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"Planet Funk Meets Planet Punk"

Planet Funk Meets Planet Punk
Nu beats on famous bleats
BY MARC SAVLOV



We Are Your Friend: Chris Rose (l) and Adreon Henry of Car Stereo (Wars)
Photo By Roxanne Jo Mitchell

Here's a neat trick for all you jaded, indie hipsters: Punch up YouTube, and check out Blondie's 1980 video for "Rapture." Pay special attention to Deborah Harry's snazzy rapping and the intoxicating subcultural smash 'n' grab of high art and low guitars, B-boy hipsters, and Basquiat hopheads of the There and Then.

When you're done, head over to the Here and Now: Austin's Beauty Bar, Mohawk, Whisky Bar, Plush, Gomi, FactoryPeople, or wherever local DJs like Chris Rose and Adreon Henry of Car Stereo (Wars), DJ Gates megaBradley and Ian Orth of Learning Secrets, Chris "Prince" Klassen, Cut Clubcutting Dave "Kidindie" Pacho, or DJ Mel are spinning hard-driven vinyl. Listen as the Doors' "Riders on the Storm" becomes "Rapture" becomes Simian's "Never Be Alone." Talk Girl Talk, make love to Death From Above like it's 1979, and spank rock. It's been bad.

Now close your eyes, and pretend you're Fab 5 Freddy, 'cause everybody's high. Today's Threat Level is DJ Red Alert, and the only thing worth watching on television is Television. The only party worth going to is Glen Friedman's TV Party. Don't stop. Do punk rock.

What's going on with the Austin DJ and club scene that, seemingly overnight, it's transformed into something akin to the Please Kill Me-era East Village NYC art-punk scene of three decades past? Reinvention, that's what.

Cultural echoes of the explosively artistic 1980s have been pinging about nationally at least since the turn of the millennium. Witness the return of skinny ties and tight jeans, radical political art and multimedia. Hear Franz Ferdinand and Bloc Party skittering across commercial radio, and sniff out reissues of edgy musical masterpieces from Richard Hell & the Voidoids, Television, and yes, even Blondie, to Britpunk godheads like Gang of Four, Wire, and the Buzzcocks. Wasn't that original prankster and erstwhile Sex Pistolero Malcolm McClaren popping up as producer of Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation even as the Austin Museum of Art hosts their "Radical NY!" show, which features works by and of Richard Hell, Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, and the spray-painted masterworks of the original Style Wars/Bleecker Street bombers? Planet Funk meets Planet Punk.

It isn't just James Brown and Joey Ramone who are dead, but the whole of L.A. style. Austin's rave scene, club music glitterati, whatever you choose to call it, barely made it to the year 2000. By that time the hypnotic beats of house music and its 10 million offshoots had become less hypnotic than metronomic, and what was once a vibrant and valid international music community devolved into factionalized genres and subgenres boasting overpaid jet-setters and so-called superstar DJs like trance master Paul Van Dyk and deep-house whipping boy Paul Oakenfold. Let's face it: They got stale, and clubgoers baled. The ecstasy led inexorably to agony: Last night a DJ bored me stiff.

That was all before Austin's trendsetting barroom triumvirate of Beautiful Mohican Whisky chasers ushered in this new, old sound that's equal parts mash-up tracks – new beats on famous bleats – indie rock guitar samples, and shiny new technology like Serato hijacked not only your average clubgoers expectations but also those who spin the vinyl. Finally, the only limit for DJs is the boundaries of their own imaginations.


Cut Club
Photo By Roxanne Jo Mitchell

"I refer to it as 'the New Shit,'" says Beauty Bar's Bart Butler.

He should know, too, having run Whisky Bar for the past five years while the only musical constant remained the evergreen hip-hop pop stylings of DJ Mel. Asked to describe Beauty Bar's musical milieu, "the New Shit" is as close as he can come to a fitting description of an overall Austin-centric musical mojo on the uptick.

"What's interesting about what's happening here at Beauty Bar," adds Butler, "is that all the bands know all the DJs and the filmmakers and photographers, and they've all pooled their talents into this one big scene. I think a lot of it has to do with MySpace and the fact that everyone's getting their party info off of everyone else's MySpace pages.

"That's been a huge thing for networking, for DJs, and for bands as well. The crowd here really pays attention to that. If it weren't for MySpace we wouldn't know about as many bands as we do alongside the Car Stereo (Wars) guys and Ian Orth's We Explode! and Learning Secrets parties. And somehow these differing styles are all fitting together and complementing each other.

"It's pretty remarkable."

Flashback to the last hours, minutes, seconds of 2006. At Beauty Bar, Car Stereo (Wars) pumps out a sonic barrage channeled into the champagne throng that packs the club's all-encompassing dance floor. Two guys, two turntables, one mixer, and one laptop are spinni - Austin Chronicle 2007


"Planet Funk Meets Planet Punk"

Planet Funk Meets Planet Punk
Nu beats on famous bleats
BY MARC SAVLOV



We Are Your Friend: Chris Rose (l) and Adreon Henry of Car Stereo (Wars)
Photo By Roxanne Jo Mitchell

Here's a neat trick for all you jaded, indie hipsters: Punch up YouTube, and check out Blondie's 1980 video for "Rapture." Pay special attention to Deborah Harry's snazzy rapping and the intoxicating subcultural smash 'n' grab of high art and low guitars, B-boy hipsters, and Basquiat hopheads of the There and Then.

When you're done, head over to the Here and Now: Austin's Beauty Bar, Mohawk, Whisky Bar, Plush, Gomi, FactoryPeople, or wherever local DJs like Chris Rose and Adreon Henry of Car Stereo (Wars), DJ Gates megaBradley and Ian Orth of Learning Secrets, Chris "Prince" Klassen, Cut Clubcutting Dave "Kidindie" Pacho, or DJ Mel are spinning hard-driven vinyl. Listen as the Doors' "Riders on the Storm" becomes "Rapture" becomes Simian's "Never Be Alone." Talk Girl Talk, make love to Death From Above like it's 1979, and spank rock. It's been bad.

Now close your eyes, and pretend you're Fab 5 Freddy, 'cause everybody's high. Today's Threat Level is DJ Red Alert, and the only thing worth watching on television is Television. The only party worth going to is Glen Friedman's TV Party. Don't stop. Do punk rock.

What's going on with the Austin DJ and club scene that, seemingly overnight, it's transformed into something akin to the Please Kill Me-era East Village NYC art-punk scene of three decades past? Reinvention, that's what.

Cultural echoes of the explosively artistic 1980s have been pinging about nationally at least since the turn of the millennium. Witness the return of skinny ties and tight jeans, radical political art and multimedia. Hear Franz Ferdinand and Bloc Party skittering across commercial radio, and sniff out reissues of edgy musical masterpieces from Richard Hell & the Voidoids, Television, and yes, even Blondie, to Britpunk godheads like Gang of Four, Wire, and the Buzzcocks. Wasn't that original prankster and erstwhile Sex Pistolero Malcolm McClaren popping up as producer of Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation even as the Austin Museum of Art hosts their "Radical NY!" show, which features works by and of Richard Hell, Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, and the spray-painted masterworks of the original Style Wars/Bleecker Street bombers? Planet Funk meets Planet Punk.

It isn't just James Brown and Joey Ramone who are dead, but the whole of L.A. style. Austin's rave scene, club music glitterati, whatever you choose to call it, barely made it to the year 2000. By that time the hypnotic beats of house music and its 10 million offshoots had become less hypnotic than metronomic, and what was once a vibrant and valid international music community devolved into factionalized genres and subgenres boasting overpaid jet-setters and so-called superstar DJs like trance master Paul Van Dyk and deep-house whipping boy Paul Oakenfold. Let's face it: They got stale, and clubgoers baled. The ecstasy led inexorably to agony: Last night a DJ bored me stiff.

That was all before Austin's trendsetting barroom triumvirate of Beautiful Mohican Whisky chasers ushered in this new, old sound that's equal parts mash-up tracks – new beats on famous bleats – indie rock guitar samples, and shiny new technology like Serato hijacked not only your average clubgoers expectations but also those who spin the vinyl. Finally, the only limit for DJs is the boundaries of their own imaginations.


Cut Club
Photo By Roxanne Jo Mitchell

"I refer to it as 'the New Shit,'" says Beauty Bar's Bart Butler.

He should know, too, having run Whisky Bar for the past five years while the only musical constant remained the evergreen hip-hop pop stylings of DJ Mel. Asked to describe Beauty Bar's musical milieu, "the New Shit" is as close as he can come to a fitting description of an overall Austin-centric musical mojo on the uptick.

"What's interesting about what's happening here at Beauty Bar," adds Butler, "is that all the bands know all the DJs and the filmmakers and photographers, and they've all pooled their talents into this one big scene. I think a lot of it has to do with MySpace and the fact that everyone's getting their party info off of everyone else's MySpace pages.

"That's been a huge thing for networking, for DJs, and for bands as well. The crowd here really pays attention to that. If it weren't for MySpace we wouldn't know about as many bands as we do alongside the Car Stereo (Wars) guys and Ian Orth's We Explode! and Learning Secrets parties. And somehow these differing styles are all fitting together and complementing each other.

"It's pretty remarkable."

Flashback to the last hours, minutes, seconds of 2006. At Beauty Bar, Car Stereo (Wars) pumps out a sonic barrage channeled into the champagne throng that packs the club's all-encompassing dance floor. Two guys, two turntables, one mixer, and one laptop are spinni - Austin Chronicle 2007


Discography

2 10"s in the works
gomiam-1998
electromutherfucker mix -2000-2001
the mating ritual of bears mix-2001
return of the beatimprint mix-2004
bearfacts 1- 2005
bearfacts 2-2006
near dark, after dark-2007(double cd)

Photos

Bio

John Gomi AKA John Lohse 1972 -DJ,Musician, Artist, Designer,Boutique Owner & currently celebrating the 15th aniversary of his love affair with electronic music& his 8th year as co-owner boutique GOMI, in Austin, Tx. Traveling the world, John Gomi is still constantly “searching for the perfect beat.” Focusing as of late on hard electonic & indie-dance as well as the more pulsing, deep, & minimal excursions, such as vocal NY, throbing Berlin, with that,”French-Touch”, along with the fashion’s, designers, artists that have been inspired by those sounds.Maintaining a residence in Austin, TX (with a brief stint in New Orleans) since the early 1990’s John Gomi has been a part of just about every incarnation of the Austin electronic dance scene, most recently with his monthly party Paparazzi Welcome, Austin’ premier disko punk /neu-new wave dance party with partner in crime Kangaroo Sexxxy. A Party that’s got austin dancing to a different beat.

John Gomi currently divides his time between DJing events, fashion shows for organizations like Ducati , AMODA, etc.,

OUTLAW PARTIES,

recording with his group City of Hungry Ghosts, his Label GOMIHEARTELECTRIC www.gomiheartelectric.com, & painting & graphic design. All avenues maintaining a strong since of urban, street arts, & electronic dance culture. Although it might not always be obvious in it’s various forms John Gomi’s work is deeply rooted culturally in both Hip Hop, & Punk Rock respectively. Not unlike the New York he experienced in his youth 80’s. John Gomi’s work is a fusion of cultures & mythologies so vast it almost seems impossible to try & define them in simple terms.

John Gomi, & Gomi, the boutique have been feature in several articles & in the media. Most recently in the Austin Chronicle article,”Planet Funk Meets Planet Punk-Nu beats on famous bleats” BY MARC SAVLOV, & on radio station 101x, on Hypersonic with Jason Jenkins. Others publications GOMI has been featured in are as follows.

Metropop, Juxtapoz, Austin American Statesman, Austin Chronicle, Texas Monthly, Envy, 512, BleachOnline, Austinist, Globalbeatz,Daily Texan, Austin Business Journal,etc.