The Jo Wymer Band
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The Jo Wymer Band

Freehold Township, New Jersey, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2008 | SELF

Freehold Township, New Jersey, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2008
Band Blues Singer/Songwriter

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Aug
07
The Jo Wymer Band @ Musikfest

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States

May
15
The Jo Wymer Band @ News 12 New Jersey

Edison, New Jersey, United States

Edison, New Jersey, United States

Apr
28
The Jo Wymer Band @ Lanes At Sea Girt

Sea Girt, New Jersey, United States

Sea Girt, New Jersey, United States

Apr
27
The Jo Wymer Band @ SAIGE CAFE

Jackson, New Jersey, United States

Jackson, New Jersey, United States

Mar
17
The Jo Wymer Band @ Uva

Bradley Beach, New Jersey, United States

Bradley Beach, New Jersey, United States

Mar
16
The Jo Wymer Band @ Our House Restaurant & Banquet Facility

Farmingdale, New Jersey, United States

Farmingdale, New Jersey, United States

Feb
23
The Jo Wymer Band @ Howell Lanes

New Jersey, United States

New Jersey, United States

Feb
16
The Jo Wymer Band @ Huddy's Inn

Colts Neck, New Jersey, United States

Colts Neck, New Jersey, United States

Feb
09
The Jo Wymer Band @ Iron Plow Vineyards

Columbus, New Jersey, United States

Columbus, New Jersey, United States

Music

Press


One of the things I love about music review blogs and music news sites is that they enable me to keep up with all the great music being recorded. I (like many people) stay fairly busy and by myself there is no way I could keep up with everything going on in music now. While every reviewer has their own likes and dislikes for the most part the music reviewed and recommended is pretty good. Sometimes, as with the debut album by Jo Wymer, Living With Scars, the music is exceptional.

I saw Jo Wymer on John Allmans Top 10 of 2011 and intended to pick her album up months ago but got busy and distracted and never followed through. Luckily I got a reminder in my email and was able to listen to it.

My favorites are Dirty Secrets, which really showcases her voice, That Kiss which I tagged as an awesome vid of the day and This Ain’t Love for the opening, the drums, the guitar and the awesome scream Jo lets loose in the song. When I first heard This Ain’t Love I immediately wanted to title my review “cause sometimes you just wanna rock” but settled for the easier to find album title. I also like I Can Tell, because it is a great rock song and because iTunes thinks it is going to corrupt me.





Living With Scars is true to its name. Whether Jo picks up a microphone or a guitar what results is music influenced by her life and experience. When she sings,

I know what you want

you wanna take away my past

but that’s what made me who I am

that’s what keeps you coming back”

the words apply not only to the song but to the entire album. It isn’t just her powerhouse voice and cool blues-rock sound but also how she interprets her life experiences into music that keeps us coming back, song after song.

Look, I am all “hey, go buy this, it is really good” but for the undecided, you can pop over to the Jo Wymer website and listen to the entire album. She also links to amazon, cd baby, itunes, etc where you all can purchase the album. You can also find Jo on Facebook.

- Kit
- Kit Brown


One of the things I love about music review blogs and music news sites is that they enable me to keep up with all the great music being recorded. I (like many people) stay fairly busy and by myself there is no way I could keep up with everything going on in music now. While every reviewer has their own likes and dislikes for the most part the music reviewed and recommended is pretty good. Sometimes, as with the debut album by Jo Wymer, Living With Scars, the music is exceptional.

I saw Jo Wymer on John Allmans Top 10 of 2011 and intended to pick her album up months ago but got busy and distracted and never followed through. Luckily I got a reminder in my email and was able to listen to it.

My favorites are Dirty Secrets, which really showcases her voice, That Kiss which I tagged as an awesome vid of the day and This Ain’t Love for the opening, the drums, the guitar and the awesome scream Jo lets loose in the song. When I first heard This Ain’t Love I immediately wanted to title my review “cause sometimes you just wanna rock” but settled for the easier to find album title. I also like I Can Tell, because it is a great rock song and because iTunes thinks it is going to corrupt me.





Living With Scars is true to its name. Whether Jo picks up a microphone or a guitar what results is music influenced by her life and experience. When she sings,

I know what you want

you wanna take away my past

but that’s what made me who I am

that’s what keeps you coming back”

the words apply not only to the song but to the entire album. It isn’t just her powerhouse voice and cool blues-rock sound but also how she interprets her life experiences into music that keeps us coming back, song after song.

Look, I am all “hey, go buy this, it is really good” but for the undecided, you can pop over to the Jo Wymer website and listen to the entire album. She also links to amazon, cd baby, itunes, etc where you all can purchase the album. You can also find Jo on Facebook.

- Kit
- Kit Brown


One of the things I love about music review blogs and music news sites is that they enable me to keep up with all the great music being recorded. I (like many people) stay fairly busy and by myself there is no way I could keep up with everything going on in music now. While every reviewer has their own likes and dislikes for the most part the music reviewed and recommended is pretty good. Sometimes, as with the debut album by Jo Wymer, Living With Scars, the music is exceptional.

I saw Jo Wymer on John Allmans Top 10 of 2011 and intended to pick her album up months ago but got busy and distracted and never followed through. Luckily I got a reminder in my email and was able to listen to it.

My favorites are Dirty Secrets, which really showcases her voice, That Kiss which I tagged as an awesome vid of the day and This Ain’t Love for the opening, the drums, the guitar and the awesome scream Jo lets loose in the song. When I first heard This Ain’t Love I immediately wanted to title my review “cause sometimes you just wanna rock” but settled for the easier to find album title. I also like I Can Tell, because it is a great rock song and because iTunes thinks it is going to corrupt me.





Living With Scars is true to its name. Whether Jo picks up a microphone or a guitar what results is music influenced by her life and experience. When she sings,

I know what you want

you wanna take away my past

but that’s what made me who I am

that’s what keeps you coming back”

the words apply not only to the song but to the entire album. It isn’t just her powerhouse voice and cool blues-rock sound but also how she interprets her life experiences into music that keeps us coming back, song after song.

Look, I am all “hey, go buy this, it is really good” but for the undecided, you can pop over to the Jo Wymer website and listen to the entire album. She also links to amazon, cd baby, itunes, etc where you all can purchase the album. You can also find Jo on Facebook.

- Kit
- Kit Brown


One of the things I love about music review blogs and music news sites is that they enable me to keep up with all the great music being recorded. I (like many people) stay fairly busy and by myself there is no way I could keep up with everything going on in music now. While every reviewer has their own likes and dislikes for the most part the music reviewed and recommended is pretty good. Sometimes, as with the debut album by Jo Wymer, Living With Scars, the music is exceptional.

I saw Jo Wymer on John Allmans Top 10 of 2011 and intended to pick her album up months ago but got busy and distracted and never followed through. Luckily I got a reminder in my email and was able to listen to it.

My favorites are Dirty Secrets, which really showcases her voice, That Kiss which I tagged as an awesome vid of the day and This Ain’t Love for the opening, the drums, the guitar and the awesome scream Jo lets loose in the song. When I first heard This Ain’t Love I immediately wanted to title my review “cause sometimes you just wanna rock” but settled for the easier to find album title. I also like I Can Tell, because it is a great rock song and because iTunes thinks it is going to corrupt me.





Living With Scars is true to its name. Whether Jo picks up a microphone or a guitar what results is music influenced by her life and experience. When she sings,

I know what you want

you wanna take away my past

but that’s what made me who I am

that’s what keeps you coming back”

the words apply not only to the song but to the entire album. It isn’t just her powerhouse voice and cool blues-rock sound but also how she interprets her life experiences into music that keeps us coming back, song after song.

Look, I am all “hey, go buy this, it is really good” but for the undecided, you can pop over to the Jo Wymer website and listen to the entire album. She also links to amazon, cd baby, itunes, etc where you all can purchase the album. You can also find Jo on Facebook.

- Kit
- Kit Brown


Thursday, January 12, 2012
Jo Wymer -- Living With Scars
I first heard Jo Wymer's music around the same time I first listened to The Alabama Shakes, but it's not for nothing that the two are so close in my mind. Jo Wymer's voice is every inch as clear, soulful, and beautiful as Brittany Howard's, and both ladies know how to play guitar.

But where the Shakes sing songs of Christian redemption, Wymer's subject matter is about the journey she's been through, and how she's just not going to take anybody's shit anymore. Really, it's a rare vocalist who can pour his or her heart and soul into every note, and Wymer is that singer. However, I think where Wymer really displays her singing and songwriting talent is her capacity to explore different emotions. This is not just an album about defiance, injury, healing, love, or lust. It's about being human, and that means living through a number of different experiences.

Fortunately for me (and I suspect most of you,) Jo Wymer is based in New Jersey. She plays there frequently and is starting to break into Philly and NYC. She's playing at The Parkside Lounge in Manhattan next Friday, January 20th, from 9 to 10 PM. Admission is only $3 (THREE), so I'll see you there!


Dirty Secrets
Come On Baby
I Can Tell
- by Rachel Cholst


By 'Rebel' Rod Ames


It is the last day of the year – finally. It has been a trying year to say the least. Trying to keep up with all of the wonderful music has been a chore, all be it a good chore. I hate to even call it a chore because that would imply work. The only work was to figure out who to exclude from my top 25.

I used to do a top 10 list but that was just so unfair, so I decided to lengthened the list to 25. Not quite as difficult, but difficult never the less.

So without further ado here is my list-finally! One more note, the top 10 is in order. After 10 there is no particular order.



1 – 13ghosts “Liar’s Melody” (This is American Music)

2 – Ray Manzarek/Roy Rogers Band – “Translucent Blues” (Blind Pig Records)

3 – Carolyn Wonderland – “Peace Meal” (Bismeaux Records)

4 – The Cash Box Kings –“ Holler and Stomp” (Blind Pig Records)

5 – Lauderdale – “Moving On” (Lauderdalemusic.com)

6 – Drive-By Truckers – “Go Go Boots” (ATO Records)

7 – Ian Seigal and the Youngest Sons – “The Skinny” (Nugene Records)

8 – The Hollows – “Belong to the Land” (self-released)

9 – Scotty Alan – “Wreck and the Mess” (Spinout Records)

10 – Eric Hisaw – “Ghost Stories” (self-released)


The above albums round out my top 10 of the year. They were outstanding in every way. Literally every tune on the album is at the very least, great! You can’t go wrong with any of these and will without fail want to add each one to your library.

The remaining albums finish out the top 25 and are in no particular order. They are all great records. Rebel Rod would never steer you wrong!



The Far West – “The Far West” (Light Fighter) – This one could have very easily been in the top 10. It was a coin toss – literally.

Piñataland – “Hymns for a Dreadful Night” (Mekkatone Records) – a wonderful concept record – pure genius.

Candye Kane – “Sister Vagabond” (Delta Groove) – Candye Kane is awesome as usual and Laura Chavez bends them strings brothers and sisters!

The Black Keys –“El Camino” (Nonesuch Records) – This may not be their best it is still the Black Keys.

Hadden Sayers – “Hard Dollar” – Good Texas style blues.

Tracy Nelson – “Victim of the Blues" (Delta Groove) – Come on, It’s Tracy Nelson for cryin’ out loud!

Jack Cade and the Everyday Sinners – This Fiery Road (Collision Music) – great American Music from across the pond – I wish American music were as popular in America (loud and long sigh!).

Robert Earl Reed – “Carlene” (Hill Country Music) – The good reverend is proving himself a force to reckon with, hailing from the Hill Country of Mississippi. We will be hearing from this amazing singer-songwriter for years to come.

Butchers Blind – “Play For the Films” (Paradiddle Records) – This band is just getting started – expect to hear from this band in the future for sure – a very talented group of young musicians from Brooklyn!

Jo Wymer – “Living With Scars” (Lakehouse Music) – This beautiful lady from New Jersey can belt out a tune!

Pokey La Farge – “Middle of Nowhere” (Free Dirt Records) – This young cat knows how it’s supposed to be done and does it in fine fashion here.

Tom Waits – “Bad As Me” (Anti/Epitaph) – Mr. Waits is as incredible as ever!

Rhubarb Whiskey – “Cautionary Tales” (Self-released) – Dark, humorous, weird, just the way I like it.

Wess Floyd – “Foxhole Confessions (Blind Roar/TIAM) – anyone that writes and performs a song titled “George A. Romero” is a friend of mine. Truly and awesome album.

Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears - "Scandalous" (Lost Highway Records) - This guy's got soul and covers just about every genre from R&B to Blues on this record.






Happy New Year everyone! Rebel Rod says check ‘em all out! Let’s all get ready for the end of the world!

Peace! - From Under the Basement - Rodney Ames


Best Albums of 2011 – Twangville (http://twangville.com/9209/mayers-picks-best-albums-of-2011/) - by Mayer Danzig


Top 90 of 2011 Complete List
Posted on January 1, 2012 by Tom
RANK ALBUM ARTIST
1 Smithereens2011 THE SMITHEREENS
2 21 ADELE
3 Blessed LUCINDA WILLIAMS
4 No One Listens To The Band Anymore THE DAMNWELLS
5 Mockingbird Time THE JAYHAWKS
6 Ashes And Fire RYAN ADAMS
7 El Camino THE BLACK KEYS
8 Some Girls (deluxe reissue) THE ROLLING STONES
9 Dust Bowl JOE BONAMASSA
10 Speak QUINCY MUMFORD & THE REASON WHY
11 I’m With You RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS
12 Revelator TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND
13 How To Become Clairvoyant ROBBIE ROBERTSON
14 Bridge OUTSIDE THE BOX
15 Circuital MY MORNING JACKET
16 Dancing Backward In High Heels NEW YORK DOLLS
17 The King Is Dead THE DECEMBERISTS
18 How I Go THE KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD BAND
19 Unida Cantina ROGER CLYNE & THE PEACEMAKERS
20 Mondo Amore NICOLE ATKINS
21 Sunset Over Hope Street ARI HEST
22 The Head And The Heart THE HEAD AND THE HEART
23 Barton Hollow THE CIVIL WARS
24 Wasting Light FOO FIGHTERS
25 A Map Of The Floating City THOMAS DOLBY
26 Go Go Boots DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS
27 The Innocent Ones WILLIE NILE
28 The Grand Theatre Volume 2 OLD 97'S
29 Elsie THE HORRIBLE CROWES
30 New Blood PETER GABRIEL
31 Codes And Keys DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE
32 Move Like This THE CARS
33 Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds NOEL GALLAGHER’S HIGH FLYING BIRDS
34 For True TROMBONE SHORTY
35 Sky Full Of Holes FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE
36 Number Seven WILL HOGE
37 Low Country Blues GREGG ALLMAN
38 The Harrow & The Harvest GILLIAN WELCH
39 Dirty Jeans And Mudslide Hymns JOHN HIATT
40 Burlap To Cashmere BURLAP TO CASHMERE
41 III & IV RYAN ADAMS & THE CARDINALS
42 The Gaddabouts THE GADDABOUTS
43 Long Live The King THE DECEMBERISTS
44 Man In Motion WARREN HAYNES
45 Helplessness Blues FLEET FOXES
46 The David Mayfield Parade THE DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE
47 Nothing Is Wrong DAWES
48 Hard Times And Nursery Rhymes SOCIAL DISTORTION
49 Dogs THE PARLOR MOB
50 Join Us! THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS
51 Angles THE STROKES
52 Aide Memoire VAL EMMICH & THE VEERIES
53 Stone Rollin’ RAPHAEL SAADIQ
54 The King of In Between GARLAND JEFFREYS
55 Oceanea EP THOMAS DOLBY
56 Pearl Jam 20 PEARL JAM
57 Mayhem IMELDA MAY
58 Almost There SHARIF
59 Fallen Empires SNOW PATROL
60 Ghost On The Canvas GLEN CAMPBELL
61 Kiss Each Other Clean IRON AND WINE
62 Achtung Baby 20th Anniversary Edition U2
63 Welding Burns ROD PICOTT
64 I’ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive STEVE EARLE
65 Heart On Fire EP SCARS ON 45
66 See My Friends RAY DAVIES
67 Collapse Into Now R.E.M.
68 The Whole Love WILCO
69 Miracle Worker SUPERHEAVY
70 Yes And Also Yes MIKE DOUGHTY
71 Western Ballad SHANNON McNALLY
72 So Beautiful Or So What PAUL SIMON
73 Junk Of The Heart THE KOOKS
74 The King Of Limbs RADIOHEAD
75 Seeds We Sow LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM
76 Showroom of Compassion CAKE
77 The Spade BUTCH WALKER & THE BLACK WIDOWS
78 True Blood soundtrack NEKO CASE & NICK CAVE
79 Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage 1982-2011 R.E.M.
80 Mylo Xyloto COLDPLAY
81 Whatever’s On Your Mind GOMEZ
82 Living With Scars JO WYMER
83 LP1 JOSS STONE
84 Through A Crooked Sun RICH ROBINSON
85 Rock N Raw DVD THE DOUGHBOYS
86 Bruiser THE DUKE SPIRIT
87 Protect Your Own CURRENT SWELL
88 Mission Bell AMOS LEE
89 World Wide Rebel Songs TOM MORELLO: THE NIGHTWATCHMAN
90 Let Your Hair Down STEVE MILLER BAND
91 Fixin’ To Die G. LOVE - by Tom Brennan


Top 90 of 2011 Complete List
Posted on January 1, 2012 by Tom
RANK ALBUM ARTIST
1 Smithereens2011 THE SMITHEREENS
2 21 ADELE
3 Blessed LUCINDA WILLIAMS
4 No One Listens To The Band Anymore THE DAMNWELLS
5 Mockingbird Time THE JAYHAWKS
6 Ashes And Fire RYAN ADAMS
7 El Camino THE BLACK KEYS
8 Some Girls (deluxe reissue) THE ROLLING STONES
9 Dust Bowl JOE BONAMASSA
10 Speak QUINCY MUMFORD & THE REASON WHY
11 I’m With You RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS
12 Revelator TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND
13 How To Become Clairvoyant ROBBIE ROBERTSON
14 Bridge OUTSIDE THE BOX
15 Circuital MY MORNING JACKET
16 Dancing Backward In High Heels NEW YORK DOLLS
17 The King Is Dead THE DECEMBERISTS
18 How I Go THE KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD BAND
19 Unida Cantina ROGER CLYNE & THE PEACEMAKERS
20 Mondo Amore NICOLE ATKINS
21 Sunset Over Hope Street ARI HEST
22 The Head And The Heart THE HEAD AND THE HEART
23 Barton Hollow THE CIVIL WARS
24 Wasting Light FOO FIGHTERS
25 A Map Of The Floating City THOMAS DOLBY
26 Go Go Boots DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS
27 The Innocent Ones WILLIE NILE
28 The Grand Theatre Volume 2 OLD 97'S
29 Elsie THE HORRIBLE CROWES
30 New Blood PETER GABRIEL
31 Codes And Keys DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE
32 Move Like This THE CARS
33 Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds NOEL GALLAGHER’S HIGH FLYING BIRDS
34 For True TROMBONE SHORTY
35 Sky Full Of Holes FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE
36 Number Seven WILL HOGE
37 Low Country Blues GREGG ALLMAN
38 The Harrow & The Harvest GILLIAN WELCH
39 Dirty Jeans And Mudslide Hymns JOHN HIATT
40 Burlap To Cashmere BURLAP TO CASHMERE
41 III & IV RYAN ADAMS & THE CARDINALS
42 The Gaddabouts THE GADDABOUTS
43 Long Live The King THE DECEMBERISTS
44 Man In Motion WARREN HAYNES
45 Helplessness Blues FLEET FOXES
46 The David Mayfield Parade THE DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE
47 Nothing Is Wrong DAWES
48 Hard Times And Nursery Rhymes SOCIAL DISTORTION
49 Dogs THE PARLOR MOB
50 Join Us! THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS
51 Angles THE STROKES
52 Aide Memoire VAL EMMICH & THE VEERIES
53 Stone Rollin’ RAPHAEL SAADIQ
54 The King of In Between GARLAND JEFFREYS
55 Oceanea EP THOMAS DOLBY
56 Pearl Jam 20 PEARL JAM
57 Mayhem IMELDA MAY
58 Almost There SHARIF
59 Fallen Empires SNOW PATROL
60 Ghost On The Canvas GLEN CAMPBELL
61 Kiss Each Other Clean IRON AND WINE
62 Achtung Baby 20th Anniversary Edition U2
63 Welding Burns ROD PICOTT
64 I’ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive STEVE EARLE
65 Heart On Fire EP SCARS ON 45
66 See My Friends RAY DAVIES
67 Collapse Into Now R.E.M.
68 The Whole Love WILCO
69 Miracle Worker SUPERHEAVY
70 Yes And Also Yes MIKE DOUGHTY
71 Western Ballad SHANNON McNALLY
72 So Beautiful Or So What PAUL SIMON
73 Junk Of The Heart THE KOOKS
74 The King Of Limbs RADIOHEAD
75 Seeds We Sow LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM
76 Showroom of Compassion CAKE
77 The Spade BUTCH WALKER & THE BLACK WIDOWS
78 True Blood soundtrack NEKO CASE & NICK CAVE
79 Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage 1982-2011 R.E.M.
80 Mylo Xyloto COLDPLAY
81 Whatever’s On Your Mind GOMEZ
82 Living With Scars JO WYMER
83 LP1 JOSS STONE
84 Through A Crooked Sun RICH ROBINSON
85 Rock N Raw DVD THE DOUGHBOYS
86 Bruiser THE DUKE SPIRIT
87 Protect Your Own CURRENT SWELL
88 Mission Bell AMOS LEE
89 World Wide Rebel Songs TOM MORELLO: THE NIGHTWATCHMAN
90 Let Your Hair Down STEVE MILLER BAND
91 Fixin’ To Die G. LOVE - by Tom Brennan


Not so much a Top 10 list, as there is plenty of music I haven’t heard this year, but these 10 albums represent the discs that rarely made it out of rotation on my iPod or Spotify account. These are the albums that I turned to when I was happy, when I was caught in a blinding moment of despair, when I needed someone else’s words to articulate the emotions swirling in my head, if only to allow me the chance to breathe in, breathe out, and steady the ship.

Music has that power – to soothe, to agitate, to kickstart into action and give voice and purpose to one’s life. And these here are some pretty powerful artists, in that regard, whose songs helped define the past year of my life.

Girls Guns and Glory: Sweet Nothings - This one has it all, from mournful ballads to shit-kicking rev-ups, and there’s not a damn bit of filler to be found. Best song, “Baby’s Got A Dream,” which instantly vaulted into my favorite songs of all time.
Imelda May: Mayhem - Imelda May is the total package. She’s a latex-wearing, Vargas pinup with an undeniable ear for the heart of rockabilly swing. Best song, “Proud and Humble” or “Psycho.”
The Horrible Crowes: Elsie - It’s no secret, I love The Gaslight Anthem, and this side project was a gift for longtime fans waiting for their follow-up to “American Slang.” Best song, “I Witnessed A Crime.”
Jonathan Keevil: Bellflower (Original Motion PictureSoundtrack) – If you haven’t seen “Bellflower,” you are missing out on the best film to come out since “Fight Club.” It’s an apocalyptic love story with flamethrowers and badass Mad Max-inspired muscle cars that perfectly captures love’s intensity, from the intoxicating thrill of the first kiss to the heart-smacked gut punch of the worst breakup ever. Jonathan Keevil’s haunting soundtrack does for Evan Glodell’s film what Elliott Smith did for “Good Will Hunting.” It is simply remarkable. Best song, “Blind, Deaf Too,” “Enough” or “Babyfin.”
Lydia Loveless: Indestructible Machine – Much has been made of Loveless’s destructive bent, her penchant for honestly exploring her issues with drugs and drink, and the fact that she’s barely legal and likely a candidate for the doomed 27-year-old musician’s curse. But there is no denying how amazingly talented she is, or that Loveless is as close as we’ll likely come to a 21st-century Patsy Cline. Best song, “Learn to Say No.”
American Anodyne: So You Want to Be A Bullfighter - Good old outlaw country that would make Waylon proud. American Anodyne announced themselves as a force to be reckoned with on their debut, perfectly balancing a handful of rousing juke joint rockers with the social commentary of a modern-day Woody Guthrie. Best song, “Call My Brother” or “El Dorado, Dark Blue.”
Kasey Anderson and the Honkies: Heart of a Dog – Singer-songwriter Kasey Anderson hooked up with the Honkies and delivered a wonderful slice of countrified rock, the perfect album for driving fast down an empty interstate, destination unknown. Best song, “Kasey Anderson’s Dream.”
Jessica Lea Mayfield: Tell Me - Another younger-than-her-years songstress, Jessica Lea Mayfield can break your heart with her big, beautiful eyes or just cut it out with her incredibly sharp ruminations on the damage love can do. Best song, “I’ll Be the One You Want Someday.”
The Breedings: Laughing at Luck – This brother/sister act out of Nashville, TN are the real deal, and I think they are poised to break big in 2012. Erin and Willie Breeding compliment each other perfectly on their debut, but it’s Erin’s voice that will grab you tight and not let go. Best song, “When It All Comes Down.”
Jo Wymer: Living with Scars - I love Jo Wymer. This New Jersey-based mother/wife/teacher lives and rocks by a simple motto: Play it loud. And on her self-financed, independently released debut, she does just that, reaching for a brass ring that few artists are lucky to ever touch in their entire career and refusing to let go. I compared her to Pat Benatar in my review, but honestly, she’s better. Few albums in 2011 made me smile as much in 2011, and I can honestly say I never once was tempted to turn the volume down. Best song, “Dirty Secrets.” - by John Allman


Jo Wymer - Living With Scars


.
For every review I publish, there are probably five-hundred I get approached to write. The music world has changed because more than anything, the internet has opened the floodgates in terms of music that's available. You are not bound by what your local record store carries. This is a blessing and a curse because it means everyone thinks they're an artist and I often hear dozens of records I admire but simply don't love and with limited time, I often can't write about. They don't crawl under your skin or unsettle you, miss evoking pure euphoria and above all else they don't paint pictures vivid enough for me. However, usually once a year someone comes from out of nowhere to remind me of why I love music and in 2011 the artist's name is Jo Wymer. Listening to Jo Wymer's debut CD Living With Scars is akin to having a cold bucket of water thrown upon you as you are in a hibernating sleep but also is as warm as a fire on a winter night. Converging more than a decade of song writing and performing around the Asbury Park, NJ area she has crafted a ferociously stinging record whose roots are deep in rock, rhythm and blues. Above all else, her songs don't hold back and discretely brush over ache, but confronts it head on.
"I Can Tell" opens Living With Scars with the lyrics "I can tell you don't love me" and instantly Wymer takes us on a candid drive of hard brash realities that are universal but few are willing to go into detail about. The heated lyrical jolt is complimented by a cracking and lashing full throttle combustion of instruments. The gutsiest moment on the record is "Dirty Secrets" which she talks of how intimacy can be followed by severe awkwardness where two naked bodies drift apart after sharing the most personal of experiences. The mental foreplay people play with one another dissipates when the clothes are removed and Wymer has channelled the essence of this regular occurrence into a reflective anthem of despondency that I've never quite heard before now. She doesn't just take us inside her world, but lays out the mental secrets and personal distress which we try and often fail running from. Most of life's greatest tragedies come out of never letting go of the past however Wymer embraces her life and uses it as a stepping stone which she has risen above. The band's muscular foundation of guitars, bare knuckle drums and wailing vocals immediately pulls you in. The human spirit and psyche is so tender a record executive would encourage the artist to bury the pain only leaving a smidgen of the ache to be head but Wymer has no filter and delivers one song after another of tough-talking tales.

"That Kiss" features a wondrous chorus ready-made for radio. It's about finding new love when all else appeared impossible. I dare you to not roll down the windows and sing it at the top of your lungs with its big beat and booming chorus. "I'm Gone" has a bristling bluesy backbeat while "Memories" is a stirring ballad about not running away from your past because it infuses your very soul; to deny it is to deny yourself. "This Ain't Love (and War)" is heightened by a wall of horns in an unrepentant display of self-worth. Wymer's slams her declaration of supercharged swagger into overdrive on "Real Man" and "Can't Live Without Your Kiss" which sequentially plow through a tale of significance and yearning. Wymer's voice takes on fierce and fascinating dimensions so that even when she pines for someone or something it comes off from a place of strength and not as a wounded heart. There's a crushing sense of rebelliousness throughout all ten songs on Living With Scars. The album closes on a bluesy "Come On Baby" with some surreal six-string work that tips its hat to Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn. The minimalist atmosphere allows her voice once again to pierce through with the same intensity as a gospel-choir. While the album is full of robust and rocking arrangements, I love the "Sleepwalking" aura of "Come On Baby". When the 42-minute album concludes you can't help but wish there was more. Props must be given to Wymer's full-bodied arrangements as she easily could have gone down a more commercial path and also a less restrained path. The truth is I could see artists as varied as American Idol winners and Melinda Lambert perform rock-hard renditions with considerable impact, but they would be polished up and sadly lose most of their gusto. I mention this to point out the strength of her song writing which comes with an unflinching sense of authenticity.

Jo Wymer comes off as one who has lived life, breathed it in, learned many dear lessons and is sharing them here. The record is full of contemporary clarity whereas so much music is drenched in nostalgia making us yearn for something long gone. Instead of questions and ache, there's a deep resolve in the lyrics that's sexy as hell. Most artists are fragile souls who still haven't found their groove, their inner peace or - ANTIMUSIC by Anthony Kuzminski


Jo Wymer - Living With Scars


.
For every review I publish, there are probably five-hundred I get approached to write. The music world has changed because more than anything, the internet has opened the floodgates in terms of music that's available. You are not bound by what your local record store carries. This is a blessing and a curse because it means everyone thinks they're an artist and I often hear dozens of records I admire but simply don't love and with limited time, I often can't write about. They don't crawl under your skin or unsettle you, miss evoking pure euphoria and above all else they don't paint pictures vivid enough for me. However, usually once a year someone comes from out of nowhere to remind me of why I love music and in 2011 the artist's name is Jo Wymer. Listening to Jo Wymer's debut CD Living With Scars is akin to having a cold bucket of water thrown upon you as you are in a hibernating sleep but also is as warm as a fire on a winter night. Converging more than a decade of song writing and performing around the Asbury Park, NJ area she has crafted a ferociously stinging record whose roots are deep in rock, rhythm and blues. Above all else, her songs don't hold back and discretely brush over ache, but confronts it head on.
"I Can Tell" opens Living With Scars with the lyrics "I can tell you don't love me" and instantly Wymer takes us on a candid drive of hard brash realities that are universal but few are willing to go into detail about. The heated lyrical jolt is complimented by a cracking and lashing full throttle combustion of instruments. The gutsiest moment on the record is "Dirty Secrets" which she talks of how intimacy can be followed by severe awkwardness where two naked bodies drift apart after sharing the most personal of experiences. The mental foreplay people play with one another dissipates when the clothes are removed and Wymer has channelled the essence of this regular occurrence into a reflective anthem of despondency that I've never quite heard before now. She doesn't just take us inside her world, but lays out the mental secrets and personal distress which we try and often fail running from. Most of life's greatest tragedies come out of never letting go of the past however Wymer embraces her life and uses it as a stepping stone which she has risen above. The band's muscular foundation of guitars, bare knuckle drums and wailing vocals immediately pulls you in. The human spirit and psyche is so tender a record executive would encourage the artist to bury the pain only leaving a smidgen of the ache to be head but Wymer has no filter and delivers one song after another of tough-talking tales.

"That Kiss" features a wondrous chorus ready-made for radio. It's about finding new love when all else appeared impossible. I dare you to not roll down the windows and sing it at the top of your lungs with its big beat and booming chorus. "I'm Gone" has a bristling bluesy backbeat while "Memories" is a stirring ballad about not running away from your past because it infuses your very soul; to deny it is to deny yourself. "This Ain't Love (and War)" is heightened by a wall of horns in an unrepentant display of self-worth. Wymer's slams her declaration of supercharged swagger into overdrive on "Real Man" and "Can't Live Without Your Kiss" which sequentially plow through a tale of significance and yearning. Wymer's voice takes on fierce and fascinating dimensions so that even when she pines for someone or something it comes off from a place of strength and not as a wounded heart. There's a crushing sense of rebelliousness throughout all ten songs on Living With Scars. The album closes on a bluesy "Come On Baby" with some surreal six-string work that tips its hat to Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn. The minimalist atmosphere allows her voice once again to pierce through with the same intensity as a gospel-choir. While the album is full of robust and rocking arrangements, I love the "Sleepwalking" aura of "Come On Baby". When the 42-minute album concludes you can't help but wish there was more. Props must be given to Wymer's full-bodied arrangements as she easily could have gone down a more commercial path and also a less restrained path. The truth is I could see artists as varied as American Idol winners and Melinda Lambert perform rock-hard renditions with considerable impact, but they would be polished up and sadly lose most of their gusto. I mention this to point out the strength of her song writing which comes with an unflinching sense of authenticity.

Jo Wymer comes off as one who has lived life, breathed it in, learned many dear lessons and is sharing them here. The record is full of contemporary clarity whereas so much music is drenched in nostalgia making us yearn for something long gone. Instead of questions and ache, there's a deep resolve in the lyrics that's sexy as hell. Most artists are fragile souls who still haven't found their groove, their inner peace or - ANTIMUSIC by Anthony Kuzminski


Living With Scars, by Jo Wymer
In recent years the long tradition of powerful women singer-songwriters has been rather quiet. Sure there are plenty of extremely talented artists putting out some incredible music, but it has been awhile since I’ve heard a voice overflowing with confidence and bravado. New Jersey singer-songwriter Jo Wymer is set to change that.

Living With Scars is filled with the type of bristling rock and roll that explodes from speakers big and small. Album opener “I Can Tell” sets the tone with Wymer calling out a cheating lover against a backdrop of furious guitars and pounding drums. “Dirty Secrets” finds Wymer cautioning a new lover to leave her history book closed. “Curiousity kills everything,” she warns as the electric guitars drive the point home. Call it blues rock with an attitude.

Even the more pop-oriented “That Kiss” is a tremendous showcase for Wymer’s boldness. Through the course of the song she moves rapidly from romantic self-defeat to insistent redemption, bursting into a hook-laden chorus. The ballad “Memories” has a similar build towards an explosive chorus, with a searing organ adding additional emphasis.

A heavy beat and a strutting guitar set the tone for album stand-out, “This Ain’t Love (Love and War).” It’s hard to beat the potent combination of slide guitar and horns that appear mid-song, call it the Reeses Peanut Butter cup of rock and roll – two great tastes that taste great together.

Living with Scars may be Wymer’s debut, but it is enriched with the long legacy of rock and roll. - Album of the Month Review written by Mayer Danzig


When I was a kid and first discovered the music that would begin to define me, most of it was guitar driven, played by bands predominantly fronted by female singers.

I’m talking Pat Benatar, Heart, Blondie, The Motels.

Not every band stuck with me for the long haul, but some like Benatar, I’ve never been able to shake. That voice backed by Neil Giraldo’s wailing guitar. Jesus help me, I’ve been saved.

Jo Wymer is a lot like Benatar. She growls, purrs and isn’t afraid to hit the high notes with gusto throughout her hook-laden debut, Living With Scars.

It’s literally a tour de force of potential hits, songs that are radio-ready, if radio had any soul left and wasn’t auto-tuned to hell and steered by programmers, not deejays, deciding which four songs go on heavy rotation and which 15 “classics” serve as hourly filler.

Like Benatar, she has a hell of a backing band, a damn fine guitarist and enough attitude to keep an audience enthralled.

Here’s the problem, though.

Wymer, who hails from New Jersey, isn’t on a label. She self-produced her album. She’s playing lots of local festivals and logging the necessary hours to establish herself, but how’s that supposed to help her feed her family? A labor of love is great, but in a down economy, it would be nice to get paid for kicking so much musical ass.

I think Wymer’s fate rests with so many other deserving artists who struggle and fight to be heard. She just needs a lucky break, a record executive, or better yet, television producer, to hear her album, to listen to the stories that she spins in her songs, the wonderfully vivid narratives that she belts out like a woman scorned.

These days, it doesn’t take a hit album to break big. All it takes is for someone high-enough up on the production chain of a show like The Vampire Diaries or Fringe, hell, even cheesy crap like Grey’s Anatomy, to take a shine to one of the stronger tracks off Living With Scars, and there are plenty, and lobby to include it on the show.

I can totally see “Dirty Secrets” or “Stay Away From Me” or “That Kiss” playing through a musical interlude, that portion of the hour-long drama where there’s no dialogue, just a succession of scenes that propel specific storylines.

With her vivid imagery, Wymer’s songs play perfectly to this niche.

For now, though, Wymer and her band need your help, they need your support, they need you to go out and buy her album. Trust me, it’s worth the cost. This is damn good guitar rock with just enough honkytonk inflection to make you move in your seat.

Jo Wymer – Dirty Secrets
Jo Wymer – Stay Away From me
Jo Wymer – I Can Tell

Jo Wymer’s Official Site, Jo Wymer on Facebook, Buy Living With Scars

5
- by John Allman


http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1uikw/BarflyNovember2011Vo/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=

Page 12 - Steve Lavine - Barfly Magazine


http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1uikw/BarflyNovember2011Vo/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=

Page 12 - Steve Lavine - Barfly Magazine


Americana Roots Presents the FEMME FATALE ROCK MIX - The Best Independent Female Rock Artists. Check it out and download the podcast.
http://americanaroots.com/ - Von Cloedt


Americana Roots Presents the FEMME FATALE ROCK MIX - The Best Independent Female Rock Artists. Check it out and download the podcast.
http://americanaroots.com/ - Von Cloedt


By 'Rebel' Rod Ames


I’m going to be completely honest here. I just typed that as if to say that sometimes I am not completely honest. I’m absolutely certain that I have not lied to you, the readers thus far.

Anyhow, case in point, I almost did not review Jo Wymer’s debut album “Living With Scars”, and I cannot for the life of me, understand why.

I believe that sometimes on a certain day at a certain time things just may not be lined up properly for whatever it is that I’m listening to at the time, but for whatever the reason, the music just doesn’t hit me as I think it should.

Thankfully, Review Shine gives us bloggers a full sixty days to get on the same accord as the artist. On day fifty-seven it finally occurred, I found myself on the same wavelength as Jo Wymer, and am I ever grateful for that.

Her voice is as powerful as anyone I have heard in recent memory, and her range is phenomenal. I’m not talking necessarily about octave changes either. She can take her voice down to almost a whisper without losing any power what so ever. She is equally efficient at serenading the listener with a slow rock ballad or it can be hard, slide-guitar driven blues-rock. It doesn’t matter. Whatever she belts out, sounds great.

Track 6, “Memories” is one of those tunes that grab you and it would be safe to say is one of my favorite tunes on the record and certainly one that I could and probably will select to play on my radio show.

However, the tune that rang true to my already pleasured ears was the final track, “Come On Baby”. On this spectacularly simple tune, it is just Jo and an electric guitar. Splendid in its pureness, its simplicity, and Ms. Wymer’s sultrily sexy voice, all of it coming together to propel it over the top, and in a deafeningly quiet manner, completes the record in about as a classy approach that I have heard in a very, very, very, long time. “Memories” may be heard on “From Under the Basement, but “Come On Baby” will frequently be heard. It is that good!

Ms. Wymer – sing your songs baby!

This record is out now – ‘Rebel’ Rod says to definitely check this one out. Sorry it took me so long to get around to it! My bad! - Album Review by Rebel Rod Ames


Jo Wymer - not just a one trick Blues Pony....click the link to read more...... - THE AQUARIAN WEEKLY - written by John Pfeiffer


—by John Pfeiffer, January 13, 2011

Light Of Day 2011 comes alive this weekend in Asbury Park. And while the Paramount Theatre shows featuring big names are all sold out, we thought we’d share some of the other great bands that will be over at the Stone Pony, The Wonderbar and other venues across Ocean Ave that we recommend checking out during this music filled weekend. An important reminder, all set times are approximate so give yourself plenty of time to get there. Rule of thumb is one hour before listed set time—that’s my own rule. Enjoy!


John Eddie, Glen Burtnick (pictured above), Joe Rapolla, April Smith @ McCloone’s Songwriters By the Sea, Jan. 16 from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. with guests.

John is the Jersey shore’s most underrated rock and roll outlaw. Ah, but don’t feel too bad for John Eddie. With songs being recorded by some of rock and roll’s top guys today, Eddie just might be having his own private chuckle throughout this decade. But I’ll tell you one thing that ain’t funny: his stage performance. Featuring the state’s best players, John Eddie is a seriously great bandleader and draws legions of hardcore fans to his hybrid Jersey-Nashville sound. Featuring one of my favorite guitarists (besides Sonny Kenn) P.K. Lavengood, Eddie mixes it up all night long. If you haven’t had a chance to catch this Jersey icon, don’t hesitate to find him. He’ll be right on the stage at McCloone’s for the Songwriters By the Sea with Glen Burtnick, Joe Rapolla, April Smith and more!
Jerzy Jung, Christine Martucci, Colin Rocker, Keith Monacchio, Lisa Bouchelle @ The Watermark Songwriters By The Sea, Jan. 16.

Comprised of yet another group of Jersey premier singer songwriters, this gathering represents the shore as well as the Western inland. With powerhouse vocalist Christine Martucci hailing from the Flemington area and storytelling kingpin Keith Monacchio hailing from the Trenton sector, they come to play and play they shall. Teaming up with shore veteran Lisa Bouchelle, Colin Rocker and Shoreworld favorite Jerzy Jung, a writer who breathes easy believability into everything she tackles, these writers in the round make it easy for you to sit back and watch the magic unfold. I know, I sound like a Disney advertisement but, seriously, they’ll knock you out.

Jo Wymer @ The Stone Pony, Friday, January 14 12:25 p.m.

Jo Wymer has been focused on music for several years, performing, writing songs and teaching. She plays guitar, piano, harmonica and leads her own band. She started her own music business, teaching private lessons, including a focus on special needs students with autism, spectrum disorders, Down’s syndrome, etc. She also currently attends TCNJ, and is working toward a Master’s Degree in Special Education, specializing in Mathematics. Wymer is working in the studio on her debut album, which will be released this year, and performs frequently in the NJ/NY region with her powerhouse rock band.

She also performs solo acoustic shows, which provide a unique opportunity to see her perform her music in stripped down form. Jo’s music comes from the scar tissue of adult perspective; sex, guilt, joy, failure, love, loss, lust, their consequences and rewards, and the faith that keeps us moving forward in spite of it.

She will be playing in a duo, Friday night at the Stone Pony at approximately 12:25 p.m. - THE AQUARIAN WEEKLY - written by John Pfeiffer


LIVING WITH SCARS is more than worth the wait. - New Jersey MetroMix - Asbury Park Press - written by Alex Biese


SHINEBONE MAGAZINE - April 2008

By Rob Wheary

Jo Wymer and the Itty Bitty Band

There’s a quote from Kid Rock that says, “If it looks good, you’ll see it; if it sounds good, you’ll hear it; if it’s marketed right, you’ll buy it; but... if its real, you’ll feel it.” Jo Wymer is real. Playing the blues from the guitar and with a voice that rivals that of Heart’s Nancy Wilson, one of the greatest voices in rock history, Wymer brings out the soul of the music that she is singing about. Her song, “Boulevard” is one of the best that I’ve heard in a long time. All of the tracks that I heard were live songs, so I can only hope that there is more to come from this artist in the future, so that more can feel what music needs today, a singer like this. - Reviewer - Rob Wheary


Jo Wymer -- SLG
It seems fitting that, shortly after the fifth birthday of the blog, I get to write about Jo Wymer's second release, SLG. Wymer was one of the first artists I wrote a review of. She was the first artist to put me on their guest list (I subsequently reviewed the concert, of course) and to give me free swag. I had literally started the blog only a month before and felt like a huge imposter, but I appreciated Jo's enthusiasm and had a great time at her concert. I've missed her music and am thrilled with her latest release, SLG.Like many folks over the past few years, Wymer has shifted from her brash (but melodic) '80s rock sensibility to soul. I feel like this is a good move for her -- Wymer's voice is rich and full, and I'm glad to have the opportunity to hear it in more tranquil settings. It speaks to her range, of course -- "Shoebox," an ode to her son, sits somberly next to "Addiction" -- a reaffirmation of self-determination in the midst of many distractions. SLG also demonstrates the depth of Wymer's songwriting. While Living With Scars had a more upbeat feel, SLG puts a more reflective spin on the same things: survival and perseverance. Given the world around us today, albums like SLG can arm us with a little more courage than we had before. - Rachel Cholst


Jo Wymer hails from Freehold, New Jersey. The Black Sheep of the Jersey Shore Rock Scene – Jo is a two-time JAM AWARD winner, One-time AMA award winner, an a Two- Time NAPW WOMAN OF THE YEAR award winner (2013 and 2014) She is a Navy veteran and mother, who has been writing Rock, Americana, Blues and Pop music as well as music for television and film for almost 20 years.

Jo’s newest project is being produced by two-time Grammy WINNER Marc Swersky and was released on July 4, 2016.

Jo’s music can be heard on 250+ radio stations across the United States and on such national TV shows like; SONS OF ANARCHY, THE AFFAIR and THE 100 as well as FOX NACSAR Sunday. Wymer’s vocals are powerful, high energy, soulful and bring an authentic raw feel to her songs. Her delivery of the storylines is masterful.

Jo’s recent accolades and accomplishments include: • Worked and recorded with such greats as The E Street Band to Warren Haynes • Performed with the SNL band • Opened for such great artists as; Joan Osborne, Martin Short, Jeffrey Gaines, Jake Clemons, Nick Clemons, The Black Keys, Bob Burger, Glen Burtnik and many others • She won the 2010 and 2012 New Jersey Acoustic Musicians award for top female performer • First female lead band to win the Top Blues Band award at the AMA awards in 2010 • Played with Earl Slick from David Bowie and member of the Smithereens.

In this interview, we chat with Jo about her influences, changes in the music world, and, of course, her newest project.

Full Q&A, links, and a stream below.



Let’s dive a little deeper into You, the artist and your music. What attracted you to this genre(s) or style(s)?

I like a lot of different genres of music – that is what makes me different and sets me apart for a lot of other vocalist, musicians and songwriters.

One minute I love high-energy rock (totally polarized from the opera I studied as a young girl) or songs where the lyrics choke you up or make you say ‘HELL YEAH”… and then the next minute I am fist pumping to Journey and “BLINK LIKE A JEANIE” then on to listening to Patty Griffin, Ryan Adams, Ani DiFranco or Damien Rice to chill the rest of the night away!

What led you into this journey with music? And further, what drives you to push it out to the public?

My children lead me to this journey with music.

This is the legacy I have to leave them.

I was a Navy Veteran with a lot of stories to tell them about …from past loves to past experiences I have had – From ex-husbands to places I have visited or traveled to.

These are the stories of the people, places and things that need to be told in a raw – truthful – unrestrained, aggressive fashion.

Rock music is a dying genre….music is crazy in today’s world.

I am driven to keep the music of my youth strong in my heart…songs that drove me to listen for more than 30 seconds. The days of pulling out the liner notes from the album sleeve…putting the headphones on and reading and listening at the same time…

THIS is what drives me to push it out to the public…I believe there are people out there that still want to do that and young listeners who want to do that as well. Listeners who want to transcend themselves to another place while listening…with posters on the ceilings of their bedrooms…and black lights!

Who or what influences your creativity? Have your tastes in music changed over time?

People like Bettye Lavette, Candi Stanton, The Black Crows, Tom Petty, Elvis Costello, U2, Pat Benatar and Chrissie Hynde have been huge influences over the years – because their writing was truthful and the music was simple.

Musicians like Bonnie Raitt, Chrissie Hyde, Jeff Beck, Adam Clayton, Jeff Ament, Billy Joel, and Joan Jett – because of their excellent musicianship – drove me to excel in the instruments I play.

Recently, powerful influences in songwriting are the talents of Bono, Patty Griffin, Jason Isbell, Patterson Hood, Buddy and Julie Miller, Gretchen Peters and Grace Potter that have influenced me to dig deeper towards the “TRUTH” more in my writing. I know…all over the place…but you asked. I guess what I am saying is I guess I am more like Patty Griffin and Joan Osborne….I guess good music is good music and not just one genre or type…right??

Were you trying to accomplish anything specific on this new project? Creatively or otherwise?

Not really – you see, my debut album LIVING WITH SCARS came out of the gate like a kick in the balls. Lots of screaming guitars….bang-a-gong drumming and “in-your-face” lyrics that made people shake their booties and take life with “FOUR ON THE FLOOR” approach.

This new project…S.L.G. … got a bit simpler and deeper. More feeling….more soulful…less noise. Marc Swersky, Joe DiMaio, Leon Zervos took this project on with the zest of music doctors – by keeping it real simple…which is what I wanted….my voice and the music – that’s it…the little black dress (or the little simple 5 song EP) is always classic…keeps you wanting more.

Producer and two-time GRAMMY winner, Marc Swersky, knew exactly what I was trying to achieve with a more TRUTHFUL, LESS NOISEY and a more soulful attitude.

What was the last song you listened to?

“Jump Into The Fire” – The Greyhounds

Which do you prefer? Vinyl? CDs? MP3s?

Truthfully – MP3’s – because then they can go ANYWHERE…right to my iTunes then on to my iPod to bring in my car – or on the airplane – or other different places.

How about this one…. Do you prefer Spotify? Apple Music? Bandcamp? Or something else? Why?

Something Else as always…outside the box….lyric videos…house concerts…push tours….licensing push…..strip clubs…tattoo conventions….anything that is different from the norm….that has the potential to pay something!!

Other than the digital era overwhelming us with access to an abundance of music, what is the biggest challenge you face when trying to connect with or find new fans?

The digital ocean is a big one for sure…..bigger than the planet it self…people don’t listen to music for music sake anymore….…the stuff youngsters hear are in movies or on TV…so the only way is licensing. My own children listen to Marvin Gaye’s TROUBLED MAN on their iPods after they heard it in the movie “CAPTAIN AMERICA”

In my day it was ..(a) you bought an album and listened to it – then

(b) gave it to your friend to borrow and listen to….

so my biggest challenge is to get licensing so I can be heard by a younger listener.

Where is the best place to connect with you online? Discover more music?

My website (www.jowymer.com) and social media sites like Facebook…Twitter…Instagram. Soundcloud is where I go to listen to new music. Bloggers are where I go to see what music trends are.

Anything else you’d like to add before signing off?

I always try to make the music truthful…believable and accessible. Have fun and crazy live music shows….and trust my fans ….listen to them and deliver what they want from me. - Review of SLG


Discography

LIVING WITH SCARS - released June 2011
visit www.jowymer.com for more details!

S.L.G. - released July 2016

Photos

Bio

Jo Wymer hails from Freehold, New Jersey.  The Black Sheep of the Jersey Shore Rock Scene - Jo is a two-time JAM AWARD winner, One-time AMA award winner, an a Two- Time NAPW WOMAN OF THE YEAR award winner (2013 and 2014) 

The Jo Wymer Band was recently featured on SPOTLIGHT NEW JERSEY NEWS 12 WOMEN OF SONG - Light of Day 2018 -check them out!

https://www.facebook.com/dellacrews/videos/1847443585268699/

Jo is a Navy veteran and mother, who has been writing Rock, Americana, Blues and Pop music as well as music for commercial television and film for over 20 years.  

Jo's newest project S.L.G. was produced by two-time Grammy WINNER Marc Swersky and is was released on July 4, 2016.  

Jo's music can be heard on 250+ radio stations across the United States and on such national TV shows like;  Harlots, SOA, The Affair, True Blood, Reign, Harlots, Rookie Blue and THE 100 as well as FOX NACSAR Sunday.  

Jo Wymer’s vocals are powerful, high energy, soulful and bring an authentic raw feel to her songs. Her delivery of the storylines is masterful and genius. Audience members are awe struck with her emotionally raw performances.

Performing live with her band and capturing her solo acoustic shows is something special and if the chance arises, one should definitely take that opportunity.

Jo's recent accolades and accomplishments include: • Worked and recorded with such greats as The E Street Band to Warren Haynes • Performed with the SNL band • Opened for such great artists as; Joan Osborne, Martin Short, Jeffrey Gaines, Jake Clemons, Nick Clemons, The Black Keys,  Bob Burger, Glen Burtnik and many others • She won the 2010 and 2012 New Jersey Acoustic Musicians award for top female performer • First female lead band to win the Top Blues Band award at the AMA awards in 2010  • Played with Earl Slick from David Bowie and the late Pat DiNizio of the Smithereens.


Jo's Band Members are:

Jo Wymer - Guitar, Bass, Keys and Harmonica

Gino Simonelli - Lead Guitar

Augie Foglio - Bass

Gus Trotter - Keys

Don Rispoli - Drums/ Vocals

Saxophone - Scott Solomon

Background Vocals - Tyler Holt and Mary  Junda

Jo is also a BMI Songwriter/Composer and Publisher.
Truman Bruce Publishing,

PLEASE VISIT www.jowymer.com for more details on shows and album information!

Band Members