Justin Enco & The Poor Life Decisions Band
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Justin Enco & The Poor Life Decisions Band

Delray Beach, Florida, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2008 | INDIE

Delray Beach, Florida, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2008
Band Rock Acoustic

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"Sometimes, there's nothing like an original"

By: Audra Hodges
One thing that bothers me about music gigs in this town, and many others, is that very few bands can get paid to play their own music. The fact of the matter is that bar crowds seem to hang around longer if they can sing along with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
or 3 Doors Down than with an original piece of music. It’s understandable, but kind of depressing. I like a good sing-along as much as the next girl, but I also love creativity, originality and talent. And South Florida has plenty to offer.

One such example is Justin Enco, who can be found in some of the more popular bars and clubs along the Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton and Delray Beach music scene.
“Original shows are my favorite,” Enco said, “just because it is still new and fresh to me, as opposed to cover gigs — I’ve played some covers hundreds to thousands of times.”

The first time I came across Enco, I was headed to see a “friend of a friend” who was playing a Dave Matthews cover show in Boca Raton. Imagine my surprise as I stood in the crowded Daniel O’Connell’s bar and it hit me that the music I was listening to sounded very much like Dave Matthews. Whether you’re a Dave fan or not, you must admit that, with the grit and tempo of the vocals plus the varying guitar strides, if you cover DMB well, you’re a pretty good musician.

Enco’s first CD, “Waiting For Yesterday,” offers a poetic, sometimes sad, but on the whole upbeat look at different aspects of life. There’s friendship in the track entitled “Random Thought” and a thoughtful message to a lost friend in “Lonely August.”

He learned to play guitar by practicing Nirvana’s “Come As You Are,” and it was then that he realized his given surname, Encomenderos, was a bit of a mouthful for the casual fan. In true rock star fashion, he shortened it to the catchier Enco. Since then, he has covered everything from Nirvana to Men at Work — and does it in a way that will have you humming old favorites on the drive home.

“My favorite audience consists of people who genuinely love music,” Enco says. “They are there for the live music and appreciate our style and originals.”

So, the next time you head out to a local bar and hear an impressive “cover band,” see if they have any original music they wouldn’t mind playing. I guarantee you, they won’t mind ... and you won’t regret it.

Enco’s follow-up CD, “Forces in this Place,” will be released this summer.


www.losmag.com
Issue 3, Volume 2 April 2006
Pg. 2 & 18 - Live of Stage Magazine


"Sometimes, there's nothing like an original"

By: Audra Hodges
One thing that bothers me about music gigs in this town, and many others, is that very few bands can get paid to play their own music. The fact of the matter is that bar crowds seem to hang around longer if they can sing along with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
or 3 Doors Down than with an original piece of music. It’s understandable, but kind of depressing. I like a good sing-along as much as the next girl, but I also love creativity, originality and talent. And South Florida has plenty to offer.

One such example is Justin Enco, who can be found in some of the more popular bars and clubs along the Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton and Delray Beach music scene.
“Original shows are my favorite,” Enco said, “just because it is still new and fresh to me, as opposed to cover gigs — I’ve played some covers hundreds to thousands of times.”

The first time I came across Enco, I was headed to see a “friend of a friend” who was playing a Dave Matthews cover show in Boca Raton. Imagine my surprise as I stood in the crowded Daniel O’Connell’s bar and it hit me that the music I was listening to sounded very much like Dave Matthews. Whether you’re a Dave fan or not, you must admit that, with the grit and tempo of the vocals plus the varying guitar strides, if you cover DMB well, you’re a pretty good musician.

Enco’s first CD, “Waiting For Yesterday,” offers a poetic, sometimes sad, but on the whole upbeat look at different aspects of life. There’s friendship in the track entitled “Random Thought” and a thoughtful message to a lost friend in “Lonely August.”

He learned to play guitar by practicing Nirvana’s “Come As You Are,” and it was then that he realized his given surname, Encomenderos, was a bit of a mouthful for the casual fan. In true rock star fashion, he shortened it to the catchier Enco. Since then, he has covered everything from Nirvana to Men at Work — and does it in a way that will have you humming old favorites on the drive home.

“My favorite audience consists of people who genuinely love music,” Enco says. “They are there for the live music and appreciate our style and originals.”

So, the next time you head out to a local bar and hear an impressive “cover band,” see if they have any original music they wouldn’t mind playing. I guarantee you, they won’t mind ... and you won’t regret it.

Enco’s follow-up CD, “Forces in this Place,” will be released this summer.


www.losmag.com
Issue 3, Volume 2 April 2006
Pg. 2 & 18 - Live of Stage Magazine


""Long Drive Home" Album Review"

At some point, most musicians have to decide if they have what it takes to pursue their love of music as a career and then back up that decision with the desire and determination to make something out of it. Long Drive Home is where Justin Enco ended up when he answered that question for himself. The first album for the Canadian born singer/songwriter, Long Drive Home is a perfect example of traditional acoustic indie rock.

From the first song, Forgiven, the jaunt begins with a beat that calls your body to move along with it. The trip continues with the windows down and the music loud for Counting Lifelinesand title track Long Drive Home. Both are nicely done songs with a good sound and a hint of country to them. Cross My Mind then comes along with a catchy chorus and cleverly written song that brings attention to the fact that a good songwriter can make a difference in the world simply by writing about how things can be, if given the chance.

The CD is half way home when Maybe We Should Have Known, slows it way down. As if the day has suddenly turned to night and the asphalt becomes dirt, this quiet change features a well placed piano melody. Another Side of Me and Destiny Hidden pick up the pace somewhat and showcase nicely written and blended songs. Not All the Time cuts in with a funky riff but gets a bit bumpy through awkward chorus transitions.

Silent Goodbyes is a beautiful predawn slow dance that leads you to the end of the journey with Courage Over Fear. The last track of Long Drive Home is a mellow theme song of perseverance. With lines like “Don’t worry about what you may have missed. Don’t hurry, we have time,” the CD arrives at its destination leaving the listener with something to think about.

Long Drive Home is a nice, consistent ride down a laidback road. There isn’t anything that really sticks out about this album but it is very nicely done. Good writing, strong vocals and pleasant arrangements make this the perfect background music for studying, shopping or getting it on. - Indie Music Report by Veronica Trent


""Long Drive Home" Album Review"

At some point, most musicians have to decide if they have what it takes to pursue their love of music as a career and then back up that decision with the desire and determination to make something out of it. Long Drive Home is where Justin Enco ended up when he answered that question for himself. The first album for the Canadian born singer/songwriter, Long Drive Home is a perfect example of traditional acoustic indie rock.

From the first song, Forgiven, the jaunt begins with a beat that calls your body to move along with it. The trip continues with the windows down and the music loud for Counting Lifelinesand title track Long Drive Home. Both are nicely done songs with a good sound and a hint of country to them. Cross My Mind then comes along with a catchy chorus and cleverly written song that brings attention to the fact that a good songwriter can make a difference in the world simply by writing about how things can be, if given the chance.

The CD is half way home when Maybe We Should Have Known, slows it way down. As if the day has suddenly turned to night and the asphalt becomes dirt, this quiet change features a well placed piano melody. Another Side of Me and Destiny Hidden pick up the pace somewhat and showcase nicely written and blended songs. Not All the Time cuts in with a funky riff but gets a bit bumpy through awkward chorus transitions.

Silent Goodbyes is a beautiful predawn slow dance that leads you to the end of the journey with Courage Over Fear. The last track of Long Drive Home is a mellow theme song of perseverance. With lines like “Don’t worry about what you may have missed. Don’t hurry, we have time,” the CD arrives at its destination leaving the listener with something to think about.

Long Drive Home is a nice, consistent ride down a laidback road. There isn’t anything that really sticks out about this album but it is very nicely done. Good writing, strong vocals and pleasant arrangements make this the perfect background music for studying, shopping or getting it on. - Indie Music Report by Veronica Trent


"Local Musican Astounds Fans at Bull Bar"

Written by: Andre Rosario
South Florida Lifestyle & Entertainment News

Released June 14, 2006: Boca Times, West Boca Times, Delray Times, Coral Springs Forum.


Twenty-something musician Justin Enco has a faint air of disenchantment as I meet him outside the entrance to Delray Beach's Bull Bar at 2. E. Atlantic Ave.

Soon though, his broad, pretty-boy grin is backing him up as he tells me about his musical career, spanning five years professionally and stemming back further to his days in his native Toronto.

That's when I realize this is a man who truly loves what he does. He's just gotten over a months-long bout with bronchitis and a lung infection, both garnered from many nights spent crooning inside smoke-filled hangouts like the one we're about to enter.

Yet just before going on stage he tells me, again with a grin, "I love this place. There'd have to be some serious incentive for me to leave it," perhaps half-hoping for that Big Incentive to come along.

As I walk into The Bull, I look back and notice there's a giant marlin perched atop the door, his mouth agape. I think for a second it should be called 'The Fish' instead. Seriously, this place looks like it was decorated by Ernest Hemmingway: dead fish mounted as trophies all over the walls, heavy-duty fishing poles above the bar, large bottles of red wine in the back and even vintage tourism posters for Cuba in the john. It's dimly lit and cool from the leafy fans spinning constantly above, so maybe it represents Hemmingway in his darker, depressive days.

The crowd's definitely not the college bunch that Enco laments, loud party-goers who only drunkenly request the same John Mayer and 3 Doors Down covers. This group is more laid-back, in the 25-to-35 year-old range, couples mostly. Half of them are engaged in the semi-animated conversation at the bar, the other half waiting patiently at the bar's side tables and in lounge chairs for Enco to start up.

That is until the game starts. Tonight Justin has major competition: game one of the NBA Finals, and judging from the way every set of male eyes (and most women's too) gravitate toward the bar's two TVs (opposite Justin's tiny stage) at 9 p.m., there are more than a few Heat fans in attendance.

Undaunted, Justin begins his set a few minutes into the game with a simple introduction: "Hi, my name is Justin Enco." From there he launches into an emotive original tune, strumming with his eyes closed. Pretty soon we hear a raucous "You're the man! Come on! Who's better than you!"

I look up and see that the rowdy bartender is staring affectionately not at Shaq but at Enco. That's Rod Haste, and seems to be Enco's most ardent supporter, though by no means his only one. "He's got talent" Rod tells me convincingly of Enco. He also informs me that Enco is the only one to get two nights a week performing at this, the busiest bar on the crawling Delray Strip. He is also the establishment's longest-running performer, with a steady gig there for over two years. "He keeps'em coming'." With the right label backing him, Enco could make it big, Rod says. "He's got the voice of Dave Matthews."

On stage, Enco gradually earns the respect of most newcomers and justifies the support of the regulars, steadily pumping out a mix of astonishingly catchy original tunes and living, breathing renditions of modern rock standards by the likes of Oasis, Counting Crows and Pearl Jam. He's got a repertoire of 25 originals and over three hundred covers, so theres room to choose.

Sometimes he delves into classic rockers by Led Zeppelin and at one point does rare justice to the Beatles' "Blackbird." He plays a very convincing John Mayer tune and has a quirky penchant for throwing in some Bob Marley in mid-tune which he plays not with an annoying faux-Jamaican accent, but in his own stunning way. Enco says he prefers to stick to the modern rock idiom but proves he's got remarkable versatility.

Enco plays by ear-in both senses. He tells me he's just taught himself Radiohead's "Karma Police" but says "I don't know if I've got the ending right, since I don't have the CD." He simply puts it together from the various times he's heard the song in his life.

He goes on stage every night without a set list, preferring to wing it because "improv is the only way to keep it interesting." For four hours barring a few breaks-he plays without ever becoming uninteresting.

While for the moment Enco plays solo or as a duo with a percussionist or a keyboardist, he enjoys the chemistry of a band and has plans to record what will be his second album that way by the year's end. He keeps busy, with gigs five nights a week at The Bull Bar in Delray, 4140 Bar & Grille, The Original Fat Cat's, and Sloppy Joe's, all in the Fort Lauderdale area. His first CD, a solo outing is titled "Waiting For Yesterday." You can find out where and when to catch him at his Web site, www.justinenco.com. - Times 2-Forum


Discography

Waiting For Yesterday-2004
Long Drive Home-July 2008
Mirrors EP- 2014 Release

Photos

Bio

An open-mic night appearance in Boca Raton, FL turned into a career for this Toronto, Canada native. Music was originally Enco's scape-goat to get out of the real world-but developed quickly into an unforeseen passion.

Since 2002, Enco has played over 2000 showcases & local shows in his musical career. "Waiting For Yesterday", Enco's debut solo album was released in 2004 to a good local following. Enco's follow-up release Long Drive Home was released in July 2008 & exclusively distributed through Barnes & Noble Stores.

Previously signed by an Indie label under the Interscope family, Enco currently has his original music featured in regular rotation on XM/Sirius Satellite Radio on The Coffee House.

Enco fronted the cover band "Ghosts Of Vegas" (2006-2007), WPBF's Best Band of Palm Beach County 2007. The Justin Enco Band (since 2008) is one of the most creative, innovative, cover bands on the South Florida circuit. "JEB" can be found at the most premier venues in the area, in addition regularly plays private parties, weddings, happy hours & corporate events.

Justin is available to play solo acoustic (guitar & vocals) wedding cocktail hours, private events, corporate functions, and happy hours!

For any booking inquiries please contact:
justinenco@yahoo.com*

Band Members