Johnny HiFi
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Johnny HiFi

Los Angeles, California, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2001 | SELF

Los Angeles, California, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2001
Band Alternative Rock

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Sep
07
Johnny HiFi @ LA18 Harvest Moon Festival

Arcadia, California, United States

Arcadia, California, United States

Aug
07
Johnny HiFi @ San Francisco Belle

San Francisco, California, United States

San Francisco, California, United States

Aug
03
Johnny HiFi @ Nihonmachi Street Fair

San Francisco, California, United States

San Francisco, California, United States

Music

Press


"Artist Review"

Impeccably dressed walking fashion statement - Austin Music Network


"Billboard Underground Artist of the Month"

Despite the name, Johnny Hi-Fi is more than just one person...it’s a band that has been variously labeled as the "Radiohead of the boy-band generation," "Asian-Britpop" and "American Coldplay." You decide. (billboard.com/bbcom/video/underground_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003544205) - Billboard Magazine


"Billboard Underground Artist of the Month"

Despite the name, Johnny Hi-Fi is more than just one person...it’s a band that has been variously labeled as the "Radiohead of the boy-band generation," "Asian-Britpop" and "American Coldplay." You decide. (billboard.com/bbcom/video/underground_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003544205) - Billboard Magazine


"Johnny Hi-Fi - Anything But Traditional"

Johnny Hi-Fi frontman Eric Hsu says times are changing, and his music is anything but traditional...The band plans to tour national-wide and watch for their third full length album to be released on their website in early 2008. - MTV News


"Johnny Hi-Fi - Anything But Traditional"

Johnny Hi-Fi frontman Eric Hsu says times are changing, and his music is anything but traditional...The band plans to tour national-wide and watch for their third full length album to be released on their website in early 2008. - MTV News


"Man Overboard - #8 on Top 10 Countdown"

12.24.2006 "Man Overboard" at #8 on MTV Chi Top 10 Countdown. - MTV


"Man Overboard - #8 on Top 10 Countdown"

12.24.2006 "Man Overboard" at #8 on MTV Chi Top 10 Countdown. - MTV


"The First Video on MTV Chi"

MTV USA is launching MTV Chi, the first ever music and pop culture telvision channel for young Chinese-Americans. Homegrown artists like Jin and Johnny Hi-Fi will finally have their own platform to showcase their talents in the United States. - MTV


"The First Video on MTV Chi"

MTV USA is launching MTV Chi, the first ever music and pop culture telvision channel for young Chinese-Americans. Homegrown artists like Jin and Johnny Hi-Fi will finally have their own platform to showcase their talents in the United States. - MTV


"Family First: Passion & Profession"

NEW YORK (CBS) ¯ If your kids have dreams of breaking into careers that are incredibly risky such as professional athlete or rock star, what's a parent to do?

Dr. Asif Khan and members of the band "Johnny Hi-Fi" have managed to balance their day jobs with their passion for music. They're now helping college students throughout the country strike that balance with seminars called Passion & Profession.
(wcbstv.com/parenttoparent/Family.First.Cindy.2.234630.html) - CBS


"Family First: Passion & Profession"

NEW YORK (CBS) ¯ If your kids have dreams of breaking into careers that are incredibly risky such as professional athlete or rock star, what's a parent to do?

Dr. Asif Khan and members of the band "Johnny Hi-Fi" have managed to balance their day jobs with their passion for music. They're now helping college students throughout the country strike that balance with seminars called Passion & Profession.
(wcbstv.com/parenttoparent/Family.First.Cindy.2.234630.html) - CBS


"Forget the white-bread '80s MTV."

The Top 10 Chi Countdown -- determined by online voting on the network's Web site and not exclusive to Chinese and Chinese American artists -- matches the group's eclecticism. This show, which originally aired in December, includes New York-via-Austin indie rock from Johnny Hi-Fi, a Mandopop ballad from Jolin Tsai, sunny Singaporean pop from Stephanie Sun, and Madonna's "Hung Up." (Chi's current top 10 features UC Berkeley escapees Putnam Hall, Cantopop singers Andy Lau and Nicholas Tse, Kelly Clarkson and the inescapable Jin.)

(http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/02/24/DDGA2HCOD818.DTL) - San Francisco Chronicle


"Forget the white-bread '80s MTV."

The Top 10 Chi Countdown -- determined by online voting on the network's Web site and not exclusive to Chinese and Chinese American artists -- matches the group's eclecticism. This show, which originally aired in December, includes New York-via-Austin indie rock from Johnny Hi-Fi, a Mandopop ballad from Jolin Tsai, sunny Singaporean pop from Stephanie Sun, and Madonna's "Hung Up." (Chi's current top 10 features UC Berkeley escapees Putnam Hall, Cantopop singers Andy Lau and Nicholas Tse, Kelly Clarkson and the inescapable Jin.)

(http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/02/24/DDGA2HCOD818.DTL) - San Francisco Chronicle


"Almost famous in Beijing"

Foreign and Chinese musicians, both famous and not so famous, shared the stage at Beijing Pop Festival over the weekend. Organisers said more than 20,000 people attended, and for big names such as Placebo and Supergrass, it was just another stop on their tour around the world. However for other bands, the Chaoyang Park stage had a very special meaning.

It was the first time New York-based band Johnny Hi-Fi performed in Beijing and they were excited because their Chinese songs could be understood by most of the people in the audience.

The band's lead singer, Johnny Hsu, was born in Taiwan but moved to the United States with his family at the age of 14. When he performs with his band in the United States, he sings mostly in English, but every time he would sing a few songs in Chinese.

"In the United States, our songs in English tend to touch the audience more than the songs in Chinese because of the language, but here the situation is reversed," said Hsu.

For the band's upcoming third album, Hsu will record an English version and a Chinese version of each song.

It was only natural that Johnny Hi-Fi has targeted the market of Asia, especially China. Before their show at the Beijing Pop Festival, the band performed in Hong Kong, Taipei and Tokyo.

Because Johnny Hi-Fi is an independent band that has not signed with any record company, they had to organize and pay for their own tour.

Hsu said they couldn't make ends meet in this tour, but the main purpose of this tour was to meet audiences in Asia.

"This performance at Beijing Pop Festival is our biggest show ever, as we played to some 4,000 people, while in the past the biggest place for our show could hold about 1,000 people," said Hsu.

"I hope to come back to China after we record our third albums."

The Beijing Pop Festival provided a similarly rare opportunity for American hip-hopper Lex (Alexi Solit) to rap in Chinese. Lex used to study Chinese in an American university for three years and in Beijing for half a year.

Back in the United States, Lex seldom sings in Chinese because most people don't understand, but when putonghua came out of his mouth at Chaoyang Park, the audience was pleasantly surprised.

"When I studied Chinese, I just enjoyed learning it, and didn't think of singing in it some day," said Lex. "It's good to be able to connect to the audience through Chinese."

Though most of what Lex sang was still in English, he said language was not a big problem.

"Many young people in China understand some English," said Lex. "And it's not just about what you sing. Even people can't understand all of our lyrics, they can still appreciate our performance."

Apart from the festival's headliners, local band Cold Blooded Animals was probably the most warmly received act, as it caused the first group pogo at the festival.

Blending grunge music with Chinese elements, Cold Blooded Animals has become established in the somewhat barren Chinese rock scene, and appearances in overseas festivals have brought them some international fame.

At Beijing Pop Festival, the band adopted two guzheng (Chinese zither), which created a special effect together with the distorted sounds of the electric guitar.

"Many Western journalists asked me if I feel honoured to play at the same festival with famous bands like Placebo," said Xie Tianxiao, lead singer of Cold Blooded Animals. "I think music should not only be judged by the Western standard, and China should have its own sound."

However, Xie said the festival was a good opportunity for the exchange between Chinese and foreign musicians.

It was also a good opportunity for the audience to appreciate an eclectic programme of pop-rock music.

"I'm glad that this festival can bring some very good Western bands to China, as well as present local bands in a big stage," said Berwin Song, a young Chinese-American who works in Beijing. "I hope there will be more festivals like this in China."

Compared to the first Beijing Pop Festival which was held last year, this year's festival has grown in scale. Last year there was only one stage and the festival lasted only for one day, while this year there were two stages and performances went on for two days.

Many people complained that they were kept far from the stage by a fence, a measure required by the Public Security Bureau of Chaoyang District to prevent accidents.

Wang Songlin, the festival's publicist said the event went on peacefully, which might help them to persuade the Public Security Bureau next year to allow them to bring the audience closer to the stage.

"A few years ago it was impossible to hold open-air festivals like this," said Wang. "Now we can, and we will do it better and better."

A mother carries her son for the Beijing Pop Festival in Chaoyang Park. wu chong

(http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2006-09/12/content_686626.htm) - China Daily


"Almost famous in Beijing"

Foreign and Chinese musicians, both famous and not so famous, shared the stage at Beijing Pop Festival over the weekend. Organisers said more than 20,000 people attended, and for big names such as Placebo and Supergrass, it was just another stop on their tour around the world. However for other bands, the Chaoyang Park stage had a very special meaning.

It was the first time New York-based band Johnny Hi-Fi performed in Beijing and they were excited because their Chinese songs could be understood by most of the people in the audience.

The band's lead singer, Johnny Hsu, was born in Taiwan but moved to the United States with his family at the age of 14. When he performs with his band in the United States, he sings mostly in English, but every time he would sing a few songs in Chinese.

"In the United States, our songs in English tend to touch the audience more than the songs in Chinese because of the language, but here the situation is reversed," said Hsu.

For the band's upcoming third album, Hsu will record an English version and a Chinese version of each song.

It was only natural that Johnny Hi-Fi has targeted the market of Asia, especially China. Before their show at the Beijing Pop Festival, the band performed in Hong Kong, Taipei and Tokyo.

Because Johnny Hi-Fi is an independent band that has not signed with any record company, they had to organize and pay for their own tour.

Hsu said they couldn't make ends meet in this tour, but the main purpose of this tour was to meet audiences in Asia.

"This performance at Beijing Pop Festival is our biggest show ever, as we played to some 4,000 people, while in the past the biggest place for our show could hold about 1,000 people," said Hsu.

"I hope to come back to China after we record our third albums."

The Beijing Pop Festival provided a similarly rare opportunity for American hip-hopper Lex (Alexi Solit) to rap in Chinese. Lex used to study Chinese in an American university for three years and in Beijing for half a year.

Back in the United States, Lex seldom sings in Chinese because most people don't understand, but when putonghua came out of his mouth at Chaoyang Park, the audience was pleasantly surprised.

"When I studied Chinese, I just enjoyed learning it, and didn't think of singing in it some day," said Lex. "It's good to be able to connect to the audience through Chinese."

Though most of what Lex sang was still in English, he said language was not a big problem.

"Many young people in China understand some English," said Lex. "And it's not just about what you sing. Even people can't understand all of our lyrics, they can still appreciate our performance."

Apart from the festival's headliners, local band Cold Blooded Animals was probably the most warmly received act, as it caused the first group pogo at the festival.

Blending grunge music with Chinese elements, Cold Blooded Animals has become established in the somewhat barren Chinese rock scene, and appearances in overseas festivals have brought them some international fame.

At Beijing Pop Festival, the band adopted two guzheng (Chinese zither), which created a special effect together with the distorted sounds of the electric guitar.

"Many Western journalists asked me if I feel honoured to play at the same festival with famous bands like Placebo," said Xie Tianxiao, lead singer of Cold Blooded Animals. "I think music should not only be judged by the Western standard, and China should have its own sound."

However, Xie said the festival was a good opportunity for the exchange between Chinese and foreign musicians.

It was also a good opportunity for the audience to appreciate an eclectic programme of pop-rock music.

"I'm glad that this festival can bring some very good Western bands to China, as well as present local bands in a big stage," said Berwin Song, a young Chinese-American who works in Beijing. "I hope there will be more festivals like this in China."

Compared to the first Beijing Pop Festival which was held last year, this year's festival has grown in scale. Last year there was only one stage and the festival lasted only for one day, while this year there were two stages and performances went on for two days.

Many people complained that they were kept far from the stage by a fence, a measure required by the Public Security Bureau of Chaoyang District to prevent accidents.

Wang Songlin, the festival's publicist said the event went on peacefully, which might help them to persuade the Public Security Bureau next year to allow them to bring the audience closer to the stage.

"A few years ago it was impossible to hold open-air festivals like this," said Wang. "Now we can, and we will do it better and better."

A mother carries her son for the Beijing Pop Festival in Chaoyang Park. wu chong

(http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2006-09/12/content_686626.htm) - China Daily


"When Johnny Hi-Fi rocks home"

The fiercely independent band from New York is using its Asian roots to find its way further up, writes Katie Lau
Johnny Hi-Fi looks deep in thought in his publicity shots and it's highly probable the Taiwanese-born American indie rocker was musing about getting where he wants to go.

Johnny Hi-Fi is Eric Tsu, frontman of a New York City rock band of the same name is driven by fierce ambition and a can-do attitude. His pseudonym is an amalgamation of a "cool-guy" name - he mentions Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood and uber- hipster Johnny Depp - and the abbreviation for highest quality sound.

The group is quintessential indie - self-reliant with regular day jobs and unsigned by a record label. They plan their own tours and marketing strategies and record their albums with complete creative control.

Hsu says entrepreneurial spirit is very much alive in he and his multi- ethic bandmates - Pakistani drummer Asif Khan, American guitarist Kim Henry and Japanese bassist Justin Matsubara, most of whom are also business professionals. "We've gone through so much, and keep coming to the same conclusion. That is, if you want the job done right, do it yourself," says the lead singer and guitarist.

They are so experienced in balancing their musical and professional careers that in their spare time, they hold group sessions to share ways of handling the pressures of living double lives. "You just have to have the drive. I read an advertising slogan the other day that sai
d: `Coffee! You can sleep when you're dead!' and I'm beginning to believe it," Hsu says.

Hsu is flattered by critics comparing his band to Coldplay and Radiohead. But these comparisons oversimplify Johnny Hi-Fi's appeal, a mix of richly textured sound based in melodic hooks, harmonic rhythms and vocals with a distinctly Asian pop flavor.

Born and raised in Taiwan, Hsu moved to Austin, Texas, to attend college. Growing up idolizing Madonna and Michael Jackson he was aware of his vocal talent. Later influenced by the grunge of Nirvana he was compelled to pick up a guitar and write his own music rather than sing karaoke-style.

"It really is a blessing that I had the opportunity to be influenced by both cultures, both kinds of music and and be able to meld them together to create a new sound," Hsu says, citing Taiwanese rock star Chang Chen-yue (aka A-Yue), Faye Wong and Jay Chou as his Chinese influences.

After playing regularly on American college campuses, the band relocated to New York in 1999 and got their first break opening for A-Yue, through the respected House of Blues circuit in 2004, resulting in steady exposure on MTV Chi.

Although their popularity in the US is growing, the band remains virtually unknown in Asia, although the song Passive Killer was covered by Taiwanese pop star Richie Jen.

Their upcoming 10-day Asian tour kicks off tonight (Sept 2) at the Fringe Club, where they will be joined by local indie bands The Lovesong and The Shotgun She-ras. Subsequent stops will be Taipei, Tokyo and Beijing, where they will share the Beijing Pop Festival bill with Brit rockers Placebo and Supergrass and Canadian heavy metal singer Sebastian Bach.

With three albums and three EPs behind them, the band hopes to capitalize on Hsu's language skills and will release a bilingual double album later this year, featuring Chinese versions of the English songs on the second disc, in the hope of cultivating a wider fan base in Asia. "Going bilingual is absolutely the future. It will be the most ambitious but fruitful decision we will have ever made. It certainly hasn't been easy, but I think everyone will be surprised just how well the two go together," Hsu says.

While aiming to break into the Chinese market and continue touring, changing Asian stereotypes is also on their agenda.

"The presumptions come in all shapes and form. In everyday life we are considered to be smart, money- minded and geeky. Oh, did I mention perverted too? In the entertainment business, we're always cast as the nerds, the doctors or classical musicians.

"I'm just out there sending everyone a message that we know how to rock, too."

(http://www.thestandard.com.hk/weekend_news_detail.asp?pp_cat=40&art_id=26378&sid=9643324&con_type=3&d_str=20060902) - The Standard - Hong Kong


"When Johnny Hi-Fi rocks home"

The fiercely independent band from New York is using its Asian roots to find its way further up, writes Katie Lau
Johnny Hi-Fi looks deep in thought in his publicity shots and it's highly probable the Taiwanese-born American indie rocker was musing about getting where he wants to go.

Johnny Hi-Fi is Eric Tsu, frontman of a New York City rock band of the same name is driven by fierce ambition and a can-do attitude. His pseudonym is an amalgamation of a "cool-guy" name - he mentions Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood and uber- hipster Johnny Depp - and the abbreviation for highest quality sound.

The group is quintessential indie - self-reliant with regular day jobs and unsigned by a record label. They plan their own tours and marketing strategies and record their albums with complete creative control.

Hsu says entrepreneurial spirit is very much alive in he and his multi- ethic bandmates - Pakistani drummer Asif Khan, American guitarist Kim Henry and Japanese bassist Justin Matsubara, most of whom are also business professionals. "We've gone through so much, and keep coming to the same conclusion. That is, if you want the job done right, do it yourself," says the lead singer and guitarist.

They are so experienced in balancing their musical and professional careers that in their spare time, they hold group sessions to share ways of handling the pressures of living double lives. "You just have to have the drive. I read an advertising slogan the other day that sai
d: `Coffee! You can sleep when you're dead!' and I'm beginning to believe it," Hsu says.

Hsu is flattered by critics comparing his band to Coldplay and Radiohead. But these comparisons oversimplify Johnny Hi-Fi's appeal, a mix of richly textured sound based in melodic hooks, harmonic rhythms and vocals with a distinctly Asian pop flavor.

Born and raised in Taiwan, Hsu moved to Austin, Texas, to attend college. Growing up idolizing Madonna and Michael Jackson he was aware of his vocal talent. Later influenced by the grunge of Nirvana he was compelled to pick up a guitar and write his own music rather than sing karaoke-style.

"It really is a blessing that I had the opportunity to be influenced by both cultures, both kinds of music and and be able to meld them together to create a new sound," Hsu says, citing Taiwanese rock star Chang Chen-yue (aka A-Yue), Faye Wong and Jay Chou as his Chinese influences.

After playing regularly on American college campuses, the band relocated to New York in 1999 and got their first break opening for A-Yue, through the respected House of Blues circuit in 2004, resulting in steady exposure on MTV Chi.

Although their popularity in the US is growing, the band remains virtually unknown in Asia, although the song Passive Killer was covered by Taiwanese pop star Richie Jen.

Their upcoming 10-day Asian tour kicks off tonight (Sept 2) at the Fringe Club, where they will be joined by local indie bands The Lovesong and The Shotgun She-ras. Subsequent stops will be Taipei, Tokyo and Beijing, where they will share the Beijing Pop Festival bill with Brit rockers Placebo and Supergrass and Canadian heavy metal singer Sebastian Bach.

With three albums and three EPs behind them, the band hopes to capitalize on Hsu's language skills and will release a bilingual double album later this year, featuring Chinese versions of the English songs on the second disc, in the hope of cultivating a wider fan base in Asia. "Going bilingual is absolutely the future. It will be the most ambitious but fruitful decision we will have ever made. It certainly hasn't been easy, but I think everyone will be surprised just how well the two go together," Hsu says.

While aiming to break into the Chinese market and continue touring, changing Asian stereotypes is also on their agenda.

"The presumptions come in all shapes and form. In everyday life we are considered to be smart, money- minded and geeky. Oh, did I mention perverted too? In the entertainment business, we're always cast as the nerds, the doctors or classical musicians.

"I'm just out there sending everyone a message that we know how to rock, too."

(http://www.thestandard.com.hk/weekend_news_detail.asp?pp_cat=40&art_id=26378&sid=9643324&con_type=3&d_str=20060902) - The Standard - Hong Kong


"Johnny Hi-Fi to plug in and play"

Fans of indie-rock might not instantly recognize the name Johnny Hi-Fi, but those with an ear for tight, well-executed guitar driven alt-rock are in for a treat next week when the New York based four-piece stops off in Taipei to play gigs at The Wall and The Riverside Cafe.

Formed in Austin, Texas in the mid-1990s and fronted by Taiwan born Kevin Hsu -- one of the few Asian faces to have successfully made inroads into the US alt-rock scene -- Johnny Hi-Fi started out as artsy post-rock band with alt-rock attitude.

The four-piece got its big break after it relocated to New York in 1999. Shortly after the band's arrival in the Big Apple the moody blues/rock oriented single Passive Killer hit the number three spot in local alt-rock charts.

While the band's early material saw it blending the folksy simplicity of the Throwing Muses with gnarly off-center and Weezer-like alt-pop, the band has since morphed into a hybrid combo that combines the moody downbeat of Coldplay and melodic alt-rock hooks and riffs of post-Bleed America Jimmy Eat World.

Following the release of its Scam Artist EP in August 2004, Johnny Hi-Fi toured with Taiwan's potty-mouthed rocker Chang Chen-yue (’£?k›Ô) during his House of Blues tour in the US. Although only a support act for Chang, the combo received extensive coverage in the US music press and found itself propelled to a minor league status alt-rock act on the pages of various publications ranging from Coyote Music to Asia Pacific Arts.

In April of this year the band released what many consider to be its most musically challenging album, Sad Stories. Packed with an interesting mix of tunes ranging from the up-beat alt-rock I Can't Reach You, the downbeat yet gritty Man Overboard and the simplistic moody Britpop-like When You Walk Out the album is the band's strongest musical statement to date.

Although next week's tour is set to coincide with the Asian release of the band's album, Johnny Hi-Fi will, no doubt, be performing a selection of tunes from its extensive and contrasting play-list. If Taipei fans really get lucky then Johnny might even grace us with its fantastic cover version of the Pet Shop Boys' Suburbia.

(http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2005/10/07/2003274849) - Taipei Times


"Johnny Hi-Fi to plug in and play"

Fans of indie-rock might not instantly recognize the name Johnny Hi-Fi, but those with an ear for tight, well-executed guitar driven alt-rock are in for a treat next week when the New York based four-piece stops off in Taipei to play gigs at The Wall and The Riverside Cafe.

Formed in Austin, Texas in the mid-1990s and fronted by Taiwan born Kevin Hsu -- one of the few Asian faces to have successfully made inroads into the US alt-rock scene -- Johnny Hi-Fi started out as artsy post-rock band with alt-rock attitude.

The four-piece got its big break after it relocated to New York in 1999. Shortly after the band's arrival in the Big Apple the moody blues/rock oriented single Passive Killer hit the number three spot in local alt-rock charts.

While the band's early material saw it blending the folksy simplicity of the Throwing Muses with gnarly off-center and Weezer-like alt-pop, the band has since morphed into a hybrid combo that combines the moody downbeat of Coldplay and melodic alt-rock hooks and riffs of post-Bleed America Jimmy Eat World.

Following the release of its Scam Artist EP in August 2004, Johnny Hi-Fi toured with Taiwan's potty-mouthed rocker Chang Chen-yue (’£?k›Ô) during his House of Blues tour in the US. Although only a support act for Chang, the combo received extensive coverage in the US music press and found itself propelled to a minor league status alt-rock act on the pages of various publications ranging from Coyote Music to Asia Pacific Arts.

In April of this year the band released what many consider to be its most musically challenging album, Sad Stories. Packed with an interesting mix of tunes ranging from the up-beat alt-rock I Can't Reach You, the downbeat yet gritty Man Overboard and the simplistic moody Britpop-like When You Walk Out the album is the band's strongest musical statement to date.

Although next week's tour is set to coincide with the Asian release of the band's album, Johnny Hi-Fi will, no doubt, be performing a selection of tunes from its extensive and contrasting play-list. If Taipei fans really get lucky then Johnny might even grace us with its fantastic cover version of the Pet Shop Boys' Suburbia.

(http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2005/10/07/2003274849) - Taipei Times


Discography

"City of Angels" EP - 2013
"Love Sold Me Out" EP - 2010
"Vicious Cycle of Promises & Apologies" Album - 2008
"Phase III" EP - 2006
"Sad Stories" Album - 2005
"Scam Artist" EP - 2004
"30" Album - 2004
"Don't Set Yourself Up" EP - 2003
"So This Is Love" Demo - 2000
"The Freak Susan Years" - 1993

Featured on "Teabag Unfiltered" - 2004
Featured on "Tanya Donnelly Tribute - Volume 2" - 1999
Featured on "Tanya Donnelly Tribute - Volume 1" - 1998

Photos

Bio

With 10 albums/EPs and numerous North America and Asia tours under their belt, Johnny HiFi's alternative rock sound has captured fans all over the world. The band has made countless appearances on MTV, MyxTV, Billboard Magazine, Performer Magazine and the New York Times. They have also performed in more than 50 US cities and in China, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Canada. Johnny HiFi is now based in Los Angeles and currently working on new albums, music videos and tours.

For more information, check out:
http://www.JohnnyHiFiBand.com
http://www.facebook.com/JohnnyHiFiBand
http://www.twitter.com/JohnnyHiFiBand
http://www.instagram.com/JohnnyHiFiBand

Band Members