Joe Taylor
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Joe Taylor

New York City, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Rock Pop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Aug
12
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Jul
22
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Jun
28
Joe Taylor @ Draft Picks

Mount Prospect, Illinois, United States

Mount Prospect, Illinois, United States

Jun
22
Joe Taylor @ Beacon Hill Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

May
12
Joe Taylor @ The Bitter End

New York, New York, United States

New York, New York, United States

May
03
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Apr
06
Joe Taylor @ ApCal

Madera, California, United States

Madera, California, United States

Jan
19
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Oct
14
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Sep
21
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Sep
09
Joe Taylor @ Forest Hill Field Club

Bloomfield, New Jersey, United States

Bloomfield, New Jersey, United States

Sep
07
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Sep
03
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Aug
20
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Aug
19
Joe Taylor @ Hollywood Golf Club

Deal, New Jersey, United States

Deal, New Jersey, United States

Aug
18
Joe Taylor @ Broadway Comedy Club

New York, New York, United States

New York, New York, United States

Aug
13
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Aug
05
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Aug
03
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Jul
28
Joe Taylor @ Beacon Hill Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Jul
23
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Jul
13
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Jul
09
Joe Taylor @ Indian Trail Club

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, United States

Jul
07
Joe Taylor @ Beacon Hill Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

May
05
Joe Taylor @ Canoe Brook Country Club

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Summit, New Jersey, United States

Music

Press


"Joe Taylor's soul-stirring balladry and Steve Perry-caliber vocals are on full display here; 'Don't Change' is tender and passionate by turns, summing to a powerful pop anthem many will admire for its energy and originality." - 2017 Akademia Music Awards


It’s safe to assume that artists, no matter their medium, understand the feeling of professional futility better than most. The financial insecurity and continuous rejection from audiences and critics is enough to weed out all but the ardently committed. And while many people try to make a living in the arts, most eventually give up.

Singer-songwriter Joe Taylor never quit. His nearly 30-year musical journey has taken him from Halifax to playing for change in the subways of New York to the glossy studios of Los Angeles. The guy could easily teach a class on the ups-and-downs of making it as a musician. Well, sit down. School is in session.

Taylor on rejection: “You have to be able to take rejection. You have to be crushed and pick yourself up again. You have to grow a thick skin, and if you don’t, then you’re done.”

Taylor on critics: “No matter how harsh a critic is about my music, I have already destroyed myself 200 times over. I always want to tell them, ‘You should read my reviews of myself. My opinion is way more brutal.’”

Taylor on persistence: “You have to be devoted. You have to be willing to bend but not break… If it’s just you and one other person playing in a coffee shop and that’s all you did for the rest of your life then you have to love it. You have to love the pain.”

That’s just it: Joe Taylor loves the pain. Given that gem coupled with the sage wisdom above, one would almost be tempted to assume that his music sounds as jaded and forlorn as a Leonard Cohen song on a rainy Sunday. However, on his most recent album, Anything’s Possible, he sounds optimistic and downright peppy. Whether it’s power anthems like “Contagious” and “Possible” or soul ballads like “Walk Away” and “The Sweetest Tune” (the latter was featured on Days of Our Lives), the album could almost be seen as a culmination of his beloved pain so far.

For Taylor, the journey began in Halifax, Canada—an oceanfront city in Nova Scotia with a small town feel. To hear him tell it, he was four-years-old when he realized he was going to play music. Eventually picking up his guitar and heading to Toronto in the mid-90s, he was working as a furniture salesman while honing his music skills when he decided to visit his brother in New York City. There, like so many before him, Taylor fell in love with The City. He commuted back-and-forth, playing gigs at The Knitting Factory and CBGB’s, and eventually made the move permanent in 2001.

“Toronto is a big city, but the difference is the energy,” said Taylor. “In other places it’s all about who you know. In New York it’s more about what you can do. No one’s gonna sugarcoat it there.”

Over the next few years, Taylor played just about any club that would have him. He built a solid enough fan base that he could afford to take some small tours, but never made any real money. Looking to make ends meet, Taylor took to busking in the subways for spare change.

“That was always a great experience, playing in subways, ’cause I could test out new songs. If you’re in Grand Central or Penn Station at rush hour and you can stop someone who’s clearly on a mission to get the hell out of there, or you can trick a couple of them into actually smiling for a few seconds, then you know what you’re doing is good.”

In 2008 he tried out for Music Under New York, a program of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority that schedules paying gigs for musicians in the subway. When he was accepted for program consideration, he got a call from the New York Times—they wanted to tag along on his audition. “I thought it was a joke. But they showed up and drove me over to the audition in a limo. It was pretty surreal.”

At the tryout Taylor said he wasn’t nervous, even though he was set to compete against a range of talents and was “just a guy with a guitar.” He picked an original song, “Around the World,” which was unheard of since most people sang covers. Taylor charmed the judges and his music wowed. He was picked as one of the winners and the resulting Times piece lovingly dubbed him the “Subway Idol,” a name he still embraces.

Building on the attention the Times story earned him, Taylor sojourned to LA to work with a handpicked band of studio vets as well as Grammy-winning producer and engineer Matthew Spindel (Santana, Fleetwood Mac, Tom Petty). Toward the beginning of the sessions, Spindel encouraged Taylor to write more uplifting material as opposed to the standard, forlorn singer-songwriter fare.

“I would think to myself, ‘Hmm, write a positive song. How do I do that?’” said Taylor, laughing and adding, “That’s not to say that I’ll never write another terribly depressing song. Trust me, I’ve got plenty of those left in me.”

According to Taylor, he and the band recorded over 200 songs before choosing 12 for Anything’s Possible. He also made a fan in rock legend Rick Springfield, who asked him to contribute backup vocals to Springfield’s 2012 album, Songs for the End of the World. Since returning from the West Coast, Taylor has continued to tour and rehearse new material in his new Westchester “personal kingdom,” which overlooks the Bronx River.

He knows he’s not exactly a superstar, but he is managing to make a comfortable living doing what he loves. Asked what keeps him going, he mentions family and managers, but also comes back to that ineffable drive that anyone with a dream understands: After all these years, he still loves the pain.

“No one kicks my butt harder than me,” he said. “I don’t know what it is about me, man, but I’ve got something to prove. I don’t care how much pain comes with it. I’m just gonna do it.” - Long Island Pulse


On June 29, 1989, I attended a 10,000 Maniacs concert at Radio City Music Hall with Tim Finn (of Split Enz fame) as the opening act. He had just released his third solo effort, and I was so blown away by his music and his performance that I went out and purchased his CD the next day. Now, I've never had the privilege of enjoying Joe Taylor live, but if I had (and I certainly hope to one day) there would have been the same knee-jerk reaction. His creations are chill-inducing earworms -- the good kind -- that stay with you long after they end, just as they should.

Canadian-born Taylor now calls New York home, and he has established himself as quite the prolific singer/songwriter. After hearing Anything's Possible, I immediately was hooked by his transcendent vocal style, which encompasses a raspy Steve Perry-like quality and a distinct tonality that stirs echoes of Mister Mister's Richard Page. Laden with beautifully penned, eloquently voiced catchy pop tunes, this 12-song collection boasts all of the ingredients for a chart-topping success. In fact, track two, "The Sweetest Tune," a dreamy, guitar-driven piece that evokes images of palm trees and aqua seas, hit number one on the Canadian Music Charts. Taylor wrote or co-wrote several of the tracks and plays acoustic guitar on many of them. The record was produced, recorded and mixed by Jeff Gross, who has worked with the likes of Gary Wright and Rick Springfield, and Grammy-award winning engineer Matthew Spindel, who also has collaborated with Springfield along with countless others including Fleetwood Mac, Tom Petty and Santana.

Taylor starts out with upbeat, crunchy stuff on "Contagious," "Sweetest Tune" and even later on with "All Around the World," but it's not just rainbows and blue skies. There are the darker, more heart-wrenchingly soulful compositions as well, including the break-up songs "Pictures Off the Wall," "Tears in Your Eyes," which is highlighted by a subtle alto sax, and the haunting "Walk Away" featuring keys and accordion to complement his off-the-chain notes.

"Tired of Waitin'" cranks with its Rufus-flavored funky groove, while cuts such as "Possible" and "New Day" offer more of a '90s Third Eye Blind/Collective Soul/Goo Goo Dolls flair.

Offering the heaviest electric guitar sound is "Here and Gone," with hints of Led Zeppelin and Beatles riffs towards the end. Their influence also can be heard on "Save Me."

In our sex, drugs and rock & roll fast-paced world, it's refreshing to hear the lyrics in "Better With Our Clothes Left On" - a song about getting to know someone before jumping in head first - And it seems so strange, but it's better with our clothes left on.

Combining stellar songwriting, soaring tones and stripped down instrumentation, this batch of material really allows Taylor's unique artistry to shine. With the rapidly decreasing amount of truly talented singer/songwriters on today's music scene, it's rewarding indeed to find a diamond among the coals.

Joe Taylor: www.joetaylorofficial.com - Ink19


September 6, 2013

If ever there was a time to make it happen, it's right now. And if you’re passionate about music as Joe Taylor is then then you’ve found your place in this universe. This is the musician that will reinforce the reasons why you need to believe in your dreams in order to fly this plane. Joe Taylor, a native of Halifax, Canada and now a transplanted New Yorker, is not just a story of some kid wanting to have his fifteen minutes of fame, but it’s a novel about a songwriter, guitarist and singer who’s sheer determination has caught the hearts of many with his nostalgic pop/rock emanating from his lyrical being.

Just back from touring the West Coast at The House of Blues Voodoo Lounge in West Hollywood and the ApCal Winery in Madera, CA, just to name a few, Taylor flew back home last week to play The Hard Rock at Foxwoods in Connecticut and is eager to get back into the studio to lay down some new tracks. According to Taylor there is no set release date. But he did say that his new album would be stripped down and have a new sound.

After performing tunes off his Anything’s Possible album at Sullivan Hall for Anolie Magazine’s Summer Release Event this past July, I caught up with Taylor to chat about his music, life and everything in between.

Taylor explains how, as a musician in this business, you need to make the best out of an awkward situation. On his performance at The Paramount in Huntington, Long Island, opening up for Rick Springfield, Taylor exclaims “If you cannot take a room that is skewed against you, you have to make them friendly, even if their silent.” Not knowing how diehard Springfield fans would react, Taylor took front and center with his acoustic guitar and pulled the 80’s wool away from their eyes and ears and wrapped himself up in the moment.

Most five year old's today idolize super heroes, but not Joe Taylor. He admits the turning point in his life as a five year old was when he heard John Denver’s “Seasons of the Heart” album. The album that almost never saw the light of day, this is the album that changed his life, defined his musical style and molded him into the person he is today and the very reason why he plays music.

Taylor goes on to say, “I’m me, I’ve got my own sound, which is great. Most people go through their entire career and never find their own sound.” As he continued to develop his musical skills, Taylor mastered the harmonica, bass guitar and studied vocal Jazz.

Taylor’s philosophy on life is pretty simple, “get the best of what life has to offer” and “no matter how tough things get, anything is possible.” So when asked if he could acquire any Superhuman power, Taylor hesitantly claims he would like to have the ability to fly like Superman, because he doesn’t like being held down and likes to travel.

As Summer draws to an end, Taylor will be working on some new tunes and getting ready to travel overseas to Europe with his guitar in tow, sometime in March of 2014. Grab your boarding pass, cause this is one flight you’re not going to want to miss. Once it takes off, its guaranteed to take you for a lyrical spin.

Be sure to like…follow…subscribe…and download Joe Taylor’s album Anything’s Possible on iTunes and visit his site for updates on his tour. - The Examiner


On the surface it’s a transparent format, two people sitting across from each other having a conversation. The reporter with a motive to extract not the most basic questions every reporter out there will ask, but the reporter whose function is to share a story that will intrigue her readers and at the same time portray her subject with profound dignity and passion for why music is the center of his universe.

Meet singer-songwriter and guitarist, Joe Taylor. A young boy who grew up in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and claims to have spent a lot of time in the principal’s office as a result of playing “kiss and tell.” Having lived a pretty normal life as an adopted child in the western burbs of Toronto, in a town called Mississauga, he recalls getting off the 401 and driving south on Yonge Street, the longest street in the world. “We took Yonge Street and we drove all the way in. It was the biggest city I’d ever seen in my life. And I think the coolest thing was that, I love buildings, so the coolest thing for me, was seeing the CN Tower. It was massive…and it still is.” The CN Tower (Canadian National Tower) at the time was the tallest free standing concrete structure in the world. Standing at a height of 1,815 feet tall and was declared as one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World.

It wasn’t until the age of five, when his father introduced him to “Seasons of the Heart” by John Denver, that he realized music would ultimately drive his passion to create on a vast scale. While other kids were listening to songs like “Down by the Bay” and “Bananaphone” by Egyptian-born Canadian singer-songwriter, Raffi, Taylor was on the road to deciphering lyrics of misplaced love.

Music was just a fraction of the passions that drove Taylor. At eight years old, his position as left wing scored him his first goal, which was actually the tying goal of the game, hockey that is. In between taking slap shots and body checks on the ice, Joe was carving out a path to all roads that led to possibly the greatest band of all time, The Beatles. The Scientific Method was without a doubt not the only subject that pre-occupied this fifth grader. Taylor got a hold of The Beatles “20 Greatest Hits,” compilation album and listened to hits like “Hey Jude,” Hello, Goodbye,” and “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” over and over again. He exclaims, “This is really cool!”

As The Beatles made their permanent residence in the young mind of this soon to be lyrical prodigy, the stage was about to showcase Taylor’s “coat of many colors.” Casted as Joseph, the dream interpreter and fortune teller in “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” this promising artist’s performance of “Pharaoh's Dream Explained,” if performed today, without a doubt would earn him a Tony.

Fast forwarding to 1988, also known as the vulnerable years, this thirteen year old came face to face with the soundtrack that would forever earn the most respect for any musician ever to walk this Earth. John Lennon’s, “Imagine Soundtrack,” put Taylor in full gear. “There was no stopping me after that," he says. He picked up the guitar in the ninth grade and started taking both vocal and guitar lessons for several years, while attending Catholic school. Taylor would stay after school and receive guitar lessons from his religion teacher. His first lesson, one that he remembered so vividly, was The Beatles version of “Rock and Roll Music,” which was originally written and recorded by the late and great rock and roll icon, Chuck Berry. As he moved forward mastering his picking and strumming techniques, he spent six months and endured countless hours of pain in his fingers learning to play the bar chords on “Yesterday.” Not to mention the audible pain his family endured. This timeless piece by The Beatles came in at number thirteen on Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Songs of All Times, written by Lennon and McCartney recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London. Also known as the most recorded song of all time.

Joe Taylor’s love of music was not completely received by his parents, although proud, his father told him to do something that actually made money. This unfavorable prescription on how to choose a career drove Taylor into the arms of The Unknown Legends. His first band formed in 1991, a musical entourage of kids from another school whose intentions were not altogether focused on earning an income but making music. As a singer-songwriter, Taylor was now put in a position to adapt to collaborating with the other members of the band on the creative side while touring all over Toronto and fending off the adverse advice from his father to get a ‘real” job in order to support himself before his years as a student came to a close. The band, whose name later changed to The James Band, remained together for ten years before they disbanded. Taylor continued with his education and studied vocal jazz at Humber College in Toronto.

Taylor diverts for a moment to reveal a funny story of his days in Toronto’s Chinatown at Grossman’s Bar. ”It was open mic night, it was a Tuesday and the streets were lined with garbage and I played two songs. Performing in the city was moving up in the ranks, because now you’re playing in the city.”

Taylor recollects back to his mid-twenties, having completed his gig at Humber College, he packed his bags, bid farewell to Toronto and headed to New York City with his guitar in tow. So now your 490 miles away from your native home, in a city filled with aspiring musicians and anticipating your next move. New York City was and still is the premier place to perform, however an unestablished singer-songwriter and guitarist from Canada has got to pay his dues, but with Taylor’s will to succeed and not be viewed as one of the many apples in the tree, but to be seen as the only big apple, he landed a job selling furniture. According to Taylor, “Music wasn’t paying well, and I was pretty good at selling furniture, so I did what I had to do.” Soon thereafter, Taylor hooked up with producer, engineer and writer, Jeff Gross, who later went on to produce Taylor’s album, “Anything’s Possible,” in 2011.

Things in Taylor’s life started to evolve and he refused to accept life the way it was headed, so he started making changes. With the breakup of his former band, he knew life as a solo artist was the right move in the right direction. He confidently states, “Relying on the band was just not working for me, I needed to be in control so I came to New York. It was a beautiful period in my life; I met the love of my life.”

While reliving his new found journey to New York City, he paints a vivid picture of the city of when he first transplanted here ten years ago, and was listening to “Vienna” by Billy Joel, which he claims to be his favorite song and goes on to say “It’s a song about taking your time and chances and not counting yourself out.”

During his early years living in New York City, Taylor continued to play the bar circuit in and around and beyond the city limits. Traveling as far as Texas and Florida to perform four to five days a week at open mic nights. In 2005, Taylor recorded his first acoustic album, titled “Try.” But it wasn’t until 2006, when he performed live at the UnUrban Café in Santa Monica, CA when he met his producer, Jeff Gross, who happened to be one of the three people in attendance at this gig. Six months later Taylor went on to work with producer Jeff Gross (Rick Springfield, Bob Saget, Gary Wright) and Grammy® winning engineer, Matty Spindel (Santana, Don Henley, Tom Petty, Fleetwood Mac, Rick Springfield) of Red Road Music to produce his second album, “Anything’s Possible.” As more doors continued to sway open, Joe continued to play at the local bars in New York City and fortunate enough to gain a very supportive fan base all over.

So, what drives an individual to devote every waking moment to push him or herself to the limit to live the life of a musician? What constraints are they confronted with when it comes to the process of creating? As Taylor’s career started taking shape, his writing became more imminent. His ideas were drawn by the experiences surrounding him. Taylor exclaims, “It’s ultimately how you feel. As far as the songwriting itself, a lot of it comes down to feelings. Sometimes it’s just the plainest feelings in the world. It’s the most obvious things that you write about, the most simplest and obvious things. They are the most powerful and everyone can relate to it.”

As an artist, Taylor’s approach to writing is that of a painter who paints with all the colors on his palette across the canvas. When asked to describe his technique he says, “When you start painting with pink, yellow, purple, if you’re not painting with black you pretty much put yourself at risk. When you paint with black, metaphorically, it’s safe. It’s going to be a harder song and no one is going to make fun of me. It’s not going to show any of my emotions. When you start painting with the other colors, you put yourself more at risk. The painting becomes much more complex. And if the color is just not right, than the whole thing doesn’t work. And that’s how it works with my songwriting, lyrics, melodies and harmonies. If one thing is out of place, it doesn’t work. But when you paint with a few colors, you lose the timeliness and when you paint with all the colors its more complex. At the end of the day it’s simple.”

Taylor makes reference to The Beatles and how the simplistic approach they used is what drove their success. Taylor claims, “It was more complex than anything you’ve ever heard on the radio. It’s so simple, yet it’s more chord changes and has more complexities, lyrics and melody wise.” The quality and state of music production continues to change with the times, and although the digital age still continues to affect how we listen to our music, what was simple, quick and only required a small hand of people to produce suddenly became complicated and technologically demanding for musicians. Taylor seems to agree and expresses, “Today music is hidden behind a lot of production. You can have great production but you don’t necessarily have a great song. A great song comes from a simple place. It’s having a sixth sense and tapping into the infinite intelligence. It’s picking things up from the universe that you can’t necessarily see, feel, taste or touch. Your regular senses can’t pick it up but you know they exist. You don’t necessarily create it. All you do is draw upon them. It’s already out there. You’re just re-assimilating it. When you start tapping into the sixth sense, you have to lose fear when it comes to writing if you want to write some great stuff. You can always go back and rework a song. You have to let the idea come out and let it flow out of you. Don’t try to be what was. Don’t try to be what is. Well, you can try to be a little of what was, if it’s cool, as long as it’s not what “is” right now, because what “is” right now , by the time you get there, it’s over…it’s done.”

Stylistically, it has taken Taylor twenty five years to develop his sound. He alleges, “A lot of artists don’t have their own sound. They sound like someone else borrowing someone else's sound. For me, I have my own sound and I am really proud of that. And it took a really long time to do that. But you have to find what works for you as a songwriter and you have to ultimately have to love what you do.” When asked how he felt about being compared to other established musicians, he admits, “I’m okay with that, there’s no way getting around being compared to somebody.”

Taylor’s “Anything’s Possible” album has gained him tremendous notoriety in his native home of Canada. “The Sweetest Tune” topped at number one on The Canadian Music Charts and ravaged the airwaves for thirteen months. When asked about his favorite song on the album, Taylor says, “It all depends on the day. Sometimes it’s “Walk Away”, which was my first song, produced and co-written by Jeff Gross, Jim Hanft and myself.”

Collaboration involves a meeting of the minds and the ability to reach and maintain an understanding with the other writer. Taylor spent numerous hours collaborating with other writers on his album, namely Hillary Bernstein, who co-wrote “Save Me”, “All Around the World”, “Sweetest Tune”, “Tired of Waitin,” “New Day” and “Walk Away”. According to Taylor, “Walk Away was one of those songs where it’s just timeless. It was the first break through song, amidst the fighting. Jeff’s riff and our lyrics and melodies is what made this unique vibe.” Taylor recalls driving on the 405 to LAX after that grueling recording session how the tears rolled down his face. Taylor’s recollection of his experience in Los Angeles was quite vivid. He goes on to say, “When you’re in New York and you’re in Los Angeles, it’s a different speed. And you have to know how to keep up with those speeds. New York lets you get it done. In Los Angeles, you get it done when you get it done. Out of sight, out of mind.”

The birth of “Sweetest Tune” was a result of Taylor’s attentiveness to songs by Jacob Dylan and Paul Simon. “The interesting chord progressions capo’d high up on the guitar is what gave it its magical sound,” says Taylor. Inspirations for several songs on this album were secretly snuck in by Taylor, by artists such as Steve Perry, Cold Play and Led Zeppelin. He claims his production guys were unaware of this incorporation.

The drive to create exposes our inner most feelings, our secrets and our fears. Are we driven to our passions or are our passions driving us? Music is the one language most interpreted by our drive to express emotions on so many levels. So, why the need to create a melody, or even a verse. While writing the bridge to “Save Me” in the back of a cab talking to co-writer, Hillary Bernstein on his cell phone while heading to the session, Taylor recalls, "When we finally recorded "Save Me" the session guys said the chord progression sounded a little like, "Stairway to Heaven by Led Zepplin, and I laughed and joked and said I actually borrowed it from The Beatles. And as a result we all laughed and the bass player played an ode to "Something." According to Taylors producers, Jeff Gross and Matthew Spindel were quite particular with song choice, so if you were able to get it passed them, you were popping the champagne cork. After five years of production, “Anything’s Possible” was completed in the Spring of 2011 and the producer’s tall orders were met.

As Taylor continued to submerge into the depths of his unconscious mind to dealing with writing constraints, streamlining phrases and reordering words to fit the meter of a song and then get up on stage to pour his heart and soul out to a room filled with perfect strangers and several familiar faces, he refused to let his inspirations run dry. He recalls being pulled over and getting a ticket, driving from Chicago to Rochester, Minnesota. It was a very cold Thursday morning and he was scheduled to perform that evening. He lost control of his vehicle as a result of a snow storm which created hazardous driving conditions and flipped his car several times on I-90. Death came knocking on his driver side door, but this musician’s noble calling from the universe is what saved his life. He walked away unscathed. The next day he rented a car and reluctantly headed to Minneapolis to perform. Still shaken up and unable to leave town due to the snow storm, he spent a week in Winona recovering. Taylor boarded the train with his gear to Chicago the following week and headed home to New York with a fever.

The following morning he headed to the West Coast for his recording session with bass player, Lance Morrison (Jagged Little Pill), drummer, Matt Laug (Jagged Little Pill) and guitarist George Nastos (Rick Springfield, Guitar Hero) while not letting on that he was still recovering from a near death experience. After seven endless hours of laying down vocals and guitar, his producer says “Let’s do the songs for real. That was a great warm up Joe.” Taylor managed to get through the session consuming himself by the love of his lyrical art and hiding the inside pain that so desperately wanted to surface and stated, "I was absolutely terrified that if I told my producers that I was sick and running with a fever of 104 and whiplash, that they would cancel the session. And we would not get another shot at this because of the high profile people that were on board, so I never told them until after the session was done." He barely lasted another hour that day and managed to make it back into the studio the following day for another several hours. Taylor was literally singing for his life at this point. The first three songs were cut and Taylor slept for two straight days before flying back to New York. Bass player, singer-songwriter Matt Bissonette (Elton John, Ringo Starr, David Lee Roth, Rick Springfield), would later, lay down most of the backround vocals and bass parts for the remaining songs. He also contributed to three songs, including the title track "Possible." Also, drummer Michael Holowatch would sit in for most of the remaining songs on the album.

Music has been sewn into the core of Joe Taylor’s personal tapestry and it has become as imperative as air, food and water. Music is the phenomenon of which has taken him whole. It has separated him and at the same time fastened him into the experiences and feelings in a world that he has created for himself. It is the essence of life itself which compels him as a musician to strive to create and share his passions with the universe. And as big as the universe may seem, Joe Taylor’s passionate, resonating voice will carry him to the end and back.

www.joetaylorofficial.com

www.facebook.com/joetaylormusic

www.reverbnation.com/joetaylor

www.twitter/joetofficial - The Examiner


Music has become a powerful catalyst for healing because it touches the very core of our souls. The emotional, mental and spiritual ties it has to the health of our physical bodies and mental health is one that every man, woman and child can relate to, and when singer-songwriter/guitarist, Joe Taylor set foot into The Rivington House, a healthcare facility in New York City, which provides interactive and holistic services to patients living with HIV/Aids, his voice and solid finger strumming resonated throughout the three floors he visited. The patients flocked from their rooms into the hallways to hear the sounds coming from a musician who has dedicated his time to patients, so that they can immerse themselves into a world where discrimination does not exist. As stated in an in-depth interview by The Examiner, “music has been sewn into the core of Joe Taylor’s personal tapestry and it has become as imperative as air, food and water. Music is the phenomenon of which has taken him whole. It has separated him and at the same time fastened him in to the experiences and feelings in a world that he has created for himself. It is the essence of life itself which compels him as a musician to strive to create and share his passions with the universe. And as big as the universe may same, Joe Taylor’s passionate, resonating voice will carry him to the end and back.”

Taylor recently joined forces with Musicians On Call, a not-for-profit organization, based in New York City, which recruits musicians on a voluntary basis to bring music to patients in hospitals who need it the most.

While accompanied by his agent, Sandy and Jerry, volunteer guides for Musicians On Call, Taylor filled the air with holiday tunes, such as “Winter Wonderland,” Jingle Bell Rock” and “Frosty the Snowman.” The most requested songs from the patients were for The Rolling Stones and The Beatles. Taylor also treated a patient to “Possible,” an original song off of his CD, Anything’s Possible. Just goes to show rock and roll is just as alive today as it ever was. The patient’s smiles were endless as they clapped and danced from their wheelchairs and beds. Taylor’s rendition of “Don’t Stop Believing” by Journey, was the perfect way to end the evening as Taylor’s voice took those bed-bound patients on a journey. A journey without ever having to physically move their bodies, patients whose eyes remained closed, they were able to visualize places never imagined and for those whose bodies were physically there but there state of being was elsewhere, the music penetrated deep within their bones.

That night Taylor’s singing and guitar playing allowed these patients to take control of their health by stirring up their innermost feelings and senses and tapping into parts unlike anything else. It was an energy that moved some to tears and perhaps sparked a memory.

The magic of music that was created by Taylor that night was never complex or compromising. After having spent two and a half hours at the facility, Joe emotionally states, “There was something very special last night when I walked into Rivington House. I wasn’t sure what I’d find and who I would meet, but it turned out to be a magical experience. Singing for a crowd who I knew were suffering from a pandemic that was debilitating them from the inside out. To see the happiness in their eyes made me feel very good. As time passed that night, we walked up to different floors and I just wanted to keep singing. This experience has given spark to my perspective. The perspective of the great gift we all have been given…it’s called LIFE.”

We live in an age where medicine is depending more on science and technology. Visually, healing should look like quarter notes and treble clefs. Not molecular or empirical structures. Modern medicine has yet to fully comprehend the healing power music has. It treats the whole person, not just the body.

For Joe Taylor it was about making a difference for the fifty five patients at The Rivington House he visited, who live in isolation and pain. He took them to a level of comfort, dependence and empowerment. His music makes it possibly the world’s most powerful tool. You can have a medicine cabinet overflowing with small, round solid masses of unpleasant tastes, which target a specific problem. A musical medicine cabinet is filled with a variety of cures with tastes that will satisfy any patient.

We love musicians that can make us want to move, to dance and to feel alive through the motions in our bodies. It matters not who or what is in fashion or who won for Best Actor; all that is important is the fact there exists music which is, inspiring, calming, invigorating, life-affirming, positive, beautiful, healing, awakening and therapeutic and based upon the affirmation of love as an effective foundation within every note and expression as they cut through the hearing and enter the human experiences. When we are stirred to the core of our being and paralyzed as a result; when we reach a musical cleansing, no matter what our taste or genre we desire, but one which brings to us the euphoria of a musical turning point, where we are elevated to infinite tears, we are experiencing music of a healing nature, and it's musicians like Joe Taylor and organizations like Musicians On Call that make it possible. - The Examiner


Musician Joe Taylor has recently returned from his winter tour across the United States, to nestle back in to the groove of his home-state of New York. For Taylor; the tour was long, but rewarding and he is glad to be back home to work on more music. Ever since he can remember, Taylor has been jiving to his favorite songs, but “a summer of heart breaks from a certain beautiful girl” gave him the inspiration to create. He made a passion out of an unpleasant situation, and used his parents garage as a studio where he created his first song “Tears Are Coming Down” which can be found on his CD.

As Taylor moved through life, he was inspired by everything around him. He wrote about anything from television, to Sunday brunch. His friends and family also provided him with great influences and support as he moved through the formative years of his career. Among familial inspirations, Taylor was influenced by various artists like The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, and Queen which still rank as some of his favorites.

In Joe Taylor’s eyes “nothing can compare to being on stage and feeling the energy of the audience. Priceless and timeless.” He feels lucky for having the opportunities to spread his sound. One of his teachers also gave him a hand. As Taylor began to familiarize himself with the guitar, his religion teacher gave him a hand and taught him some Beatles songs. Taylor has had a good run so far but doesn’t plan to stop, as he will be performing at the Ottawa Convention Centre for the National Women’s Show during March 29th and 30th. “With 10,000 women in in one place I hope to not disappoint them with my voice and guitar playing, or I better start running.”

Joe has gained recognition with the New York Times, and dubbed the Subway Idol. He is flattered for the recognition, but doesn’t stop too long to bask in the flame since he tries do his best to adress the question; “what can I do to move this career forwards and not backwards?”

As a word of advice to anyone hoping to follow their path as a musician Taylor offers this: “If you need to have a backup plan don’t do this business. You will get run over like a speeding bullet train at 400 miles an hour. It doesn’t mean you don’t work a job to survive but if you want to pick a career good luck. And to the 0000.0009 of you that are 110 percent committed and serious about the music business…… Never ever ever ever ever give up!”

Learn about Joe Taylor!

Official Website

FaceBook

NY Times Feature

Reverbnation

YouTube - Kush Magazine


Positivity in music is a tad rare nowadays. For every “Happy” that’s released there’s a “Blurred Lines” and a “Pompeii” it seems. Fortunately, for us all, Joe Taylor exists. Though his songs cover a range of topics and emotions, they all possess a warmth and infectious optimism that is impossible not to love. He’s currently touring the country with the simple, straightforward hope that fans “take whatever they need from my music to get them through their lives.”

For those unfamiliar with Taylor, he’s a retro-acoustic rock musician whose most recent album, “Anything’s Possible,” features an electric variety of songs with memorable titles such as “Better With Our Clothes Left On.” When asked the impossible question of which song is his favorite, Taylor insists that he has too many favorites.

“They are all like my children. I love them equally for different reasons at different times,” said Taylor. He derives inspiration for his lyrics from everyday life.

“I write about everything around me from day to day experiences to people-watching in various places,” said Taylor. The song “All Around the World,” which was released as a single in 2009 and later included on “Anything’s Possible,” was inspired by “a beautiful day in Los Angeles” and came to him in a peculiar place.

“I was in the shower in LA at my producer’s place and I started humming the melody for the chorus. I later headed over to [fellow musician, Hillary Bernstein]’s and we banged it out in about two hours,” said Taylor. The musician has loved music all his life and realized he wanted to be a musician when he was 3-years-old.

“I was sitting in the car driving to Toronto, Canada with my family up from Halifax, Nova Scotia,” said Taylor, “and when we saw the skyline I just knew that I was going to play music in big cities and then all around the world.” Following one’s dream is never easy but it’s worth it to Taylor, who firmly believes that if you do what you love things will fall into place, naturally.

“So if music is your passion practice to master your trade, meet lots of people, have an open mind and never give up no matter how hard things may get.” He has advice not just for musicians, but everyone figuring out their career.

“Follow your passion no matter what anyone says,” said Taylor, “If you don’t know your passion then ask yourself what you wanted to do with your life when you were 4-years-old. No matter how silly that might be you will get to the truth of what makes you tick as a person.” - The Hofstra Chronicle


Joe Taylor is dubbed the "Subway Idol" by the New York Times. - Jigar Mehta


Kinetic Playground Review
The Sweet sound of Joe Taylor's vocals and soulfully strummed cords from his friendly guitar could be heard oozing out of The Kinetic Playground doors Friday night as 'the strokes' concert filtered out into the streets and poured into the Hot Rockin' establishment next door. Joe performed with expressively poignant and heartfelt lyrics from his own music mixed in with covers from Boston's,"More than a Feeling" to Journey's "Lights" as he magnetized this 'Kinetic' energized crowd and brought them down to their knees cheering for more. Lighters raised into the air and arms swaying back and forth...This is what "Life" is called for Joe Taylor! (Track from "Try" cd) Locals and performers both agree that The Kinetic Playground is truly a wonderful establishment to experience great live entertainment...4/7/06 joetaylorsongs.com
- By Jewels (Sunday 4/9/06 11:16 AM)

- Center Stage


What People are Saying

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"Thoughtful and soulful."

STEWART BRODIAN
Radio Programmer WDIY

Allentown, PA.



"Joe has a great ability to connect with the audience especially his voice. The song writing is classic and has what has been lost over the past 15 years of popular musical culture."

CRAIG PALMER- Publicist and on the Board Of Directors for the Brooklyn Opera Company”, New York City



"Joe Taylor brings to us from Toronto his wonderful Canadian songwriting style which is only outdone by his incredible vocals."

LARRY OAKES Founder-
SINGER/SONGWRITER SESSIONS

New York City



"Though we usually don't book musicians or actors that don't have major representation, we are strongly considering Joe for a Canada A.M. slot as he has a very professional

attitude towards performance and a powerful, powerful voice."

JON TAYLOR-
Producer-Canada A.M., Toronto, Canada

- John Salvis


Toronto-born, New York City-based musician Joe Taylor has earned a coveted spot as a finalist in MUNY's 'Subway Idol.'

Canadian singer underground for NY 'Subway Idol'
Updated Sat. May. 24 2008 9:15 AM ET

Lindsay Zier-Vogel, entertainment writer

Most of us go to the subway to get to our places of work, but for Toronto-born, New York-based musician Joe Taylor the subway is his office.

This lanky blonde-haired singer-songwriter has just made it through "Subway Idol," an annual competition that whittles down hundreds of applicants for 20 highly coveted spots on the Music Under New York (MUNY) roster.

The New York Times got wind of Taylor's aspirations and followed him to his MUNY audition. In the four-minute clip, Taylor hauls his guitar and amp into the cab and wanders the marble halls of Grand Central Terminal. The highlight of this winning audition is watching Taylor rock out before an enthusiastic crowd.

Rocking out in Toronto

Taylor first tested his pipes in Toronto, singing and writing for the rock band James Band. His big break came after music big shots Paul Shubot and Alfie Di Pucchio heard him play a gig in Toronto. They recorded his unique sound that very night, launching his career as a solo artist.

Since moving down to NYC in 2001, Taylor released a demo through Red Road Music and now performs all over the US, bringing his retro-pop-rock tunes to audiences in Chicago, Washington D.C., Los Angeles, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Boston, Houston, and Philadelphia.

Taylor is thrilled to be added to the MUNY roster, noting that he now holds a lifetime permit to play his folk rock tunes in the subway system. "There's something really similar about Toronto and New York," he says of the vibe in his hometown and his adopted city. "Maybe that's why I love both of them."

A Grand Central Audition

Where previous MUNY artists wowed the judges with novel acts -- barbershop quartets, baroque harps, Brazilian folkloric violin, even the musical saw -- Taylor arrived at Grand Central terminal with nothing more than his six string and an amp.

"Everybody's got a spiel or a schtick," he says from his home in New York, "but I just do my thing. I don't do anything any better than anyone else out there, but I think [what makes my music appealing] is its honesty."

With a voice like Canada's own Sam Roberts, Taylor fired up the Grand Central crowd, getting them clapping in time with his catchy pop tune, "All Around the World."

"I have to say, with the 500-or-600 foot ceilings, you got damn good acoustics," he laughs.

Taylor's favourite acoustic location is in front of the shuttle that runs from Grand Central to Times Square. "It's like playing in a big shower," he says. "The sound bounces off the walls with that brilliant echo-y sound."

But when he's amp'd up, Taylor declares Penn station the hands-down best venue to get a crowd worked up.

Playing underground isn't all stunning acoustics and fabulous crowds. Taylor still has to battle the roar of incoming trains, the din of passengers and the clamour of outside traffic.

He also notes that in the middle of the summer, there'll be a lot of sweat, both his and that of his commuter audiences. "And the funky smells from the New York City subway system," he adds as yet another summertime challenge.

Coins and smiles

When he's looking for an equal ratio of coins and smiles, Taylor plays his folk rock tunes on weeknights just after rush hour. Though, the very best time to play, reveals Taylor, is Saturday and Sunday afternoons, "That's definitely when you get the most smiles."

Weekends also provide a large cross section of the public -- kids, elderly folk, teenagers, hipsters, business folk. After having played so many gigs in bars and clubs across the States, Taylor says it's a treat to be able to connect with a larger demographic.

On weekends or weekdays, Taylor is honoured to offer an escape for New York commuters. "If I can crack a smile outta somebody, even for a few seconds, and remove anxiety from [someone's] daily life, then I've done my job."

"All Around the World"

So what does Taylor do to get people to stop and listen? "I just do my thing," he says, adding that playing underground is a great place to try out new material.

"I can test out where my songs are at by people's reactions. They have no reason in the world to stop and listen to what I'm doing, but if they do, I know something's working."

The one song that always gets the crowd going is "All Around the World," the same song he crooned under the domed ceiling at Grand Central Terminal. "Sometimes lyrics can really catch someone right at the right time," he says.

Whether he's above or below ground, Taylor stays true to his own lyrics: "What you give is what you get," he both says and sings. "The more you put yourself out there, the more you receive."

Listen to Joe's music on his MySpace page www.myspace.com/joetaylorsongs

Watch - Lindsay Zier-Vogel, entertainment writer


http://nbc5streetteam.wordpress.com/2008/06/04/musician-joe-taylor/

My one guilty pleasure (well, I have more than one but this all I’ll admit to right now) is loving General Hospital. I’m too busy to watch it regularly but as long as I see at least 5 minutes per week I’m good. But today, for the first time in my life I’ll be tivo-ing (is that a word?) Days Of Our Lives. Not because I want to watch it, but because of the song that will be featured in the coffee shop scene. The song is called “The Sweetest Tune” and it’s sung by one of the sweetest musicians I’ve ever interviewed, Joe Taylor.


If you’re not familiar with him, he’s a marvelous songwriter/singer currently based in New York. You can hear his music here. There’s a sweet video done by the New York Times about musicians auditioning to perform in the NY subway that features him - watch it here. Did he make it? Find out here.

He periodically performs in Chicago - hopefully, you’ll have the chance to experience his music live soon.

Type my name in the search bar to see/hear more of my posts including interviews with Alanis Morissette, The Bravery, Lovehammers, Triumph’s Rik Emmett, Matthew Santos, Shooting Star, Mike Tafoya comedian Lee Camp & more.
- Cara Carriveau


“Joe Taylor has the kind of voice and presence that will make you sit up and take note” “An amazing singer!”

Matty Spindel
Grammy Winning - Engineer for Santana
Los Angeles, CA


“Doing a search on reverbnation.com I came across Joe Taylor’s profile. Hearing the track ‘Life’ first, I was immediately impressed with the sound and quality of artists he represents. I visited his full profile and read his amazing biography and listened to more tracks. His music takes me back to some of the music I grew up on and admire so much. He will definitely be making it into my favorites…”

Randell Box
www.bestofbands.com
New York, NY




“Joe Taylor is a refreshing new talent writing some great songs and I'm very excited about his next release. I'm really proud to play his music on my show.”

Gene Godfrey
Radio DJ – Classic FM 88.9 WBZC
Philadelphia, PA



“Joe Taylor has a talent for creating wonderfully powerful and compelling melodies like few writers I have met. And on top of that, he has the vocal chops to carry them off. His emotionally charged vocals are undeniable and harken back to the great vocalists of decades past. A great talent yet to be discovered by the masses.”

Hillary Bernstein
Writer and Publisher
Sony Music
Los Angeles, CA

“Over the past 30 years I’ve heard thousand of bands and haven’t heard a progressive rock/pop voice like Joe’s before.”

Beth Shandles
Writer, Photographer, and Booking Agent
Chicago Music Guide and B.S. Entertainment
Chicago, IL

“Joe Taylor had a retro rock solid voice that could be heard from outside of the venue last Tuesday night at the Star Series Songwriter Sessions at the Eighth and Rail.”

Carla Merrill
Photographer and Reporter for The Corner News
Opelika, AL - Red Road Music


Discography

2017 - Try Again (remake album)

2015 - Build This House (single)

2014 - Don't Change (single)

2011 - Anything's Possible (album)

2005 - Try (acoustic album)




Photos

Bio

"Soulful", "evocative", and "awe-inspiring" are the words used by music critics and fans alike that experience Joe Taylor live. His debut album “Anything’s Possible,” captures the magic and vibrancy of his live performances that combine stellar songwriting, soaring tones and stripped down instrumentation, allowing Taylor's unique artistry to connect with his listeners.

Taylor’s signature sound developed early in his native Toronto and evolved after moving to New York City performing solo at such iconic music venues as CBGB’s 313 Gallery, The Knitting Factory’s Tap Room, The Bitter End, Kenny’s Castaway, The Triad Theater, The Red Lion, C-Note, and The Back Fence.  

During this time, The New York Times took notice and dubbed him the “Subway Idol” while Taylor auditioned for a coveted spot in New York City’s MTA's “Music Under New York.” The recognition resulted in a video documentary available at The New York Times website. http://www.nytimes.com/video/nyregion/1194817476452/subway-idol.html

“That was always a great experience, playing in subways, ’cause I could test out new songs. If you’re in Grand Central or Penn Station at rush hour and you can stop someone who’s clearly on a mission to get the hell out of there, or you can trick a couple of them into actually smiling for a few seconds, then you know what you’re doing is good.”

Today Taylor headlines in clubs in major American cities like The House of Blues, The Paramount, the Mandalay Bay Casino, M Resorts, The Tower Theater, college tours and music festivals. Joe Taylor continues to excite, inspire and move audiences with the sweet melodic timbre of his amazing original sound and performances.

Taylor's CD “Anything’s Possible” is a collaboration with Jeff Gross and Grammy®-winning engineer Matthew Spindel, and produced the song “The Sweetest Tune” which charted all the way to Number ONE on Canadian FM radio and was featured on NBC’s daytime drama “Days of Our Lives.”

Most recently Taylor has released two songs - "Build This House" and "Don't Change" - recorded, produced, and engineered by Jane Getz, Bob Tucker, and himself.  (These songs are available on iTunes, Google Music, and CDBaby.)  

Taylor is primed to reach larger audiences with his unique sound and catchy tunes that do more than just entertain; they stir the soul. 

With new performances being scheduled for his "Try Again" CD, you can count on seeing Joe Taylor in a city near you soon.  

Band Members