Jeremy and Rebecca
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Jeremy and Rebecca

Visalia, California, United States | INDIE

Visalia, California, United States | INDIE
Band Pop Adult Contemporary

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Jul
12
Jeremy and Rebecca @ Rawhide Baseball Stadium

Visalia, California, USA

Visalia, California, USA

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He's a marketing director. She's an Early Childhood Special Education Teacher. They're married and have a family. One could understand if Jeremy & Rebecca Hendrickson never quite had time for a music career, but this is no ordinary duo. Jeremy & Rebecca set out to write songs with positive themes and uplifting content/sounds; the same sort of appeal that went into old time variety shows and family movies. The sounds are updated for today, but the spirit is good old fashioned family entertainment. What We Leave Behind is a stunning album of feel good moments buoyed by Jeremy Hendrickson's solid songwriting and Rebecca Hendrickson's dazzling voice.

Jeremy & Rebecca created What We Leave Behind without financial backing from a label or anyone else, relying on Visa and MasterCard to see the album completed. Working from a wish-list of music veterans, Jeremy & Rebecca managed to put together a recording ensemble of folks who've previously worked with the likes of Eric Clapton, Mariah Carey, Faith Hill, John Mayer, Chicago, Mary J. Blige and Rascal Flatts. In much the same way that an independent film production can create a sense of magic among cast and crew, something special occurred in the process of recording What We Leave Behind. The sense of joy that flows off the CD is accompanied by a cohesion that goes beyond professional into personal.

What We Leave Behind opens with Fool, a rockin' country love song about getting caught up in love. Rebecca Hendrickson takes lead vocals here and quickly proves to be one of the most dynamic country vocalists I've heard in a while. With a sultry, powerful voice that can cross the lines from country to R&B while passing through Rock, Jazz and The Blues, Rebecca could sing the phone book and have folks lined up to listen. Flyer takes a left turn into the disco era with a song that could have topped the charts back in disco's heyday. Never ones to sit still, stylistically, the duo launches into What We Leave Behind, a down-tempo blues tune that introduces us to Jeremy's voice for the first time in a duet with Rebecca. Jeremy's voice is one of clear, pure tone with an honestly emotive sound. The positive message here is undeniably, born from any one of a number of religions or theologies, that immortality is achieved not through your own accomplishments but in how you make the world around you better.

Feels Like The Heavens is a love song that sounds like it could have been an R&B/Pop hit in the 1980's. Straight And Narrow plays on the edges of country and rock in a highly energetic and driven musical declaration that would play very well to country radio. There is a strong moral compass in the music presented here that's Judeo-Christian in nature. The music itself isn't religious per se, but there's a distinct philosophy or belief system that underlies the songwriting that's based in one. Made To Love You also reflects this distinct grounding in perhaps the most explicit terms on the album. Jeremy & Rebecca sing to each other from their hearts, and the sincerity is clear. This is major mix-tape material without the complicated blending of love and sexuality that pervades popular music.

Jeremy takes lead vocals on How I Love You in a tune that sounds like something Barry Manilow might have recorded in the 1970's. It's a sweet song and another mix-tape must. Miracle finds Jeremy & Rebecca bringing the funk on one of the best dance oriented songs on the disc. Tallest Tree is a sweet song written by Jeremy for his son; it's the earnest promise of a father to be the best he can for his son. The song is beautifully written pop that will touch both fathers and sons. Why Strive finds Rebecca hitting a 1970's vibe again in a song that, while not my favorite on the disc, is certainly sonically interesting. Rise And Shine is a theatrical pop tune with some serious guitar work dancing around the vocals. Rebecca provides a great deal of vocal color and sass on a song that moves from shadow to light and back several times. The album closes out with Have You Got The Time, a cabaret jazz style love song that is the perfect ending for a dynamic and changeable album.


What We Leave Behind is an unusual project, a melding on many varied and disparate pieces into a concept album unlike anything you're likely to hear these days. Jeremy & Rebecca seek to entertain with values-based music and themes; making music they would be perfectly comfortable with their children hearing. The goal is admirable, and I think it's safe to say it’s a smashing success. What We Leave Behind is bound to be a breakthrough album. - Wildy Haskell


Before we start the review, I have to be honest and attempt to pull the proverbial plank out of my eye to give this album the respect it deserves. I have problems with faith. Not mine really, as much as the professors and proffers there of. My family skipped around different styles of Christianity throughout my life, many times getting swallowed up into various schemes in the name of God. So for me, faith is something that also must be protected, as much as expressed. Call me a doubting Thomas, but I need that sort of truth as confirmation of faith because my trust was abused.

For me, those who are really in touch with spirituality show it; happiness, joy, truth, and above all love, the providence of all their belief shines through naturally. I enjoy a good spiritual, but it has to be from the soul. Most religiously inspired art irks me as allegorical, crossing the line of acceptability when the ends begin to justify the means, or in other words, sinning to stop sin.

So when I get an album dealing with this sort of content matter, it walks a knife's edge. Indeed, it is easier for an out-of-tune tarnished indie punk band to get a good review out of me then a well polished, perfectly produced faith band. My standards for keeping with positive moral, as well as showing the true pain of those that still suffer, are even higher for bands with a mission to help others, for I expect well thought out modern hopeful solutions for ancient problems. If this is unfair, in this critic's opinion, leave your despair at the door, we only have time for real faith. Taoist sage Wei Po-yang once said "Worry is preposterous; we don't know enough to worry." That, precisely, is my problem with most recent spiritual expression, especially in the lyrics and attitudes of bands.

Having said all that, examined my conscious, Jeremy and Rebecca are a fresh breath of air to the stagnant swamp of worry that now seems to pollute popular music. What We Leave Behind is a beautiful, poignant, and believable work of art balanced in the physical and spiritual world, offering a clear point of view about how to live by love and faith as ways of life. Whereas many would use these virtues as a mask to parade around in, these two have found a love that makes them fearless in their exploration of music genre fusion, as well as practical advice, be it for the common sinner like myself, or for the pilgrim on the path to salvation, the album is friendly and helpful without ever becoming preachy, or striking us with guilt. To the contrary, the listener is empowered with positive potential.

Listening to How I Love You my mind drifts to my love in the next room, reminding me that the special moments are firmly embedded in the mystery, and that the mystery is all around. The mundane is what can be made magic in a moment if you but recognize the chance for providence to occur. It won't happen if you believe it can't!

The song Miracle bluntly puts you in your place and is exactly what I'm blathering on about at the top of the article. The miracle is the message, the song, the creation, and it actually exists. You can go touch the flesh of all creation right now. Breathe and you taste the breath of infinity, connected to all of us and everything, and no matter what you call it, a miracle is still miraculous by any other name. With all this analytical spiritual soul searching, it is almost heart-wrenching when Jeremy will stop to ask something like "And why on earth are there so many stars?" The childlike innocence of perspective is never lost, the ego always given to the mystery of creation. Faith isn't about disproving the mystery, it is about embracing the life you were given and making the best of it.

My favorite thing about Jeremy and Rebecca is that even though they talk passionately about their faith, the mystery is left to you, the way you find to utilize their advice is entirely applicable and never allegorical, therefore accessible to anyone who still "believes" from any background, religious preferences aside. Great music always prevails.

I can't find a single wrong note on the album. Every aspect, every musician, every bit of production is impeccable. It is difficult to believe that this is essentially a grassroots operation, but it just goes to show the power of belief. Carl Marsh does some especially beautiful conducting and composing of the strings, building Jeremy and Rebecca's sound to an epic, even cinematic level of intensity. Expect to visit each popular genre at least a couple times over the course of the album, from rock to country.

Despite the culturally heightened awareness for musical style, the album is classic in taste, yet unique in that certain rules are deconstructed only to be remade in brave cadences, bluesy interludes, mini-lead guitar solos, and little touches that trick you into thinking you've heard a phrase before, but then it's turned inside out for a while to shake us up, returning to elegant resolu - Julian Gorman


He's a marketing director. She's an Early Childhood Special Education Teacher. They're married and have a family. One could understand if Jeremy & Rebecca Hendrickson never quite had time for a music career, but this is no ordinary duo. Jeremy & Rebecca set out to write songs with positive themes and uplifting content/sounds; the same sort of appeal that went into old time variety shows and family movies. The sounds are updated for today, but the spirit is good old fashioned family entertainment. What We Leave Behind is a stunning album of feel good moments buoyed by Jeremy Hendrickson's solid songwriting and Rebecca Hendrickson's dazzling voice.

Jeremy & Rebecca created What We Leave Behind without financial backing from a label or anyone else, relying on Visa and MasterCard to see the album completed. Working from a wish-list of music veterans, Jeremy & Rebecca managed to put together a recording ensemble of folks who've previously worked with the likes of Eric Clapton, Mariah Carey, Faith Hill, John Mayer, Chicago, Mary J. Blige and Rascal Flatts. In much the same way that an independent film production can create a sense of magic among cast and crew, something special occurred in the process of recording What We Leave Behind. The sense of joy that flows off the CD is accompanied by a cohesion that goes beyond professional into personal.

What We Leave Behind opens with Fool, a rockin' country love song about getting caught up in love. Rebecca Hendrickson takes lead vocals here and quickly proves to be one of the most dynamic country vocalists I've heard in a while. With a sultry, powerful voice that can cross the lines from country to R&B while passing through Rock, Jazz and The Blues, Rebecca could sing the phone book and have folks lined up to listen. Flyer takes a left turn into the disco era with a song that could have topped the charts back in disco's heyday. Never ones to sit still, stylistically, the duo launches into What We Leave Behind, a down-tempo blues tune that introduces us to Jeremy's voice for the first time in a duet with Rebecca. Jeremy's voice is one of clear, pure tone with an honestly emotive sound. The positive message here is undeniably, born from any one of a number of religions or theologies, that immortality is achieved not through your own accomplishments but in how you make the world around you better.

Feels Like The Heavens is a love song that sounds like it could have been an R&B/Pop hit in the 1980's. Straight And Narrow plays on the edges of country and rock in a highly energetic and driven musical declaration that would play very well to country radio. There is a strong moral compass in the music presented here that's Judeo-Christian in nature. The music itself isn't religious per se, but there's a distinct philosophy or belief system that underlies the songwriting that's based in one. Made To Love You also reflects this distinct grounding in perhaps the most explicit terms on the album. Jeremy & Rebecca sing to each other from their hearts, and the sincerity is clear. This is major mix-tape material without the complicated blending of love and sexuality that pervades popular music.

Jeremy takes lead vocals on How I Love You in a tune that sounds like something Barry Manilow might have recorded in the 1970's. It's a sweet song and another mix-tape must. Miracle finds Jeremy & Rebecca bringing the funk on one of the best dance oriented songs on the disc. Tallest Tree is a sweet song written by Jeremy for his son; it's the earnest promise of a father to be the best he can for his son. The song is beautifully written pop that will touch both fathers and sons. Why Strive finds Rebecca hitting a 1970's vibe again in a song that, while not my favorite on the disc, is certainly sonically interesting. Rise And Shine is a theatrical pop tune with some serious guitar work dancing around the vocals. Rebecca provides a great deal of vocal color and sass on a song that moves from shadow to light and back several times. The album closes out with Have You Got The Time, a cabaret jazz style love song that is the perfect ending for a dynamic and changeable album.


What We Leave Behind is an unusual project, a melding on many varied and disparate pieces into a concept album unlike anything you're likely to hear these days. Jeremy & Rebecca seek to entertain with values-based music and themes; making music they would be perfectly comfortable with their children hearing. The goal is admirable, and I think it's safe to say it’s a smashing success. What We Leave Behind is bound to be a breakthrough album. - Wildy Haskell


To be perfectly honest I was quite ready to not like this record. But when I inserted the CD into the player, something else happened. I not just liked the record, I loved it. I've never considered myself much of a mainstream kind of guy, but I recognize talent when I hear it, and it is definitely here.

The Hendricksons set out to produce and finance this entire project without the backing of a major record label even though it sounds as if it were. Mr. Hendrickson jokes the two major investors for their project were MasterCard and Visa.

Musically this duo is all over the place. Nine times out of ten, I'd say there is evidence of a severe identity crisis present on this recording. However, these songs are all so well written, so well produced, and most importantly, so well performed, it all works to come together to create something that sounds like it should all be together. Jeremy Hendrickson has somehow infused all these different genres; blues, jazz, modern country, rock, and pop to form some powerfully upbeat music that we can all enjoy. Mr. Hendrickson's talent for writing and producing plays a huge role for the seemingly seamless flow of the songs from one genre to the next. This is truly an amazing accomplishment for a seasoned veteran let alone someone trying to break through.

I believe a major reason for their success in meeting their goal of creating such a broad project, was the fact they were able to entice a select group of musicians, arrangers, engineers, and vocalists who have worked with major recording artists such as Faith Hill, Rascal Flatts, John Mayer, Mary J. Blige, Josh Groban, Mariah Carey, Eric Clapton, and Chicago. The production values always present on these artist's recordings is present in this work as well. It shines through and makes for an incredible listening experience. The choir arrangements, the string arrangements, etc. all help this to be a very successful compilation of songs that all of us can relate to and enjoy.

I really believe I could sit in a room with my parents whom are in their late 70's and 80's, my youngest son, who is fifteen, and my two adult sons who are in their mid to late 20's and we would all agree there is something for each one of us on this record. That was Jeremy and Rebecca's intention and they absolutely succeed here.

When I read their bio and saw that their songs were all upbeat and family oriented, I have to admit there was a gag reflex, but they very quickly won me over. They succeeded in creating a very upbeat sounding record, and I believe, will appeal to an extremely broad audience.

Rebecca Hendrickson's voice is powerful and able to crossover from genre to genre seamlessly. She can be soulful, she can be country, she can be bluesy, she can be jazzy, and she can even be rock ‘n roll without changing who she is. It's a unique ability that few performers possess. Jeremy and Rebecca harmonize beautifully and compliment each other throughout the record. Jeremy sings solo on several cuts and has a great voice as well. This is a very talented duo that very pleasantly surprised this reviewer.

The only negative I could find to this album is the cover. In my opinion it does not give us a good representation of what is to be found on the CD. In fact, had I not already read their bio I would have thought it to be some kind of a down home blue-grass record. My mother always told me "you can't judge a book by its cover"; but mom didn't know about the recording industry. For some people it's the cover that grabs us initially, especially when we are trying to break through. So, I'd say jazz up the cover some. Make it more appealing to a younger demographic. Make them pick it up and give it a listen.

All in all I believe this to be an amazing record with some major talent. After I finished listening to the record I wondered; why haven't I heard of these guys before? I sincerely do expect to hear a lot more from Jeremy and Rebecca in the very near future. - Rod Ames


To be perfectly honest I was quite ready to not like this record. But when I inserted the CD into the player, something else happened. I not just liked the record, I loved it. I've never considered myself much of a mainstream kind of guy, but I recognize talent when I hear it, and it is definitely here.

The Hendricksons set out to produce and finance this entire project without the backing of a major record label even though it sounds as if it were. Mr. Hendrickson jokes the two major investors for their project were MasterCard and Visa.

Musically this duo is all over the place. Nine times out of ten, I'd say there is evidence of a severe identity crisis present on this recording. However, these songs are all so well written, so well produced, and most importantly, so well performed, it all works to come together to create something that sounds like it should all be together. Jeremy Hendrickson has somehow infused all these different genres; blues, jazz, modern country, rock, and pop to form some powerfully upbeat music that we can all enjoy. Mr. Hendrickson's talent for writing and producing plays a huge role for the seemingly seamless flow of the songs from one genre to the next. This is truly an amazing accomplishment for a seasoned veteran let alone someone trying to break through.

I believe a major reason for their success in meeting their goal of creating such a broad project, was the fact they were able to entice a select group of musicians, arrangers, engineers, and vocalists who have worked with major recording artists such as Faith Hill, Rascal Flatts, John Mayer, Mary J. Blige, Josh Groban, Mariah Carey, Eric Clapton, and Chicago. The production values always present on these artist's recordings is present in this work as well. It shines through and makes for an incredible listening experience. The choir arrangements, the string arrangements, etc. all help this to be a very successful compilation of songs that all of us can relate to and enjoy.

I really believe I could sit in a room with my parents whom are in their late 70's and 80's, my youngest son, who is fifteen, and my two adult sons who are in their mid to late 20's and we would all agree there is something for each one of us on this record. That was Jeremy and Rebecca's intention and they absolutely succeed here.

When I read their bio and saw that their songs were all upbeat and family oriented, I have to admit there was a gag reflex, but they very quickly won me over. They succeeded in creating a very upbeat sounding record, and I believe, will appeal to an extremely broad audience.

Rebecca Hendrickson's voice is powerful and able to crossover from genre to genre seamlessly. She can be soulful, she can be country, she can be bluesy, she can be jazzy, and she can even be rock ‘n roll without changing who she is. It's a unique ability that few performers possess. Jeremy and Rebecca harmonize beautifully and compliment each other throughout the record. Jeremy sings solo on several cuts and has a great voice as well. This is a very talented duo that very pleasantly surprised this reviewer.

The only negative I could find to this album is the cover. In my opinion it does not give us a good representation of what is to be found on the CD. In fact, had I not already read their bio I would have thought it to be some kind of a down home blue-grass record. My mother always told me "you can't judge a book by its cover"; but mom didn't know about the recording industry. For some people it's the cover that grabs us initially, especially when we are trying to break through. So, I'd say jazz up the cover some. Make it more appealing to a younger demographic. Make them pick it up and give it a listen.

All in all I believe this to be an amazing record with some major talent. After I finished listening to the record I wondered; why haven't I heard of these guys before? I sincerely do expect to hear a lot more from Jeremy and Rebecca in the very near future. - Rod Ames


Jeremy & Rebecca's What We Leave Behind hearkens back to the genesis of contemporary Christian music. Those with long memories may recall popular recordings by the likes of Michael & Stormie Omartian and Debbie Boone, where big, full-bodied pop arrangements were applied to overwhelmingly positive lyrics. These twelve songs do more than just offer a reminder of that era, however. They also put spiritual songs into a lively, winning format, for today's listeners - not merely for nostalgia's sake.

Gospel music -- the traditional African-American variety -- however, is timeless, and Jeremy & Rebecca show themselves to be up to the task of that genre with this disc's title track. The song's lyric makes a good point too, when it asks: "What story will be told of our lives?" After all has been said and done, in other words, will we leave a good or bad impression on the world? This soulful, philosophical workout is also given a gospel-blues-rock musical exclamation point, with the equivalent of a gospel choir on the vocal outro, as well as a tasty blues guitar/Hammond B-3 instrumental exchange at track's end.

While this CD kicks off with two slightly funky numbers, in Fool and Flyer, the duo throws down a little country flair with Straight and Narrow, which is linked to the title song because you cannot leave the world a better place, if you don't also lead a dedicatedly moral life. Wanda Vick's Fiddle, banjo, Dobro, and mandolin certainly help give this track its authentic Nashville feel.

Oftentimes, songs directed at God can also be sung to a romantic partner. After all, if love comes from on high, so to speak, it's certainly meant to be spread around among humankind, as well. When Rebecca Hendrickson sings, "It feels like the heavens/Since you came into my life," this is obviously a heavenly love song directed at her man. Then with Made To Love You, on which Jeremy and Rebecca duet, lines like "I was made to hold you" can only be understood in the context of a male/female relationship. (I've never seen anyone successfully put his or her arms around The Almighty).

Although Jeremy & Rebecca sing a whole lot about love, whether that's the secular or spiritual kind, they also include songs that help put everyday life into a more Biblically-informed context. Why Strive is a handy example of this particular lyrical approach. Its lyric asks why men and women try so hard to do everything on their own, when they can just put their dreams in God's hands. More to the point, its words poke a hole in the whole pride balloon. "Have you ever seen a haughty cloud proud of its position in the sky?" the song asks at one point, then ponders, "Does Saturn wear her rings to flaunt her wealth around the universe?" The answer to these questions is a firm, rhetorical ‘No!' Yet humans, by there very natures, are apt to show off their bling, even against their better judgment. Nature, however, knows better and does better.

Even so, Jeremy & Rebecca shouldn't be shy about promoting What We Leave Behind. Instead, they should be proud as peacocks of this sparkling 12-song achievement. Even if this recording were the only legacy they left behind, they would have still done extremely well. - Dan MacIntosh


Jeremy & Rebecca's What We Leave Behind hearkens back to the genesis of contemporary Christian music. Those with long memories may recall popular recordings by the likes of Michael & Stormie Omartian and Debbie Boone, where big, full-bodied pop arrangements were applied to overwhelmingly positive lyrics. These twelve songs do more than just offer a reminder of that era, however. They also put spiritual songs into a lively, winning format, for today's listeners - not merely for nostalgia's sake.

Gospel music -- the traditional African-American variety -- however, is timeless, and Jeremy & Rebecca show themselves to be up to the task of that genre with this disc's title track. The song's lyric makes a good point too, when it asks: "What story will be told of our lives?" After all has been said and done, in other words, will we leave a good or bad impression on the world? This soulful, philosophical workout is also given a gospel-blues-rock musical exclamation point, with the equivalent of a gospel choir on the vocal outro, as well as a tasty blues guitar/Hammond B-3 instrumental exchange at track's end.

While this CD kicks off with two slightly funky numbers, in Fool and Flyer, the duo throws down a little country flair with Straight and Narrow, which is linked to the title song because you cannot leave the world a better place, if you don't also lead a dedicatedly moral life. Wanda Vick's Fiddle, banjo, Dobro, and mandolin certainly help give this track its authentic Nashville feel.

Oftentimes, songs directed at God can also be sung to a romantic partner. After all, if love comes from on high, so to speak, it's certainly meant to be spread around among humankind, as well. When Rebecca Hendrickson sings, "It feels like the heavens/Since you came into my life," this is obviously a heavenly love song directed at her man. Then with Made To Love You, on which Jeremy and Rebecca duet, lines like "I was made to hold you" can only be understood in the context of a male/female relationship. (I've never seen anyone successfully put his or her arms around The Almighty).

Although Jeremy & Rebecca sing a whole lot about love, whether that's the secular or spiritual kind, they also include songs that help put everyday life into a more Biblically-informed context. Why Strive is a handy example of this particular lyrical approach. Its lyric asks why men and women try so hard to do everything on their own, when they can just put their dreams in God's hands. More to the point, its words poke a hole in the whole pride balloon. "Have you ever seen a haughty cloud proud of its position in the sky?" the song asks at one point, then ponders, "Does Saturn wear her rings to flaunt her wealth around the universe?" The answer to these questions is a firm, rhetorical ‘No!' Yet humans, by there very natures, are apt to show off their bling, even against their better judgment. Nature, however, knows better and does better.

Even so, Jeremy & Rebecca shouldn't be shy about promoting What We Leave Behind. Instead, they should be proud as peacocks of this sparkling 12-song achievement. Even if this recording were the only legacy they left behind, they would have still done extremely well. - Dan MacIntosh


With today's Clear Channel radio dial, there is one station for almost every musical taste. Gone are the days when a song from Jimi Hendrix would be played on the radio right after a song from B.W. Stevenson. Radio has gotten so segmented that there just might be a "Lite-Alternative-Indie-Rock" radio station format somewhere in America right now. So when an album that contains rock, jazz, country and other musical styles is created, the music industry is the first to take notice. In fact, the musicians in the industry may just want to take part in the creation of such an album, when the opportunity presents itself. Enter Jeremy and Rebecca.

Husband and wife Jeremy and Rebecca Hendrickson have recently released their debut album entitled "What We Leave Behind". This is the type of album that just doesn't get made anymore. And it's about time that someone made this type of release to remind people that there was a time when it was allowable to have multiple musical styles on one album.

What We Leave Behind is an album that Jeremy and Rebecca Hendrickson wanted to make. The songs on the release were penned by Jeremy and performed with Jeremy on the piano and Rebecca having the responsibility of taking the lead vocal duties on the majority of the tracks, with the exceptions like The Tallest Tree where Jeremy takes the lead. And songs like the title track of What We Leave Behind, and Made To Love You were written as duets with both Hendricksons sharing lead vocal duties.

One very evident thing that separates What We Leave Behind from many of today's commercial releases on many major record labels is the amount of people who lent their talents to the making of the album. When many labels want to make a release for as little as possible, Jeremy and Rebecca enlisted the help of many talented musicians to help create the sound that the couple was looking for. Many of the tracks contain a large string ensemble to add the right feeling to the song, while other tracks contain a full orchestra to help bring out the full potential of the song.

What makes What We Leave Behind special is what separates it from everything else out there right now: From one track to the next, Jeremy and Rebecca's new album switches gears from one style of music to another. The album starts off with Fool. Fool is a great country-flavored rock song that features just enough fiddle from musician Wanda Vick to satisfy anyone's desire for a little country music. The album's next track of Flyer sounds like something that would have been found somewhere within the career of Donna Summer. The disco-flavored song sounds like it could have been made during the peak of disco's popularity. One of the best moments on the release comes from the song Made To Love You. You can almost hear the song being remade with Trisha Yearwood and Vince Gill handling the vocals on this duet. The album contains many styles throughout its 40-plus minute running time. The CD ends with Have You Got The Time, a song that once again features Rebecca handling the vocals while Jeremy and some friends play a tune that is very reminiscent of the Vince Guaraldi Trio, with the addition of a saxophone.

The music on Jeremy and Rebecca's new CD of What We Leave Behind should satisfy lovers of rock, country, and blues, even jazz. And with the addition of both strings and a horn section, the music on the new album should make the couple a lot of new fans. If you like many different types of music, give Jeremy and Rebecca a chance.

To find out more about Jeremy and Rebecca and their new release of What We Leave Behind, go to their website at www.jeremyandrebecca.com. You can also find them on MySpace at www.myspace.com/jeremyandrebecca. - Matheson Kamin


Discography

What We Leave Behind

Photos

Bio

“… a stunning album of feel good moments buoyed by Jeremy Hendrickson's solid songwriting and Rebecca Hendrickson's dazzling voice.” (Wildy Haskell)

“… a beautiful, poignant, and believable work of art. … Every aspect, every musician, every bit of production is impeccable. It is difficult to believe that this is essentially a grassroots operation…“ (Julian Gorman)

“Rebecca Hendrickson's voice is powerful and able to crossover from genre to genre seamlessly… without changing who she is. It's a unique ability that few performers possess.” (Rod Ames)

“These songs are all so well written, so well produced, and most importantly, so well performed… Jeremy Hendrickson has somehow infused all these different genres; blues, jazz, modern country, rock, and pop to form some powerfully upbeat music that we can all enjoy… This is an amazing accomplishment for a seasoned veteran let alone someone trying to break through.” (Ames)

"Jeremy and Rebecca… should be proud as peacocks of this sparkling 12-song achievement. Even if this recording were the only legacy they left behind, they would have still done extremely well.” (Dan MacIntosh)

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Singer/songwriter duo Jeremy and Rebecca, known for their eclectic pop/rock sound with a country edge and a smattering of stylistic jaunts, recently released their debut album What We Leave Behind. Distinctive for its stylistic breadth, and cinematic flair, the album is a large-scale, independent project written and produced by Jeremy Hendrickson, featuring an impressive list of supporting talent.

Made under their personal label, Dwelling Records, it is clearly evident the artists took full advantage of the freedom they had in helming their own project. The end result is a rich and sophisticated, genre-defying, yet remarkably cohesive collection of singles perfectly suited for today’s MP3 generation, with its propensity for musical mélange.

Jeremy and Rebecca each bring their individual proficiencies to the table in this creative collaboration. Drawing from her strong gospel-music background, Rebecca’s vocals hearken back to an era where powerful, soulful singers like Whitney Houston reigned supreme. Additionally, much of Jeremy’s piano-laced pop/rock approach is surely reminiscent of Billy Joel, and the like.

But while each performs admirably on their respective solo pieces, the husband and wife pair really shines when singing together. Their tight and striking harmonies lift the listener’s ear to new heights and firmly drive home the lyric, making their duets truly standout performances.

Although similarities have been made to Sugarland, and not without merit, Jeremy and Rebecca stand alone in their unique amalgam of styles which they weave in and out of effortlessly. While the pair can capably lay down a dynamic contemporary-country, power-pop ballad, or a rousing country-rock or bluegrass-influenced romp; they feel, and sound, equally comfortable dishing out a rip-roaring disco tune juxtaposed against an expansive blues-gospel number, even mixing in an intimate old-school jazz ballad for good measure.

One quickly becomes convinced that the duo has placed no stylistic limits on themselves, much to the appreciation and delight of the listener. In fact, it is this very diversity which makes hearing Jeremy and Rebecca’s music such a satisfying experience.

Timeless and inspiring, accessible while poignant, the music of Jeremy and Rebecca will certainly not soon be forgotten.