Jeramiah Red
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Jeramiah Red

Anaheim, California, United States | SELF

Anaheim, California, United States | SELF
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Celebrating its 11th anniversary, the OC Music Awards kicks off on January 3rd with seven weeks of free showcases at different venues across the county. 35 local artists will compete for the titles of Best Live Band or Best Live Acoustic and a performance slot at the 2012 OC Music Awards, March 3 at the Grove of Anaheim. And, the voting is open now!

“ Our music is very heavy; it has a bite...But also, we do songs and stuff where you can groove and sip on something nice, like smooth...I think we'd be closer to a whiskey.
” Travis Ruiz about Jeramiah Red's sound Much like one of their strongest musical influences, The Raconteurs (who are self-described as a “new band made up of old friends”), Jeramiah Red define their artistic collaboration as a “camaraderie” that unofficially started at different times in their lives–whether that be through school, through work, or through other bands that weren’t satisfying their musical expression authentically.

After vocalist Wes Dickson and bassist Tim Miller spent time in a punk rock outfit, they bonded with drummer Matt Pleskacz, percussionist and harmonica player Travis Ruiz, and guitarist Ian Cullen over their mutual love for the sex-slathered, meaty guitar riff sounds of The Dead Weather, The Raconteurs, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Black Keys, older Kings of Leon, and gritty Americana blues.




A sound not only radically different from the punk rock sound Dickson and Miller were used to playing but the poppy “Jack Johnson-like” surf rock with a “Shwayze kind of thing” that Pleskacz, Ruiz, and Cullen were used to playing.

Although, for the record, the Shwayze reference is a point of contention amongst band mates.

“ I started playing punk rock music and thought, 'Yeah. I want to be a musician. I don't care if I'm going to be poor...This is what I want to do.'
” Dickson It is both these vastly different musical experiences and their individual moments of musical epiphany that have brought Jeramiah Red together to write songs about “relationships,” whether they be with a girl, a friend, a critical (or in Pleskacz’ case, encouraging) parent, an establishment, or strangers in the audience who know all the words to their songs.

Oh, and a teenage distaste for sports.

“I was like 16. And I said, ‘I hate sports. I don’t want to play sports anymore.’ I got sick of sports. I hated high school,” Dickson explained. “It was right when I became a punker. Anti-establishment came into me…I started playing punk rock music and thought, ‘Yeah. I want to be a musician. I don’t care if I’m going to be poor…This is what I want to do.’”

Both Cullen and Pleskacz followed a similar path; both were urged to play classical piano.

Pleskacz, who said he knew from when he was a “fetus” that he wanted to play music, showed a dislike for piano, his mother told him that she wanted him to stay in music and to pick any other instrument. Pleskacz chose the drums which, as an adult, he deems as a precious release from the mundanity of materialistic struggl



Read more: OC Music Awards 2012: Jeramiah Red Drink Heavily From The Well Of Bluesy Classic Rock http://kroq.radio.com/2011/12/30/oc-music-awards-2012-jeramiah-red-drink-heavily-from-the-well-of-bluesy-classic-rock/#ixzz1vRYTw7X4 - KROQ


Who will be 2012's Young the Giant? There's no denying the Irvine band formerly known as the Jakes had a stellar 2011, playing the MTV VMAs, Jimmy Kimmel Live and festivals all over the world while riding the enormous waves of their first full-length release. Here, we predict the county's next breakout artists—go see them while you can for less than $40 at a neighborhood joint before they run away from OC forever.

NICOLE VAUGHN & HER LOVELY BAND
Fans still mourning the breakup of Rilo Kiley can find solace in Nicole Vaughn & Her Lovely Band. Vaughn's career picked up steam in 2011 with the release of her album Say It. Her next release will be the first recordings with Her Lovely Band, who joined her last year. The ship that keeps her afloat in a sea of singer/songwriters, Her Lovely Band includes drummer Garrison Giali, guitarist Kris Butcher, Dylan Bowes and backup vocalist/percussionist Eli Balmer.

THE GROMBLE
The Gromble are arguably the biggest, funnest band out of South County right now; their live shows ooze with hyperkinetic charisma. They have a deal with 37 Records in Westminster and will release a full-length soon.

KIEV
Orange's Kiev set the local music scene a-twitter with their stereoscopic 3D performance at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts with Menomena in May. Three-dimensional projections of stoney illustrations and lava-lamp-like goo floated onstage as they played. Beyond a cool light show, it's their tight and technical brand of indie rock that keeps Kiev on top of the local-music consciousness.

RAILROAD TO ALASKA
Railroad to Alaska's precise-yet-carnal sound unites indie rock fans and metalheads because of their lyrics and wild, live concerts. In 2011, they won Best New Artist at the OC Music Awards, and this year, they have been nominated for Best Metal, Best Alternative and Best Live Band.

JERAMIAH RED
I was really, really trying to avoid writing about them—not because they don't deserve it, but because I don't want to be caught in a conflict of interest. So I'll get this out of the way; I'm dating a guy in the band. Phew. I was forced to change my mind after Jeramiah Red were nominated in six categories for the OCMAs, tied only with Young the Giant. They surpassed groups that are nationally known and receive frequent airplay, despite the fact the band only released their first album in December—and they don't even have a record deal. From a Jan. 9 post on Heard Mentality. - OC WEEKLY


Who will be 2012's Young the Giant? There's no denying the Irvine band formerly known as the Jakes had a stellar 2011, playing the MTV VMAs, Jimmy Kimmel Live and festivals all over the world while riding the enormous waves of their first full-length release. Here, we predict the county's next breakout artists—go see them while you can for less than $40 at a neighborhood joint before they run away from OC forever.

NICOLE VAUGHN & HER LOVELY BAND
Fans still mourning the breakup of Rilo Kiley can find solace in Nicole Vaughn & Her Lovely Band. Vaughn's career picked up steam in 2011 with the release of her album Say It. Her next release will be the first recordings with Her Lovely Band, who joined her last year. The ship that keeps her afloat in a sea of singer/songwriters, Her Lovely Band includes drummer Garrison Giali, guitarist Kris Butcher, Dylan Bowes and backup vocalist/percussionist Eli Balmer.

THE GROMBLE
The Gromble are arguably the biggest, funnest band out of South County right now; their live shows ooze with hyperkinetic charisma. They have a deal with 37 Records in Westminster and will release a full-length soon.

KIEV
Orange's Kiev set the local music scene a-twitter with their stereoscopic 3D performance at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts with Menomena in May. Three-dimensional projections of stoney illustrations and lava-lamp-like goo floated onstage as they played. Beyond a cool light show, it's their tight and technical brand of indie rock that keeps Kiev on top of the local-music consciousness.

RAILROAD TO ALASKA
Railroad to Alaska's precise-yet-carnal sound unites indie rock fans and metalheads because of their lyrics and wild, live concerts. In 2011, they won Best New Artist at the OC Music Awards, and this year, they have been nominated for Best Metal, Best Alternative and Best Live Band.

JERAMIAH RED
I was really, really trying to avoid writing about them—not because they don't deserve it, but because I don't want to be caught in a conflict of interest. So I'll get this out of the way; I'm dating a guy in the band. Phew. I was forced to change my mind after Jeramiah Red were nominated in six categories for the OCMAs, tied only with Young the Giant. They surpassed groups that are nationally known and receive frequent airplay, despite the fact the band only released their first album in December—and they don't even have a record deal. From a Jan. 9 post on Heard Mentality. - OC WEEKLY


Posted by Sara Escalante | 0 comments

It seems like just yesterday that I attended the first Tuesday night Showcase series on January 3rd, where the battle for best live band and best live acoustic began. Yet nine weeks seem to have somehow slipped by, culminating with the 11th annual OC Music Awards this past Saturday, March 3rd, at the City National Grove of Anaheim. From that first showcase until now, I have been introduced to and become a fan of new and local artists, added literally hundreds of jams to my ever-expanding musical library, and most importantly have had the privilege of meeting and interviewing many of these bands whom I can now call friends. This sweet ride began at Detroit Bar, a long time local hangout of mine, and it ended with a red carpet, flashing bulbs, 135 bands, and over a thousand fans. Here are some highlights of the final sold-out Awards night…

Jeramiah Red
In just a couple of months I have become obsessed with so many local bands, and it was surreal to watch people that I met and watched play at small bars around Orange County, be formally introduced and come down the red carpet. For instance Jeramiah Red, five guys I saw and fell in love with at the first showcase night, were now arriving at the OC Music Awards with six nominations in their pocket, including Best Album, Song, New Artist, Blues, Country, and Rock. Along with nabbing two of these awards—Best New Artist, and Best Blues—they also, once again, delivered a killer performance of “Can’t Help Myself” that had the entire audience on their feet. Win, lose, or draw, I am convinced that these guys are a force to be reckoned with, and I know our entire team at Music In Press is ecstatic that they are headlining our Music Pays It Forward launch concert at The Copper Door in Santa Ana on March 13th, 2012.
Riding high on their Best Live Band Award, which they won for their performance at Santa Ana’s Samueli Theatre the previous week, Railroad to Alaska arrived on the red carpet in good spirits, toying with photographers: “Sorry we’re all so ugly!” “Does my hair look okay?” I have had the pleasure of meeting them, and again, what strikes me the most about these guys, and really about most of these local bands, is that while they are drowning in talent, their humility serves as a life vest that seems to keep their heads above water—let’s hope they don’t lose that. Founder of Warped Tour, Kevin Lyman, presented Railroad to Alaska with their Best Live Band Award—which includes a four-day recording session at Red Bull Studios, a full Ernie Ball endorsement and a tour pack filled with Ernie Ball strings and accessories, as well as a performance slot on four of the Vans Warped Tour dates this summer. The band then took the stage and with their epic performance, reminded everyone why they deserved this award as well as their win in the Best Metal category.
Another local favorite of mine, Nicole Vaughn and her Lovely Band, not only opened the show but also took home the award for Best Country. In her modest acceptance speech, the adorable Miss Vaughn talked about “how great it’s been sharing this journey with all the other bands over this year and over all the years… [and thanked] our parents for letting us live at home for free while we are all trying to do whatever it is we are trying to do.” (Later that night @Nicole_Vaughn tweeted, “Drinking whiskey with my ma to celebrate! Lots of hard work, a lot of love from our community and so happy. Thank you everyone” …see, I told you she is adorable).
This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award went to the more than deserving Rodney Bingenheimer, aka Rodney on the ROQ. A wonderful video montage was put together to honor and highlight the epic career of this disc jockey who was introduced as “the only DJ that is more impressive than a band.” Bingenheimer is attributed with helping countless iconic bands become successful. His willingness to play and promote new and edgy artists through the airwaves brought the sounds of Guns N’ Roses, the Sex Pistols, The Cure, No Doubt, Nirvana, Agent Orange, The Adolescents, the Offspring, and many more to American listeners.

Kiev
Unfortunately, many of the bigger names were no shows. Video acceptance speeches were sent in for Young the Giant, who racked up three awards for Best Song, Best Alternative, and Best Music Video, as well as Social Distortion who won Best New Album. Also absent were The Growlers, The Dirty Heads, and The Aquabats. There were also a number of technical glitches throughout the entire ceremony—like when the Best Youth video started rolling while the owners of Wahoo’s Fish Taco were smack dab in the middle of announcing the nominees for Best Surf Band—but all in all, the audience seemed to let those mistakes slide, and host Psycho Mike of KROQ did a good job of keeping the program running smoothly.
In all reality it may have been the final performance of the show by Best Indie winners, Kiev, that made everyone forget abou - MUSIC IN PRESS


Posted by Sara Escalante | 0 comments

It seems like just yesterday that I attended the first Tuesday night Showcase series on January 3rd, where the battle for best live band and best live acoustic began. Yet nine weeks seem to have somehow slipped by, culminating with the 11th annual OC Music Awards this past Saturday, March 3rd, at the City National Grove of Anaheim. From that first showcase until now, I have been introduced to and become a fan of new and local artists, added literally hundreds of jams to my ever-expanding musical library, and most importantly have had the privilege of meeting and interviewing many of these bands whom I can now call friends. This sweet ride began at Detroit Bar, a long time local hangout of mine, and it ended with a red carpet, flashing bulbs, 135 bands, and over a thousand fans. Here are some highlights of the final sold-out Awards night…

Jeramiah Red
In just a couple of months I have become obsessed with so many local bands, and it was surreal to watch people that I met and watched play at small bars around Orange County, be formally introduced and come down the red carpet. For instance Jeramiah Red, five guys I saw and fell in love with at the first showcase night, were now arriving at the OC Music Awards with six nominations in their pocket, including Best Album, Song, New Artist, Blues, Country, and Rock. Along with nabbing two of these awards—Best New Artist, and Best Blues—they also, once again, delivered a killer performance of “Can’t Help Myself” that had the entire audience on their feet. Win, lose, or draw, I am convinced that these guys are a force to be reckoned with, and I know our entire team at Music In Press is ecstatic that they are headlining our Music Pays It Forward launch concert at The Copper Door in Santa Ana on March 13th, 2012.
Riding high on their Best Live Band Award, which they won for their performance at Santa Ana’s Samueli Theatre the previous week, Railroad to Alaska arrived on the red carpet in good spirits, toying with photographers: “Sorry we’re all so ugly!” “Does my hair look okay?” I have had the pleasure of meeting them, and again, what strikes me the most about these guys, and really about most of these local bands, is that while they are drowning in talent, their humility serves as a life vest that seems to keep their heads above water—let’s hope they don’t lose that. Founder of Warped Tour, Kevin Lyman, presented Railroad to Alaska with their Best Live Band Award—which includes a four-day recording session at Red Bull Studios, a full Ernie Ball endorsement and a tour pack filled with Ernie Ball strings and accessories, as well as a performance slot on four of the Vans Warped Tour dates this summer. The band then took the stage and with their epic performance, reminded everyone why they deserved this award as well as their win in the Best Metal category.
Another local favorite of mine, Nicole Vaughn and her Lovely Band, not only opened the show but also took home the award for Best Country. In her modest acceptance speech, the adorable Miss Vaughn talked about “how great it’s been sharing this journey with all the other bands over this year and over all the years… [and thanked] our parents for letting us live at home for free while we are all trying to do whatever it is we are trying to do.” (Later that night @Nicole_Vaughn tweeted, “Drinking whiskey with my ma to celebrate! Lots of hard work, a lot of love from our community and so happy. Thank you everyone” …see, I told you she is adorable).
This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award went to the more than deserving Rodney Bingenheimer, aka Rodney on the ROQ. A wonderful video montage was put together to honor and highlight the epic career of this disc jockey who was introduced as “the only DJ that is more impressive than a band.” Bingenheimer is attributed with helping countless iconic bands become successful. His willingness to play and promote new and edgy artists through the airwaves brought the sounds of Guns N’ Roses, the Sex Pistols, The Cure, No Doubt, Nirvana, Agent Orange, The Adolescents, the Offspring, and many more to American listeners.

Kiev
Unfortunately, many of the bigger names were no shows. Video acceptance speeches were sent in for Young the Giant, who racked up three awards for Best Song, Best Alternative, and Best Music Video, as well as Social Distortion who won Best New Album. Also absent were The Growlers, The Dirty Heads, and The Aquabats. There were also a number of technical glitches throughout the entire ceremony—like when the Best Youth video started rolling while the owners of Wahoo’s Fish Taco were smack dab in the middle of announcing the nominees for Best Surf Band—but all in all, the audience seemed to let those mistakes slide, and host Psycho Mike of KROQ did a good job of keeping the program running smoothly.
In all reality it may have been the final performance of the show by Best Indie winners, Kiev, that made everyone forget abou - MUSIC IN PRESS


Orange Pop: Jeramiah Red ups its game
January 17th, 2012, 3:15 pm · · posted by KELLI SKYE FADROSKI, THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

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Snuggled into old movie theater seats that line a back wall inside ArtiSans label, a recording studio in Fullerton, local rock band Jeramiah Red chats excitedly back and forth about its six OC Music Awards nominations.
The quintet is still somewhat in shock that they’re tied with Irvine’s breakout band Young the Giant for the most nods at this year’s ceremony, March 3 at City National Grove of Anaheim. “We definitely weren’t expecting all of those nominations, so that was a big surprise,” vocalist Wes Dickson says.
“To be nominated for six,” adds guitarist Ian Cullen, “at first I was like, this is a different Jeramiah Red. It was a huge honor because we worked really hard on the album, so to be nominated with Young the Giant and Social Distortion and everybody like that was really exciting and a totally cool thing.”

Jeramiah Red’s five-song EP — Ghost Songs from the Getty, released in December and produced by Barrett Slagle at ArtiSans — is nominated for best album alongside the Aquabats’ Hi-Five Soup!, Thrice’s Major/Minor, Young the Giant’s self-titled release and Social Distortion’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes.
“It would be cool to beat Young the Giant and Social Distortion in best album,” harmonica player and percussionist Travis Ruiz says with a laugh. “That would be the biggest surprise.”
The band is also nominated for best song (for “Can’t Help Myself)”, best new artist, best blues, best country/Americana and best rock.
“All the different genres, from Americana to blues to rock, we got in all of those,” Cullen says, scratching his head. “Maybe we really are all three of those? From now on when people ask us what we sound like, we’re going to say ‘blues, rock, Americana.’”
Of all the nominations, however, Jeramiah Red is most excited about the best new artist category: “It’s definitely something I looked at,” Dickson says. “I looked at the bands we were nominated with, and I know we’ve been around for a little more than a year, but finally it was like, ‘OK, this is an established artist that we can categorize in this category.’”
“In all of the other categories, we’re nominated with such established bands (and) it’s kind of intimidating,” bassist Tim Miller adds. “With six awards, there will be a lot of times we’re not going to hear our name called.”
Jeramiah Red was the first band to perform at the kickoff of the 2012 OC Music Awards live showcases at Detroit Bar in Costa Mesa earlier this month. The group is competing in the best live band category for a chance to play at the awards ceremony, but they admit going first definitely brought extra pressure.
“(It was like) we’re going to be the first guys breaking the barrier, here we go, let’s see what we can pull off — and we’re holding our breath, seeing if we can put on a good set,” Dickson recounts. “But once you start that first song, you just dive into it and it’s a blast.”
“We had nothing to compare it to, really, so we could just do what we do and then rock from there and everybody else had to follow,” drummer Matt Pleskacz says.
Jeramiah Red is currently working on a single at ArtiSans, so the band is laying low for a bit, rather than working the local club circuit. But Dickson says he’s “feeling” either a new EP or full-length disc by the end of the year.
Photo by Austin Ruiz. - OC REGISTER


Orange Pop: Jeramiah Red ups its game
January 17th, 2012, 3:15 pm · · posted by KELLI SKYE FADROSKI, THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

inShare
Pin It
Snuggled into old movie theater seats that line a back wall inside ArtiSans label, a recording studio in Fullerton, local rock band Jeramiah Red chats excitedly back and forth about its six OC Music Awards nominations.
The quintet is still somewhat in shock that they’re tied with Irvine’s breakout band Young the Giant for the most nods at this year’s ceremony, March 3 at City National Grove of Anaheim. “We definitely weren’t expecting all of those nominations, so that was a big surprise,” vocalist Wes Dickson says.
“To be nominated for six,” adds guitarist Ian Cullen, “at first I was like, this is a different Jeramiah Red. It was a huge honor because we worked really hard on the album, so to be nominated with Young the Giant and Social Distortion and everybody like that was really exciting and a totally cool thing.”

Jeramiah Red’s five-song EP — Ghost Songs from the Getty, released in December and produced by Barrett Slagle at ArtiSans — is nominated for best album alongside the Aquabats’ Hi-Five Soup!, Thrice’s Major/Minor, Young the Giant’s self-titled release and Social Distortion’s Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes.
“It would be cool to beat Young the Giant and Social Distortion in best album,” harmonica player and percussionist Travis Ruiz says with a laugh. “That would be the biggest surprise.”
The band is also nominated for best song (for “Can’t Help Myself)”, best new artist, best blues, best country/Americana and best rock.
“All the different genres, from Americana to blues to rock, we got in all of those,” Cullen says, scratching his head. “Maybe we really are all three of those? From now on when people ask us what we sound like, we’re going to say ‘blues, rock, Americana.’”
Of all the nominations, however, Jeramiah Red is most excited about the best new artist category: “It’s definitely something I looked at,” Dickson says. “I looked at the bands we were nominated with, and I know we’ve been around for a little more than a year, but finally it was like, ‘OK, this is an established artist that we can categorize in this category.’”
“In all of the other categories, we’re nominated with such established bands (and) it’s kind of intimidating,” bassist Tim Miller adds. “With six awards, there will be a lot of times we’re not going to hear our name called.”
Jeramiah Red was the first band to perform at the kickoff of the 2012 OC Music Awards live showcases at Detroit Bar in Costa Mesa earlier this month. The group is competing in the best live band category for a chance to play at the awards ceremony, but they admit going first definitely brought extra pressure.
“(It was like) we’re going to be the first guys breaking the barrier, here we go, let’s see what we can pull off — and we’re holding our breath, seeing if we can put on a good set,” Dickson recounts. “But once you start that first song, you just dive into it and it’s a blast.”
“We had nothing to compare it to, really, so we could just do what we do and then rock from there and everybody else had to follow,” drummer Matt Pleskacz says.
Jeramiah Red is currently working on a single at ArtiSans, so the band is laying low for a bit, rather than working the local club circuit. But Dickson says he’s “feeling” either a new EP or full-length disc by the end of the year.
Photo by Austin Ruiz. - OC REGISTER


Young the Giant, Jeramiah Red, Railroad to Alaska nab multiple wins at OC Music Awards
March 4th, 2012, 12:20 pm · · posted by ROBERT KINSLER, FOR THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

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Orange County has long been a hotbed for original music. Early heroes like the Chantays, Dick Dale and singer-songwriter Jackson Browne paved the way for a substantial ’80s wave bolstered by synth-pop band Berlin and punk rock legends Social Distortion and the Adolescents, as well as a flood of ’90s acts — Lit, No Doubt, Korn and the Offspring among the best-known.
Fast forward to the 21st century and O.C.’s ever-burgeoning musical tent now includes groundbreaking talent from a variety of genres.
Much of it was celebrated Saturday night at the 11th annual OC Music Awards at City National Grove of Anaheim, where breakout band Young the Giant came away the big winner with three trophies, including nods for best song and best music video (both for hit single “Cough Syrup”), although the Irvine group wasn’t on hand to accept. Newcomers Railroad to Alaska and Jeramiah Red nabbed two apiece, while mainstays Social D, the Adolescents and Thrice also got their due.
Indeed, in addition to YTG, it seems emerging acts Railroad, Jeramiah (pictured) and two-time best indie champ Kiev are poised to join their celebrated O.C. forebears in building a national reputation, considering both their wins and winning performances here.
Click here for photos of red carpet arrivals and click here for more pics from the after party.
Of the nine live turns, staged amid awards in 26 categories, Kiev was in a class by itself thanks to the use of 3D technology that enhanced its Radiohead-meets-Steely Dan sonic sphere, something the sextet first successfully tried while opening for Menomena last year at Samueli Theater. Everyone in the audience was given appropriate glasses to wear during Kiev’s performance of “Small Kid / Big Tree,” allowing them to see a multi-layered effect that had animation dancing in front and behind the band during its experimental rock.
Other memorable performances came from many of the evening’s winners: singer-songwriter Nicole Vaughn and Her Lovely Band, which won for best country/Americana, capably kick-started the ceremony; best new artist honoree Jeramiah Red rocked with more zest than you’d expect from a best blues winner; best Latin victor Boogaloo Assassins delivered a tight jam while folk-soul trio Allensworth (previously announced best live acoustic winner) docked its usual groove armada to instead appear in effective scaled-down fashion.
As the OC Music Awards have grown, so has the show itself advanced light years ahead of early incarnations, when it was a struggle to get sponsors or attract the region’s most famous names to participate.
Saturday’s ceremony once again featured KROQ‘s Psycho Mike as host, and in addition to reps from a horde of sponsors (Farmer John, Bud Light, Wahoo’s and Ernie Ball, just to name the biggest), the roll call of presenters included X vocalist (and current O.C. resident) Exene Cervenka, Dramarama frontman John Easdale and Vandals bassist Joe Escalante, who shared candid thoughts on the significance of being named best punk before giving that prize to the Adolescents.
Escalante, currently campaigning for an L.A. County judge’s seat in the June 5 election, remembered how bands back then “were bored. We were sick of (’70s/’80s rock station) KMET, we didn’t like hippies … we didn’t even know why we didn’t like hippies.” They just desperately wanted to carve out a different identity.
Those seminal groups, he said, gave rise to a distinctly O.C. punk flavor that over time has translated to heftier paydays, as the geographical tag now fetches a premium from booking agents internationally: “Oh, this is an Orange County band? Then we’re gonna pay ‘em a little more.”
Steve Soto of the Adolescents, meanwhile, gave props to O.C.’s earliest and oft-forgotten punk outfits, the Crowd and Middle Class, while reminding the audience in his acceptance speech that “in our neighborhood, we grew up with Social Distortion and Agent Orange.”
Thrice, the Dustin Kensrue-fronted quartet that recently announced it will go on indefinite hiatus after its next tour, was on hand to receive its previously announced Orange County Impact Award as well as the competitive trophy for best rock. Rodney Bingenheimer, aka Rodney on the ROQ, was this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award recipient and was treated to a video tribute featuring fellow KROQ personalities Jed the Fish and Richard Blade, as well as Blondie singer Debbie Harry, all four members members of No Doubt and other musicians whose ascensions were assisted via crucial airplay on the Mayor of Sunset Strip’s radio show.
Ever the champion of rising indie artists, Bingenheimer closed out brief but heartfelt remarks by urging the talent on hand at the sold-out Grove to “send me more CDs. I’m there (on the air) at midnight, so stick around.”
Thr - OC REGISTER


Young the Giant, Jeramiah Red, Railroad to Alaska nab multiple wins at OC Music Awards
March 4th, 2012, 12:20 pm · · posted by ROBERT KINSLER, FOR THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

inShare
Pin It
Orange County has long been a hotbed for original music. Early heroes like the Chantays, Dick Dale and singer-songwriter Jackson Browne paved the way for a substantial ’80s wave bolstered by synth-pop band Berlin and punk rock legends Social Distortion and the Adolescents, as well as a flood of ’90s acts — Lit, No Doubt, Korn and the Offspring among the best-known.
Fast forward to the 21st century and O.C.’s ever-burgeoning musical tent now includes groundbreaking talent from a variety of genres.
Much of it was celebrated Saturday night at the 11th annual OC Music Awards at City National Grove of Anaheim, where breakout band Young the Giant came away the big winner with three trophies, including nods for best song and best music video (both for hit single “Cough Syrup”), although the Irvine group wasn’t on hand to accept. Newcomers Railroad to Alaska and Jeramiah Red nabbed two apiece, while mainstays Social D, the Adolescents and Thrice also got their due.
Indeed, in addition to YTG, it seems emerging acts Railroad, Jeramiah (pictured) and two-time best indie champ Kiev are poised to join their celebrated O.C. forebears in building a national reputation, considering both their wins and winning performances here.
Click here for photos of red carpet arrivals and click here for more pics from the after party.
Of the nine live turns, staged amid awards in 26 categories, Kiev was in a class by itself thanks to the use of 3D technology that enhanced its Radiohead-meets-Steely Dan sonic sphere, something the sextet first successfully tried while opening for Menomena last year at Samueli Theater. Everyone in the audience was given appropriate glasses to wear during Kiev’s performance of “Small Kid / Big Tree,” allowing them to see a multi-layered effect that had animation dancing in front and behind the band during its experimental rock.
Other memorable performances came from many of the evening’s winners: singer-songwriter Nicole Vaughn and Her Lovely Band, which won for best country/Americana, capably kick-started the ceremony; best new artist honoree Jeramiah Red rocked with more zest than you’d expect from a best blues winner; best Latin victor Boogaloo Assassins delivered a tight jam while folk-soul trio Allensworth (previously announced best live acoustic winner) docked its usual groove armada to instead appear in effective scaled-down fashion.
As the OC Music Awards have grown, so has the show itself advanced light years ahead of early incarnations, when it was a struggle to get sponsors or attract the region’s most famous names to participate.
Saturday’s ceremony once again featured KROQ‘s Psycho Mike as host, and in addition to reps from a horde of sponsors (Farmer John, Bud Light, Wahoo’s and Ernie Ball, just to name the biggest), the roll call of presenters included X vocalist (and current O.C. resident) Exene Cervenka, Dramarama frontman John Easdale and Vandals bassist Joe Escalante, who shared candid thoughts on the significance of being named best punk before giving that prize to the Adolescents.
Escalante, currently campaigning for an L.A. County judge’s seat in the June 5 election, remembered how bands back then “were bored. We were sick of (’70s/’80s rock station) KMET, we didn’t like hippies … we didn’t even know why we didn’t like hippies.” They just desperately wanted to carve out a different identity.
Those seminal groups, he said, gave rise to a distinctly O.C. punk flavor that over time has translated to heftier paydays, as the geographical tag now fetches a premium from booking agents internationally: “Oh, this is an Orange County band? Then we’re gonna pay ‘em a little more.”
Steve Soto of the Adolescents, meanwhile, gave props to O.C.’s earliest and oft-forgotten punk outfits, the Crowd and Middle Class, while reminding the audience in his acceptance speech that “in our neighborhood, we grew up with Social Distortion and Agent Orange.”
Thrice, the Dustin Kensrue-fronted quartet that recently announced it will go on indefinite hiatus after its next tour, was on hand to receive its previously announced Orange County Impact Award as well as the competitive trophy for best rock. Rodney Bingenheimer, aka Rodney on the ROQ, was this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award recipient and was treated to a video tribute featuring fellow KROQ personalities Jed the Fish and Richard Blade, as well as Blondie singer Debbie Harry, all four members members of No Doubt and other musicians whose ascensions were assisted via crucial airplay on the Mayor of Sunset Strip’s radio show.
Ever the champion of rising indie artists, Bingenheimer closed out brief but heartfelt remarks by urging the talent on hand at the sold-out Grove to “send me more CDs. I’m there (on the air) at midnight, so stick around.”
Thr - OC REGISTER


Local Record Review: Jeramiah Red
By Ned Raggett Mon., Nov. 29 2010 at 7:53 AM Comments (1)
Categories: Beat Blvd., album review


Beat Blvd. is Heard Mentality's weekly review of local releases. If you're an OC musician or band with something new to offer--vinyl single, full length album, CD, cassette--we want to hear from you! Send copies, along with any photos and PR material, to Beat Blvd., c/o OC Weekly, 2975 Red Hill Ave., Suite 150, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. You can also e-mail us digital downloads at lbose@ocweekly.com.


?
Jeramiah Red
Jeramiah Red EP
www.myspace.com/jeramiahredmusic

One can't knock Jeramiah Red's self-description when it comes to conciseness. They describe their influences as "WOMEN" and their sound as "ROCK AND ROLL." (If they had meant Costa Mesa's legendary The Women, that would be all the cooler.) On their self-released debut EP, the quintet serve up a rollicking if nonetheless pretty straightforward blend of blues-rock touchstones old and new.

You can just as easily imagine songs like "Can't Help Myself" as nuggets off the Almost Famous soundtrack as turning up in iTunes Genius function tips after listening whatever newest Jack White project turns out to be.

If the form is familiar rather than revelatory, there's moments of flair-Travis Ruiz's harmonica parts often give each song a signature moment or two, while the prettily moody start of "Holy Time" is the type of touch that shows where they could yet go in the future. - OC WEEKLY


Local Record Review: Jeramiah Red
By Ned Raggett Mon., Nov. 29 2010 at 7:53 AM Comments (1)
Categories: Beat Blvd., album review


Beat Blvd. is Heard Mentality's weekly review of local releases. If you're an OC musician or band with something new to offer--vinyl single, full length album, CD, cassette--we want to hear from you! Send copies, along with any photos and PR material, to Beat Blvd., c/o OC Weekly, 2975 Red Hill Ave., Suite 150, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. You can also e-mail us digital downloads at lbose@ocweekly.com.


?
Jeramiah Red
Jeramiah Red EP
www.myspace.com/jeramiahredmusic

One can't knock Jeramiah Red's self-description when it comes to conciseness. They describe their influences as "WOMEN" and their sound as "ROCK AND ROLL." (If they had meant Costa Mesa's legendary The Women, that would be all the cooler.) On their self-released debut EP, the quintet serve up a rollicking if nonetheless pretty straightforward blend of blues-rock touchstones old and new.

You can just as easily imagine songs like "Can't Help Myself" as nuggets off the Almost Famous soundtrack as turning up in iTunes Genius function tips after listening whatever newest Jack White project turns out to be.

If the form is familiar rather than revelatory, there's moments of flair-Travis Ruiz's harmonica parts often give each song a signature moment or two, while the prettily moody start of "Holy Time" is the type of touch that shows where they could yet go in the future. - OC WEEKLY


Good bands know good beer. Did you know Creedence Clearwater Revival got the "clear water" part of their name from an old TV ad for Olympia beer? And, what about Blue Öyster Cult? Well, their name is almost an anagram for Cully's Stout Beer. Add local quintet Jeramiah Red to the list of awesome beer-named groups. They got their moniker from an Irish-style ale sold at BJ's Restaurants—although the beer is spelled Jeremiah with an E. A couple of the band mates used to work at BJ's and developed an affinity for the brewski, often downing one or two after their shifts ended. They introduced it to their buddies, who dug the beer—and the name. Lead vocalist/guitarist Wes Dickson, guitarist/vocalist Ian Cullen, bassist Tim Miller, drummer Matt Pleskacz and percussionist/harmonica player Travis Ruiz not only can hold their beer, but they also make badass music. Though the guys grew up in Orange County, they all came from very different backgrounds musically, and that diversity helped them form their funky fusion of rock & roll and blues (think: Black Keys). Dickson's powerful, crisp voice commands attention, but it is Ruiz's immaculately executed harmonica riffs that take the songs from good to damn good. Jeramiah Red played some big venues this year—including the OC Fair—and they were nominated for the People's Choice Award and Best Rock Band at the 2011 OC Music Awards. So, beer-band enthusiasts, by all means, continue in your quest to try every beer ever brewed before naming your band, but in the meantime, head to BJ's, buy the ale and listen to these guys. - OC WEEKLY


Good bands know good beer. Did you know Creedence Clearwater Revival got the "clear water" part of their name from an old TV ad for Olympia beer? And, what about Blue Öyster Cult? Well, their name is almost an anagram for Cully's Stout Beer. Add local quintet Jeramiah Red to the list of awesome beer-named groups. They got their moniker from an Irish-style ale sold at BJ's Restaurants—although the beer is spelled Jeremiah with an E. A couple of the band mates used to work at BJ's and developed an affinity for the brewski, often downing one or two after their shifts ended. They introduced it to their buddies, who dug the beer—and the name. Lead vocalist/guitarist Wes Dickson, guitarist/vocalist Ian Cullen, bassist Tim Miller, drummer Matt Pleskacz and percussionist/harmonica player Travis Ruiz not only can hold their beer, but they also make badass music. Though the guys grew up in Orange County, they all came from very different backgrounds musically, and that diversity helped them form their funky fusion of rock & roll and blues (think: Black Keys). Dickson's powerful, crisp voice commands attention, but it is Ruiz's immaculately executed harmonica riffs that take the songs from good to damn good. Jeramiah Red played some big venues this year—including the OC Fair—and they were nominated for the People's Choice Award and Best Rock Band at the 2011 OC Music Awards. So, beer-band enthusiasts, by all means, continue in your quest to try every beer ever brewed before naming your band, but in the meantime, head to BJ's, buy the ale and listen to these guys. - OC WEEKLY


After hearing about their success at the OC music awards last month, I have been anxious to see for myself what all of the hype was about. I listened to their CD and it is fantastic! It is complete with strong vocals, heavy riffs, passionate guitar solos, seamless changes, and a harmonica (I’m a sucker for harmonicas); however, I wanted to see if the band could pull off a live performance. After attending their show last night at Santa Ana’s Copper Door, its plain to see why they are doing so well.

The band is very straight forward with their style and approach. They are a rocking blues band who can be likened to Band of Skulls, Kings of Leon, and The Living End. Their music is very aggressive, they utilize heavy riffs when needed, and grip you with catchy hooks that make you want to move, as can be seen by the crowd present at the event. They owned the crowd. Their music is seemingly designed to make the audience jump up and down, punch the person standing across from them in the face, and then give that person a hug (this is a hyperbole, and did not happen at the event). The songs are aggressive yet quirky and energetic yet refined.



The highlight of the night was found smack dab in the middle of the set when the band played my favorite song from their album, Ghost Tracks from the Getty, “Line ‘em up.” The masterpiece of the song held new meaning for me as the band played it live. Lead singer, Wes Dickson, had a powerhouse performance with passionate, spot-on vocals. The guy has an incredible range, which he showcases in every song. His approach is edgy and classic, all the while emotional and fun; he didn’t miss a note the entire night and “Line ‘em up” was a great representation of his abilities.

Another notable attribute taken from this song is the band’s musicianship as a whole. To begin, lead guitarist and backing vocalist, Ian Cullen plays an essential role in developing the band’s sound. His harmonies are clean but his guitar is oh, so mean and dirty… in a good way. He takes soloing to a new level by making his guitar plead for mercy as it cries out each note with shear passion and devastating melodies.



The band as a whole is so tight. The rhythm section, consisting of Tim Miller on the bass, Matt Pleskacz on the drums and Travis Ruiz on the Harmonica (nice) and percussion, held the whole operation together with class and skill. If you listen to Jeramiah Red’s music, there are a lot of changes that appear in every song. It is the driving force of this strong rhythm section that sets the pace and overall feel of each number and it is their job to make sure that each change occurs without losing momentum. They did this with style, and plus, it was cool seeing a percussionist on stage; don’t see that everyday.

The band performed the hell out of their set and the crowd was equally energized. The audience was jumping, singing, head banging, fist pumping, clapping to every song,and grateful for the performance. I don’t know if it was the flowing beer that night, but the crowd was as into the music as the band was, which is a rare and beautiful thing.

All in all, Jeramiah Red is the real deal. Their songs are aggressive, their live performance’s are explosive, and their talent shows their potential for future endeavors. They are a dynamic band with a great sound and I wouldn’t be surprised to see their names mentioned with other Orange County greats like Avenged Sevenfold, Thrice, and Young the Giant. Only time will tell and in the mean time let’s enjoy the journey while their tickets still cost 5 to 8 bucks.

Check them out on facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/Jeramiahred?sk=app_178091127385

Until next time, listen and discover!

-Wade the Squid - HUMANFANKIND


There was a robbery last Tuesday night at the first Showcase Series for this year’s
OC Music Awards. Five bands took Detroit Bar’s stage to compete for the 2012 ‘Best
Live Band’ award, and without a doubt the first performers, Jeramiah Red, STOLE
the show. Much respect is deserved to Paulie Pesh, The Gromble, Strange Birds, and
James Fletcher, who all played their hearts out, but the members of Jeramiah Red
left blood on that stage.
A couple groups, Strange Birds and The Gromble in particular, seemed to struggle
through their sound-checks, which might explain why their sets were a bit off. The
members of Strange Birds seemed disconnected from one another and their lead
singer, Aidin Sadeghi, was more concerned with getting the sound booth to amp up
the volume of his microphone than anything else. I listen to these guys and dig the
meandering style of their music, but unfortunately on Tuesday they came across
as monotonous and a bit dreary. Before their third song, Sadeghi announced to the
unenthused audience, “give me a second here… I just realized my guitar has been
out of tune for the past two songs,” but honestly things never really picked up.

Jeramiah Red
I happen to be a big fan of The Gromble, but I got a similar sense of frustration
from their performance. They seemed to be having trouble hearing each other and
finding that pocket where everyone is in tune both literally and physically. But they
definitely have a big following of people who know them, their songs, and lyrics.
Further, and I’ve said this in a previous article about these guys, they obviously love
playing together and have a clear future ahead of them. Everyone has off nights, and
with 2 OC Music Award nominations in their pocket (Best Indie & Best Live Band),
The Gromble deserves every accolade that has and will continue to come their way.
Paulie Pesh and the James Fletcher band left me with a similar taste in my mouth—
talented musicians, pleasant on the ears, but like most of the audience, I wasn’t
on the edge of my seat. James Fletcher’s reputation precedes him and there is no
doubt he is a seasoned performer (Fletcher has spent the last few handfuls of years
drumming for a number of great bands and songwriters including SMILE, MATT
COSTA, SCOTT WEILAND, SATISFACTION, MPHASE, and ZEE AVI). His whole band,
in fact, has a very sophisticated air about them, but despite their maturity and
natural ease on stage, the element of electricity was lacking—that nameless “thing”
that keeps you from turning away towards the bathroom or bar. I will say that
Fletcher’s new album, The Booze & Clocks, is a great summer listen, however. I
bought it last week, and since we’ve been blessed with a 75 degree winter in Orange
County, I can tell you first hand that these songs are the perfect soundtrack to a lazy
day poolside.

The OCMA's Showcase Night 1
Paulie Pesh, on the other hand, did hold my attention, but that may be partly due
to the fact that they had legit twelve bandies on stage. I don’t use the term bandie
casually either—this was like watching a full-blown high school band perform.
There were drums, trumpets, clarinets, saxophones, guitars, a standing bass, and
I’m sure other instruments that I couldn’t even see on Detroit’s small stage, yet
the anticipation of watching all these musicians get ready to play was not exactly
satisfied by their performance. Maybe it was the size of the venue that hindered the
sound of Paulie Pesh, but regardless, the performance was a bit muddled and I’m not
positive it was ever understandable why they needed twelve members to portray
their sound. When you think of big bands like Chicago, Dave Matthews Band, or
Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, there is some sort of essential need for each
unique instrument they utilize. What would Chicago be without horn sections? Dave
Matthews without a saxophone player? But with Paulie Pesh I felt like stripping
them down a bit might actually enhance their sound. I will give it to them though—
to pull off eleven instruments and two voices on Detroit’s stage is a feat in and of
itself.
But as previously stated, Jeramiah Red owned that night. The fact that they
performed first was almost cruel because I’m not sure anyone had a chance of
creating the same magic they generated. Photographer, Chelsea Jeheber, and
I literally became instant groupies—or bandaids for you Almost Famous fans.
Opening with “Line’em Up,” they sunk their teeth in that stage and played with a
vengeance. Frontman Wes Dickson is a natural. He has a voice to envy, a style to
copy, and a performance quality that makes a girl blush and a guy want to be a
rockstar. He is interactive with the audience, who after one song couldn’t help but
adore the band, and comfortable in a way that puts him years before his time.
Every member of Jeramiah Red has a sense of ease while playing, but it’s combined
with a fervor that literally makes them irresis - MUSIC IN PRESS


There was a robbery last Tuesday night at the first Showcase Series for this year’s
OC Music Awards. Five bands took Detroit Bar’s stage to compete for the 2012 ‘Best
Live Band’ award, and without a doubt the first performers, Jeramiah Red, STOLE
the show. Much respect is deserved to Paulie Pesh, The Gromble, Strange Birds, and
James Fletcher, who all played their hearts out, but the members of Jeramiah Red
left blood on that stage.
A couple groups, Strange Birds and The Gromble in particular, seemed to struggle
through their sound-checks, which might explain why their sets were a bit off. The
members of Strange Birds seemed disconnected from one another and their lead
singer, Aidin Sadeghi, was more concerned with getting the sound booth to amp up
the volume of his microphone than anything else. I listen to these guys and dig the
meandering style of their music, but unfortunately on Tuesday they came across
as monotonous and a bit dreary. Before their third song, Sadeghi announced to the
unenthused audience, “give me a second here… I just realized my guitar has been
out of tune for the past two songs,” but honestly things never really picked up.

Jeramiah Red
I happen to be a big fan of The Gromble, but I got a similar sense of frustration
from their performance. They seemed to be having trouble hearing each other and
finding that pocket where everyone is in tune both literally and physically. But they
definitely have a big following of people who know them, their songs, and lyrics.
Further, and I’ve said this in a previous article about these guys, they obviously love
playing together and have a clear future ahead of them. Everyone has off nights, and
with 2 OC Music Award nominations in their pocket (Best Indie & Best Live Band),
The Gromble deserves every accolade that has and will continue to come their way.
Paulie Pesh and the James Fletcher band left me with a similar taste in my mouth—
talented musicians, pleasant on the ears, but like most of the audience, I wasn’t
on the edge of my seat. James Fletcher’s reputation precedes him and there is no
doubt he is a seasoned performer (Fletcher has spent the last few handfuls of years
drumming for a number of great bands and songwriters including SMILE, MATT
COSTA, SCOTT WEILAND, SATISFACTION, MPHASE, and ZEE AVI). His whole band,
in fact, has a very sophisticated air about them, but despite their maturity and
natural ease on stage, the element of electricity was lacking—that nameless “thing”
that keeps you from turning away towards the bathroom or bar. I will say that
Fletcher’s new album, The Booze & Clocks, is a great summer listen, however. I
bought it last week, and since we’ve been blessed with a 75 degree winter in Orange
County, I can tell you first hand that these songs are the perfect soundtrack to a lazy
day poolside.

The OCMA's Showcase Night 1
Paulie Pesh, on the other hand, did hold my attention, but that may be partly due
to the fact that they had legit twelve bandies on stage. I don’t use the term bandie
casually either—this was like watching a full-blown high school band perform.
There were drums, trumpets, clarinets, saxophones, guitars, a standing bass, and
I’m sure other instruments that I couldn’t even see on Detroit’s small stage, yet
the anticipation of watching all these musicians get ready to play was not exactly
satisfied by their performance. Maybe it was the size of the venue that hindered the
sound of Paulie Pesh, but regardless, the performance was a bit muddled and I’m not
positive it was ever understandable why they needed twelve members to portray
their sound. When you think of big bands like Chicago, Dave Matthews Band, or
Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, there is some sort of essential need for each
unique instrument they utilize. What would Chicago be without horn sections? Dave
Matthews without a saxophone player? But with Paulie Pesh I felt like stripping
them down a bit might actually enhance their sound. I will give it to them though—
to pull off eleven instruments and two voices on Detroit’s stage is a feat in and of
itself.
But as previously stated, Jeramiah Red owned that night. The fact that they
performed first was almost cruel because I’m not sure anyone had a chance of
creating the same magic they generated. Photographer, Chelsea Jeheber, and
I literally became instant groupies—or bandaids for you Almost Famous fans.
Opening with “Line’em Up,” they sunk their teeth in that stage and played with a
vengeance. Frontman Wes Dickson is a natural. He has a voice to envy, a style to
copy, and a performance quality that makes a girl blush and a guy want to be a
rockstar. He is interactive with the audience, who after one song couldn’t help but
adore the band, and comfortable in a way that puts him years before his time.
Every member of Jeramiah Red has a sense of ease while playing, but it’s combined
with a fervor that literally makes them irresis - MUSIC IN PRESS


Discography

"Ghost Tracks from the Getty" 2011 E.P.
"Bottle" 2012 Single

Photos

Bio

Jeramiah Red is Orange County’s raucous answer to southern rock and roll. The band has kicked up the dust of the local music scene with their dirty blues guitar, steel-drivin' harmonica and powerful vocals. Wes Dickson (vocals, guitar), Ian Cullen (lead guitar, vocals), Travis Ruiz (harmonica, percussion, graphic design), Tim Miller (bass) and Matt Pleskacz (drums) have played together in different incarnations throughout the years, and after shedding the skins of their previous bands, Jeramiah Red was formed in 2008.

They were nominated for six categories in the 2012 OC Music Awards along with 2 wins– a rare feat matched only by Young the Giant. The nominations include: Best Album ("Ghost Tracks from the Getty"), Best Song ("Can't Help Myself"), Best Rock, Best Americana, and winners in Best New Artist, and Best Blues. They recently took home another win for Best Rock at the 2013 OC Music Awards.

You can hear their single (“My Baby), at the Honda Center after every home game victory for the Anaheim Ducks, and they are currently working on their highly anticipated second EP, “The Winter Tick”, at The Music Box Studios with former Young the Giant Producer, Jon O’Brien.