JK & The Lost Boys
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JK & The Lost Boys

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | INDIE

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | INDIE
Band Rock Acoustic

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"Word on the Street - JK & The Lost Boys"


There is a lot of crazy stuff going on in our little music scene these days. Bands are breaking up, starting over, or just changing directions. There are three particular things I would like to touch on, before I go on vacation and leave the next few articles in the capable hands of Tara Morris.

First, there is a band called JK and the Lost Boys that is coming into our market for the first time this weekend, from Atlanta. They will be playing downstairs at Raw on Friday. JK and the Lost Boys are a folk/rock four-piece that could be described as pop rock if the term was used properly. Currently, “pop” is a term used for instruments set on auto-tune, played over a hip-hop track. This is not the case with JK and the Lost Boys. They are, in my opinion, “pop” because they have catchy hooks, delivered by talented musicians.

You are probably wondering: What is the deal with the name? It’s a mouthful, for one, and who is this JK person? At least, this is what I first questioned. JK stands for the lead singer, Justin Keller, and it has been his nickname since he was a kid. OK. Simple enough. But what about these “lost boys”? Are they referencing one of my favorite cheesy vampire movies? Is it a shout out to the Coreys? Nope. But what it does stand for is something I could not have ever guessed, and something that appeals to my sense of humor.

Apparently, when Justin was six years old, the Olympics were coming through their small town in Rockdale County, GA, just outside of Atlanta. With the Olympics came an infestation of press and media armies to report on the events. While the press was visiting, they discovered that a local Rockdale County high school was the host to one of the largest syphilis outbreaks in the United States. TBS decided to do a documentary on the outbreak, as a result, and entitled it, The Lost Children of Rockdale County. The film has since been used in health classes across the country to warn kids about the dangers of syphilis. Justin embraced his roots, and cashed in on the county’s claim to fame by naming his band JK and the Lost Boys. Well, sure. Why wouldn’t you? Where there is Syphilis, certainly, there is music…or at least rock-n-roll.

The band consists of Justin Keller, the lead singer who plays guitar and slide guitar, Jaz Dixon on lead guitar and mandolin, Casey Courter on drums, and Chase Lamando on bass. These guys have been together for two years and just came out with an album in March, Street Lights and Avenues. JK described their band as a “natural sounding music,” far from overdone. They all come from musically inclined families, and can each play more than one instrument, which contributes to their organic flow. I would suggest you check them out, if you’ve ever liked Dave Matthews or the Counting Crows.

- Chattanooga Pulse


"JK and the Lost Boys @ Center Stage"

Showing up at Vinyl last Thursday night was like entering into a college house party. At the end of a three week tour, headlining band JK and the Lost Boys celebrated their homecoming with many friends, classmates, family, and fans in attendance. The opening bands (Allison Weiss, Johnny Rockbridge and the High Chairs) set the bar high with upbeat tunes and high energy. Almost every person in the venue huddled close to the Vinyl stage dancing, drinking, and socializing.

JK and the Lost Boys’ opening song “Beautiful Day” communicated a positive, lighthearted message to the audience. Justin Keller’s deep raspy, conversational vocals are reminiscent of Shawn Mullin’s song “Rockabye” without the darker timbre. The band’s live performance felt unrehearsed and fresh. An impressive aspect of JK and the Lost Boys’ live show is their unpretentious attitude and friendly approach. Keller picked up his dobro on several occasions, adding a southern drawl to an otherwise bar rock sound. Guitarist Jaz Dixon displayed admirable workmanship on his electric guitar. Apparently, it runs in the family. Dixon’s father (banjo) and sister (violin) joined the band onstage for one song, which only added more personal touches.

The old and new synthesize to create JK and the Lost Boys’ sound. Nineties pop like Third Eye Blind meets classic rock. Some moments are for jam band enthusiasts, but can be appreciated by the general listener as well. My personal favorite song was the Boys’ cover of Ray Charles’ “Don’t Need No Doctor.” JK and the Lost Boys’ performance inspired Vinyl’s audience to sing along and the atmosphere remained fun-loving to the last note.

JK and the Lost Boys recently released their first EP, Street Lights & Avenues. Available at iTunes and Amazon.

Swing by Vinyl (Center Stage), located at 1374 West Peachtree Street, right in the heart of midtown, to check out some great local bands and touring national acts playing there almost seven days a week! - DailyTracks


"JK and the Lost Boys @ Center Stage"

Showing up at Vinyl last Thursday night was like entering into a college house party. At the end of a three week tour, headlining band JK and the Lost Boys celebrated their homecoming with many friends, classmates, family, and fans in attendance. The opening bands (Allison Weiss, Johnny Rockbridge and the High Chairs) set the bar high with upbeat tunes and high energy. Almost every person in the venue huddled close to the Vinyl stage dancing, drinking, and socializing.

JK and the Lost Boys’ opening song “Beautiful Day” communicated a positive, lighthearted message to the audience. Justin Keller’s deep raspy, conversational vocals are reminiscent of Shawn Mullin’s song “Rockabye” without the darker timbre. The band’s live performance felt unrehearsed and fresh. An impressive aspect of JK and the Lost Boys’ live show is their unpretentious attitude and friendly approach. Keller picked up his dobro on several occasions, adding a southern drawl to an otherwise bar rock sound. Guitarist Jaz Dixon displayed admirable workmanship on his electric guitar. Apparently, it runs in the family. Dixon’s father (banjo) and sister (violin) joined the band onstage for one song, which only added more personal touches.

The old and new synthesize to create JK and the Lost Boys’ sound. Nineties pop like Third Eye Blind meets classic rock. Some moments are for jam band enthusiasts, but can be appreciated by the general listener as well. My personal favorite song was the Boys’ cover of Ray Charles’ “Don’t Need No Doctor.” JK and the Lost Boys’ performance inspired Vinyl’s audience to sing along and the atmosphere remained fun-loving to the last note.

JK and the Lost Boys recently released their first EP, Street Lights & Avenues. Available at iTunes and Amazon.

Swing by Vinyl (Center Stage), located at 1374 West Peachtree Street, right in the heart of midtown, to check out some great local bands and touring national acts playing there almost seven days a week! - DailyTracks


"CD Review: JK & The Lost Boys –- Street Lights & Avenues EP; Playing Vinyl, July 29"

Remember Blues Travelers from the mid-’90s? Well, if that group had died, their reincarnation would be JK & The Lost Boys. Some mellow jam sessions, catchy hooks and clever lyrics have all be bunched in together in the band’s EP Street Lights & Avenues. Natives of Conyers, Ga., the lead singer mixes the popular rock sound with his own unique brand of jam-session folksy pop inspired by those before him. Not only is the inspiration of Blues Traveler apparent, but there’s a little Dave Matthews Band and Counting Crows in there. Surprisingly, the band pulls this sound off the the greatest of ease. In other words, this doesn’t sound like a debut in any way.

“Beautiful Day” starts off the record with a distinct flavor that brings you straight back to the 90's, but that’s no insult. Current commercial rock/pop pales in comparison to that of its past, and with their charming songs, JK & The Lost Boys step back in time without sounding retro or stale. If “The Wrong Things” isn’t released as a single, that would be a mistake. One of the best tracks on the short album, the track details the mistakes of the protagonist in the matters of love.

With a twist of twang, the album goes down the folksy route at times, and while not for everyone, the sound doesn’t stretch much from the band’s overall tone. “Sing it On Down” strides down the road of the folksy sound, and while it may turn some off, fans of folk will no doubt enjoy the mix of sounds.

The most politically-charged track, “What’s This Peace” questions the true motives of war and if all the pain is worth it. Perhaps not as inspired as “Give Peace a Chance,” nonetheless, the track is worthy of mention for a debut album.

Closer “Your Colors” ends the EP on a sullen, yet satisfying, note. The track actually sounds like something John Mayer would sing, only about 10,000 times better than how any Mayer track would sound.

Of the six tracks, about three are single-worthy, something rare for a debut EP. With such a promising debut record, it looks like the boys of JK & the Lost Boys are not lost at all, but know exactly what their doing and how to do it well.

JK & The Lost Boys play Vinyl on July 29. - Atlanta Music Guide


Discography

Street Lights & Avenues
1. The Wrong Things
2. Goodbye
3. Sing it On Down
4. What's This Peace
5. Your Colors

Time Is Trouble
1. It All Comes Down
2. The Bottom
3. Dance With Me
4. You'll Be Gone
5. Better Days
6. The River
7. Good Enough

Photos

Bio


- Opened for AWOLNATION and Sleeper/Agent at 99x's Mistle Toe Jam 2011

- Latest Album "Time Is Trouble" is produced by Josh Golden and Ryan Newell (Sister Hazel)

- Won Georgia State’s Battle of The Band’s for an opening slot for Ludacris 2011

- Toured throughout the southeast

- Played with: AWOLNATION, Paul McDonald of The Grand Magnolias, Sleeper/Agent, Shawn Mullins, Chuck Cannon,
Stevie Monce, Benjy Davis Project, Will Hoge, Rachel Platten, Bess Rogers, Allison Weiss,
Nathan Beaver, Brian Collins, Jeremy Aggers, Michael Tolcher, Sarah Mac Band, B-Liminal,
Tim Brantley, Charlie Walker, Lani Daniels, Sam Thacker.

- Played Rock By The Sea 2011

Provoking any size audience and turning a room into an all out party, JK & The Lost Boys put on one hell of an energetic show. Now, with the release of their sophomore EP Time Is Trouble on June 30th, they have armed themselves with seven overpowering southern-rock tracks brimming with an energy that reflects their effervescent live experience. The recording, shepherded and shaped by producer Ryan Newell from the band Sister Hazel, ranges from rockers like the hard driving "It All Comes Down" and "The Bottom" to the melancholy with "Good Enough". Inspired by experience the band has accumulated on the road, the record portrays a mature approach to songwriting. Skillfully written and deeply metaphoric, JK has intricately woven together a set of songs that expresses the ups and downs of life, while still maintaining a positive outlook. Sure to please, Time Is Trouble one to leave in your car stereo.

Press Bio -----

“We try to steer our fate and plan for the future but time has a way of forcing events in our life, whether we’re ready for it or not” – Justin Keller, a.k.a. JK
That is the concept that defines the music of JK & The Lost Boys’ new release, Time Is Trouble. “It’s a visceral album. These songs are a reaction to events in my life that are part of growing up,” says front man JK. Sister Hazel’s famed guitarist, Ryan Newell, was enlisted as a producer, shaping a mature polish around the band’s raw high energy. Newell teamed with Atlanta’s Downright studios, producer/engineer Josh Golden, who helped craft Time Is Trouble into an energetic experience.

Striving to create an album that defines them, the band picked up bassist Chase Lamondo before laying down the demo. “After our first release, Street Lights and Avenues, we aimed to write music that was distinctly our own,” explains lead guitarist Jaz Dixon, who came on board with the band after engineering that first EP. Deeply metaphoric, JK’s lyrics take you through the experience of learning life’s hardest lessons while still trying to maintain a positive outlook. But JK & The Lost Boys has always been about the driving beat and high-energy that drummer Casey Courter helps keep in focus.

Raised in Rockdale County Georgia, JK and Casey formed the band before they could even vote. Courter talks about their high school beginnings, “Our first gig was an event at our school we did as a favor for a friend. Since then, everything’s been real natural and has gotten better over time.” Initially using music to express the feel-good vibes of teenage summers past, the band has toured throughout the southeast in the past year. “ I had good friends and good times growing up in Conyers and that came out when I sat down to write,” JK explains.

Now, with maturity only days on the road and hours in the studio can provide, JK & The Lost Boys has a new focus. Re-tooled to hit the road the band knows their worth and they don’t mind campaigning hard for the world to hear. “We’ll just keep playing shows and getting in front of people” Chase concludes, “..and having a damn good time doing it.”


Their Second EP, Time Is Trouble, is currently on Itunes.
www.jkandthelostboys.com www.myspace.com/jkandthelostboys.