Jillaine
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Jillaine

Provo, Utah, United States | SELF

Provo, Utah, United States | SELF
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"Album Review: "Scars on My Heart" by Jillaine"

In 2011, jazz songstress Jillaine released "Scars on My Heart", following her 2009 debut, "You Really Meant It". "Scars on My Heart" features 12 new songs, nine written by Jillaine, and is a very worthy sophomore effort.

I admire an artist that explores different styles and techniques. While it may not work exactly as expected ("Chris Gaines", anyone?), respect points are always earned for the effort. With "Scars", Jillaine moved from the piano/guitar jazz sound into some unabashed rockers. "You've Lost", in particular, is a superbly written and performed song backed by a rock beat and featuring a well-done guitar shred. The song, written by Erik Chaston, is a strong in-your-face message, spelling out in no uncertain terms the current state of an ex-relationship. "Confusion", "Hole You Dug", and "Doubts" also stretch Jillaine away from the jazz-club sound and into more edgy, rock-infused cuts.

The strongest songs here, though, are the performances in her home genre of jazz. Jillaine's amazing voice is perfectly suited for the spotlight of jazz, where it can shine as the focal point, complemented and supported by the instrumental accompaniment. Where Pat Benatar, Chrissie Hynde, and (yep) Lady Gaga have mastered the art of dominant lead vocals in rock songs, Jillaine has comparable talent in her comfort zone, jazz.

The title performance, "Scars on My Heart", is a highlight of the album. Jillaine sings with a subtle strength, interpreting this song in her middle and upper registers. Sam Jones on guitar and bass and Ryan Flores on drums provide perfect musical accompaniment.

"Strong and Sure" is beautifully performed. It is smooth, restrained, and soft, yet consurrently strong, with a deliberate, growing intensity through the song.

The album closes with, in my opinion, the two strongest performances. On "This Time" Jillaine explores her range, strategically incorporating the lows into the higher-register themes, with superb results. Craig Alder is stunning on guitar and bass.

"Doubts R&B" is an extended reworking of "Doubts" from earlier in the album. It goes back to basics - vocals and piano - with simply perfect results, and gets my vote for the best performance on the album. It is a shining moment in all aspects - vocal and instrumental performance (Craig Alder returns on piano), lyrics, and arrangement. Love, love, love it. It is a great way to bring the album to a close - the listener is left wanting more.

"Scars on My Heart" is another strong effort from Jillaine, who has become one of my favorite new artists. She's given us variety, stepping into different musical arenas, while reassuring us that she can return to the stronghold of jazz at any time and blow us away with her performance.

Still to come: "Jazzy Christmas To You", Jillaine's 2011 Christmas album, "As American as Jazz", a 2012 release of patriotic/Americana songs, and a promised upcoming 2012 Christmas release. Two Christmas albums in two years - that's my kind of artist! - Merry and Bright!, 5 Aug 2012


"Album Review: "Scars on My Heart" by Jillaine"

In 2011, jazz songstress Jillaine released "Scars on My Heart", following her 2009 debut, "You Really Meant It". "Scars on My Heart" features 12 new songs, nine written by Jillaine, and is a very worthy sophomore effort.

I admire an artist that explores different styles and techniques. While it may not work exactly as expected ("Chris Gaines", anyone?), respect points are always earned for the effort. With "Scars", Jillaine moved from the piano/guitar jazz sound into some unabashed rockers. "You've Lost", in particular, is a superbly written and performed song backed by a rock beat and featuring a well-done guitar shred. The song, written by Erik Chaston, is a strong in-your-face message, spelling out in no uncertain terms the current state of an ex-relationship. "Confusion", "Hole You Dug", and "Doubts" also stretch Jillaine away from the jazz-club sound and into more edgy, rock-infused cuts.

The strongest songs here, though, are the performances in her home genre of jazz. Jillaine's amazing voice is perfectly suited for the spotlight of jazz, where it can shine as the focal point, complemented and supported by the instrumental accompaniment. Where Pat Benatar, Chrissie Hynde, and (yep) Lady Gaga have mastered the art of dominant lead vocals in rock songs, Jillaine has comparable talent in her comfort zone, jazz.

The title performance, "Scars on My Heart", is a highlight of the album. Jillaine sings with a subtle strength, interpreting this song in her middle and upper registers. Sam Jones on guitar and bass and Ryan Flores on drums provide perfect musical accompaniment.

"Strong and Sure" is beautifully performed. It is smooth, restrained, and soft, yet consurrently strong, with a deliberate, growing intensity through the song.

The album closes with, in my opinion, the two strongest performances. On "This Time" Jillaine explores her range, strategically incorporating the lows into the higher-register themes, with superb results. Craig Alder is stunning on guitar and bass.

"Doubts R&B" is an extended reworking of "Doubts" from earlier in the album. It goes back to basics - vocals and piano - with simply perfect results, and gets my vote for the best performance on the album. It is a shining moment in all aspects - vocal and instrumental performance (Craig Alder returns on piano), lyrics, and arrangement. Love, love, love it. It is a great way to bring the album to a close - the listener is left wanting more.

"Scars on My Heart" is another strong effort from Jillaine, who has become one of my favorite new artists. She's given us variety, stepping into different musical arenas, while reassuring us that she can return to the stronghold of jazz at any time and blow us away with her performance.

Still to come: "Jazzy Christmas To You", Jillaine's 2011 Christmas album, "As American as Jazz", a 2012 release of patriotic/Americana songs, and a promised upcoming 2012 Christmas release. Two Christmas albums in two years - that's my kind of artist! - Merry and Bright!, 5 Aug 2012


"Album Review: "You Really Meant It" by Jillaine"

I have about 300 jazz CDs in my collection, which is paltry when compared to many jazz music lovers, but still a pretty decent accumulation of music. Probably between 75 and 100 are primarily jazz vocals, a minority of my collection, but a good representation of jazz vocalists through the years.

In my collection, I have nothing that compares to Jillaine.

Jillaine is an independent vocal artist possessing a powerful, steamy, sultry voice that leaps out at you from the first few bars of her debut album, the 2009 release "You Really Meant It". She does not have a sound similar to the greats - Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday - nor the contemporary stars of jazz like Roberta Gambarini, Sophie Milman, or Jane Monheit. Jillaine has a voice and style all her own, and it's good stuff, cats, good stuff.

Jillaine's "You Really Meant It" features nine songs, four written by Jillaine. The first song, "Older, Stronger, and Wiser, Too" is an exceptional lead track which quickly envelopes us with the heart and soul of Jillaine's voice. The record continues with "You've Got Your Memories", a gut-wrenching breakup song with excellent guitar accompaniment by Sam Jones.

The songs on "You Really Meant It" are steeped in the musicality of jazz standards. You feel as if you're in a piano lounge, sipping a martini, listening to a masterful vocalist with piano and guitar acting as enhancers, complementing and never overshadowing the vocals.

All nine songs on "You Really Meant It" are strong. Jillaine's partner musicians have just the right touch. I especially enjoyed the two songs written and accompanied by Anthony Phan, "Love Without Distance" and "Misfortune".

"Misfortune", the closing piece, is full of swagger, and, like most of the songs on this record, explores the darker aspects of life and relationships (or, recently ended relationships). Jillaine's voice is uniquely suited to driving home the emotion present in the lyrics.

I love finding music from independent artists, especially those with the talent and potential to be stars. The internet has given these artists an unprecedented method of connecting with fans, and, conversely, has made it possible for fans and music lovers to interact with artists as never before. Jillaine has a website, http://www.jillainerecords.com/index.html, a Facebook presence, https://www.facebook.com/JillaineRecords, and other web-based avenues to her music.

It was through the internet, via my friend Stubby at Stubby's House of Christmas, that I was first introduced to Jillaine's music. (Stubby's review of Jillaine's 2011 Christmas CD is here). Many kudos and thanks to Stubby for his tireless work to find all the best new Christmas music year-in and year-out. Without Stubby, I may have never found Jillaine's music.

"You Really Meant It" is a tremendous debut from a promising new artist. I love Jillaine's voice, seriously.

Jillaine has released "Scars on My Heart" (2011), "Jazzy Christmas To You" (2011), "As American as Jazz" (2012), and a single "My World" (2012) since her first album. I'll be reviewing all of her albums here, as Jillaine has graciously provided me with CDs for review.

I have not listened to her Christmas CD yet, as I'm saving it as a treat to open when the season arrives (which for me, is about mid-September). And I have no doubt that it will indeed be a treat for my ears.
Please treat yourself and visit Jillaine's website for more information and song samples from this tremendous jazz singer. - Merry and Bright!, 1 Aug 2012


"Jillaine - Jazzy Christmas To You! (CD Review)"

Is it just me or does every singer on American Idol sound like every other singer on American Idol? The same could be said of pop, Indie, and country music as well. There are so many vocalists who sound so much alike—as if they were ordered up from central casting—that I was truly excited to come across Utah’s Jillaine in my annual Christmas music search.

Jillaine has the kind of voice that’s very nearly one of a kind—a powerful voice. Jillaine can take you for a pleasant Sunday spin in the country, but she can also accelerate from purr to full growl on a dime and then back again without ever losing control.

As excited as I was to hear “Jazzy Christmas To You!” in its entirety, I also had some trepidation. Nothing spoils an album quite so much as high expectations. And high expectations for an Indie release from such a relative newcomer are doubly perilous. But the bluesy piano opening for “Deck The Halls” set just the right tone and put me at ease. From that point right on through the final pitch perfect plaintive note that closes “What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve?”, I thoroughly enjoyed this album.

You won't hear lush strings or the backing of a big band here. The backing on “Jazzy Christmas To You!” is sparse—just piano or guitar on several tracks and a trio on the others—and it works, serving to keep Jillaine’s voice out front as it should be. Aided by wonderfully fresh arrangements, Jillaine generously seasons the set with jazz and blues, but doesn’t ever stray so far as to make the album inaccessible to fans of traditional Christmas vocal albums.

One of my favorites on the album is Jillaine’s bluesy take on “I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day”. I don’t know who is responsible for that arrangement, but it suits both the song and Jillaine’s voice perfectly. I honestly don’t think I’ve ever heard a better version of that song (and I’ve heard a lot).

Jillaine follows “I Heard The Bells” with another of the album’s great tracks, “Hey Santa Claus”, written by the late Harvey Fuqua and originally performed by The Moonglows. Jillaine is at her bluesy best on this number, bending notes with her voice the way a good blues guitarist bends notes with his guitar.

“Baby It’s Cold Outside” was delightfully well executed, with bass player James Archibald serving as Jillaine’s duet partner. The pair sounded relaxed and natural and as though they were truly having fun. Once again, they pulled it off perfectly.

Next up is “Santa Send A Fella”, a song that was originally performed by Rose Marie on the old Dick Van Dyke Show. It’s a song that’s seldom covered, so it’s a special treat anytime it is. The arrangement is fairly close to the original, leaning a little more jazz and a little less show.

For me, the anchor of the album is "Merry Christmas Baby". The genius of Charles Brown’s “Merry Christmas Baby” is that it sounds great in almost any arrangement. Jillaine takes the gut bucket blues approach, much to my personal delight, channeling the spirit of Ida Cox in a way few vocalists could. To my ears, Jillaine sounds more at home on this track than any other, free to be herself and unleash the full power of her amazing voice. This is easily the bluesiest track on the album and easily my favorite.

After swinging her way through “Santa Bring My Baby Back To Me”, Jillaine lets everyone know that she can deliver just as much passion to a slow standard as she can to the blues. Her performance of "What Are You Doing New Year's Eve?" is revelatory and nothing short of stunning.

I’d have avoided some of these songs—I’ve previously noted that I don’t think anybody sounds good singing “Here Comes Santa Claus”—but Jillaine handles them well and keeps them brief. On the other hand, there are a few songs—notably “Silent Night”—where I wished Jillaine would have lingered a while. But the pacing is a plus, overall, and the sequencing of the songs (an often overlooked ingredient in the digital age) couldn’t have been any better. Jillaine is ably supported by Archibald on bass, Ryan Flores on drums, and especially Craig Alder who provides outstanding guitar and keyboard work throughout the album.

In another lifetime, I managed a young female blues singer with a nearly one of a kind voice, so I understand that Jillaine is not going to appeal to everyone. She's not likely to challenge the Michael Bubles and Justin Biebers for radio airplay this year. Jillaine is still at the beginning of her career arc; time and life will add much greater depth to her music. And this Christmas set, sadly, won't expose you to Jillaine's talent as a songwriter as her previous albums, "You Really Meant It" and "Scars On My Heart", have. But I'll tell you this in perfect honesty: I have listened to this album more than any other Christmas album so far this year, and I'm really not expecting that to change. If you knew how many Christmas albums I listen to, you'd know that that is high praise indeed.

"Jazzy Christmas To You!" is a fun album and undeniably Christmasy (proving you don't need sleigh bells to make a record sound like Christmas). You can opt for those central casting American Idol types if you like, and many many people will, but I am so happy I stumbled across Jillaine. Give me a woman with a powerful voice any day. One who has a fondness for jazz and especially blues, well, even better. "Jazzy Christmas To You!" is exactly the kind of Christmas present I like finding under my tree.

Don't forget to check our preview of "Jazzy Christmas To You!" for a free download of "Jingle Bells". Just Jillaine's way of saying "Merry Christmas". - Stubby's House of Christmas, 1 Nov 2011


"As American As Jazz (CD Review)"

Happy July 4th, y'all! It's America's birthday and I can't think of any better way to celebrate than with any album from the National Treasure that is Jillaine and, in particular, this patriotic themed record released today through iTunes.

For those with short memories and/or dropping by Stubby's anew, Jillaine is a young vocalist whose 2011 Christmas album I absolutely adored. I included it in my list of favorites for the year and you can check out our full review of "Jazzy Christmas To You!" in the reviews section. Jillaine has a powerful voice and she knows how to use it. She's got mad jazz skills and the soul of a Blues woman, all of which she displays without the vocal gymnastics of lesser talents trying too hard to impress. Her ability to use her voice as an instrument, bending notes and sliding through scales is, in my opinion, nothing short of magnificent. It would be fair of you to question my objectivity on this; there is no doubt that, at this point, I am an unabashed fan. I love this woman's voice and I love pretty much everything she does with it. I even love that cover art above. Damn, that's awesome!

"As American As Jazz" is just one of THREE albums Jillaine has recorded and plans to release in the coming months (including a second Christmas album!) and its the one that's probably the hardest sell for me. I mean, I just don't sit around listening to old Kate Smith and George M. Cohen records. I just don't. But Jillaine pulls it off with aplomb. There are some really nice touches throughout--the bluesy piano roll on "God Bless America" for example--and once again Jillaine delights with some unexpected song selections like Rhonda Vincent's "All American Bluegrass Girl". For me, in the end, the highlights are the jazz combo numbers, "Wonderful World" and, most especially, "You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To". But Jillaine's (again) paced the album very well and its a sweet listen from start to finish.

Props to the rest of the band, pianist Zach Wiggins, Jesse Quebbeman-Turley on drums, and James Archibald, the band's veteran and mainstay on bass. Me, I bought the album pretty much as soon as it hit iTunes. Like I said, I'm a fan. But, if you're inclined to try before you buy, you should be able to stream most (if not all) of the record at Reverb Nation. And, if you scroll down a bit, you might even find that "Amazing Grace" is available as a free download (also at Facebook).

Now I really can't wait for the new Christmas album. And, hey, guess what? I'm pretty sure this one will have an original track on it. More on that album shortly. In the meantime, go on and enjoy your Independence Day. - Stubby's House of Christmas, 4 Jul 2012


"Synthesis Gives Students a Solution to Soothe Stress"

With all the final projects, papers and exams building up during the last two weeks of classes, many students feel the books they purchased earlier in the semester are crashing down over their heads. Synthesis band member Regan Brough offers an escape from the avalanche of books: tonight’s Synthesis concert.

“The music we play is so uplifting and edifying,” Brough said. “You can’t leave one of our concerts without feeling like you can conquer the world.”

Tonight, Synthesis will play a “best of” concert, featuring many pieces the group has previously recorded and released on CD. The group is mostly a jazz group, but as their name suggests, they combine the sounds of big band, Latin, South American, Eastern and black gospel music to create their own style.

“There is a lot of creativity and spontaneity in our music,” said Ray Smith, director of Synthesis. “It’s the lifeblood of our music.”

Though most of Synthesis’ repertoire is instrumental music, one piece performed at tonight’s concert will feature a singer. Three girls auditioned for the spot, but Smith chose freshman Jillaine Chaston to perform on the song “Blues in the Night.” She said she was a little surprised she got chosen because she is only a freshman, but is excited for the opportunity to perform.

“This is the first time I’ve sung with a big band behind me,” Chaston said. “It’s been a different experience but it’s a lot of fun. I’m always looking for musicians to perform with.”

The concert will also include some debut pieces written by members of the group themselves. Anthony Phan and Regan Brough each wrote songs for a jazz arranging class that were then chosen to be performed by Synthesis.

Jazz songs are actually called “charts” which give a basic outline of the song but allow for improvisation solos throughout the number. The improvisation is what Brough said he likes most about playing in Synthesis.

“I love how it’s so interactive,” Brough said. “We all feed off each other and the audience. Sometimes it’s scary and you fall on your face, but then other times you’re totally on. That’s what makes it so exciting.”

As the director, Smith said he is constantly on his toes when the band is playing.

“Because of the improv, nobody knows what’s going to happen,” Smith said. “Even the band will be surprised by what will be played.”

With the variety of songs and styles at tonight’s concert, Smith said it should be a lot of fun.

“Anybody who misses this concert will be hearing about it for a while,” Smith said. “You don’t want to miss it.”

The concert is Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall. Tickets are $9 or $6 with BYU ID and can be purchased at the Harris Fine Arts Center Ticket Office. - Daily Universe, 30 Nov 2005


"BYU's Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band Wins Top Honors at California Festival"

Brigham Young University’s Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band brought home scholarship money totaling $2,700, along with other special awards from the 2nd Annual Traditional Jazz Youth Band Festival at California State University in Sacramento.

“We were awarded first prize for collegiate bands and were invited to perform in the gala concert,” said director Steve Call of the BYU School of Music faculty.

Clarinetist Chris Wilson was awarded the Kenyon O. Smith Scholarship and a cash award of $1,000, along with full tuition, room and board for the weeklong Traditional Jazz Camp at California State University in Sacramento for summer 2007. This award is worth $1,200. Saxophonist Michael Tobian was awarded the Kenyon O. Smith Scholarship with a cash award of $500.

Other awards included: Aaron Dickens, outstanding collegiate trumpeter; Tonga Tonga Tukumoeatu, outstanding collegiate trombonist; Whitney Morris, outstanding collegiate pianist; Aaron Southerland, outstanding collegiate tubist/bassist; Alecs Bylund, outstanding collegiate drummer; and Jillaine Chaston, outstanding collegiate vocalist.

For more information, contact Steve Call at (801) 422-6116 or by e-mail at steve_call@byu.edu. - BYU News Release, 14 Feb 2007


"Storm Fails to Dampen Christmas Cheer"

Traditions start from a mere idea and then spread far and wide, becoming memories that bring friends, families and neighbors together.

Saturday night marked the first Christmas By Candlelight and the BYUSA and the Student Honor Association said they hope will become a much loved Christmas celebration.

With musical performances that brought the audience to their feet, and enough hot chocolate, hot cider, cookies and candy canes for three thousand people, the event was full of Christmas cheer.

Despite the snowy weather that kept a lot of people from the event, Jason Linford, one of the coordinators of the event, and a senior studying American Studies, said the it was a success.

"We are so pleased with the success of this event and look forward to participating in this tradition for many years to come," Linford said.

With performances by Noteworthy, Mossebutter, the Student Honor Association Choir , Mindy Gledhill, Jillaine Chaston, the BYU Ballroom Dance team and others, the night was filled with sounds of Christmas cheer.

The snow didn't keep Tad Walch, and his wife Ronde Walch, from attending the event with their children and extended family members.

"We came and brought 4 of our kids and four of their other cousins," Tad Walch said. "It is nice to bring them to campus to see role models having fun."

Their favorite performance was jazz singer, and BYU student, Jillaine Chaston.

"What a fun voice," Walch said. "She stole the show."

Line Tuitavuki, a senior from West Valley City, enjoyed the show because of all the different cultures that were represented.

"I really liked that everyone was willing to share this with us and make our Christmas part of their Christmas," she said.

Many performers were willing to step outside of their comfort zones for the Christmas celebration, touching the lives of those attending.

Michelle Burnett, a member of the SHA Choir, said events like this excite her.

"There were a lot of really talented people here," Burnett said. "It makes me excited to be a BYU student where I can be involved in activities where people are excited, and ready and willing to share their talents."

"I wish it hadn't snowed so much because I know that everyone that came had an amazing experience," she said. "I wish more people could have enjoyed the talent and been a part of the start of this tradition."

Traditions are not easily started but many are working to ensure this one catches on.

"The goal of starting new traditions is to first, share the true vision of the event, second, gain student body support, and third, improve the tradition every year," Linford said. "The reason why we have traditions is to enrich the experiences of BYU students." - Daily Universe, 10 Dec 2007


"Chaston--Church Service"

On Oct. 26 at the Springville Presbyterian Church service at 10:30 a.m. Jillaine Chaston will sing seven songs as part of the service. Pastor George H. Lower's sermon is "Vocal Jazz and the Christian Faith." He will share scripture and comments relating to the words of the various songs.

The public is invited to the service at the Springville church. The church is located at 245 S. 200 East in Springville. Sunday School begins at 9:30 with Worship at 10:30 followed by Fellowship time at 11:30.

Chaston is a vocal jazz singer at Brigham Young University where she has studied with Kelly Eisenhour, jazz vocal instructor at BYU. She has had concerts in the fine arts building and her website will give you more opportunities to hear her in the future. - Daily Herald, 22 Oct 2008


"Out of the Blue"


Jazz and blues singer Jillaine Chaston will be performing a free concert at Brigham Young University on May 2. She'll take the stage alongside her five-piece combo band. The hour-long concert, which begins at 7:30 p.m., is in the Madsen Recital Hall in the Harris Fine Arts Center.

Chaston will sing famous tunes such as "Why Don't You Do Right?" and "Unchain My Heart." For more information, visit www.jillainerecords.com. - Daily Herald, 23 Apr 2009


"BYU Student gets Lifelong Dream of Performing as a Jazz Singer"

While most little girls played dress up and house with their friends, one music student at BYU dreamed of her future as a jazz singer.

“I’ve been singing at weddings and parties ever since I was a little kid,” Jillaine Chaston said. “It’s always been a huge part of my life.”

Chaston will be featuring her unique and powerful voice when she performs on Saturday from 7:30-8:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall located in the Harris Fine Arts Center. Admission is free.

“She has a very gifted voice,” said Richard Duke, one of Chaston’s teachers and mentors. “It is very rare to find someone as talented and capable, and who is able to spend the time and effort into becoming better. Part of her talent is that she seeks to find people who are also developing their talents who also have that same amount of energy and enthusiasm.”

Chaston will perform a variety of songs including original music from her debut album “You Really Meant It,” released this month on Amazon and iTunes. She will also perform songs from her sophomore album set to be released in August.

As a jazz studies major with a vocal emphasis, Chaston said she has always been interested in performing.

“It brings me the most joy. I love performing for the audience,” she explained. “I like to get to know the audience members and keep in touch with them.”

A singer and songwriter, Chaston will be performing many of her original pieces at the recital. Dawn, her mother, said the songs she wrote come from her daughter’s personal evolution.

“Not only is it a deeply engraved love of music,” she said, “but it is communicating with such dignity and power what is meaningful to her. A lot of her songs represent her growth.”

Audience members should not expect the performance to just be an ordinary recital, Duke said.

“You will hear great music by great musicians, but you will also see a great show,” he said. “It is always a fun and lively performance. There is a lot of energy.”

For more information about Chaston, visit her Web site, www.jillainerecords.com. - Daily Universe, 30 Apr 2009


Discography

"The Moment (feat. Justin Jensen)" [Single, 7/30/12]
"My World" [Single, 7/23/12]
"As American As Jazz: A Patriotic Celebration of the USA" [Album, 7/2/12]
"Jazzy Christmas To You!" [Album, 10/25/11]
"Scars on My Heart" [Album, 5/23/11]
"You Really Meant It" [Album, 3/25/09]

Photos

Bio

Besides my startling and unique vocal qualities, probably the most unusual thing about me is I am a public performer who has an environmental illness: chemical sensitivities to perfumes, colognes and scented products. I actually wear a ventilator mask in public and take a tabletop air purifier wherever I go. Despite this seemingly insurmountable obstacle, I have performed since I was five years old and have missed only one performance due to strep throat!

Even people who hate jazz are enthralled by my performances. Heavy Metal guitarists love my concerts for the energy I exude. Teens love the unexpected nature of my singing. Children love to come up to me to see if I am real and to give me gifts after I perform. Jazz lovers love the richness of my bluesy voice. They also appreciate my powerful renditions of rock favorites like "Final Countdown" and "Hold the Line."

My first demo in a recording studio was done at 10 years of age. Four more demos preceded my first CD, "You Really Meant It," released April 2009. My second CD, "Scars on My Heart," will be released in May/June 2010.

While in college the last five years working toward a jazz studies degree with vocal emphasis, I have done over 65 performances on and off campus. Particularly important to me are the benefits for United Way, Utah Regional Medical Center Neonatal and Pediatric units, and SA Lifeline Foundation.

I have sung with big bands, small combos, rock bands, funk bands with horns, just guitar or piano, even stride piano. At the Sacramento Traditional Jazz Festival, I sang Dixieland to a standing ovation from die- hard jazz enthusiasts.

As bandleader for my band, I arrange all the music and do the charts. As a composer, I have written, recorded and performed 13 of my songs as well as songs by other young composers.

My brother, Erik, and I established Jillaine Records www.jillaine.com On my video page, there is a BYU Weekly segment about my life as a performer with chemical sensitivities. It also highlights Erik.

For many years sound engineers were compressing my vocal recordings and distorting my unique vocal qualities. Erik studied and worked in sound recording so that he would have the skills to make my recordings sound close to the way I sound when I sing live. It is rare for a brother and sister to have such unique yet complementary talents.

When people would cast doubt on me for pursuing a career as a singer with chemical sensitivities or as musicians have come and gone, and when talent development costs have been prohibitive, my family always believed and never complained.

I have become a magnetic performer with a most unusual voice, compelling stage presence and masterful command of the music. And I love sharing with the audience what I experience when I sing.