Joey Salvia
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Joey Salvia

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"Various Reviews"


My Reviews...
Category: Music

Joey Salvia: Heart & Soul
If you live in New York City and listen to 1050 ESPN Radio, you probably know who Joey Salvia is. Salvia is the engineer for The Michael Kay Show, heard on the station every weekday from 4-7 PM. Though he isn't much of a sports fan, Salvia contributes to the show in a big way: through his music. A gifted singer-songwriter, Salvia writes extremely amusing song parodies of New York sports stories. Example: when Andy Pettitte left New York a few years ago to pitch for the Astros, Salvia put together a little diddy called "Oh, Andy," sung to the tune of Barry Manilow's "Oh, Mandy." There was also the song he wrote when Eric Mangini became the head coach of the New York Jets, a personal favorite of mine.

Michael Kay calls Salvia the "heart and soul of the show." He's right. Salvia's songs are both hilarious and catchy. The Mangini song gets stuck in my head quite often and I always find myself chuckling after hearing just a few words of it.

Salvia writes a lot of his songs in just 10 minutes. A musical genius.


The Montgomery Cliffs
RPM USA
Release date: January 1, 2001
For those who believe that 2001 is the actual beginning of the new millennium, then the third album from The Montgomery Cliffs is not only the first rock record to come out in the new millennium, it's the first real rock and roll album. If you have a friend who digs The Smithereens or NRBQ, and bitches incessantly that there are no new bands doing the catchy, basic rock and roll thing, grab a copy of this disc, and make him promise to be your personal slave if he loves it. I strongly suspect you will never have to work another day in your life.
Like the bands mentioned above, the Cliffs are a splendid musical unit and have absorbed a lot of great music into their brainstems. The result is friendly, good time music. The Cliffs aren't obviously retro, like The Smithereens can be, and pack much more of punch than NRBQ, primarily due to the often mod-inspired bounce of the Joey Salvia-Dennis Carollo bass-and-drums tandem. The record has a great ballsy production sound, courtesy of Mr. Myracle Brah himself, Andy Bopp. Perhaps Bopp had some influence on "Only", a Joey Salvia composition that sounds like the Brah as performed by The Pursuit Of Happiness. But this yearning pop is only one of the many faces of The Montgomery Cliffs.
They dabble in a bit of country/early rock-and-roll stuff, like the loping "B-Side" and "Bad Karma", which ventures into the realm of Ben Vaughn and The Morrells. Like mid-tempo pop in an early-80's vein? Check out "Wednesday Girl". A slow, humorous lament with a hangdog, Peter Holsapple quality? Then "O.P.B." fits the bill nicely. And when the Cliffs rock, you will be rocked too. "Ambivalent", with ripping guitar work and singing from Wayne Thomas Kurz, is a big riff fest, while "Collagen Lips" zips along like a frat-rock Buzzcocks. And "She Said" has Graham Parker attitude in the verses, clever lyrics (sung by man who wrote 'em, Salvia), and a deceptively sweet chorus that nearly masks the demands of the titular lover. The Cliffs work up a good sweat, even though they make everything seem effortless. This is a must for your next powerpop party.

The Montgomery Cliffs
Memorable tunes, updated style make holidays sing

Lights up the CD player with: Two discs of remarkably intriguing and eclectic original rock, power pop, folk and singer-songwriter holiday tunes from the likes of Ron Sexsmith, The Montgomery Cliffs and The Number Theory. The 44-track album benefits the Saint Barnabas Hospice and Palliative Care Center in New Jersey. Details online at hohohospice.com.

Leave it under the tree for: The discerning (and maybe quirky) music lover taking the less traveled, more challenging road in tune-appreciation.

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3:05 AM - 0 Comments - 2 Kudos - Add Comment - Edit - Remove -

A few more Joey Salvia Reviews...
THE MONTGOMERY CLIFFS: Self-titled (RPM USA)

With every album, Joey Salvia's songwriting takes a giant leap toward world- class status and The Montgomery Cliffs do the same. Their 4th and self titled album was far better than almost anything that saw chart action this year. With a mega-buck record label behind them and promotion dollars to push with, there could have been three legitimate hit singles on this album, but those of you who know what the music business does to its talent are thanking your various gods that none of this happened. The album was released early in the year, and by now, The Montgomery Cliffs would be another band on the record industry waste heap. Instead, we'll get more like this. And even better, as hard as that is to fathom when you listen to the rousing power pop that jumps from most of the tracks, the clever lyrics that keep your attention ("once in a while you come around like some movie star who just came to town with collagen lips and silicone breasts, and jus - Various


"Various Reviews"


My Reviews...
Category: Music

Joey Salvia: Heart & Soul
If you live in New York City and listen to 1050 ESPN Radio, you probably know who Joey Salvia is. Salvia is the engineer for The Michael Kay Show, heard on the station every weekday from 4-7 PM. Though he isn't much of a sports fan, Salvia contributes to the show in a big way: through his music. A gifted singer-songwriter, Salvia writes extremely amusing song parodies of New York sports stories. Example: when Andy Pettitte left New York a few years ago to pitch for the Astros, Salvia put together a little diddy called "Oh, Andy," sung to the tune of Barry Manilow's "Oh, Mandy." There was also the song he wrote when Eric Mangini became the head coach of the New York Jets, a personal favorite of mine.

Michael Kay calls Salvia the "heart and soul of the show." He's right. Salvia's songs are both hilarious and catchy. The Mangini song gets stuck in my head quite often and I always find myself chuckling after hearing just a few words of it.

Salvia writes a lot of his songs in just 10 minutes. A musical genius.


The Montgomery Cliffs
RPM USA
Release date: January 1, 2001
For those who believe that 2001 is the actual beginning of the new millennium, then the third album from The Montgomery Cliffs is not only the first rock record to come out in the new millennium, it's the first real rock and roll album. If you have a friend who digs The Smithereens or NRBQ, and bitches incessantly that there are no new bands doing the catchy, basic rock and roll thing, grab a copy of this disc, and make him promise to be your personal slave if he loves it. I strongly suspect you will never have to work another day in your life.
Like the bands mentioned above, the Cliffs are a splendid musical unit and have absorbed a lot of great music into their brainstems. The result is friendly, good time music. The Cliffs aren't obviously retro, like The Smithereens can be, and pack much more of punch than NRBQ, primarily due to the often mod-inspired bounce of the Joey Salvia-Dennis Carollo bass-and-drums tandem. The record has a great ballsy production sound, courtesy of Mr. Myracle Brah himself, Andy Bopp. Perhaps Bopp had some influence on "Only", a Joey Salvia composition that sounds like the Brah as performed by The Pursuit Of Happiness. But this yearning pop is only one of the many faces of The Montgomery Cliffs.
They dabble in a bit of country/early rock-and-roll stuff, like the loping "B-Side" and "Bad Karma", which ventures into the realm of Ben Vaughn and The Morrells. Like mid-tempo pop in an early-80's vein? Check out "Wednesday Girl". A slow, humorous lament with a hangdog, Peter Holsapple quality? Then "O.P.B." fits the bill nicely. And when the Cliffs rock, you will be rocked too. "Ambivalent", with ripping guitar work and singing from Wayne Thomas Kurz, is a big riff fest, while "Collagen Lips" zips along like a frat-rock Buzzcocks. And "She Said" has Graham Parker attitude in the verses, clever lyrics (sung by man who wrote 'em, Salvia), and a deceptively sweet chorus that nearly masks the demands of the titular lover. The Cliffs work up a good sweat, even though they make everything seem effortless. This is a must for your next powerpop party.

The Montgomery Cliffs
Memorable tunes, updated style make holidays sing

Lights up the CD player with: Two discs of remarkably intriguing and eclectic original rock, power pop, folk and singer-songwriter holiday tunes from the likes of Ron Sexsmith, The Montgomery Cliffs and The Number Theory. The 44-track album benefits the Saint Barnabas Hospice and Palliative Care Center in New Jersey. Details online at hohohospice.com.

Leave it under the tree for: The discerning (and maybe quirky) music lover taking the less traveled, more challenging road in tune-appreciation.

..TR>..TR> ..TR> ..TABLE>
..P> ..P>
3:05 AM - 0 Comments - 2 Kudos - Add Comment - Edit - Remove -

A few more Joey Salvia Reviews...
THE MONTGOMERY CLIFFS: Self-titled (RPM USA)

With every album, Joey Salvia's songwriting takes a giant leap toward world- class status and The Montgomery Cliffs do the same. Their 4th and self titled album was far better than almost anything that saw chart action this year. With a mega-buck record label behind them and promotion dollars to push with, there could have been three legitimate hit singles on this album, but those of you who know what the music business does to its talent are thanking your various gods that none of this happened. The album was released early in the year, and by now, The Montgomery Cliffs would be another band on the record industry waste heap. Instead, we'll get more like this. And even better, as hard as that is to fathom when you listen to the rousing power pop that jumps from most of the tracks, the clever lyrics that keep your attention ("once in a while you come around like some movie star who just came to town with collagen lips and silicone breasts, and jus - Various


Discography

Long Lost Weekend(2008) If It Aint Brooklyn, Don't Fix It (2000) The Montgomery Cliffs (2001) A Pop Opera (1999) Christmas Lights EP (1998) Andiamo! (1997)

Photos

Bio

Before Joey began the radio days of his career, his band recorded an album for 115 Records, a Christmas album and rock opera for RPMUSA , a self released solo effort titled, If it Aint Brooklyn, Don’t Fix it, and the last album recorded by The Montgomery Cliffs, known to the fans as, The Green Album, also released on RPMUSA. Read what a few critics say: Their self-titled (4th) release is a great slice of power pop loaded with concise songwriting. The album closes on a powerful note and a few sharp hooks with "She Said," just one of at least three songs here that would be radio bound in a just world. Joey Salvia (bass/vocals) continues his transition to world class songwriter. © 2001 - DJ Johnson
At the core is the unique, slightly snotty and tenaciously determined voice of Joey Salvia, who can whip out some viciously delightful melodies. Unbeknownst to me, I’m already chronically infected! -Splendid 2002
LONG LOST WEEKEND is a true pop singer-songwriters record. Each track was carefully chosen out of many songs from over a 7 year period. What you get is 11 honest snap shots of a man going through a transition while dealing with modern times. This artist demonstrates his strong ability to write a perfect pop tune as well as show off a few blues chops then turn around and give you a folk ditty that will recall Steve Earle or Bob Dylan.
Produced and recorded the old fashion way...on analog tape with Andy Bopp, during the summer of 2008, Long Lost Weekend is proof that artists do grow with time and songwriters who write catchy melodies along with clever story telling are still among us...but given the right place and time, one or more of these songs might be a hit. Listen to “Invisible Fence” or a song about a man looking to buy his own funeral suit, “Dressed To A T”. “Beautiful Sunset” and “The Perfect Crime” are both well crafted pop songs.
A Word From Joey:
Back when I was recording albums for independent labels with my then rock band, The Montgomery Cliffs, I had no idea that my life was going to take such a turn. We were touring,selling records,and struggling working day jobs. While searching for a decent record contract, we did some radio interviews when a small break came. I began working as an “on air” jock for the Long Island, NY radio station, 92.7 WLIR. Before long, I was working with Yankees broadcaster, Michael Kay, and writing songs for his show that I became somewhat of a side kick on. Later, I started working for Fox News and began writing political parodies that are still played on Fox’s radio and TV stations across the country. My Michael Kay theme song has become a part of the NY sports sound track of life. After all of those years searching for a place for my music in this world, I had finally found some ground where I could be creative and make a great living doing so. My quest for the big record contract ended like that.
Back in 2000, I released an album called, If It Aint Brooklyn, Don’t Fix It. Performing Songwriter Magazine picked it as one of the best “DIY” CD’s in one of their issues. It was an album of songs about growing up with my friends and family in good old Brooklyn! It was a bunch of snapshots of my life in song. While doing this album, I noticed how the internet was taking over the music business. The big record companies began to suffer and the true indie artist was born...again.
Long Lost Weekend is my 6th commercial release and my second on SIAN (Songs In A Nutshell Publishing). On this album I document bits of my life over the past 7 years. Many demos and out takes have been left behind. What is left are 11 songs recorded and produced by Andy Bopp that were recorded on old school production gear....like analog tape and sorts. The album plays like a confession and runs about 39 minutes. The title track sets up the album for songs like, “Invisible Fence” (looking for truth) and Where were you ( a song written during a post 911 break up). Beautiful Sunset is also a song to be pointed out as it may be the best I can do when it comes to painting a tragic loss of love as if it were the end of the most treasured day in ones life. While the record starts out reflecting on the past, in the end, I find myself in the now and “Ready For Today”.
I hope you enjoy this self-released CD and I would be so grateful if you can let people know about my work. In the end, I write songs. I may not always be able to record, promote, release, and produce albums...but for now, I wanted to put something into the world that has truth and a small bit of humanity to it.... A piece of my heart...my life.
This could be my last CD. The world is now downloading one song at a time and albums are a dead art...for now. In the future, I just May have to release my songs in digital only formats. Maybe one at a time....so enjoy this album that was meant to be heard in one sitting. Thank you! 10/08