fit into, but it is a large portion of it. What do you feel like the role of folk is in contemporary music?
Zach Chance: I think folk has kind of had a relevance lately. It’s storytelling and people talking about real issues and things that affect them in their lives, whether it be government or things they’re observing. To me, it feels like there’s a rebirth of that or an appreciation for that. It’s always been relevant, but it seems like it’s caught a little more mainstream kick up. I think people appreciate the genuineness of it. It’s not just talking about partying and having a good time all the time, which everybody enjoys. There’s a grit behind it.
Clay: Yeah. I think people are also hungry for that type of music and the storytelling. Music that talks about issues like what happened in the ’70s. That’s why people are going back to music in the ’70s and listening to old stuff. Stuff that related then relates today. When you write in a similar fashion to that, it stays relatable.

DT: What kind of stories do you tell in your music?
Chance: Sometimes we can be selfish. We write solely from experience. If we’ve experienced that, then it’s easy to pull from that. We try to tell stories that have affected us, the way we’re feeling and things that paint a picture of home and what people can relate to.
Clay: There’s been some land that’s been in my family that’s 1,200 acres. We went out there, and we’ve been going out there since we were kids. A lot of our growing up took place there. There is a definite outdoorsy-ness bred in what we do. At the same time, we have a new song called “Truth,” and it speaks directly about you mentioned; what the country’s going through. It’s sort of an observation of the condition of the country. It’s like ‘what are we gonna do about it? When are things really going to turn around?’

DT: You guys only have an EP out now. Are there plans for a full album?
Chance: We’re discussing it. It’s all pretty fresh right now. We’re entertaining ideas of producers. It’s a long way away. We like what we’re doing, so we’re going to stick to the same sounds. We might explore movi - The Daily Texan


“Off the charts” would be the first description that comes to mind in recounting last Sunday’s events at the John Anton Ford Amphitheatre in Hollywood, but also describes the hope for all the artists’ musical talents and abilities for the future. Koffeehouse Music, LLC in partnership with the County of Los Angeles presented their 5th Annual “Evening of Independence,” an evening filled with live music and fundraising.
Koffeehouse Music is a premier Los Angeles, grassroots live music promotions and production company, best known for showcasing some of the most talented emerging singer-songwriters and bands. Koffeehouse Music allows musicians to launch their career in a new setting and from a new platform by sharing their music with industry executives and music lovers alike.

As the sun set and the stars began to sprinkle the sky and flicker, Jamestown Revival started off the show on the main stage. Currently based in Los Angeles, these Texan-born best friends rocked the stage with their rock-n-roll with a southern slant - Temple City Tribune - Los Angeles


1. What is the origin of your band name or the story behind it?

Jamestown Revival came from the desire to get back to the roots of what it is that we do. Not only what we do, but where we came from. We spent a month in a cabin in the middle of a thousand acres on a ranch in Texas doing nothing but soul searching. Jamestown Revival is the culmination what we took away from that experience.


2. Who are the artists that have influenced your music the most?

Neil Young, Creedence Clearwater, The Band, Simon & Garfunkel... It's an ever-changing list.



3. Who are the artists that you listened to the most growing up?



James Taylor, Eric Clapton and other great singer-songwriters


4. Who has been your biggest non-musical influence?

Louis L'Amour is a big influence on the way that I think. My father has also been a huge influence of mine


5. What is your most memorable live performance?

CoComing home to Magnolia, Texas to play a show after a while out on the road. Just felt amazing to be with our friends and family and I'll never forget it.

C

6. What are the best and worst venues you have played?

Not sure. I'll be diplomatic and say that even the bad ones have a bit of charm if you look around hard enough.
7. Do you have any crazy fan stories?

I once saved a fan from a wild grizzly bear while juggling jars of honey and spam.
8. What is your favorite song to play? What is a crowd favorite?

Maybe "The Revival"? Depends on the night...
9. What does the future hold for you/your band?

Quite a few shows I would imagine. That and a few more guitars hanging on the wall.

10. How often do you rehearse? What is a typical rehearsal session like?

Zach and I get together, half-ass rehearse, and then when it comes time to get on stage, we start feeling this energy and we feed off of it.
11. As a band how do you write together? What inspires you to write music?

We get together and talk about whatever's going on. Conversations between Zach and I have a way of running away with themselves. If we're lucky, the conversations eventually turns in to a song. A lot of times, its the great outdoors that inspires our writing.
12. Do you have any music that we haven’t heard yet? Recorded earlier or secret tracks?

Absolutely. Who knows if it will ever see the light of day, but my guess is that it won't. Once you're over a song, it's hard to find it again for it.

13. What current artist/band would you most like to work with?

I'm working with him. He's my childhood friend, business partner, and the other half of Jamestown Revival
14. What, if any, songs would you like to do a cover of?

We cover "Satisfied Mind" sometimes and I enjoy it. The lyrics really seem to hit home with us.

15. Have you had any major fights/disagreements as a band? Who won?

Of course. But we work it out and move on. If you can't do that then nobody wins.

16. What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Did you overcome it or still working on it?

Keeping a full touring calendar. We just parted ways with our old booking agent, and until we find the right person, we're booking our own shows. It's tough.

17. Do you think that selling music online is helping or hurting the music industry? Are you concerned about people stealing music?

I think it's helping. People from all over the world (places that you can make it to on tour) can buy your music. What I think is hurting music the most is things like "spotify", where the artist gets virtually nothing, and people can stream on demand whatever they want. I hate it. The more things that cut in to indie artists sales, the fewer indie artists that there will be...

18. With so many great bands out there, why should I listen to you? What do you think makes you stand out from the crowd?

Because our music will make you want to shake your leg... On top of that, Zach once rode a tornado from Texas to California while gargling corn mash whiskey.

19. Outside of music related stuff, what do you do for fun?

Hike, bike, backpack, fish, mountaneer

20. Would you do a gig in my backyard?

Sure

21. Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way?

Our families and our close friends for sure.
- TheMusiciLove


1. What is the origin of your band name or the story behind it?

Jamestown Revival came from the desire to get back to the roots of what it is that we do. Not only what we do, but where we came from. We spent a month in a cabin in the middle of a thousand acres on a ranch in Texas doing nothing but soul searching. Jamestown Revival is the culmination what we took away from that experience.


2. Who are the artists that have influenced your music the most?

Neil Young, Creedence Clearwater, The Band, Simon & Garfunkel... It's an ever-changing list.



3. Who are the artists that you listened to the most growing up?



James Taylor, Eric Clapton and other great singer-songwriters


4. Who has been your biggest non-musical influence?

Louis L'Amour is a big influence on the way that I think. My father has also been a huge influence of mine


5. What is your most memorable live performance?

CoComing home to Magnolia, Texas to play a show after a while out on the road. Just felt amazing to be with our friends and family and I'll never forget it.

C

6. What are the best and worst venues you have played?

Not sure. I'll be diplomatic and say that even the bad ones have a bit of charm if you look around hard enough.
7. Do you have any crazy fan stories?

I once saved a fan from a wild grizzly bear while juggling jars of honey and spam.
8. What is your favorite song to play? What is a crowd favorite?

Maybe "The Revival"? Depends on the night...
9. What does the future hold for you/your band?

Quite a few shows I would imagine. That and a few more guitars hanging on the wall.

10. How often do you rehearse? What is a typical rehearsal session like?

Zach and I get together, half-ass rehearse, and then when it comes time to get on stage, we start feeling this energy and we feed off of it.
11. As a band how do you write together? What inspires you to write music?

We get together and talk about whatever's going on. Conversations between Zach and I have a way of running away with themselves. If we're lucky, the conversations eventually turns in to a song. A lot of times, its the great outdoors that inspires our writing.
12. Do you have any music that we haven’t heard yet? Recorded earlier or secret tracks?

Absolutely. Who knows if it will ever see the light of day, but my guess is that it won't. Once you're over a song, it's hard to find it again for it.

13. What current artist/band would you most like to work with?

I'm working with him. He's my childhood friend, business partner, and the other half of Jamestown Revival
14. What, if any, songs would you like to do a cover of?

We cover "Satisfied Mind" sometimes and I enjoy it. The lyrics really seem to hit home with us.

15. Have you had any major fights/disagreements as a band? Who won?

Of course. But we work it out and move on. If you can't do that then nobody wins.

16. What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Did you overcome it or still working on it?

Keeping a full touring calendar. We just parted ways with our old booking agent, and until we find the right person, we're booking our own shows. It's tough.

17. Do you think that selling music online is helping or hurting the music industry? Are you concerned about people stealing music?

I think it's helping. People from all over the world (places that you can make it to on tour) can buy your music. What I think is hurting music the most is things like "spotify", where the artist gets virtually nothing, and people can stream on demand whatever they want. I hate it. The more things that cut in to indie artists sales, the fewer indie artists that there will be...

18. With so many great bands out there, why should I listen to you? What do you think makes you stand out from the crowd?

Because our music will make you want to shake your leg... On top of that, Zach once rode a tornado from Texas to California while gargling corn mash whiskey.

19. Outside of music related stuff, what do you do for fun?

Hike, bike, backpack, fish, mountaneer

20. Would you do a gig in my backyard?

Sure

21. Anyone you would like to thank for helping you along the way?

Our families and our close friends for sure.
- TheMusiciLove


Texas natives Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance only have a four-song EP ("The Knives and Pipes") out now, but the duo, known as Jamestown Revival, have already caught the attention of major players in the biz: Their smooth, country-tinged songs have been used in a variety of television shows (from "The Hills" to "Sons of Anarchy") and they are one of the acts competing in Rolling Stone's "Choose The Cover" contest, in which readers will choose one of 16 unsigned bands or artists to appear on an upcoming cover of the magazine. Listen to two Jamestown Revival songs and vote for them (or another fave artist) in the contest here. Like what you hear? The guys are currently writing their first full-length release and will be on tour in May. - OnLoud.com


Jamestown Revival, heard of this band before? If not you better get on top of their EP, The Knives & Pipes. The laidback duo of Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance originally hail from Magnolia, Texas and are currently one of 16 bands vying for the cover of Rolling Stone. In what’s a really sweet contest featuring many great up-and-coming bands, give a listen to Jamestown Revival and cast your vote for the guys (final four bands will rock out at Bonnaroo in a Battle of the Bands this June). Even better, vote for Jamestown Revival, click the Facebook ‘Like’ icon and then shoot at email to ivoted@jamestownrevival.com and you can score a free copy of their EP.

Wondering what their sound is like? Personally I think it’s a blend of a handful of genres including their country roots, bluegrass, pop, rock and rockabilly, soul and they pull it off so elegantly. They have a more mellow, chillaxing approach which makes listening to them that much more enjoyable. I know after one listen I was hooked and have found myself pushing repeat again and again the past week. - DoYouHearTheMusic.com


Jamestown Revival, heard of this band before? If not you better get on top of their EP, The Knives & Pipes. The laidback duo of Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance originally hail from Magnolia, Texas and are currently one of 16 bands vying for the cover of Rolling Stone. In what’s a really sweet contest featuring many great up-and-coming bands, give a listen to Jamestown Revival and cast your vote for the guys (final four bands will rock out at Bonnaroo in a Battle of the Bands this June). Even better, vote for Jamestown Revival, click the Facebook ‘Like’ icon and then shoot at email to ivoted@jamestownrevival.com and you can score a free copy of their EP.

Wondering what their sound is like? Personally I think it’s a blend of a handful of genres including their country roots, bluegrass, pop, rock and rockabilly, soul and they pull it off so elegantly. They have a more mellow, chillaxing approach which makes listening to them that much more enjoyable. I know after one listen I was hooked and have found myself pushing repeat again and again the past week. - DoYouHearTheMusic.com


Jamestown Revival formed just six months ago between solo singer-songwriters Zach Chance, who just turned 26 and handles keyboards, and 25-year-old Jonathan Clay, who plays guitar. The Austin, TX-based duo has known each other since high school and shares a love of the wild outdoors and nature, plus a passion for making music. Spinner caught up with the pair on tour somewhere near San Diego, Calif. driving down I-80. Jamestown Revival are also currently competing to be on a future cover of Rolling Stone. If you like what you hear, vote for the Jamestown Revival below.

Before Jamestown Revival, you were both separate solo singer-songwriters. How long did you do that for?
Jonathan Clay: I've been doing it for about four years, Zach started up more recently -- a year and a half ago. But we grew up together. We've been writing music together since we were fifteen years old. We have written songs for each other, but we'd never done it together like this, as a duo project.

Do you think that the two of you have been working up to this collaboration for a while?
JC: I think so. It's not something that we thought about. But if we look back on the process it took to get here, then it all makes perfect sense. We have a great understanding of each other, we're very close friends.



The band name seems very appropriate to the old timey vibe of the lyrics and music. Is that down to your wild Texan blood?

JC: It is. That name symbolizes our sense of history -- old versus new. The introduction of all these new things, like having a cellphone in your pocket 24 hours every day. We spent a lot of time outdoors growing up and developed a love of nature.

Zach Chance: I think we both feel a call to the wild and simpler times. We both cherish something about that. We prefer nature to civilization.

So far, you've made one record, the 'Knives & Pipes' EP. How did that process go?
JC: We did that all ourselves -- played every instrument, produced it, and designed the artwork. It's 100 percent straight from the heart. Straight out of our heads, straight out our hearts. There was no outside pressure, nothing but the two of us creating.

Seems that you are both self-starters.
ZC: We are, we've got a fire burning. Somebody lit a fire under our a-- and it's hot.

What are your influences?
JC: Everything from Led Zeppelin to The Black Keys, to James Taylor, to Simon & Garfunkel. We're drawn to that older sound. Our guitar style, our songwriting, our general style, it all comes from there.

You decided to keep the band to just the two of you, not have a full band with drummer and bassist. Why?
JC: We're keeping it to the two of us right now. We're trying to make as much noise, as much two-man rock and roll as we can at this point. I think we both see a bass player and a drummer in our future. That's the eventual direction we want to take. But we feel like this is appropriate for the development of the group. We're building a strong foundation, which is the two of us.

The Rolling Stone Cover Contest is an amazing opportunity.
JC: We're very excited. It's an awesome opportunity, it hasn't sink in yet. But we feel very fortunate to be involved. [Performing at] Bonnaroo is definitely a dream of ours for sure.

It's thrust you in the spotlight somewhat. How are you staying grounded?
JC: I can't really take it in. It doesn't seem much has changed. We're staying focused on what we do.

ZC: We're staying focused on what we love. We took a day recently to visit the Redwood forest. We played music out there in the woods, connecting with what we love. Really, getting out doors, any chance we get we take advantage of that. Not to sound like I'm a total tree-hugger or anything, but that really helps us. If we get away from that, that's when we'll get in trouble. - Spinner.com


Jamestown Revival is one of the latest bands to be put forward for the Rolling Stones unsigned acts competition, which can give the platform and coverage to launch any new act.

Music and the use of instruments is very close to what Jamestown Revival are about. Folk, Indie and Rock is what this Texas duo create, put together by Jonathan Clay, once a prominent architect, and Zach Chance, a young shaman.

Jamestown Revival went on a long journey to meet, and along with releasing an E.P “Knives and Thieves’’ in February, the duo are set to make their mark on the music scene and give us an insight to themselves, music and performing live.

Geoff Fitzgerald: Tell me a little about Jamestown Revival?

JR: We were childhood friends who grew up in a small town in Texas. We started making music, first as solo artists and then collaboratively. This whole thing was formed as a truly uninhibited form of expression.

GF: I have read about the very courageous circumstances that you both went through on the journey of meeting. Can you tell me more about that amazing encounter?

Jon: Well, first of all: it is an absolutely true story and the only part we left out is that three years later we both won the Nobel Peace Prize for our discoveries.

Zach: Don’t forget the bank robbery and car chase involving an El Camino and the Mexican Police.

GF: You both seem very, very musical and play many instruments, which you can hear through your music. Are you both from musical backgrounds?

Zach: I grew up with my parents listening to a lot of different styles of music. Music was always a presence in our house. My mom was always walking around the house singing, which definitely rubbed off on me because I catch myself doing the same thing now.

Jon: My dad played piano, banjo and guitar, and I think hearing those three instruments growing up definitely shaped what I do.

GF: You have both said that you shared in the idea of making music. Can you share some of those ideas with me?

JR: We’ve always had a shared appreciation for music, which ultimately led us down the path of creating it. From the time we first met we were always writing together and now it’s sort of taken form as a duo project. We both have an appreciation for the role music can play. Capturing certain moments, ideas, and feelings and acting as a story to our lives. It’s an amazing release and form of expression.



GF: As we know, you both play the instruments; is this the same for the songwriting?

JR: Yes. All of our writing is derived from some conversation we’ve had that really stuck with us. To the point where we say that’s a great idea for a song and then we sit down together and sort of let things flow. I’m not sure how the process for other bands works, but it certainly is the formula for our music.

GF: Your track "The Revival" made me feel very uplifted and happy. Does the track have uplifting meanings or any connection to your band title?

JR: “Revival” is a song about going against the grain in the way we choose to live. Conventional wisdom says that music isn’t the “safe” career choice, but we certainly had smiles on our faces when we wrote it.

GF: Your E.P The Knives & Pipes, which was released at the beginning of February, has four very folk/indie sounding tracks. Is this the true sound of Jamestown Revival?

JR: I think so. Our music comes more from our surroundings and what we believe than anything we find ourselves listening to. Ultimately it’s our fingerprint; we wrote, recorded, produced and played every instrument on the EP. We even designed the album artwork. We can confidently say that this is a true representation of Jamestown Revival.

GF: Who are your musical Inspirations or Idols?

JR: Our influences range from James Taylor and Led Zeppelin to Otis Redding and R.L. Burnside. We’re pretty eclectic. I think at this point our biggest influence is experiencing life and pulling from that.

GF: You have just done a live event for "Believe in Miracles," a benefit concert at O'Rena at Oakland University. Tell me about the event?

JR: It was a really special night that was put together by the girl’s softball team at Oakland University as a chance to raise money and awareness for a great organization. It was certainly a pleasure to be a part of it.

GF: Live gigs and tours always sound better when musicians play instruments in their performances. Are there any plans for more live events, so your fans and prospective listeners can see you?

JR: Of course. We’ve just come off of the road traveling up and down the west coast. The goal now is to sort of regroup and get back out again towards the end of April. It’s crucial for every band today to have a great live performance, not only for their survival but also to build a solid fan base. It really is special when you can give a performance that is more than music but and experience. That’s when people really feel like they’re a part of something.

G - Man of The Hour Magazine


Jamestown Revival is one of the latest bands to be put forward for the Rolling Stones unsigned acts competition, which can give the platform and coverage to launch any new act.

Music and the use of instruments is very close to what Jamestown Revival are about. Folk, Indie and Rock is what this Texas duo create, put together by Jonathan Clay, once a prominent architect, and Zach Chance, a young shaman.

Jamestown Revival went on a long journey to meet, and along with releasing an E.P “Knives and Thieves’’ in February, the duo are set to make their mark on the music scene and give us an insight to themselves, music and performing live.

Geoff Fitzgerald: Tell me a little about Jamestown Revival?

JR: We were childhood friends who grew up in a small town in Texas. We started making music, first as solo artists and then collaboratively. This whole thing was formed as a truly uninhibited form of expression.

GF: I have read about the very courageous circumstances that you both went through on the journey of meeting. Can you tell me more about that amazing encounter?

Jon: Well, first of all: it is an absolutely true story and the only part we left out is that three years later we both won the Nobel Peace Prize for our discoveries.

Zach: Don’t forget the bank robbery and car chase involving an El Camino and the Mexican Police.

GF: You both seem very, very musical and play many instruments, which you can hear through your music. Are you both from musical backgrounds?

Zach: I grew up with my parents listening to a lot of different styles of music. Music was always a presence in our house. My mom was always walking around the house singing, which definitely rubbed off on me because I catch myself doing the same thing now.

Jon: My dad played piano, banjo and guitar, and I think hearing those three instruments growing up definitely shaped what I do.

GF: You have both said that you shared in the idea of making music. Can you share some of those ideas with me?

JR: We’ve always had a shared appreciation for music, which ultimately led us down the path of creating it. From the time we first met we were always writing together and now it’s sort of taken form as a duo project. We both have an appreciation for the role music can play. Capturing certain moments, ideas, and feelings and acting as a story to our lives. It’s an amazing release and form of expression.



GF: As we know, you both play the instruments; is this the same for the songwriting?

JR: Yes. All of our writing is derived from some conversation we’ve had that really stuck with us. To the point where we say that’s a great idea for a song and then we sit down together and sort of let things flow. I’m not sure how the process for other bands works, but it certainly is the formula for our music.

GF: Your track "The Revival" made me feel very uplifted and happy. Does the track have uplifting meanings or any connection to your band title?

JR: “Revival” is a song about going against the grain in the way we choose to live. Conventional wisdom says that music isn’t the “safe” career choice, but we certainly had smiles on our faces when we wrote it.

GF: Your E.P The Knives & Pipes, which was released at the beginning of February, has four very folk/indie sounding tracks. Is this the true sound of Jamestown Revival?

JR: I think so. Our music comes more from our surroundings and what we believe than anything we find ourselves listening to. Ultimately it’s our fingerprint; we wrote, recorded, produced and played every instrument on the EP. We even designed the album artwork. We can confidently say that this is a true representation of Jamestown Revival.

GF: Who are your musical Inspirations or Idols?

JR: Our influences range from James Taylor and Led Zeppelin to Otis Redding and R.L. Burnside. We’re pretty eclectic. I think at this point our biggest influence is experiencing life and pulling from that.

GF: You have just done a live event for "Believe in Miracles," a benefit concert at O'Rena at Oakland University. Tell me about the event?

JR: It was a really special night that was put together by the girl’s softball team at Oakland University as a chance to raise money and awareness for a great organization. It was certainly a pleasure to be a part of it.

GF: Live gigs and tours always sound better when musicians play instruments in their performances. Are there any plans for more live events, so your fans and prospective listeners can see you?

JR: Of course. We’ve just come off of the road traveling up and down the west coast. The goal now is to sort of regroup and get back out again towards the end of April. It’s crucial for every band today to have a great live performance, not only for their survival but also to build a solid fan base. It really is special when you can give a performance that is more than music but and experience. That’s when people really feel like they’re a part of something.

G - Man of The Hour Magazine


What's the crappiest day job you've ever had?
Zach Chance: I worked at a wing shop, buffalo wings, you had to cut the fries and everything…that job wasn't a lot of fun for me.

Jonathan Clay: I worked at a restaurant called Italian Garden. It was horrible. It was a local Italian joint, and I'm much too scatterbrained to remember an order, I can't wait tables. I lasted two weeks.

What's the best show you've attended?
Zach: We saw Damien Rice and Muse at Austin City Limits several years ago. They went back to back, and they were great, I had an amazing time that night. Damien Rice like made me want to cry, I had tears of joy, sadness, then an hour later I'm dancing like an idiot.

You guys are both originally from Magnolia, Texas. What was it like growing up there?
Zach: There were 1,000 people in the town.

Jonathan: We got a new high school when we were sophomores, that was a big step up for us. It has a small town feel, for sure. We didn't even have a McDonald's when we first moved there.

Zach: I don't want to paint it or portray it as totally Podunk, because it wasn't. It was just kind of a quieter suburban town.

I saw a video where you were in a boat and smoking pipes – do you really do that stuff?
Jonathan: That is pretty much more accurate than I think people would believe. My family has some land out in Walker County, Texas, and it's been in my family since the late Seventies. Me and Zach spent a lot of time there growing up, fishing, riding four-wheelers, just getting dirty, getting away from suburbia. We have a lot of respect for the outdoors and nature and earth.

What are your biggest vices on the road?
Jonathan: Scratch-off lottery tickets and coffee energy drinks. I wish I could buy hundreds upon thousands of scratch-offs. Sometimes if I'm having a bad day, Zach knows we need some scratch-offs. - Rolling Stone Magazine


Who: Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance put their solo projects aside to form this laid-back duo. "We always wrote on each other's records," says Clay, whose songs have gotten play on The Hills and Sons of Anarchy (Chance's have appeared on Private Practice). "Getting together was inevitable."

Sound: Mellow folk-rock tunes laced with harmonies and rockabilly guitar.

Bromance: Clay and Chance grew up in Magnolia, Texas (pop. 1,100), and have been inseparable since high school, although Clay's wife has replaced Chance as his roommate. "We've gotten good at avoiding arguments," says Clay.
- Rolling Stone Magazine


Discography

Feb 15th 2011 - 'The Knives & Pipes EP'
Oct 15th 2013 - 'The California EP'

JANUARY 2014 - UTAH (full length album)

Photos

Bio

At the heart of Jamestown Revival is a friendship that spans over a decade.

Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance grew up together in the small Texas town of Magnolia. From a young age, they shared a love for music as well as the outdoors. About an hour north of Magnolia TX, there was some old family land with a dilapidated ranch house where they spent the better part of their adolescence.

At one point or another, music from Creedence Clearwater and The Everly Brothers, to fellow Texans Willie Nelson, Guy Clark, and Stevie Ray Vaughan found it’s way through an old pair of speakers that sat on the back porch. The pair spent the day exploring that thousand-acre plot of land, and when the sun when down they took to the records of the songwriters and bands that inspired them. At the age of 22, they moved to Austin and began to craft a sound of their own. Deeply rooted in harmony, they merged the sounds of the South with classic American, and Western rock.

Looking for adventure, as well as a change of pace, they eventually made the decision to head west and make the move to Los Angeles, CA.

Throughout the course of the next 12 months, they wrote what will be Jamestown Revival’s first full-length album. It’s heavily autobiographical, telling the stories of their adventures, their discomforts, and their observations. In order to capture the spirit of the music, the two found a log cabin high within the Wasatch Mountains of Utah. The pair, along with their band and engineer, set out to convert it in to a temporary recording studio. With wild moose right outside the window, and aspen leaves spinning in the wind, they tracked 14 songs. Performed live, with no headphones, and entirely to tape, the process captured the moments in the room.

Now back L.A., the duo are planning to release their music and gear up for life back out on the road. These days, they’re exploring far more than just a thousand acres…