Jeff Przech ('Presh')
Gig Seeker Pro

Jeff Przech ('Presh')

Unionville, Connecticut, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2003 | SELF

Unionville, Connecticut, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2003
Solo Americana Country

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


These nine new originals (and one cover) are more tightly focused, much catchier and a stronger showcase for Przech's voice. The Unionville, Conn., singer hits the middle ground here between gruff and soulful, with a tone that is often reminiscent of Gregg Allman. There are traces of honky-tonk in the bright lead guitar parts on opener "Maribelle" and the trebly licks on "Second Favorite Memory," and Przech threads his voice through the blustery guitars on "Cold November" like he's been doing it on roadhouse stages for years. He takes a more wistful tack on "Four Letter Words," a song that's nostalgic for better, bygone days, and the combination of his rough-edged voice and whirring organ on "Coy" has an especially Allman-esque feel.... his new album is a worthwhile second effort from a musician who's only getting better at what he does. - Eric R. Danton


The guitar assault hits you right off with Maribelle, the first track on the record. It continues with Cold November and Under Your Skin, although both of those come off a lot more alt country than southern rock. A little further down they mine that same vein with Second Favorite Memory, where Przech sings that “you’re my second favorite memory…and all the rest are tied for first.” There’s a break-up line for you.
Not everything on the album is a driving tempo. Coy is slower and nearly anthemic with its building crescendo and final guitar solo. The Willows is a ballad about self-destruction, and the aching in Przech’s voice points to the loss of a close, close friend. Checking In has some of that ache as well, but is a slightly different take on the life-on-the-road theme.
Jeff Przech and his bandmates live, and hold day-jobs, in Connecticut. That domicile far away from some of the country’s musical hubs seems to have enabled them with a sense of self in their music. They certainly haven’t subscribed to any of the popular music bandwagons making the rounds today. Instead, they’ve put out a timeless rock and roll album that would have sounded as good 40 years ago as it does today. - Twangville


It’s an amazing feeling when you find that exciting new artist. It’s even better when he’s practically in your backyard. I recently had the privilege of that exact sensation.

Jeff Przech (pronounced Presh) is an alt country/americana artist from Connecticut. He comes from the same ilk as Jason Isbell and Sturgill Simpson. Like Isbell, Przech is a storyteller. His songs are all about real life and feelings.

Przech just released his new album, Jeff Przech and the Outfit. From first listen I was totally blown away. The songwriting is fierce and the vocals are broken in and worn. The musicianship majestic. The flavor of the record is perfect. It feels like you are sitting in some smoky honky tonk with a band of outlaws on stage. Przech’s voice is in sublime harmony with the record’s whole vibe. His lyrics feel honest and heartfelt. The musicians (including Przech’s 12 year old daughter) are spot on.

The album opens with “Maribelle”, the first single off the release. It’a rocking tune with great guitar work and bluesy vocals. It ideally sets the record’s tone. You’re tapping your feet from song one. “Cold November” follows, a fiery rocker about a faulty relationship. “Under Your Skin” is a Mellencampish short story about romantic awakenings and new found appreciations.

On “Coy” Przech slows it down. Bluesy and soulful, it’s a roadhouse 5am shot in hand kind of song. Przech’s voice yearns and pleads with grit. “Be Gone” brings the upswing back.

Next is one of my favorite tunes on Jeff Przech and the Outfit, “Second Favorite Memory”. Przech’s tongue in cheek lyrics (You’re my second favorite memory. All the rest are tied for first) and his cavalier attitude makes it hilarious. “Four Letter Word” is the most countrified number with its twangy guitar. “The Willows” is an unforgettable piece of hurt and desperation. The heartbreak is etched in every word and note.

Przech ends the record with his rendition of “The Weight” by the Band. It works on many levels and it’s an excellent song to end with.

Jeff Przech may not be a household name yet but if his album Jeff Przech and the Outfit is any indication it wont be long till it is. Buy this album and see him live. Then you can thank me. - Amp Music


From the opening notes of the first toe-tapping single, “Maribelle”, it’s clear that Jeff Przech and his exceptional backing unit have brought their A-game. Przech is a thoughtful, soulful songwriter who happily lives on the country side of the Americana pantheon. His influences, which he wears proudly on both sleeves, are on full display here. One part Waylon Jennings, one part Jason Isbell, and a whole lot of ’70s music that tap-danced back and forth from the rock to country worlds and back. But it’s not without his own twist on it all. Catchy rock hooks deftly mingle with country and folk aesthetics, while bluesy numbers like “Coy” are woven through the sonic tapestry that Przech and his outfit sew together. Przech’s tell-it-like-it-is lyrics matched with top-notch musicianship, all through the lens of pristine production, render this album completely accessible for those who don’t necessarily partake in the more sawdust-laden styles of music. You don’t need cowboy boots to apply for fandom here, but they certainly couldn’t hurt. Three years ago Przech delivered a memorable selection of tracks on his Sounds Like Fresh album, his return to the recording fold is a triumphant one to say the least. - The Metal Dad


Connecticut-based country/Americana singer/songwriter Jeff Przech just released the single “Maribelle,” a twangy and soulful bit of barroom rock that sounds like a beer-soaked cousin to the Bee Gee’s classic “To Love Somebody.” In his promo photo Przech proudly sports a “Waylon” T-shirt, which lets you know that there’s a deep-voiced outlaw spirit behind his material. You might hear a little Allman Brothers, John Mellencamp and the Black Crowes as well.

Przech releases a new record two days before this show, which will be a celebration of the new album. Przech’s songs deal with loneliness, anger, struggle and forgiveness from a stoic male perspective. His first record, helpfully titled “Sounds Like Fresh,” came out in 2015. The record is a rock-leaning album, with a full band, but Przech will be hitting the road to perform the material with his guitar, in much the same fashion that the songs were written. - CT Now


The record finishes out with a cover of The Band's ever popular hit “The Weight”. The harmonies in the song, the guitar and keys make the cover a pleasant surprise to round out a very good sounding record by Przech. If you’re looking for something to put on as your driving down the highway with not a care in the world, give this one a shot, you’ll be glad you did. - Roots Music Magazine


"Hailing from Connecticut, Jeff Przech (pronounced 'Presh') is prepping for the release of his new album, JEFF PRZECH & THE OUTFIT, on April 6th. The follow-up to his critically acclaimed 2015 release Sounds Like Fresh offers a vintage vibe and full band take on the Americana sound that's heavy on Telecasters, twang, and grit while remaining grounded in solid storytelling.

The project's first single, “Maribelle,” is steeped in southern rock tradition with gritty electric riffs and a solid backbeat that's led by Przech's perfectly-worn vocals relaying a tale about things not turning out the way one planned." - The Daily Country


Connecticut native Jeff Przech and his band The Outfit are preparing to release their new, self-titled album on April 6th. The band's country/Americana sound comes pouring right out on the opening track "Maribelle" as you feel right at home with their music. They continue with the country blues of "Cold November" and "Coy," along with guitar boogie of "Be Gone" and the soft-shoe shuffle of "Four Letter Words." Jeff Przech & The Outfit wrap up their new album with poetic, acoustic ballad "The Willows" and a great Americana-style cover of The Band's hit song, "The Weight." - JPs Music Blog


"Przech sings in a pleasantly worn-in voice on songs cut from enduring alt-country cloth: acoustic-guitar foundations support warm, growling electric licks, keening steel and a winsome world-weary sensibility."
- Eric R. Danton, WSJ/Rolling Stone/Paste/Salon.com -


'Sounds Like Fresh' is more than a clever title meant to explain the pronunciation of 'Przech.' In a world where so many artists are employing marketing gimmicks and studio tricks, vying for the next big spotlight in the music scene, Jeff Przech makes it abundantly clear that's he's here to do one thing, and that's make great music. With well written songs that are honestly sung and expertly played, Jeff's album pleases from start to finish; a sonic palette that is not only FRESH but wholly refreshing. - Jay Roberts


It’s Spring in New England. The trees are starting to bud, the scent of new blossoms fills the air. Birds by the hundreds are sharing their songs with any ears willing to listen, and finally, the windows are down. The fresh air you’re smelling needs a soundtrack and Connecticut is filled with a ton of options. One of the newest, and best fitting options is the debut from singer/songwriter Jeff Przech.

Przech has been a veteran of the CT music scene for quite some time with various projects. It, admittedly by the artist himself, took a long time though for his debut, solo album, Sounds Like Fresh, to finally come to fruition. The wait was worth it for anyone who fancies kicking up dust on dirt roads and spending time deep in Mother Nature’s womb. Przech is as Americana as they come and it’s not a dirty word to throw the country moniker around when describing this album. If Przech’s influences were trees he’d have an entire orchard full of some of the greats of the traditional and alt-country movements, as well as varying forms of folk and Americana. Yet at the same time the man can write a pop-infused hook like it’s no one’s business. Try not to tap your feet and sing along to the chorus of “Angry All The Time.” You’ll find it harder to do than you expected.

Yet, unlike most singer/songwriters with a pop-sensibility Przech does nothing to curb the wandering road his songs choose to take and that’s a good thing. The average song on this album clocks in at around the five-minute mark, an almost unheard of number for a solo artist. But Przech, like a father to his music, seems content to sit back and watch his musical children grow into whatever they want to be, just as long as they do right by the rest of us. And they do. These songs that love to ramble are also allowed to do so by Przech employing a full backing band on this album. Where many of these songs could certainly stand alone with just Przech, his dusty voice, and an acoustic guitar his decision to employ exceptional players and their accoutrements has paid off. “Clinchfield Rail” is the perfect example of one of the songs that is seemingly made whole with profound accompaniment – pedal steel and a rhythm section keeping time like they were doing so for Johnny Cash himself. It shows Przech is as much an arranger of quality music for a full band as he is for himself, a talent that not all singer/songwriters posses.

Jeff Przech’s new album certainly does “sound like fresh” – a fresh take on a genre that is in constant need of a good swift kick in the ass. Country music doesn’t have to be the trite and awkward collision of twang and pop that Nashville is constantly trying to jam down our collective throats. Przech is one of several artists (many from his home state) who have figured out a way to write country music that both fans and non-fans of the genre can find accessible. You don’t need to be wearing a flannel shirt to dig this record, but it certainly wouldn’t hurt either.

Sounds Like Fresh is out now and can be experienced at the Jeff Przech official website. The Sounds Like Fresh CD release party is going down Sunday, April 26 at Bridge Street Live in Collinsville, CT. - Chip McCabe


Despite the fact that Connecticut is constantly a tour stop for some of the biggest (and worst) country artists in the world, there are not a ton Connecticut artists making music you could unconditionally quantify as country music. Jeff Przech is one of those exceptions. His debut album, Sounds Like Fresh, is arguably the best country record the Nutmeg State has produced in quite some time. Przech combines elements from a wide array of countrified influences to present a listening experience that indeed sounds fresh on so many levels. - The Metal Dad


I was on a late evening train, close to my last hours on board, tired and half dreaming. I popped on Jeff’s album, "Sounds Like Fresh," not knowing what to expect. And in walks "Eden", a song curiously back dropped by New York’s sunset skyline as the train rolled past Manhattan. It was a 'cold call' to the soul. The sky turned dark and rich with stratum, somehow matched by the tones of the lead guitar, while Przech’s voice pierced through with oranges and reds similar to the sun fracturing the clouds that night. Simultaneously, I was brought back to a memory of driving my truck down a one-lane dirt road in Larimer County. Jeff’s overall approach on this record is like the old school, traditional roots country I came to love in Colorado, which became the basis for my own music. Jeff and I are cut from the same cloth.

"Sounds Like Fresh" travels through ballads and train beats, across the landscapes of well-crafted songs with both lyrical and rhythmic traction, like those in "Angry All The Time." As a whole, bubbly and fresh guitar tones are given most attention in the mix throughout the production, escorted by diverse textures of leads and vocal grit. I’m just gonna say it, and I hope it’s taken as a high compliment, but Przech has got a set of pipes likened to Blues Traveler’s John Popper at times, and it draws me more closely into exploring his craft as a writer. A good voice is always well deserved of a good song, and Jeff delivers solidly on both with a mellow sustain of country-roots standards.

But the album’s standout cut is "Clinchfield Rail." Maybe it’s because I was riding a train, or the deep saccharine of the pedal steel was hitting me in the tear duct, or the way that Jeff reached down into his guts to summon up the vocals, but I think it was mostly something about the lonely. Loneliness is the classic ingredient that renders this beauty an all time classic number. I wouldn’t be able to tell it apart from any other hit streaming on WSM 650AM, if you catch my drift. Przech’s music has national appeal, and I look forward to hearing more from him as he summons the work.

- Jennifer Dauphinais - Local Band Review


By Ted Rogen

Hailing from Hartford, CT, Jeff Przech plays music that sounds about as American as music can get. His recent release Sounds Like Fresh contains eleven songs that might lead you to waving the flag, watching the game with a couple of cold ones and doing some grilling on a Sunday afternoon. Przech plays palpable pop songs with combine Americana, country and rock.

The songs on Sounds Like Fresh are led by two elements - the acoustic guitar and vocals. Przech has a good voice and only adds to the “American” feel. He sounds masculine and stoic with a bit of country twang. His deep voice has a classic, traditional flavor that can be traced to a surplus of singers who have hit the airwaves.

His acoustic guitar provides the chord progressions but it is usually layered with an electric that provides the lead. The combo is certainly nothing new but works just fine for the spirit in which these songs were intended. Sounds Like Fresh is a warm sounding album and the overall feeling I was left with was nostalgia. It contains reflective qualities within the music and certainly within the lyrics as well.

On the very first song “Eden” he goes into detail about the irony of a town called Eden that has none of the qualities of Eden itself. It’s obvious that the song takes this one town as an example for the thousands of other towns which mirror the feeling and rather dismal milieu.

The nostalgia and reflective vibe sinks its teeth in deep on the second track ”Fade Away.” He sings, “Looking back over my shoulder All I see is that I’m getting older.” On the chorus he goes on to sing, “See a lifetime fade away Watch it all just fade away.” Although the lyrics could easily be considered depressing by themselves the song is upbeat and warm which ends up creating a successful dichotomy.

“Wasting Time” and “Angry All the Time” continue to reinforce a similar theme but also showcase that Przech is a consistently solid songwriter. There were a lot of good songs on this album but “No Matter Where You Go” and “Tell Me Something” were two highlights amongst the batch.

Sounds Like Fresh is pretty much the antithesis of avant-garde. It relies on classic songwriting that shoots straight for the heart. It’s pure with its intention and leaves little question as to what we might expect from Przech in the future. - The Equal Ground


His fan base knows Przech’s deep soulful voice provides weight to his lyrics. He’s a storyteller and his songs on “Sounds Like Fresh” speak to the working class America. “Clinchfield Rail” would fit comfortably on Bruce Springsteen’s “Ghost of Tom Joad” album while “Make a Wrong Thing Right” could be rightfully played on Country radio tomorrow. - Nutmeg Chatter


By Victor D. Infante
Telegram & Gazette Staff

Posted Aug. 13, 2015 at 6:00 AM

A good part of what’s wrong with contemporary country music is that it gets caught up in a saccharine, nostalgia-laden view of small town America that seems, at times, out of touch with reality. So when Connecticut singer-songwriter Jeff Przech, in his song “Eden,” paints a portrait of a young woman yearning to leave a small town that has nothing to offer her, it’s immediately striking. There’s nothing romanticized here. “The streets of empty buildings,” sings Przech, “laced with empty eyes/it’s clear that this ain’t her idea of paradise.”
Przech reserves his empathy for people, not for spoonfed nostalgia, and that gives his new album, “Sounds Like Fresh” — which he’ll play a release party for at 8 p.m. Aug. 15 at the Vanilla Bean Café in Pomfret — a real resonance. Even when he moves to more personal songs, such as the heartbreaking “Wasting Time,” the people in his songs bristle with detail and a sad, near-broken humanity. “That shattered mirror over the sink,” he sings, “shows it’s wrong to act before you think/the evidence seems she cannot ignore.” That entwined sense of wistfulness and combustion carries over to the next song, “Angry All the Time,” where he sings, “I can’t forgive what I can’t forget/and I won’t pay for someone else’s crime.”

Everyone in these songs is a little wounded, and a little broken, and the world they live in can’t be confused with anyone’s idea of paradise. When he does come to a moment of unadulterated happiness on the album, such as in the lovely “Julia Rose” — a song from a parent to a child — it burns brightly in contrast. What makes this range of expression work more than anything is Przech’s rich tenor: His voice is warm, resonant and expressive, allowing him to imbue each song with feeling.
Building a non-sentimental framework for the album works to Przech’s advantage when he pivots to a song more cut from the classic Western music cloth, “Clinchfield Rail,” about a man separated from his family for months while working on a railroad. The song’s a curious artifact on the album, a step away from the more modern-seeming picture he’d been painting — but it works, and indeed, is one of the album’s standout tracks.
The album hurtles to a close with a string of fairly conventional but well-crafted contemporary country songs: “Make A Wrong Thing Right,” “Tell Me Something” and “No Matter Where You Go.” Independently, each song is fine, but in the context of the album they really serve to open things up, taking the fairly dense fare presented earlier and lending it some buoyancy.
The album ends on an interesting two-punch note, with Przech’s song “Back Again” leading into a cover of Ryan Adams’ “English Girls Approximately.” In a lot of ways, the penultimate song is really the album’s closer, with its persona promising his lover that he’ll return a bright contrast to “Eden’s” woman trapped someplace she doesn’t want to be. But “English Girls” makes a good, oddly upbeat ending, with its sense of dashed love and of yearning for someone from another country, again a counterbalance to the picture painted in “Eden.” Przech delivers the song with intensity and feeling, the last guitar strums fading out and bringing to a close an album’s turbulent but ultimately rewarding emotional journey. - Worcester Telegram & Gazette


Jeff Przech’s latest CD Sounds Like Fresh is fine singer-songwriter faire with a country roots edge. Przech, of the Connecticut music scene, has one of those smooth, warm country vocals that makes the listener feel he’s having a personal conversation with him. Thoughtful reflective lyrics with considered selections of acoustic instruments, pedal steel, and percussion are all part of the charm on this CD. Each track, whether bright or dark, makes the listener feel Przech is taking him down a long country road where his stories unfold like the bucolic scenery.

Opening track “Eden” has an easy going vibe buttressed by gritty guitar work in the backdrop. Up front, Przech sings in one of those slightly gravel voices that gives edge to his words. Here, he maintains a perfect balance between the song’s general vibe and the grit on the outskirts. It’s impossible not to listen up and follow along as he lays out his story with his persistent focus. A lead guitar phrase takes center stage, making things pretty in a hearty way when it spikes its higher notes before mellowing out a bit, like tumbleweed catching the wind before pausing, an appropriate sonic landscape for the occasion.

“Wasting Time” has an enticing rambling feeling, making the listener enjoy its pleasant stroll to wherever it wants to go. Przech makes his case with his earnest, plaintive timbre, bringing home the emotional honesty of what he’s singing about. Similarly, “Wasting Time” is built upon a persistent ramble with a touch more grit in the acoustic guitar, a flinty sound supporting Przech’s dreamy, floating vocal approach. It’s a pleasure to hear how his voice suspends itself over the flinty melody while remaining in motion. Pretty, melodic touches around his voice buttress well the bittersweet emotive qualities here.

I don’t think Przech is “Angry All The Time” but his song titled thusly kicks its way forward with a pushy guitar chord that feels strong, assertive. He’s singing about not letting people and events make him angry. It’s all about empowerment, having the strength to let something go and move on. It all sounds so sincere and earnest coming from the plaintive grit in Przech. Relatable and engaging, this tune’s a winner.

“Julia Rose” comes wafting in the winds stirred by wide sounding acoustic and electric guitars. Przech’s vocal approach, crisp and flowing, contrasts sweetly with the flowing smoothness of a mellifluous lead guitar phrase. It’s the sense of musical and emotional largeness of this song that makes it work. It’s like a large, unfurling flag that dazzles with is size and colors. And, those guitars, too, offers another emotive tuft.

“Clinchfield Rail” glides in with a dark overtone from it melodic phrase, a pedal steel guitar played by Jon Graboff that seems to portend something tragic is on its way. Przech’s self-restrained, somber vocal tone adds to the eerie feeling of the song. It’s a perfect work of art, all coming together in one haunting tale of life on the road carrying not so precious cargo and being too long away from home.

“Make A Wrong Thing Right” makes a lot of nice twists and turns in its melodic line and groove, carrying the listener along with Przech’s philosophical point of view. With plenty of grit in the guitars and vocals, this singer-songwriter makes a lot of things right in his song. It feels like a pleasant Sunday morning joy ride. Conversely, “Tell Me Something” takes a direct, straight forward approach, ambling forward with a gentle strum. Here, Przech’s gentle vocal makes the listener feel he’s having a conversation with an old friend.

“No Matter Where You Go” finds a guitar chirping melodically over an exotic percussion instrument’s pattern. A mellow forward motion leaves plenty of open space for a lead guitar to glide in and out with melodic sweep. Przech’s handsome vocal, wholesome as always, carries this one with a particular carefree approach. It let’s his voice breathe, exposing all of its rich timbre and the way that richness percolates in the open atmosphere of this tune. It also helps that he’s singing about a topic near and dear to him: being a father.

“Back Again” allows Przech to unleash a dual guitar line over his steady drum work. He also sings with meaningful depth, especially during his chorus, making the listener feel his message about being away too long. Acoustic guitar and steel guitar make perfect bedfellows on this one, running alongside each other, each offering its own emotional grist and flinty note picking, each note ringing out with something that beautifully, mournfully echoes the bittersweet vocal melody Przech cruises his way through.

Przech closes out his album with “English Girls Approximately,” an assessment of modern English girls, by Ryan Adams, visiting the music scene of Adams’ youth. Przech balances Adams’ intrigue in their elegant refinement with their sensibility that might include a cold ability to discount his youthful attachment. Przech keeps his voice distant from the guitars and even the backing vocal Joanne Rowe provides to illustrate how hard it is to revisit old emotions. This one will hit the head with its sparse descriptions and the heart with its youthful emotional yearning.

Przech has come up with eleven emotionally honest, country flavored singer-songwriter tunes that engage the heart while also warning it, warning it of things the heart should be aware of. Emotional honesty delivered by a warm, engaging vocal surrounded by flinty, rustic melodies and grooves is Przech’s stock in trade. He delivers the goods on Sounds Like Fresh. - Bill Copeland


Connecticut native Jeff Przech released his debut solo album back in March and is currently touring the East Coast this summer, performing all throughout Connecticut, including the Podunk Bluegrass Festival on August 6th. His new album "Sounds Like Fresh" has been receiving rave reviews and has a great warm tone to his songwriting. The eleven-track album begins the soft acoustic strummings of "Eden and "Wasting Time," which will both win your heart over right from the start. His country/folk/rock prowess takes over with the gentle flow of the songs "Tell Me Something" and "Back Again." Jeff's vocals in "Make A Wrong Thing Right" are strong, as this country gem is just waiting to be uncovered. He closes the album with a great cover of Ryan Adams' "English Girls Approximately," as he does his best to stay true to the original. For a complete list of live dates and to find out more about Jeff Przech, please visit his website at jeffprzech.com. - JP's Music Blog


The guitar assault hits you right off with Maribelle, the first track on the record. It continues with Cold November and Under Your Skin, although both of those come off a lot more alt country than southern rock. A little further down they mine that same vein with Second Favorite Memory, where Przech sings that “you’re my second favorite memory…and all the rest are tied for first.” There’s a break-up line for you.

Not everything on the album is a driving tempo. Coy is slower and nearly anthemic with its building crescendo and final guitar solo. The Willows is a ballad about self-destruction, and the aching in Przech’s voice points to the loss of a close, close friend. Checking In has some of that ache as well, but is a slightly different take on the life-on-the-road theme.

Jeff Przech and his bandmates live, and hold day-jobs, in Connecticut. That domicile far away from some of the country’s musical hubs seems to have enabled them with a sense of self in their music. They certainly haven’t subscribed to any of the popular music bandwagons making the rounds today. Instead, they’ve put out a timeless rock and roll album that would have sounded as good 40 years ago as it does today. - Twangville


These nine new originals (and one cover) are more tightly focused, much catchier and a stronger showcase for Przech's voice. The Unionville, Conn., singer hits the middle ground here between gruff and soulful, with a tone that is often reminiscent of Gregg Allman. There are traces of honky-tonk in the bright lead guitar parts on opener "Maribelle" and the trebly licks on "Second Favorite Memory," and Przech threads his voice through the blustery guitars on "Cold November" like he's been doing it on roadhouse stages for years. He takes a more wistful tack on "Four Letter Words," a song that's nostalgic for better, bygone days, and the combination of his rough-edged voice and whirring organ on "Coy" has an especially Allman-esque feel.... his new album is a worthwhile second effort from a musician who's only getting better at what he does. - Eric R. Danton


On his new single, "Someday", Jeff Przech has layered some good, twangy banjo and mandolin on top of the southern rock roots of his last album. The result is a fertile new sound that I'm looking forward to hearing more of on future releases. - Shawn Underwood - Twangville


Discography

"Someday" (single) - February, 2019

"Jeff Przech & The Outfit" - April, 2018

"Sounds Like Fresh" - March, 2015

Photos

Bio

The new music from Jeff Przech (“Presh”) is a big musical departure from his 2018 release, Jeff Przech & The Outfit… which was a big musical departure from his 2015 debut, Sounds Like Fresh. While this might seem like a deliberate reimagining of his sound, Przech disagrees: “I don’t think you can call this a reinvention because I don’t feel I invented anything in the first place. There’s no pretense in my music. I’ve always done the same thing with my songs and recording - I just chase the sounds I hear in my head. On the last record I heard a full band with electric guitars. For these new songs I heard them very raw, stripped down, so that’s how we captured them.”

Przech, who jokingly says he lives “Northeast of Nashville” in the small town of Unionville, Connecticut, strives to be a storyteller in his music first and foremost. His newest single, “Someday” is Exhibit A. Przech’s songs deal with struggle and the human condition, topics that are relatable to most,  and while listeners may not have walked in the shoes of the narrator in “Someday”, they can empathize with his toil and loneliness. Przech gives his narrators a voice, even if that voice does not necessarily belong to Przech himself.

While classic, narrative songwriting and soulful, emotive vocals have always been hallmarks of Przech’s songs, he takes a distinct musical turn with “Someday” and the rest of his new music. The Telecasters and Quilter amps have been traded in for acoustic guitar, banjo, mandolin, and upright bass. The result is a loose, laid back feel that is equally on the stage or on a porch somewhere. Shawn Underwood of Twangville says, “On his new single, ‘Someday’, Jeff Przech has layered some good, twangy banjo and mandolin on top of the southern rock roots of his last album.  The result is a fertile new sound that I'm looking forward to hearing more of.”

Przech looks forward to bringing his songs, new and old, to new ears in 2019. His live shows will include a rotating cast of musicians and instruments - upright bass, drums, steel guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle - along with Przech’s solo performances. Przech takes none it for granted and whether the audience is 3 or 3000, they will see the same show. As Przech says, “If I’m going to ask people to give up their valuable time and hard earned money to come see and listen to me, I need to make it worth their while. I need to provide them something that’s equally valuable, something that’s honest and genuine. I’ve always tried to do that, but I believe these new songs are my best work yet and I can’t wait for people to hear them.”

"Przech sings in a pleasantly worn-in voice on songs cut from enduring alt-country cloth: acoustic-guitar foundations support warm, growling electric licks, keening steel and a winsome world-weary sensibility."

- Eric R. Danton, WSJ/Rolling Stone/Paste/Salon.com

"Przech is as Americana as they come and it’s not a dirty word to throw the country moniker around.  If Przech’s influences were trees he’d have an entire orchard full of some of the greats of the traditional and alt-country movements, as well as varying forms of folk and Americana."

- Chip McCabe, The Lonesome Noise