Jim Protector

Jim Protector

BandAlternativeRock

a smooth cocktail of indie-rock, electronica and bloody fingertips

Biography

The Norwegian midwinter of 2001 was extremely cold, but it gave Alex and Jarle time to write and record the weird and melodious music of Jim Protector, using the family-computer and whatever instrument or tool at hand. The outcome was the hand made 7-inch Half Finished / Half Begun, released the following year. Suprisingly enough it recieved dazzling rewievs in some of Norways most profiled music-zines, Mute (8/10) and Panorama (5/6). A nice start.

During 2003 songs for the new EP Jim Protectors guide to self-pity was recorded, engineered by Thomas Ruud, from the Norwegian rock-act Mohammed. As the often the case when funding studio-time and record-release on ones own, things tend to take a little more time. Add the fact that the boys were spread between cities and continents for a while, one can understand why the release was delayed until late fall of 2004. Not, however, without its fair share of attention.

The young fellows of Jim Protector are now gathered in the old viking-city of Trondheim, where they also attend studies. A refurnished office in a closed down smelting-plant serves as a practice-room and studio. Now a quartet, Jim Protector has proven to be a most competent and entertaining live-act, for those lucky enough to have seen it, strengthen by the drummer Andreas and the energetic guitar-player Stein Ove. Cracked fingernails and bloody fingertips are quite common when these guys rock the stage!

What does Jim Protector sound like? Try guitarbased indie-rock with a touch of catchy, child-like melodies, add elements of casio-pop, lo-fi and white noise, well, then you kinda get the idea. You might want to compare it with the likings of Arab Strap, Motorpsycho, Granddaddy, Neutral Milk Hotel, Yo La Tengo or some of the bands from the Canadian Constellation label. Or you just might want to compare it with something else.

On their debut album Jim Protector has been collaborating with Ken Stringfellow (The Posies, R.E.M., Big Star) to mix and refine the Jim Protector sound. A most charming cut with lo-fi legend Jad Fair (Half Japanese, Teenage Fanclub, Yo La Tengo++) is also included. The album was recorded in their abandoned smelting plant studio in Trondheim, mixed by Ken Stringfellow one cold week in February 06 at Livingroom Studios, Oslo, and one hot week in April 06 at Soundhouse recording, Seattle and finally mastered at Cutting Room, Stockholm, by Håkan Åkesson. The album has been well received and that summer the guys got to play at North by Northeast in Toronto, Canada and one of Norway’s biggest music festivals called Quart.

It's like what Baby Spice said: "Be a little bit wiser, baby: put it on, put it on." While you're out gallivanting at NXNE, it's always wise to have a few jim protectors on hand, as this poptronica band reminds us.
-NOW Magazine May 31, 2007

They're an infectious and noisy indie rock four-piece all the way from Sweden's less trendy neighbour, Norway. These guys like their guitars turned up, way up. Whether they were locking into a post-punk groove or slinging out a bass-heavy dirge, the Protector guys kept it distorted and loud. Not surprisingly, the vocals often ended up buried beneath the wall of noise for most of the performance. They indulged the place in a frenzy of feedback on the finale and went over time, but, hey, they deserved the extra time.
-Chartattack, June 11, 2007

Discography

Half finished/half begun 7" (2002)
Jim Protector´s guide to self-pity EP (2004)
Shields Down (2007)

Check out songs here www.myspace.com/jimprotector
Some live-video material can be found on our website: www.jimprotector.net

Set List

Our sets are usually 30-60 minutes long, depending on the place and bands we´re sharing the gig with. Normally, these songs are included in our live-set (give or take a few songs):

French
The Hallmark Channel
Jim Protector´s guide to self-pity
The Tunnel
Waking up with me
interlude
Shields Down
Creating a diversion
wooden knee

we are not known for doing cover-songs, but you never know what might happen on stage.