Jennifer Hall
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Jennifer Hall

Chicago, Illinois, United States | SELF

Chicago, Illinois, United States | SELF
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"Live Review: Jennifer Hall @ Subterranean"

Hovering above the stage at Subterranean is a sculpture of a person stabbing their finger at the sky, poised to take off in the direction of the finger. Behind that person is another, who is in a pulling position, trying to keep the latter person on the ground. What beautiful tension, a fine expression of passion. It’s a great piece of artwork to have above a stage, especially when the music engages this theme of beautiful tension and passion.

Jennifer Hall takes the stage around midnight Saturday in front of an excited crowd. She and her band open with “Young Things,” a strumming groove that rides Jennifer’s voice into a seamless crescendo. Hall has the presence of a strong butterfly; she demands attention, but doesn’t beg for it. The second song, “When We Were Good,” is as jazzy as much as it rocks, really building the momentum for what’s to follow. “My House is Falling: is a song with so much attitude that it stomps out the people noise up top of the venue and in the back of the crowd. Jennifer’s voice along with the guitar creates a beautifully haunting mood.

Hall has a fine ability to always be in sync with her band, while at the same time seemingly to be singing into a hairbrush in her bedroom. The balance of the band is also very spot on. It’s interesting how the dose of rock n roll added to the sound is at such a precise dose, it seems that a tad more would cause chaos. Other stand out songs include “Green and Blue,” “I Want Someone Badly,” and “Like I Lie To You.”

The band closes with a cover of “You Really Gotta Hold On Me.” And this set firmly places Jennifer Hall in the mosaic of city music heard over Saturday night banter and the occasional bottle crash. It could be easy to compare Hall to many of her predecessors, but it’s best to wait a few years and compare others to her. - Heave Media


"Live Review: Jennifer Hall @ Subterranean"

Hovering above the stage at Subterranean is a sculpture of a person stabbing their finger at the sky, poised to take off in the direction of the finger. Behind that person is another, who is in a pulling position, trying to keep the latter person on the ground. What beautiful tension, a fine expression of passion. It’s a great piece of artwork to have above a stage, especially when the music engages this theme of beautiful tension and passion.

Jennifer Hall takes the stage around midnight Saturday in front of an excited crowd. She and her band open with “Young Things,” a strumming groove that rides Jennifer’s voice into a seamless crescendo. Hall has the presence of a strong butterfly; she demands attention, but doesn’t beg for it. The second song, “When We Were Good,” is as jazzy as much as it rocks, really building the momentum for what’s to follow. “My House is Falling: is a song with so much attitude that it stomps out the people noise up top of the venue and in the back of the crowd. Jennifer’s voice along with the guitar creates a beautifully haunting mood.

Hall has a fine ability to always be in sync with her band, while at the same time seemingly to be singing into a hairbrush in her bedroom. The balance of the band is also very spot on. It’s interesting how the dose of rock n roll added to the sound is at such a precise dose, it seems that a tad more would cause chaos. Other stand out songs include “Green and Blue,” “I Want Someone Badly,” and “Like I Lie To You.”

The band closes with a cover of “You Really Gotta Hold On Me.” And this set firmly places Jennifer Hall in the mosaic of city music heard over Saturday night banter and the occasional bottle crash. It could be easy to compare Hall to many of her predecessors, but it’s best to wait a few years and compare others to her. - Heave Media


"Jennifer Hal In This"

Jennifer Hall is quickly becoming one of my favorite singer/songwriters in the city. She has a voice and a presence that is undeniable, and as her debut album, In This, begins to make the rounds more people will be to realize this. In This is beautifully crafted and a surprising mixture of smoky barroom piano tunes ("Green and Blue" or "Oceans") and driving rock songs ("When We Were Good"). My favorite track from the album is "Young Things" because it brings her two sounds together nicely. There are the powerful jazz vocalist undertones with the rock n' roll undercurrent through out. Below is Jennifer performing "Young Things" as captured by Backstage Stage Chicago. She also talks about her choice to stay in Chicago, and be apart of the Chicago scene in an interview following the performance.

You can pre-order and stream three tracks from In This here and be sure to check her out at the release show for the album on September 3rd at Schubas. - Gapers Block


"Jennifer Hal In This"

Jennifer Hall is quickly becoming one of my favorite singer/songwriters in the city. She has a voice and a presence that is undeniable, and as her debut album, In This, begins to make the rounds more people will be to realize this. In This is beautifully crafted and a surprising mixture of smoky barroom piano tunes ("Green and Blue" or "Oceans") and driving rock songs ("When We Were Good"). My favorite track from the album is "Young Things" because it brings her two sounds together nicely. There are the powerful jazz vocalist undertones with the rock n' roll undercurrent through out. Below is Jennifer performing "Young Things" as captured by Backstage Stage Chicago. She also talks about her choice to stay in Chicago, and be apart of the Chicago scene in an interview following the performance.

You can pre-order and stream three tracks from In This here and be sure to check her out at the release show for the album on September 3rd at Schubas. - Gapers Block


"Jennifer Hall "Would You Walk Away""

Jennifer Hall and her band recently took to the Logan Square 'L' stop to record a video for a new song, "Would You Walk Away", and ask for the help of fans in recording her new EP.


Deli Chicago Top 10 Tracks of The Year (#5)

Jennifer Hall "Please Leave" from In This which was released late in 2011, but the video dropped in May 2012.

Jennifer Hall on Daytrotter:

Daytrotter has released their Jennifer Hall session. The session includes four songs from Jennifer's 2011 release, In This.

Recently Hall released a great video for her track "Please Leave" also from In This.

You can catch Jennifer Hall tomorrow night, June 19th, at Schubas with Antony & The Tramps. - Deli Magazine


"Jennifer Hall "Would You Walk Away""

Jennifer Hall and her band recently took to the Logan Square 'L' stop to record a video for a new song, "Would You Walk Away", and ask for the help of fans in recording her new EP.


Deli Chicago Top 10 Tracks of The Year (#5)

Jennifer Hall "Please Leave" from In This which was released late in 2011, but the video dropped in May 2012.

Jennifer Hall on Daytrotter:

Daytrotter has released their Jennifer Hall session. The session includes four songs from Jennifer's 2011 release, In This.

Recently Hall released a great video for her track "Please Leave" also from In This.

You can catch Jennifer Hall tomorrow night, June 19th, at Schubas with Antony & The Tramps. - Deli Magazine


"Versatile Vocalist Jennifer Hall"

Jazzy Chicagoan Jennifer Hall writes music that combines youthful exuberance and old fashioned sincerity. Hailing from the Chicago suburbs, Hall is a versatile vocalist influenced by the likes of Edith Piaf and Ray Charles. Her new album, “In This” provides a snappy blend of pop, jazz and soul. Our Town spoke with Hall about the Chicago music scene, her writing and um, Glee.

Our Town You count jazz as an influence. How does that express itself in your writing?
Jennifer Hall Throughout high school I listened to a lot of old jazz standards sung by Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday. I loved the way Ella would linger on certain notes or hold her phrases almost as if she were stripping the emotion out of the words. I love how in jazz you are allowed to play around with the rhythm and then catch up later. Ben, our keys player and Mat, our drummer also happen to be excellent jazz players. Their parts definitely reveal their jazz influences.

OT How does the band write?
JH It feels great to say that the ways the songs are being written lately are changing. Before, I would bring lyrics and melody to our guitarist, Noam. He would write chords and do the arranging. Now our writing process has diversified and every band member contributes.

OT Do you feel more at home as a songwriter or performer, or do both experiences inform each other?
JH Coming from musical theater and choir growing up, I think I will always feel more at home as a performer, although I am embracing writing more as time goes on.

OT Right, you grew up participating in choir and show choir.
JH I learned how to have strong work ethic in that the best songs didn't come easy but required immense focus and a great deal of work. Those things have really stayed with me almost ten years later and have shaped how I approach making music.

OT Okay, but is show choir anything like Glee?
JH It was a blast. We did shows for the local elementary schools, nursing homes, community events. Although I've only seen Glee a few times it seems like it was pretty similar! There was definitely some high school drama, plenty of young love but mostly it was about people coming together to sing and have fun.

OT What’s your favorite aspect of the Chicago music scene?
JH The Chicago music scene is really supportive. From the talent buyers, to the artists to the concert goers, everyone seems to really appreciate one another and sees how we all need each other to have a great night of music.

OT Favorite venue?
JH If I meet someone out of town who needs something to do for the evening I send them to The Metro or Lincoln Hall. At Lincoln Hall the food is incredible and the staff is so friendly. Metro has a beautiful stage and the sound is awesome.

OT I’ve heard the national anthem is pretty vocally tough. What was it like to sing it at Wrigley Field?
JH I guess it is tough because the range is pretty wide. This year, I brought a pitch pipe to Wrigley Field to make sure I started off on the right note! It was a such a great evening, singing there this year. The Cubs staff was so helpful and supportive. I hope to be back next year.

Jennifer Hall plays The Metro August 31st at 8 p.m. - Chicago Sun Times


"Versatile Vocalist Jennifer Hall"

Jazzy Chicagoan Jennifer Hall writes music that combines youthful exuberance and old fashioned sincerity. Hailing from the Chicago suburbs, Hall is a versatile vocalist influenced by the likes of Edith Piaf and Ray Charles. Her new album, “In This” provides a snappy blend of pop, jazz and soul. Our Town spoke with Hall about the Chicago music scene, her writing and um, Glee.

Our Town You count jazz as an influence. How does that express itself in your writing?
Jennifer Hall Throughout high school I listened to a lot of old jazz standards sung by Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday. I loved the way Ella would linger on certain notes or hold her phrases almost as if she were stripping the emotion out of the words. I love how in jazz you are allowed to play around with the rhythm and then catch up later. Ben, our keys player and Mat, our drummer also happen to be excellent jazz players. Their parts definitely reveal their jazz influences.

OT How does the band write?
JH It feels great to say that the ways the songs are being written lately are changing. Before, I would bring lyrics and melody to our guitarist, Noam. He would write chords and do the arranging. Now our writing process has diversified and every band member contributes.

OT Do you feel more at home as a songwriter or performer, or do both experiences inform each other?
JH Coming from musical theater and choir growing up, I think I will always feel more at home as a performer, although I am embracing writing more as time goes on.

OT Right, you grew up participating in choir and show choir.
JH I learned how to have strong work ethic in that the best songs didn't come easy but required immense focus and a great deal of work. Those things have really stayed with me almost ten years later and have shaped how I approach making music.

OT Okay, but is show choir anything like Glee?
JH It was a blast. We did shows for the local elementary schools, nursing homes, community events. Although I've only seen Glee a few times it seems like it was pretty similar! There was definitely some high school drama, plenty of young love but mostly it was about people coming together to sing and have fun.

OT What’s your favorite aspect of the Chicago music scene?
JH The Chicago music scene is really supportive. From the talent buyers, to the artists to the concert goers, everyone seems to really appreciate one another and sees how we all need each other to have a great night of music.

OT Favorite venue?
JH If I meet someone out of town who needs something to do for the evening I send them to The Metro or Lincoln Hall. At Lincoln Hall the food is incredible and the staff is so friendly. Metro has a beautiful stage and the sound is awesome.

OT I’ve heard the national anthem is pretty vocally tough. What was it like to sing it at Wrigley Field?
JH I guess it is tough because the range is pretty wide. This year, I brought a pitch pipe to Wrigley Field to make sure I started off on the right note! It was a such a great evening, singing there this year. The Cubs staff was so helpful and supportive. I hope to be back next year.

Jennifer Hall plays The Metro August 31st at 8 p.m. - Chicago Sun Times


"Concert Review: Jennifer Hall at Metro"

Used to be that Labor Day celebrated not only the end of summer and the hopes of Chicago's baseball fans but the end of festival season. 2012, however looks to be different. Not only has the outdoor music season firmly implanted itself into at least mid-September with North Coast, the Hideout Block Party/AV Club Fest and an outdoor incarnation of Riot Fest, among others, but this year, local musician/artist/gadabout, Tom Schraeder is putting on a month-long salute to local musicians, comedians and artists at Lilly's, called Chicago, I Love You. With all music swirling around the city, it was fitting with that the newly-thirtysomething Cabaret Metro decided to kick off the holiday weekend with a trio of local acts on Friday night, headlined by songwriter and chanteuse Jennifer Hall.



It was a tough draw for the locals, with people heading out of town, to North Coast/Girl Talk or just resting up for the weekend and the first openers, Go Long Mule got the worst of it. The band went on to a crowd of mostly press, other musicians and a few early-arriving fans, which was a shame. Their set was full of southern drawl, crashing riffs and a general air of old-fashioned make-hay rock 'n' roll. It was an ideal set to get the ball rolling on a Friday night, would only that there had been more than a handful of people to push it. Nonetheless, the four piece outfit never once looked like they were phoning it in, with the lead singer's hat flying off midway through their closing number, an absolute, fire-breathing JAM.

Next up was was My My My, who came on seven strong with women in sparkling dresses a Lucifer-looking bassist and two backup singers - it was an impressive presentation. Their set was energetic from the get-go, with the crowd being slightly larger and notably more enthusiastic with a strong contingent clearly there to do nothing but dance to My My My. And who could blame them? The band churned out danceable pop like it was, well, their job. The songs had keys sparkling, choruses rolling and the male and female singers trading firing lines off at each other with obvious charisma. Midway through the set, they broke into an impressive a capella version of a song that I didn't recognize, but clearly should have (I was later informed that it was a current Nicki Minaj radio hit). The cover drew hoots and cheers of the "oh, my God, are they actually doing this song?"-variety. As they did this, I realized that it was perfect microcosm of my reaction to them - they were really good at playing a style of music that I didn't really like. As I codgered my way on, My My My played a few more songs and then made way for the main attraction.

Jennifer Hall may only have one record (2011's In This) to her name so far, but it was clear when she took the stage from the volume of cheering, amount of cell phone pictures taken and immediate surge in the room's energy that she's already got herself a devoted and growing following around town. She started strong with the standout track In This, "Like I Lie To You". It's a strutting, wailing, crashing beast of a song that allowed her to belt high notes to the rafters while the band worked itself into a frenzy. Leading with the best song can be dangerous for a young band, but fortunately, this served as a statement-of-purpose for the rest of the set, establishing both the singer and the band from the get-go.

For Friday's show, the band had a new drummer sitting in, Larry Beers from Chicago's beloved marching band punks, Mucca Pazza (among others) and was also debuting a number of new songs. Both could have been potential danger spots, pushing the band into unfamiliar territory but they made the songs sound, if not road-tested, then at least certainly studio-ready, playing them with conviction and muscle behind Hall. This was a good thing because, aside from a few incendiary guitar solos, the boys behind her had little hope of coming close to matching Hall's bravura vocals, which seemed to get stronger as the night went on.

Shifting styles easily from jazz standards to rock to soul, the band and singer paced themselves well and, despite playing only three songs from their album, had the crowd into the show from the first notes to the last. Hall gave the band a break midway through the set with a hushed version of Nina Simone's "The Other Woman", backed only by a soft guitar that could send chills up your spine before picking things right back up with yet another throaty wail at the end of "Young Things", the next song. After a little over an hour, the band walked off the stage briefly before returning to send the crowd home dancing with a swinging version of Smokey Robinson's classic "You Really Got A Hold On Me", knowing enough to leave the people wanting more.

After the show Hall was taking pictures, signing autographs and thanking any number of well - On Warmer Music, Music Blog


"Concert Review: Jennifer Hall at Metro"

Used to be that Labor Day celebrated not only the end of summer and the hopes of Chicago's baseball fans but the end of festival season. 2012, however looks to be different. Not only has the outdoor music season firmly implanted itself into at least mid-September with North Coast, the Hideout Block Party/AV Club Fest and an outdoor incarnation of Riot Fest, among others, but this year, local musician/artist/gadabout, Tom Schraeder is putting on a month-long salute to local musicians, comedians and artists at Lilly's, called Chicago, I Love You. With all music swirling around the city, it was fitting with that the newly-thirtysomething Cabaret Metro decided to kick off the holiday weekend with a trio of local acts on Friday night, headlined by songwriter and chanteuse Jennifer Hall.



It was a tough draw for the locals, with people heading out of town, to North Coast/Girl Talk or just resting up for the weekend and the first openers, Go Long Mule got the worst of it. The band went on to a crowd of mostly press, other musicians and a few early-arriving fans, which was a shame. Their set was full of southern drawl, crashing riffs and a general air of old-fashioned make-hay rock 'n' roll. It was an ideal set to get the ball rolling on a Friday night, would only that there had been more than a handful of people to push it. Nonetheless, the four piece outfit never once looked like they were phoning it in, with the lead singer's hat flying off midway through their closing number, an absolute, fire-breathing JAM.

Next up was was My My My, who came on seven strong with women in sparkling dresses a Lucifer-looking bassist and two backup singers - it was an impressive presentation. Their set was energetic from the get-go, with the crowd being slightly larger and notably more enthusiastic with a strong contingent clearly there to do nothing but dance to My My My. And who could blame them? The band churned out danceable pop like it was, well, their job. The songs had keys sparkling, choruses rolling and the male and female singers trading firing lines off at each other with obvious charisma. Midway through the set, they broke into an impressive a capella version of a song that I didn't recognize, but clearly should have (I was later informed that it was a current Nicki Minaj radio hit). The cover drew hoots and cheers of the "oh, my God, are they actually doing this song?"-variety. As they did this, I realized that it was perfect microcosm of my reaction to them - they were really good at playing a style of music that I didn't really like. As I codgered my way on, My My My played a few more songs and then made way for the main attraction.

Jennifer Hall may only have one record (2011's In This) to her name so far, but it was clear when she took the stage from the volume of cheering, amount of cell phone pictures taken and immediate surge in the room's energy that she's already got herself a devoted and growing following around town. She started strong with the standout track In This, "Like I Lie To You". It's a strutting, wailing, crashing beast of a song that allowed her to belt high notes to the rafters while the band worked itself into a frenzy. Leading with the best song can be dangerous for a young band, but fortunately, this served as a statement-of-purpose for the rest of the set, establishing both the singer and the band from the get-go.

For Friday's show, the band had a new drummer sitting in, Larry Beers from Chicago's beloved marching band punks, Mucca Pazza (among others) and was also debuting a number of new songs. Both could have been potential danger spots, pushing the band into unfamiliar territory but they made the songs sound, if not road-tested, then at least certainly studio-ready, playing them with conviction and muscle behind Hall. This was a good thing because, aside from a few incendiary guitar solos, the boys behind her had little hope of coming close to matching Hall's bravura vocals, which seemed to get stronger as the night went on.

Shifting styles easily from jazz standards to rock to soul, the band and singer paced themselves well and, despite playing only three songs from their album, had the crowd into the show from the first notes to the last. Hall gave the band a break midway through the set with a hushed version of Nina Simone's "The Other Woman", backed only by a soft guitar that could send chills up your spine before picking things right back up with yet another throaty wail at the end of "Young Things", the next song. After a little over an hour, the band walked off the stage briefly before returning to send the crowd home dancing with a swinging version of Smokey Robinson's classic "You Really Got A Hold On Me", knowing enough to leave the people wanting more.

After the show Hall was taking pictures, signing autographs and thanking any number of well - On Warmer Music, Music Blog


"Jennifer Hall"

A 24-year-old with the proverbial old soul, Jennifer Hall has been told she looks 12, yet acts 30. When I asked when she knew she would pursue singing, she looked upward quizzically trying to place a point and time. “That’s funny you ask that,” she exclaimed, “my aunt just recently told me she can remember me singing at age three.” While Jennifer can’t distinctly track her impetus to sing back to childhood, she can track a long-term feeling of ending up in the field. Looking back, she remembers singing "Pocahontas" at age 10 in her living room as a very natural thing. The Disney crooner has come a long way since.

When I saw Jennifer perform last fall at Lincoln Hall, she took to the stage casually clad in jeans and a loose-fitting tank top, hair pulled back and spirit radiating, before letting her voice encroach the microphone and baited crowd. As her show unfolded, I realized she was imbued with such influences as Etta James or Billie Holiday, yet intricately carves out something all her own. She was poignant and exact, delivering a soulful execution of lyrics with a voice as strong as waves crashing on shore. “I am looking to capture a sunbeam, not just any ray of light beaming, because if I could, I would make oceans. Within oceans I would find beauty. Inside beauty I would uncover truth and inside truth I would find you.” As she sang her hit “Oceans,” I found myself tearing up just as she wrapped the song, striking cords drawn from her experiences and love to project onto an audience stranger like myself. It was something very special.

After losing her mother to a heart attack two years ago, Jennifer has been able to channel the emotions from that trauma into music, though it was not an easy space to get to. “For a while I couldn’t write or touch my piano,” she admits, but eventually, as some of the darkness dissipated, she was able to draw some creativity from the tragedy. A break-up helped add to the grit in the art as well, and now she has the captivating album In This to account for all that may have bogged her down. Jennifer admits it was a scattered process in making the album, because so much was going on at the time, and a flow wasn’t easily achieved. Once the emotions and subsequent tracks got in line, she made magic. The next album is more reflective, she says, sharing a sort of conclusion after the storm.

Working and creating alongside her band mates Noam Wallenberg, Alex Sheyn, Mat Roberts, Ben Joseph and Peter Moxley, there has been an indefinite road via Craigslist and alternate band gigs to form the current group’s lustrous connection. And while Jennifer admits it’s always felt honest to represent herself as an artist, attaching an “and the” has been thrown around. There is no denying the crucial part her fellow musicians and friends play in constructing her sound.

In the coming months Jennifer and her fellas will continue playing shows throughout Chicago at music staples like Schubas and Martyrs. There are talks of taking excursions outside their city comfort zones, and there’s always the relish in moving up from “shitty gigs” in the early stages at spots like Goose Island.

Wherever she goes next, Jennifer is sure to evoke the little girl that once owned children’s choir auditions matched with the inimitable charm of a seasoned soul destined for moonbeams and captured rays of sun. - UR Chicago online


"Jennifer Hall"

A 24-year-old with the proverbial old soul, Jennifer Hall has been told she looks 12, yet acts 30. When I asked when she knew she would pursue singing, she looked upward quizzically trying to place a point and time. “That’s funny you ask that,” she exclaimed, “my aunt just recently told me she can remember me singing at age three.” While Jennifer can’t distinctly track her impetus to sing back to childhood, she can track a long-term feeling of ending up in the field. Looking back, she remembers singing "Pocahontas" at age 10 in her living room as a very natural thing. The Disney crooner has come a long way since.

When I saw Jennifer perform last fall at Lincoln Hall, she took to the stage casually clad in jeans and a loose-fitting tank top, hair pulled back and spirit radiating, before letting her voice encroach the microphone and baited crowd. As her show unfolded, I realized she was imbued with such influences as Etta James or Billie Holiday, yet intricately carves out something all her own. She was poignant and exact, delivering a soulful execution of lyrics with a voice as strong as waves crashing on shore. “I am looking to capture a sunbeam, not just any ray of light beaming, because if I could, I would make oceans. Within oceans I would find beauty. Inside beauty I would uncover truth and inside truth I would find you.” As she sang her hit “Oceans,” I found myself tearing up just as she wrapped the song, striking cords drawn from her experiences and love to project onto an audience stranger like myself. It was something very special.

After losing her mother to a heart attack two years ago, Jennifer has been able to channel the emotions from that trauma into music, though it was not an easy space to get to. “For a while I couldn’t write or touch my piano,” she admits, but eventually, as some of the darkness dissipated, she was able to draw some creativity from the tragedy. A break-up helped add to the grit in the art as well, and now she has the captivating album In This to account for all that may have bogged her down. Jennifer admits it was a scattered process in making the album, because so much was going on at the time, and a flow wasn’t easily achieved. Once the emotions and subsequent tracks got in line, she made magic. The next album is more reflective, she says, sharing a sort of conclusion after the storm.

Working and creating alongside her band mates Noam Wallenberg, Alex Sheyn, Mat Roberts, Ben Joseph and Peter Moxley, there has been an indefinite road via Craigslist and alternate band gigs to form the current group’s lustrous connection. And while Jennifer admits it’s always felt honest to represent herself as an artist, attaching an “and the” has been thrown around. There is no denying the crucial part her fellow musicians and friends play in constructing her sound.

In the coming months Jennifer and her fellas will continue playing shows throughout Chicago at music staples like Schubas and Martyrs. There are talks of taking excursions outside their city comfort zones, and there’s always the relish in moving up from “shitty gigs” in the early stages at spots like Goose Island.

Wherever she goes next, Jennifer is sure to evoke the little girl that once owned children’s choir auditions matched with the inimitable charm of a seasoned soul destined for moonbeams and captured rays of sun. - UR Chicago online


Discography

*In This, 2011

*(NEW EP, to be released early 2014)

Photos

Bio

Sometimes sweet, occasionally heartbreaking, and always sincere, Chicago’s Jennifer Hall writes music that looks back to an age long gone while buzzing with a youthful edge. Combining influences such as The Black Keys, Patsy Cline, St. Vincent, Frank Ocean, Rufus Wainwright, Jeff Buckley, Wilco and Ella Fitzgerald, this vocalist/songwriter and veteran performer has always had a goal of making great music despite genre or trend.

In the past two years, Jennifer and her band have taken the Chicago music scene by storm to say the least, playing with national touring acts including The Lumineers, The Damnwells, Harper Blynn, William Beckett of The Academy Is… and Grammy-nominated artist Matthew Santos. She has played at notable Chicago venues such as Lincoln Hall and Wicker Park Fest, Jennifer has also headlined Schubas, Subterranean and most recently The Metro in August 2012 playing for packed houses each time. She has been featured on Fox Evening News with Bob Sirrott, Fox AM News, WGN Midday News, WCIU 'You & Me This Morning', and on the radio stations for colleges DePaul, Loyola and UIC.

She completed her first Daytrotter Session July 2012 and toured the midwest, East Coast and Mid/South throughout the summer of 2013 debuting new material. Jennifer and her band are working on their second record, an EP set to release in early 2014.

Jennifer has also guest appeared several times as National Anthem singer at Wrigley Field for the Chicago Cubs, US Cellular Field for the Chicago White Sox and at Soldier Field.

The near future is sure to bring promising things for this buzzing Chicago artist.