Kill the Reflection
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Kill the Reflection

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States | SELF

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States | SELF
Band Alternative Rock

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Oklahoma City’s Kill the Reflection has come a long way.

What began as a trip-hop group in 1999 has morphed into a post-punk band that does moody with the best of them. Heavily indebted to Joy Division and Interpol — yet inspired by acts as varied as Deftones, Iggy Pop and Sade — Kill the Reflection has become a potent concoction of genres, ideas and feelings alike.

“Mainly, we want to take all the things that we have trapped inside our heads and our hearts, and throw them into a meat grinder and condense them into this edible mixture that satisfies your appetite and your mind, in hopes that your ears will enjoy it, too,” singer and guitarist Morgan Routt said. “We don’t want a burger named after us … but a beer would be nice.”

If there’s anything tying it all together, it’s a certain darkness and emotional weight that KTR sums up perfectly with its tagline: “Music for broken people.”

“This band and its music, to us, is medicine,” Routt said. “It’s comfort music as much as it is anger management. ‘Broken people’ does not necessarily mean you’re broken, but rather, you might understand the tale of a broken person best, having lived it at one time.”

It’s something that Routt relates to, as do drummer Christopher Stevens and bassist Mark Martinez.

“Having been blanketed in music since birth, when no one else was around, the music was always there as an escape,” Routt said. “Getting so lost in music as a kid and not wanting to come back … music is so therapeutic.”

He’s heard more than a few people mention how Kill the Reflection has helped them through a rough time in some fashion; he couldn’t hope for more.

“Our proudest moments would be all the feedback we have received about how a certain song is perfect for someone’s situation or past,” he said. “It pleases us the most when we look out into the crowd and see them singing along. It means they really do share something with these songs.”

Following up its debut release last year, KTR is prepping an EP for early 2013 whose songs represent only minor changes to the formula; the band knows not to try fixing what isn’t broken.

“These songs seem to explode in just the right spots and have a swampy dark feel to them, some with a more upbeat tone,” Routt said. “It is still a baby and is growing, but we want it to take you to a dimension of awe.” - Joshua Boydston, Oklahoma Gazette


Oklahoma City’s Kill the Reflection has come a long way.

What began as a trip-hop group in 1999 has morphed into a post-punk band that does moody with the best of them. Heavily indebted to Joy Division and Interpol — yet inspired by acts as varied as Deftones, Iggy Pop and Sade — Kill the Reflection has become a potent concoction of genres, ideas and feelings alike.

“Mainly, we want to take all the things that we have trapped inside our heads and our hearts, and throw them into a meat grinder and condense them into this edible mixture that satisfies your appetite and your mind, in hopes that your ears will enjoy it, too,” singer and guitarist Morgan Routt said. “We don’t want a burger named after us … but a beer would be nice.”

If there’s anything tying it all together, it’s a certain darkness and emotional weight that KTR sums up perfectly with its tagline: “Music for broken people.”

“This band and its music, to us, is medicine,” Routt said. “It’s comfort music as much as it is anger management. ‘Broken people’ does not necessarily mean you’re broken, but rather, you might understand the tale of a broken person best, having lived it at one time.”

It’s something that Routt relates to, as do drummer Christopher Stevens and bassist Mark Martinez.

“Having been blanketed in music since birth, when no one else was around, the music was always there as an escape,” Routt said. “Getting so lost in music as a kid and not wanting to come back … music is so therapeutic.”

He’s heard more than a few people mention how Kill the Reflection has helped them through a rough time in some fashion; he couldn’t hope for more.

“Our proudest moments would be all the feedback we have received about how a certain song is perfect for someone’s situation or past,” he said. “It pleases us the most when we look out into the crowd and see them singing along. It means they really do share something with these songs.”

Following up its debut release last year, KTR is prepping an EP for early 2013 whose songs represent only minor changes to the formula; the band knows not to try fixing what isn’t broken.

“These songs seem to explode in just the right spots and have a swampy dark feel to them, some with a more upbeat tone,” Routt said. “It is still a baby and is growing, but we want it to take you to a dimension of awe.” - Joshua Boydston, Oklahoma Gazette


Kill the Reflection frontman Morgan Routt took time out after the band’s recent shows at the HiLo Club, Blue Note Lounge and the city of Guthrie’s Zombie Bolt 5K to answer some questions. Here are his answers, plus pictures from ktr’s mid-October show at the HiLo, where they headlined following Psychic Milk and Kali Ra. - Chris J. Zähller, Murcury Photo Bureau


Kill the Reflection frontman Morgan Routt took time out after the band’s recent shows at the HiLo Club, Blue Note Lounge and the city of Guthrie’s Zombie Bolt 5K to answer some questions. Here are his answers, plus pictures from ktr’s mid-October show at the HiLo, where they headlined following Psychic Milk and Kali Ra. - Chris J. Zähller, Murcury Photo Bureau


Somewhere between Depth & Current’s thematic explorations of living in a broken world and Broncho’s uptempo pop-punk resides Oklahoma City trio Kill the Reflection, minus the two previous bands’ shoegaze and pop.

Unlike Depth & Current’s last-sane-man-on-Earth narrators, however, the characters residing in Kill the Reflection’s second full-length, “Together ... Apart ... ,” are just as fractured and disjointed as their environments.

With “No Love at All,” we have such a song that opens with a bit of dour note-picking straight out of the Nirvana textbook. Singer Morgan Routt then steps up and does all right to capture the really, really sucky feeling that comes when you’re still very much in love with somebody you’ve wronged and how you find yourself trying to measure back up to the way things once were.

The disc’s definitely comfortable in the realm of lyrically driven post-punk that favors mid-tempos over speed, and straightforwardness above all else. Across 12 songs, the formula gets a little repetitive and lacks a big climax, but there’s an odd, trip-hoppy leftover tacked on to the end, a song called “Damage Inside My Head.” The off-kilter beat would’ve mixed things up nicely somewhere in the middle of the record.

You can buy “Together ... Apart ...” at the band’s website, killthereflection.com. —Matt Carney - Matt Carney, Oklahoma Gazette


Somewhere between Depth & Current’s thematic explorations of living in a broken world and Broncho’s uptempo pop-punk resides Oklahoma City trio Kill the Reflection, minus the two previous bands’ shoegaze and pop.

Unlike Depth & Current’s last-sane-man-on-Earth narrators, however, the characters residing in Kill the Reflection’s second full-length, “Together ... Apart ... ,” are just as fractured and disjointed as their environments.

With “No Love at All,” we have such a song that opens with a bit of dour note-picking straight out of the Nirvana textbook. Singer Morgan Routt then steps up and does all right to capture the really, really sucky feeling that comes when you’re still very much in love with somebody you’ve wronged and how you find yourself trying to measure back up to the way things once were.

The disc’s definitely comfortable in the realm of lyrically driven post-punk that favors mid-tempos over speed, and straightforwardness above all else. Across 12 songs, the formula gets a little repetitive and lacks a big climax, but there’s an odd, trip-hoppy leftover tacked on to the end, a song called “Damage Inside My Head.” The off-kilter beat would’ve mixed things up nicely somewhere in the middle of the record.

You can buy “Together ... Apart ...” at the band’s website, killthereflection.com. —Matt Carney - Matt Carney, Oklahoma Gazette


How ironic that this review is coming only a few days after the celebration of St. Valentine. Ironic in the sense that Kill The Reflection's brand new record Together ... Apart... is every romantic cynic's wet dream. Valentines Day is meant to embrace sappy love letters, crushes and red roses. Kill The Reflection flush every bit of that nonsense straight down the toilet and what they offer up in Together ... Apart seems to be a deeper look into the realness that goes on in a relationship and not just the facade that accompanies such corporate red herrings. Rarely does the record seem to waver into brighter, more hopeful territory and for some this could be somewhat of an annoyance due to the fact that this is absolutely one of those records that when digested during misery or tragedy can help the listener heal. On the other hand, the uber-positive crowd will likely chalk this up to a band treading thin lines between realness and pretentiousness.

But let's examine this objectively for a moment. Sun doesn't come without rain, and happiness doesn't come without sorrow. It's a rollercoaster that unfortunately every human experiences. And while some may gather an unyieldingly downtrodden mood with Together ... Apart, I think it's important to acknowledge the relationship between the two spectrums while consuming it. Granted, it's certainly not a record to listen to on a bright, sunny Saturday afternoon when everything is right with the world. It does however shed light into a darker territory that many people leave repressed and thus, unhealed. Broken relationships come at a cost and it's only fair to lend an ear to music that aims to let the listener grieve as well as music that aids in a listener's happiness while the relationship is functioning properly. It's a yin and yang that must be adhered to otherwise balance would not exist.

The opening track Fields In Springtime candidly ushers in the feelings of discontent and bewilderment of a failed relationship. And while quite a few songs in history have dealt with complications of a failed relationship, Kill The Reflection, and namely tracks like Fields In Springtime and the records debut single Hold Captive seem to bare an all too real transparency into a massive open wound. Lines like And if I'm conscious I'll murder and we can both sleep good tonight. You know I met you on the way down, you're just a waste of time provide a gripping look into the psyche of a relationship where the parties involved feel like the only way to get beyond the initial agony of a damaged relationship is if it literally weren't there at all. Now, we certainly don't think the band condones murder; in fact, we think it's a metaphor for healing. If we hearken back to another song similar in content, we hear Maynard from Tool posing the question before a live rendition of Pushit, Have you ever loved someone so much you feel you had to kill them to get away? Certainly a gruesome metaphor but it works in this instance as well.

If there is a silver lining with Together ... Apart..., it seems that it lies in the fact that the leaving the protagonist is his bitter mindset and with that exit comes the sobering realization that healing won't be easy but necessary. And, thus, that's where the record shines more than anything. The realization that the the only way to defeat pain and come out better on the other side is realizing that it does hurt, it will heal and to allow yourself a ride on the rollercoaster of balancing that yin and yang, the sun and the rain, of being Together ... Apart... And with that comes a deeper understanding that duality, albeit invisible, may have just been the band's intention all along.
- Houston Molinar - Co-Founder/Managing Editor/Auxilarate


How ironic that this review is coming only a few days after the celebration of St. Valentine. Ironic in the sense that Kill The Reflection's brand new record Together ... Apart... is every romantic cynic's wet dream. Valentines Day is meant to embrace sappy love letters, crushes and red roses. Kill The Reflection flush every bit of that nonsense straight down the toilet and what they offer up in Together ... Apart seems to be a deeper look into the realness that goes on in a relationship and not just the facade that accompanies such corporate red herrings. Rarely does the record seem to waver into brighter, more hopeful territory and for some this could be somewhat of an annoyance due to the fact that this is absolutely one of those records that when digested during misery or tragedy can help the listener heal. On the other hand, the uber-positive crowd will likely chalk this up to a band treading thin lines between realness and pretentiousness.

But let's examine this objectively for a moment. Sun doesn't come without rain, and happiness doesn't come without sorrow. It's a rollercoaster that unfortunately every human experiences. And while some may gather an unyieldingly downtrodden mood with Together ... Apart, I think it's important to acknowledge the relationship between the two spectrums while consuming it. Granted, it's certainly not a record to listen to on a bright, sunny Saturday afternoon when everything is right with the world. It does however shed light into a darker territory that many people leave repressed and thus, unhealed. Broken relationships come at a cost and it's only fair to lend an ear to music that aims to let the listener grieve as well as music that aids in a listener's happiness while the relationship is functioning properly. It's a yin and yang that must be adhered to otherwise balance would not exist.

The opening track Fields In Springtime candidly ushers in the feelings of discontent and bewilderment of a failed relationship. And while quite a few songs in history have dealt with complications of a failed relationship, Kill The Reflection, and namely tracks like Fields In Springtime and the records debut single Hold Captive seem to bare an all too real transparency into a massive open wound. Lines like And if I'm conscious I'll murder and we can both sleep good tonight. You know I met you on the way down, you're just a waste of time provide a gripping look into the psyche of a relationship where the parties involved feel like the only way to get beyond the initial agony of a damaged relationship is if it literally weren't there at all. Now, we certainly don't think the band condones murder; in fact, we think it's a metaphor for healing. If we hearken back to another song similar in content, we hear Maynard from Tool posing the question before a live rendition of Pushit, Have you ever loved someone so much you feel you had to kill them to get away? Certainly a gruesome metaphor but it works in this instance as well.

If there is a silver lining with Together ... Apart..., it seems that it lies in the fact that the leaving the protagonist is his bitter mindset and with that exit comes the sobering realization that healing won't be easy but necessary. And, thus, that's where the record shines more than anything. The realization that the the only way to defeat pain and come out better on the other side is realizing that it does hurt, it will heal and to allow yourself a ride on the rollercoaster of balancing that yin and yang, the sun and the rain, of being Together ... Apart... And with that comes a deeper understanding that duality, albeit invisible, may have just been the band's intention all along.
- Houston Molinar - Co-Founder/Managing Editor/Auxilarate


“Review for Kill the Reflection's LP "Together... Apart..." Original, Stylish, Experimental rock that seems to have it's own genre and era. Piercing lyrics and vocals that compliment the songwriting throughout this collection. Kill the Reflection Delivers wave after wave of emotion from their digital sea of rifts,beats and lyrics. Well worth the listen and price to own. ”
— Jay Armon & AXIOM405 media, Axiom Fourofive - Jay Armon & AXIOM405 media, Axiom Fourofive


“Kill the Reflection 3EP Post-punk with promise and room to grow At its best, Kill the Reflection’s dark, fast music leans toward Joy Division-esque post-punk. On the group’s “3ep,” the standout “Cold” calls for the vocalist to deliver his notes in a low, forceful way that aspires toward the dominating control of Ian Curtis. The Oklahoma City-based three-piece musically churns behind him, channeling the energy of punk (especially in the drums) through tight, restrained rhythms. The tension of vocals versus instrumental energy (and, within that, drums versus guitars) make for a great track. The drum parts in the verses of “Broken” give a nod to the trip-hop that Kill the Reflection formerly purveyed as a duo (it’s recently expanded to a trio), while the chorus transforms it into a standard rock song. Kill the Reflection has a lot of room to grow as it figures out its sound, but “Cold” shows that there is great promise for the future.”
— Stephen Carradini, Oklahoma Gazette - Stephen Carradini, Oklahoma Gazette


“Kill the Reflection 3EP Post-punk with promise and room to grow At its best, Kill the Reflection’s dark, fast music leans toward Joy Division-esque post-punk. On the group’s “3ep,” the standout “Cold” calls for the vocalist to deliver his notes in a low, forceful way that aspires toward the dominating control of Ian Curtis. The Oklahoma City-based three-piece musically churns behind him, channeling the energy of punk (especially in the drums) through tight, restrained rhythms. The tension of vocals versus instrumental energy (and, within that, drums versus guitars) make for a great track. The drum parts in the verses of “Broken” give a nod to the trip-hop that Kill the Reflection formerly purveyed as a duo (it’s recently expanded to a trio), while the chorus transforms it into a standard rock song. Kill the Reflection has a lot of room to grow as it figures out its sound, but “Cold” shows that there is great promise for the future.”
— Stephen Carradini, Oklahoma Gazette - Stephen Carradini, Oklahoma Gazette


“Fleeting Melodies Vol 1’ is a strong collection of demos. The album begins with an intro where you are introduced to the music and album; I find this cool and thought worthy. It tells you that this is “music for broken people” since I enjoyed listening to every song I guess I am among those. I find the lyrics very strong, they speak of feelings that most people that have fallen in and out of love may recognize. Sometimes you find a song where you almost choke on, because of all the emotions that it brings. For me it creates a dark and twisted atmosphere that really reaches out and kind of sinks its teeth in you. The melody and rhythm together with the sharp lyrics really captured my interest from the first time I listened to it. I enjoy that the song moves in a circle, it ends as it begun. Let me tell you that it has been turned into a mesmerizing lullaby that simply caresses your ears and your soul. How I enjoy listening to this bare and moving song - I simply adore it!” - Helena Torstensson, www.reflectionsofdarkness.com


“Fleeting Melodies Vol 1’ is a strong collection of demos. The album begins with an intro where you are introduced to the music and album; I find this cool and thought worthy. It tells you that this is “music for broken people” since I enjoyed listening to every song I guess I am among those. I find the lyrics very strong, they speak of feelings that most people that have fallen in and out of love may recognize. Sometimes you find a song where you almost choke on, because of all the emotions that it brings. For me it creates a dark and twisted atmosphere that really reaches out and kind of sinks its teeth in you. The melody and rhythm together with the sharp lyrics really captured my interest from the first time I listened to it. I enjoy that the song moves in a circle, it ends as it begun. Let me tell you that it has been turned into a mesmerizing lullaby that simply caresses your ears and your soul. How I enjoy listening to this bare and moving song - I simply adore it!” - Helena Torstensson, www.reflectionsofdarkness.com


“Featured band/musician for May 2007 at WWW.GlobalGothic.com Wow, I'm impressed! I checked out their MySpace and listened to a few of their songs. I think they're my favourite band of the month we've had yet. I would so buy an album. - Wise Child Yum.Yum.Yum. says I.. - Site Owner EPS” - www.globalgothic.com


“Featured band/musician for May 2007 at WWW.GlobalGothic.com Wow, I'm impressed! I checked out their MySpace and listened to a few of their songs. I think they're my favourite band of the month we've had yet. I would so buy an album. - Wise Child Yum.Yum.Yum. says I.. - Site Owner EPS” - www.globalgothic.com


"Eerie music,but nice at the same time. This grows on you, and has a gnawing effect that gnaws at the back of your mind. Puts you in a contimplative mood afterwards" - Mostpeoplearedjs.com - Mikel O.D., Mostpeoplearedjs.com Podcast


"Eerie music,but nice at the same time. This grows on you, and has a gnawing effect that gnaws at the back of your mind. Puts you in a contimplative mood afterwards" - Mostpeoplearedjs.com - Mikel O.D., Mostpeoplearedjs.com Podcast


Discography

- Fleeting Melodies Vol.1 (2010 EP)
- 3 EP (2011 EP)
- Together,,, Apart... (2011 LP)

(currently writing for a new EP for 2013)

"Fields in Springtime" (1st single aired on Rock 100.5fm KATT, also put on rotation on the www.SPYfm.com Nightshift show)

"Hold Captive" (2nd single aired on Rock 100.5fm KATT)

Photos

Bio

We hail from Oklahoma City with razor sharp teeth and broken beats...

Alternative/Post-Punk/Rock. Oklahoma City's own, Music for broken people. KTR is singer/guitarist, Morgan Routt, bassist, Mark Martinez and drummer, Christopher Stevens. Haunting, devilish, sexy, dark & brooding music that rips your lovers heart out & explains your pain in a whirlwind of emotion. We have created a cure, a type of... Music for broken people. A precise depiction of what it means to dwell within our emotions. A tragic reminder for love of the obscure, and the maniac within. KTR is dirt, sex and necessary roughness...

A hum rattles inside our brain's like a dripping faucet, broken beats and rhythmatic tones echo about and seem to hypnotize our bleeding mind's. It's a sound that never sleeps and screams to be written down.

KTR is in rotation on local radio stations Rock 100.5 FM the KATT, theSPY FM, KHOWL 98.7 FM & Z104 The Edge (Tulsa). They have shared the stage with bands like: Neon Trees, Carolina Liar, Standing Shadows, mr.Gnome. They have been a featured artist on Oklavision.TV (presented by the Chickasaw Nation) Rock 100.5fm the KATT Local Talent Show & TheSPY FM Nightshift Show. Director Patrick George (Dead Film Festival award winner) is doing a documentary on the band, and music video work from director Jonathan Shahan is in the works.

Kill the Reflection's latest album "Together... Apart..." can be found on iTunes.com, CDbaby.com, Amazon.com as well as the Kill the Reflection website.

www.killthereflection.com

Band Members