Keaton Collective
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Keaton Collective

Seattle, Washington, United States | SELF

Seattle, Washington, United States | SELF
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Visit the website for the Bellingham, Wash., band Keaton Collective and you quickly get a glimpse of what it’s like trying to make your way playing music these days.

Below a photo of these six fellas rocking out for some fresh-faced music fans is a laundry list of links to the band’s other web presences: a blog, Bandcamp, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, YouTube ... wait, there’s more ... Reverbnation, DeliRadio, Soundcloud and Sonic Bids.

In 2012, it’s not about hearing yourself on the radio or getting on the cover of Rolling Stone, though both of those are helpful. No, the first thing you do as a band in 2012 is put your music in as many online spots as possible, hopefully reaching a few ears for your trouble.

The funny thing is that Keaton Collective’s most likeable quality — its music — is old-fashioned by comparison. This is pure, rootsy rock ‘n’ roll draped in catchy melodies and a scruffy aesthetic, and Keaton Collective is a traditional Americana band that occasionally gives its songs over to the pulse of modern indie-pop.

During one spin through the band’s 2012 album “Tercera," they reminded me of Uncle Tupelo and Wilco, Gin Blossoms, the mellow side of The Replacements, The War on Drugs (the band, not the actual war), Yo La Tengo and the old Twin Cities twang-pop band The Honeydogs.

The common thread there? Guitars. Melody. And cool, easygoing vibe. The kind of stuff that does quite well with or without the Internet’s “help," thank you very much. - Bend Bulletin


Another buzzworthy Bellingham band to play Summer Meltdown this weekend is Keaton Collective. With songs like “Fallin Asleep” and “End Of Times” from their 2012 release Tercera, this band adds a country tint on their rock and roll. KC fuses together the best parts of a handful of popular genres and the result are songs that are exciting to listen to, with surprises from the drums and harmonies that might catch you off guard over how much you like them. They leave you guessing – will this song have a banjo or an electric guitar? Will the vocals be a shock to the system, or you hear a mellow storyteller? This band is heavy Sunday morning music, and will wake up festivalgoers better than the strongest French Press. - SSG Music


Battleme is incredibly complimented by one of my favorite Bellingham bands, Keaton Collective. This band is the best and most polished I’ve ever heard them sound. Keaton’s most recent release Tercera is the best thing they’ve ever put out- they’ve always had a great feel to their records, but this release from start to finish defines everything a new listener would need to know about the guys. Have you heard “Fallin Asleep” yet? It’s one of the best songs they’ve ever written, and will keep you pressing repeat over and over. Pro-tip: make a playlist with it and only it and press “repeat.” Keaton is able to produce a record that has undeniable rock undertones, but is at the same time sort of mellow. I’m not sure how they came up with it, but they’re just perfect. Enjoy one of the PNW’s best kept secrets, and one of Battleme’s openers on Thursday night. - SSG Music


Every Monday through Friday, we deliver a different song as part our Song of the Day podcast subscription. This podcast features exclusive KEXP in-studio performances, unreleased songs, and recordings from independent artists that our DJs think you should hear. Each and every Friday we offer songs by local artists. Today’s song, featured on the Afternoon Show with Kevin Cole, is “Fallin’ Asleep” by Keaton Collective from the 2012 self-released album Tercera.

Keaton Collective - Fallin’ Asleep (MP3)
Now on their third self-produced full-length album, the Bellingham, Washington, group has blossomed from the initial unity of three separate bands that decided to stop traveling so damn much. Actually, Keaton Collective was and is a label, but the resulting band is a combination of Bellinghamites Chad Fox (guitar) and Bill Jennings (bass) who teamed up with Californians Alex Jones (guitar), Adam Taniguchi (guitar), J.D. Ucls (drums), and Ricky Penalba (drums). Previously, they all had separate projects -- among them, Braille Tapes, Young/Lost Ones, and Williams Jennings -- but now all bandmates live in the Northwest, perform together and adopt songs from group to group to create intricately strummed guitar rock with vocal harmonies that can carry you away. With the members’ varied backgrounds, the band can sound like Pavement one moment and Neil Young & Crazy Horse the next. Today’s featured song, “Fallin’ Asleep,” begins with a mellow, rootsy vibe but then kicks into a full-on guitar jam.

You can catch them for yourself on May 8th at the Tractor Tavern in Ballard, or at several shows in Bellingham -- check out their website for tour dates and to sample more music. For now, check out the video for today’s featured song:
- KEXP


Last week, I wrote about the best bands from Bellingham, listing ten favorites well worth a listen. But one thing kept coming up in the comments: "You forgot Keaton Collective," first wrote Austin Santiago, talent buyer at Bellingham venue the Wild Buffalo, a sentiment which was then repeated several times, as well as in a few emails I received after publication. In fact, Hunter Motto, the longtime Bellingham talent buyer I talked to who now works at the Crocodile, did include them in his list of favorites. But due to the convenience of naming ten bands, I foolishly left them out of the final story.
Well, it has been brought to my attention that they're playing tonight at the Tractor with Portland's AgesandAges, and according to everyone in Bellingham, it would be well worth your while to check them out. "[They] run the gamut from alt-country to indie rock to pop rock and back," Motto says, while Brent Cole, editor of Bellingham's music magazine What's Up!, noted in an email that they've won best live band at What's Up!'s awards show. Last month, their song "Fallin' Asleep" was one of KEXP's songs of the day. "They work their asses off and are a damn good band because of it," Cole says.

Listen to their most recent album, Tercera, after the jump, and see you tonight at the Tractor. Tickets here. - Seattle Weekly


The Wash is the first album released by band The Keaton Collective, featuring vocals and guitar by Chad Fox of The Braille Tapes, Adam Tanaguchi on guitar, J.D. Uhls on drums/vocals, Rey Corpuz on bass, William Jennings on stand-up bass/vocals, Alex Jones does back-up vocals, and finally Ricky Penalba on percussion/vocals.

I can safely say that this album is a great homage to the best late 90's post-punk bands, its guitar arrangements reminiscent of Sunny Day Real Estate and At The Drive-In. The instrumentation is lush and vibrant, complimenting its catchy pop choruses while still being mature and self-aware.

It’s a gorgeously arranged album with complimentary harmonies in the choruses and great instrumentation on the part of its band members. There’s nothing better than having a local band with such major hit-appeal and charm.

The album was recorded and mixed by Ricky Penalba. It was mastered at Bayside Recording by Paul Turpin.

Self Released - Whats Up! Magazine


Bellingham’s indie-rock fixture, Keaton Collective, have released their third album, which sounds like a great, cohesive romp.

Rather than writing drastically different styles for every track, Keaton Collective’s range is really shown within each song.

While the album does vary, it never strays far from being guitar-driven, with strong vocals. The vocalist is aware of his range and doesn’t try to leave his comfort zone, which is a plus because he really hones in on a voice that other frontmen probably wish they could attain. It’s a balance between just-woke-up and honest sincerity. The musicianship is also extremely solid due to obvious cohesion from the band.

“You Want To Battle? Tree” shows Keaton Collective’s ability to move from a typical love song to an amazing breakdown at the very end. “1800 Pounds Of Fur and Thunder,” is another track that showcases their talents. It develops into sweltering groove, with the guitar sounding especially heavy, while the vocalist soulfully sings above the intensity.

The songs on Tercera sometimes sound similar because the songs are unified by their tonality but that doesn’t render them boring, just clearly part of the same album. There are also small hints of country-rock in songs like “Far As We Can Tell” and “End of Times II,” which are welcomed since they give the album more dimensions. These songs are impressively executed and seem like they can only be enhanced through live performance.

By the third album, many bands have established a vehicle for their music but this album sound like Keaton Collective have been together for decades.

Self Released
For more, visit keatoncollective.org - Whats Up! Magazine


Today we’re talking about my continued love affair with Bellingham-based alt.-rockers Keaton Collective. As I’ve mentioned several times before, this six-piece impressed me with their incredible talent and endless passion for making quality music. Their third full-length, TERCERA, continues this trend.


Like their previous releases, TERCERA is loaded with a great mix of mid- to up-tempo rock and roll that’s perfect for a long road trip or a late night of dancing. But what strikes me most about this album is the band’s growth: their sound is tighter and more refined, and the production is the cleanest it’s ever been. Yet the grittiness of their recordings (which I absolutely love) remains.

I’ve been listening to the track “You Wanna Battle? Tree” for just over a month (nomnomnom), but the new standouts would have to be “Fallin’ Asleep,” (video HERE) “On A Scale From One To Dank (1564),” and “Far As We Can Tell” – all of which introduce bluegrass influences I haven’t heard from the band before (NOTE: if you can play banjo or standup bass, you’ve got my heart).

Keaton Collective didn’t make the Coachella bill this year, but rumor has it (as in, they told me) they’ll will be stopping by the festival. Here’s hoping I can convince them to play some jams Jeff Goldblum-style. Haha! - Almost Famous


The story of Keaton Collective is a beautiful one. Three years ago, four of the six members moved from southern California to live and make music in Bellingham. The result has been a collaborative process producing three solid records that blend rock, folk and country. And the story continues to get sweeter.

Tercera, the band’s latest release (celebrated Nov. 30 at The Skakedown, and will be digitally released on New Year’s Day), is a collection of songs written by Alex Jones. He describes the new songs as a combination of his own country and rock, while trying to explore new sounds and genres the band has yet to touch on.

Keaton Collective’s 2010 release, Time and Pressure, was mostly songs written by bassist Bill Jennings. “There’s a lot of songwriting going on all of the time,” says Jones. “We have a backlog of songs we’re working with, and Bill’s songs were the one’s that were ready to go when it came time (to record Time and Pressure).”

Jones went on to describe the writing process as communist in many ways. There is a natural order. Each record is representative of one band member’s songs and style, taking turns and sharing the reigns for the vision and music of Keaton Collective. “The next record will likely be Chad’s (Fox, guitarist) songs, but who knows. Things are getting more and more collaborative,” says Jones. Which is also a plus during their live shows, when several members are able to share the spotlight as lead vocalist for different songs.

Drummer Ricky Penalba is also the band’s audio engineer who Jones says has produced their finest sounding record to date. For fans of Keaton Collective’s current catalogue, fear not; the high energy and quality songwriting continues on Tercera. “I think it’s similar to the previous recordings, but we’ve worked hard to build on what we’ve done and improve,” says Jones.

The band places a great deal of emphasis on adding visual elements to their music, creating several music videos of the last few years. They are releasing a music video for the song, “Falling Asleep,” which Jones describes as a party video. “It was great,” he says. “We had a ton of our friends come out, and it felt like a real party while we were filming.” He adds that it’s just another element to the music that they continue to perfect, and are always trying to improve. They want to reach people however they can. “If someone sees a video on youtube, that’s great to have another person who’s hearing our music.”

The band is also excited to share their music live in the coming months. They are planning several release shows in late January and February, and hoping to tour shortly thereafter. “We’re still trying to buy a new van that will hold up on the road,” jokes Jones. After sinking a considerable amount of money into their last van, they’re looking for reliable transportation this time around. “We’re really proud of this record and can’t wait for others to hear it.”

See Keaton Collective perform at the Cabin Tavern on Dec. 10, with Fox and the Law and Out on the Streets. For more information, visit keatoncollective.org/ - Whats Up! Magazine


The Keaton Collective’s tenure as Bellingham’s folk-rock sweethearts has been marked by a progressive and community-based work ethic, leading to the band’s third and finest release to date. Time and Pressure is solid from start to finish, crossing genres and musical boundaries. It could touch the hearts of Hank Williams devotees and indie-rock lovers alike.

The album begins with “Robin’s Nest,” teeming with great harmonies and twangy guitar licks throughout, with a quick tempo and energetic vocals and the unmistakable yell of Chad Fox echoing lead vocal lines. The band slows things down a bit on the mid-tempo second track, “Where Wind is Born,” which is less country and more rock. It is impossible to listen to this song without nodding your head and stomping your boots, with more reverb and grimy sounds of the lead guitar.

Track three, “Momma”, is a down tempo and heartbreaking. There are accents of quick mandolin strumming and powerful yet soulful vocals that resemble the solo work of Thrice singer/guitarist Dustin Kensrue. The lyrics are clever and striking, describing “Carlo Rossi and gum disease,” and a “litter of drowned kittens in a burlap sack.”

“Shame on You, Shame on Me” is classic country without the ten-gallon hat and bolo ties. The harmonies continue to sooth while the drummer uses brushes to scale back the energy. “Hilltop Saloon” brings the drums back in loud and strong, and although I’m not sure where the Hilltop Saloon is, I am pretty sure we would all have a damn good time there.

My favorite song on this record is “From Trunk to Tale,” with brushes, smooth acoustic guitar and keys. It is a haunting and depressing dirge of a badly battered and abducted woman stuffed in the trunk of a ’68 Ford. One of the shortest songs on the album, it is the one that leaves the strongest impression.

The next track is the quick and inspiring “Don’t Rest Your Weary Head,” followed by “Plastic Jesus” with guest vocals by Cara Alboucq and a gorgeous string section. “Burn it Start Over” sounds as if it were written for Nashville and the stage of the Grand Ole Opry. The final song on is “Sugar and Honey” with the ever-present and always stirring harmonies. It is certainly not the finest song on the album, but is saved by the lightening sounds of xylophone and the end with an acapella hand-clapping-foot-stomping and lively two part vocal harmonies.

The future is bright for The Keaton Collective, and Time and Pressure is a must have for lovers of folk-rock and alternative country. - Whats Up Magazine


The Keaton Collective are Alex Jones (guitar), Adam Taniguchi (guitar), J.D. Ucls (drums), Chad Fox (guitar), Bill Jennings (bass) and Ricky Penalba (drums, engineer) and it should be noted that all six members write songs, and with the exception of Adam (who simply rocks too hard to sing), everyone else sings vocals. With this variety of talent, the KC doesn’t just have one sound, in a word the music can be described as “diverse”since it ranges from rock ‘n’ roll to folk/country to dance music.

When discussing how they handle songs between the three main singers in the band, Alex replies, “We can play whoever’s song we want at that moment.” JD adds, “and rock, paper, scissors helps.” Each member has a different sound and it makes for an interesting (if not long) band practice hearing what everyone has to offer. As Bill puts it, “Anything anybody brings to the table is going to be worth playing.”

To sum up how Keaton Collective came to be, Chad and Bill (the native Bellinghamsters) met Adam, J.D. and Alex in 2004 while touring California and over the years they stayed in touch, playing back and forth while maintaining their other bands (The Braille Tapes, young/lost ones and Polar State, to name a few). Adam suggested one big band that would cover the whole group of friends’ material. Adam, Alex, J.D. and Ricky moved here in April and now the members not only live in the same town, but in a house together.

“The album is migratory, it made the journey as well….half was made in California and the other half was made in Washington,” Chad says. The name Keaton Collective was chosen because they had already released albums from their bands through that name so it made the most sense to turn the collective idea into a band as well as a label. Alex (aka DJ Jazzy Jones) tells me his inspiration for the name came from the family featured in the 80's sitcom “Family Ties.” Keaton Collective have been hard at work practicing, touring, recording and generally depriving themselves of sleep. “Everything always gets done” Bill says. Chad backs up, “It is a big sacrifice, we are broke and tired a lot but we want to be a working, touring band.”

The KC already have a full length album titled The Wash and an EP called El Segundo which is a perfect example of their variety of sound in just four tracks. The album they are focused on right now is The Wash, which is out already and will be available for purchase online shortly. There will be new recordings in the coming months and years, you can imagine the backlog of songs that have yet to be recorded.

They have already played a handful of venues in Bellingham since April, including at The Green Frog Acoustic Tavern, The Underground Coffeehouse and The Wild Buffalo.

Taking from a Polar State lyric “We’ve been friends for a long time”, no doubt it will be a long time to come.

Catch Keaton Collective on August 5 at the Rogue Hero with Rooftops. For more about the band, visit their MySpace
- Whats Up Magazine


I've been banging on about Keaton Collective (formerly Young/Lost Ones) for a few years now, but I am still waiting for the rest of the world to wake up and listen. The formerly SoCal-based (now in Bellingham, WA) band, led by Alex Jones, produces music at will, recording and releasing music once an idea as finished percolating. It has led to a string of official and internet only releases that is the new generation of Americana. Jones has the skill and voice to give Tom Petty a run for his money, but everyone just needs to wake up and pay attention.

These guys are still the country's best unsigned band - catch them on tour throughout October and November.

SAT OCT 10 GROUND ZERO BELLEVUE WA
W/ KAY KAY AND HIS WEATHERED UNDERGROUND
THU OCT 15 WHAAM BELLINGHAM WA
W/ FINN RIGGINS, ROOFTOPS & COUNCIL OF LIONS
FRI OCT 16 CAFE VENUS/MARS BAR SEATTLE WA
W/ BRYN LUMSDEN
SAT OCT 17 CATERINA WINERY SPOKANE WA
SUN OCT 18 LIQUID LYRICS LA GRANDE OR
W/ AT LAST AN ATLAS FROM IRELAND
MON OCT 19 HIJINX BOISE ID
TUE OCT 20 THE DEERHUNTER PUB SPANISH FORK UT
WED OCT 21 YELLOW SNOW ICE PARK CITY UT
THU OCT 22 LIONS LAIR DENVER CO
FRI OCT 23 SHWERVERS BAR DENVER CO
SAT OCT 24 ATOMIC CANTINA ALBUQUERUE NM
SUN OCT 25 EQUINOX LAS CRUCES NM
W/ DANIEL MORIN, JUSTIN MCDOWELL
MON OCT 26 THE SAIL INN TEMPE AZ
TUE OCT 27 RUBY ROOM PHOENIX AZ
WED OCT 28 BLUE CAFE HUNTINGTON BEACH CA
W/ SHAPE OF THE EARTH, DYING IN DIGITAL, POCKET ROCKET
THU OCT 29 GUITAR MERCHANT CANOGA PARK CA
FRI OCT 30 URBAN OUTFITTERS VENTURA CA
AFTERNOON SHOW
FRI OCT 30 JECKYLL N HYDE'S (HALLOWEEN PARTY 1) MOORPARK CA
SAT OCT 31 HALLOWEEN PARTY 2 SIMI VALLEY CA
MON NOV 02 BILLY OS VENTURA CA
W/ FRANKLIN FOR SHORT
TUE NOV 03 STORK CLUB OAKLAND CA
W/ DIRTY BOOTS
WED NOV 04 KIMOS SAN FRANCISCO CA
W/ DIRTY BOOTS
FRI NOV 06 CREPE PLACE SANTA CRUZ CA
W/ JOHN CRAIGIE, EMILY MOLDY
TUE NOV 10 MISSISSIPPI PIZZA PORTLAND OR
WED NOV 11 HIGH DIVE SEATTLE
SAT NOV 14 THE ROGUE HERO HOME FROM TOUR SHOW BELLINGHAM WA - Stranded In Stereo


Keaton Collective

Keaton Collective

A pair of boots found in the woods buried under some dead, dried-out wildflowers. This image is at the center of the new album from indie-rock-mad-scientists the Keaton Collective. In fact, it will probably wind up being the cover art for the album or maybe a sticker or t shirt design. Wherever this image manifests, it resonates with the same invitation in the band’s new music, an invitation to come drink with us. We have moonshine and we’re thirsty.

I wasn’t expecting to find boots. Or wildflowers for that matter. The internet gave the misleading impression that this band was not so much a band but rather a revolving vagabond jukebox effecting different styles. But their story is much more complicated. Band members Chad Fox, Alex Jones and William Jennings sat down with me in their music bungalow to discuss the band’s history and offer a sneak peek at their new album Time & Pressure.

The name Keaton Collective functioned as an umbrella under which to record. The record label enabled its members to release their own music. “We realized we don’t have any money. To get anything done, we all knew we had to do it ourselves,” said Jennings.

This self-fulfilling attitude attracted a cadre of friends and musicians along the I-5 corridor, eventually forming a roster that included The Braille Tapes, Los Olvidados, and Autumn Poetry. Bellingham’s Fox and Jennings met the other musicians from southern California through mutual tours. They began playing together, functionally not unlike a Sunday flea market: wildly trading shows, music, ideas, and room to crash when touring.

“We’ll always try to put up a band. We know what it’s like. It’s such a good feeling to be welcome on a stranger’s floor,” said Jennings. Fox, for example, visited label mates in Santa Cruz for a month where he recorded much of the first Keaton Collective full length.

In April 2009, as bands on the label morphed and moved on, the decision was made to consolidate efforts. Like so many relationships hitting the half-decade mark, the band members decided to put an end to the long distance relationship and move closer. Seriously closer. Cross state-lines. They decided to move into a house together.

While this may sound like some bands’ worst nightmares, the move allowed band members to practice and record more freely.

“We sacrificed the California sunshine and light beaming down for this. We’d much rather play music,” said Jones. The new incarnation of the Keaton Collective–no longer a record label but a live-in super-band–is a collaborative effort from members of all previous recording projects. The band consists of six core members and a number of fill-in musicians including Bellingham chanteuse Cara Alboucq. “That’s the collective idea. We do almost everything ourselves,” Jones added.

The band has a hand in it all; drummer Ricky Penalba records and mixes the music, they all help press the CDs and packaging (with a conceptual bent towards card-board sleeves and not jewel cases), screen print merchandise, and book tour dates.

They are an undeniably prolific bunch and with the number of videos, songs, and releases that are completed, planned, or in the works, it seems like they are going to be around for awhile. A quick count shows that the label has released almost nine albums. What you can find on the internet is Keaton Collective related projects from before 2009 including the band’s first EP, El Segundo, and a full-length, The Wash. El Segundo’s sound is half-embracing folk rock with supplemental Lynyrd Skynrd and mandolin while The Wash focuses on Fox and band member Adam Taniguchi’s musical past with disenchanted melodies, distorted guitar, and howls reminiscent of Waxwing-era Rocky Votolato.

So, what exactly is the band doing now? They are working on an epic song cycle that will see re-recordings of much of their back catalogue (made real by an actual checklist). The latest on the hit list is the boots/wildflower double-disk of new and previously laid William Jennings’s songs called Time & Pressure. A majority of the album was recorded on a five-day beer drinking, gun shooting retreat up in the hills of Acme. The preview the band offered included “From Trunk to Tale” (swampy, pop harmonies) and “Robin’s Nest” (gruff, whiskey-drenched, oak barrels with hip-thrusting classic rock nuances).

When Jennings described his own sonic palette, he referenced both Joe Cocker and Iron & Wine. I saw Joe Cocker’s gritty re-devised covers as a surprisingly good comparison, as if Jennings was covering and taking new stock of his older material. Of the other influence he explained, “Actually when I listen to too much, I worry I’ll just write a bad Iron & Wine song.” But this album veers away from the conservative, dude-and-guitar recordings of Sam Beam towards a sound akin to Iron & Wine’s jammy, experimental, re-interpretive, live show.

The band will follow this with an album yet-untitled-informally-know-as-Alex’s-record. Then, they will kick of a two-week tour with a free show at Maritime Heritage Park on July 17 at 6 p.m. This well wishing sendoff will hopefully curb past tour misfortune, mostly tainted by multiple, expensive van troubles that began on the first day of that tour. “We got to Fairhaven. We got right out of town and it died.”

Barring any more troubles, they should return in time to share with us the two new music videos they’ve produced, that are currently either not on the internet or ungooglable. Both videos reveal the fruits of their collaborative efforts. They are polished and interesting and remarkable for local no-budget videos. One is a haunting, fuzzed-out cover of “Plastic Jesus” and the other is the waspy, indie rock “Be A Mess” from The Wash debut. Bands take note: making friends with filmmakers is invaluable.

What they are doing is something commendable. They are creating an amalgamation of their collective pasts and putting out records in order to make strides towards more cohesive new material. They are taking the cream of all their crops and playing these songs live. They are experimenting, not for the sake of, but because they are genuinely interested in the music, the boots, and the wildflowers.

Catch Keaton Collective July 17 at Maritime Heritage Park. Catch the band at myspace.com/keatoncollective.

-Hunter Motto
- Whats Up Magazine


Discography

Time and Pressure

http://keatonco.bandcamp.com/album/time-pressure

The Wash

http://keatonco.bandcamp.com/album/the-wash

Tercera

http://keatonco.bandcamp.com/album/tercera

Photos

Bio

Keaton Collective is a band that brings new life to rock and roll, country and dance music. Energized by their connections on previous tours in former bands, the musicians of Keaton Collective are a product of what was originally a DIY label consisting of three bands. From the start they've produced their own albums and set out to create something new. Their three self released albums and one EP showcase a great diversity in harmonies, melodies and instrumentation across the spectrum of rock and roll. In the past few years they were named "Best Live Band" by What's Up! Magazine Readers in 2010, played the Summer Meltdown Festival and shared the stage with bands like Cursive, The Head & The Heart, Tokyo Police Club, Los Campesinos!, Pickwick, Marcy Playground, Kay Kay and His Weathered Underground, The Jezabels, Battleme and Bedouin Soundclash.