KunoKini
Gig Seeker Pro

KunoKini

Jakarta, Jakarta Raya, Indonesia | Established. Jan 01, 2003

Jakarta, Jakarta Raya, Indonesia
Established on Jan, 2003
Band World Reggaeton

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Oct
31
KunoKini @ Taman Sari Gua Sunyaragi

Jakarta, Jakarta Raya, Indonesia

Jakarta, Jakarta Raya, Indonesia

Oct
24
KunoKini @ Secret Beach, Bali Indonesia

Jakarta Raya, Indonesia

Jakarta Raya, Indonesia

Oct
23
KunoKini @ Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Mulyorejo, East Java, Indonesia

Mulyorejo, East Java, Indonesia

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


"Ethnic Music Band KunoKini Presents Musical Blend of Old and New"

It was a hot and balmy evening in Jakarta, yet guests of the Tugu Kunstkring Paleis restaurant in Central Jakarta remained patiently seated in a dimmed gallery. Imposed on the walls all around them were pictures of the Dayak people dressed in their glorious traditional attire by New Zealand photographer David Metcalf.

Suddenly, the shrill whistle of a sampelong, a traditional flute from West Sumatra, echoed through the air, filling it with anticipation. The audience grew quiet, as the thin bamboo flute played a haunting, melancholic melody from the highlands of Minangkabau, West Sumatra, into the 100-year-old restaurant and gallery.

Four men, dressed in various traditional attires, entered the gallery, dancing and chanting. They were members of the Indonesian experimental ethnic band KunoKini.

“The sampelong melody was originally used by the people of West Sumatra at the start of a ritual to summon the spirits of our ancestors,” says Hendra Bagya, the manager of KunoKini. “We’re now using it to summon the audience’s attention at the start of our concert.”

The sampelong flute worked its magic; the audience of some 100 people that evening remained transfixed in their seats for the entire concert.

The start

KunoKini started accidentally at the Folklore Festival in Wismar, Germany, in 2003.

At that time, Astari “Beby” Achiel and Adhi Bismo Wirhaspati were both studying product design at Paramadina University in Jakarta.

With five other college friends, they were asked to learn basic traditional percussion instruments to support traditional Indonesian dancers who were scheduled to perform in Wismar.

Beby played traditional African drums called djembe, while Bismo played the Betawi tambourine rebana ketimpring.

“We just did basic percussion play onstage [in Wismar],” Beby says. “So we were quite surprised when they gave us the best performance award.”

Thrilled by their victory, the group decided to focus on Indonesian ethnic music and create a band of their own.

“We called it KunoKini — from kuno [old] and kini [new],” Beby says. “It represents our sound, which is a combination of traditional instruments and modern music.”

To learn more about Indonesian traditional instruments, KunoKini visited the Indonesian Arts Institute (ISI) in Surakarta and Yogyakarta and asked senior students to teach them how to play.

“We learned the basics from them,” Beby says. “And then we developed our own style.”

Each member of KunoKini can play three or four traditional music instruments. Beby mainly focuses on drums, while Bismo is more into tambourines.

For his final project at Paramadina University, Bismo designed a special drum set, named sokoguru (pillars, in Javanese), which comprises traditional Betawi tambourines.

The sokoguru consists of a set of stands and arms, carved out of local ironwood and resembling the pillars of traditional Javanese houses. The rebana ketimpring tambourines are placed on top of these stands, just like modern drums.

And just like modern drums, the sokoguru is played with a set of bamboo sticks. Bismo still uses the home-made drum set in the band’s performances, during which the pair usually incorporates 10 to 20 instruments.

KunoKini’s repertoire usually varies from rearranged Indonesian traditional and patriotic songs, to their own creations written by Bismo.

As their expertise in ethnic music instruments grew, so did the band’s reputation within the local and international music scenes. KunoKini continues to receive invitations to music festivals in Australia and Europe.

“The international audience is usually very lively,” Beby says. “They would clap their hands and dance around during our performances. They’re not reluctant to show they’re truly enjoying themselves.”

In Indonesia, especially in Central Java, their performances are often met with criticism.

“The traditional artists and puritans often disapprove of our fun, experimental ways of playing the traditional musical instruments,” Beby says. “But we’re committed to not only preserve Indonesia’s ethnic instruments, but also to promote them in these modern days. And the only way we can do that is to breathe new life into these traditional instruments.”

In big cities, such as Bandung and Jakarta, people’s appreciation of their music has greatly improved, according to the duo.

“Young people [in Bandung and Jakarta] often come up to us after our gigs and ask us where they can get these traditional instruments and where they can learn to play them,” Beby says.

Cultural corrosion

The myriad of questions and interest from their audience made them aware of the cultural corrosion that is currently happening in Indonesia.

There are few, if any, music shops in the archipelago that sell the country’s own traditional music instruments, but plenty that carry the djembe, or the Australian didgeridoo.

“And many local schools have erased ethnic music and language from their curriculum,” Beby says. “This is so ironic; as this is happening, ethnic music and languages are being introduced in international schools.”

To revive Indonesia’s ethnic music and traditional instruments, KunoKini offers free workshops in schools and cultural institutions for the public.

“We hope that it can spark a renewed interest in traditional Indonesian music among the people.”

Unfortunately, KunoKini’s commitment to the band’s cause does not always pay off.

“Getting funding is one of our biggest challenges right now,” Beby says.

Eleven years since the band first started, only Beby and Bismo remain. Other members of KunoKini have chosen to pursue more profitable lines of work as entrepreneurs.

Beby himself works as a freelance product designer in addition to performing with KunoKini.

On the other hand, the pair’s idealism attracts like-minded people; a number of highly talented young ethnic musicians have collaborated with KunoKini for their concerts.

During their performance at Tugu Kunstkring Paleis, KunoKini featured ethnomusicologist Rizal Maj, who played the sampelong flute, and indie band Young de Brock’s vocalist Sabar Degelong, who tackled both the djembe and didgeridoo that evening.

“I think KunoKini has successfully re-introduced Indonesian ethnic music [into the community] and repackaged the sound for today’s audience,” said Nova Dewi, one of the people in the audience that night.

“As an Indonesian, I feel proud watching them play upbeat music with our ethnic musical instruments.”

Returning to their roots

The highlight of the performance was a manual panning show, which KunoKini did for the patriotic song “Indonesia Pusaka” (“Indonesia’s Heritage”).

The number required audience members to cover their eyes with a blindfold. The four musicians then stood at four different points in the the room, playing their respective instruments.

“The result was like in a movie theater with Dolby Surround Sound,” said Sukana Jaya, an audience member.

“It was unbelievable.”

Bismo rearranged the song to match the slower pentatonic melody of traditional Dayak music.

The band and the guest performers presented “Indonesia Pusaka” with the slender suling balawung flute of the Dayak Ngaju ethnic group from Central Kalimantan, as well as gongs, the katambung (a drum also from Central Kalimantan) and gamelan, the famous Javanese orchestra ensemble.

The song’s unique arrangement was a preview of KunoKini’s upcoming tour in early 2015, which will see the duo travel to cities that neither of them have been to before, including Sabang in Aceh; Medan in North Sumatra; Malang and Surabaya in East Java; Bali; and Makassar in South Sulawesi.

Their string of concerts will follow the theme of “Kembali ke Akar Untuk Merdeka,” or “Going Back to the Roots for Independence.”

“I think Indonesia is now independent, and yet, confused,” Beby says.

“Some people think that the country’s independence entitles them to do as they please, such as throwing garbage wherever they like, riding motorbikes on the sidewalk, and so on.”

With their upcoming tour and their traditional music performances, KunoKini aims to remind the Indonesian people of their great traditional roots and cultural values.

“Indonesia has to make [its own] sound,” Beby says.

“Our country has been greatly influenced by Western and Middle Eastern countries. Instead of succumbing to globalization and forgeting our roots, we should combine the two together and create a new culture.”

Soon the experimental ethnic music group will also release their second album, titled “KunoKini and Svaraliyane.”

Svaraliyane is the Sanskrit word for “other sounds,” the duo explained.

“In the album, we will collaborate with Indonesian bass and brass players,” Beby says.

Their first album, “Reinkarnasi” (“Reincarnation”), has sold more than 5,000 copies since its release in 2010.

“KunoKini is starting a cultural revolution,” Beby says.

“We’re awakening what was long dead — ethnic music — and bringing it to today’s modern stage. And we hope to engage as many people as possible in this [cultural] revolution.” - Jakarta Globe


"KunoKini: Trotting On After a Decade"

Ethnic experimental band KunoKini has just celebrated a decade in music, growing ever resolute with its choice of music – a musical road traveled by its contemporaries.

The band’s name is made up of two words: kuno (ancient, old) and kini (contemporary, nowadays), reflecting its strife in music. The band members have struggled to contextualize their music, and have just tasted the fruits of their labor in the past few years.

But the fruit, apparently, was not as sweet for some of KunoKini’s members.

The band began with seven college dudes playing as a musical troupe accompanying traditional student dancers performing at the Folklore Festival 2003 in Wismar, Germany. Shortly before performing, one of their instructors asked them to fill a slot between acts — as dancers changed costumes — with an improvised performance.

They ended up winning the festival’s second prize for best performance. Surprised by the accolades from the foreign land, the boys who were in their early 20s at the time, decided to pursue their experiment with traditional music instruments back home.

They began making music with rebana (traditional tambourin), Javanese kendang (drum) and saron (Javanese metallophone), taking every opportunity to play at campus gigs, cultural performances and event openings.

Of the seven members, only four were left when KunoKini finally caught a big break winning a grant to play at Sydney’s Gang Festival and also performing during Australia Day in Canberra and at Brisbane’s Power House in 2008.

Adhi Bhismo Wrhaspati, Astari “Bebi” Achiel, Muhamad “Firzy “ Nur Firdaus and Akbar Nugraha released KunoKini’s first album Reinkarnasi (Reincarnation) in 2010.

In the album, the band used kerang Irian (sea shells from Papua), traditional Javanese drums, saluang (Minangkabau flute), rebana biang (jumbo-sized tambourine), waterstick, woodblock, egg shaker, shekere (West African maraca) , didgeridoo (Australian Aboriginal wind instrument), as well as a percussion instrument from Kalimantan the Klontang, conga (Cuban drum) and the African drum djembe.

They mixed the primal and rhythmical sounds with a reggae-style of half-singing half-speaking by Bhismo.

The band went back to perform at the Power House Music Festival in the same year. In 2011, they toured the Netherlands and Germany as part of another festival, the Folklore Festival.

Bebi considered KunoKini’s four-piece as the best formation they ever had.


Astari Achiel on traditional drums.

“When Firzy left in 2011 followed by Akbar in 2012, it was very devastating for me. It was like they were breaking up with me and Bhismo. It hurt,” Bebi told The Jakarta Post on the sidelines of KunoKini’s 10th anniversary event last week.

He said Firzy left to concentrate on his business and Akbar to pursue his studies.

“It was a natural choice I guess. Something normal that happens in a band,” Bebi.

He admitted that KunoKini was not a profit-seeking band, but rather an idealistic effort to give fresh air to traditional music and to campaign for it in the modern world.

“Bhismo and I sometimes have to dig deep in our pockets for KunoKini, but that’s all right. I am poor because of KunoKini, but I also become rich because of KunoKini,” Bebi metaphorized.

KunoKini has touched a lot of like-minded people and have received support from numerous parties.

Ahead of the its 10th anniversary, Simple Projects Indonesia offered to make a documentary about the band. “They really don’t need to ask, we’re excited about it,” Bebi said.

The anniversary event on May 29 was held at My Mate Cafe in Bintaro, South Jakarta, with numerous donations and also support from dance company Legong Bali, breakdancers Undercover Brothers, and musicians Ras Muhammad, Leonardo and Mata Jiwa.

KunoKini is planning to tour cities in Java, including Jakarta, Bandung, Salatiga, Yogyakarta, Malang and Surabaya, in the latter half of the year.

“We will go to schools and will screen the documentary, then discuss the movie, before performing for the students and holding workshops for them.

“It’s part of our effort to introduce traditional music to the younger generation,” Bebi said.

Any plan for another album?

“Yes, we are planning another album release next year. The album will be lighter, compared to our first one, which was a bit heavy and very experimental.

“With our next album, we want to reach a wider audience. We want our blend of contemporary traditional music to be heard by a range of different people,” Bebi said.

Ethnic experimental band KunoKini has just celebrated a decade in music, growing ever resolute with its choice of music – a musical road traveled by its contemporaries.

The band’s name is made up of two words: kuno (ancient, old) and kini (contemporary, nowadays), reflecting its strife in music. The band members have struggled to contextualize their music, and have just tasted the fruits of their labor in the past few years.

But the fruit, apparently, was not as sweet for some of KunoKini’s members.

The band began with seven college dudes playing as a musical troupe accompanying traditional student dancers performing at the Folklore Festival 2003 in Wismar, Germany. Shortly before performing, one of their instructors asked them to fill a slot between acts — as dancers changed costumes — with an improvised performance.

They ended up winning the festival’s second prize for best performance. Surprised by the accolades from the foreign land, the boys who were in their early 20s at the time, decided to pursue their experiment with traditional music instruments back home.

They began making music with rebana (traditional tambourin), Javanese kendang (drum) and saron (Javanese metallophone), taking every opportunity to play at campus gigs, cultural performances and event openings.

Of the seven members, only four were left when KunoKini finally caught a big break winning a grant to play at Sydney’s Gang Festival and also performing during Australia Day in Canberra and at Brisbane’s Power House in 2008.

Adhi Bhismo Wrhaspati, Astari “Bebi” Achiel, Muhamad “Firzy “ Nur Firdaus and Akbar Nugraha released KunoKini’s first album Reinkarnasi (Reincarnation) in 2010.

In the album, the band used kerang Irian (sea shells from Papua), traditional Javanese drums, saluang (Minangkabau flute), rebana biang (jumbo-sized tambourine), waterstick, woodblock, egg shaker, shekere (West African maraca) , didgeridoo (Australian Aboriginal wind instrument), as well as a percussion instrument from Kalimantan the Klontang, conga (Cuban drum) and the African drum djembe.

They mixed the primal and rhythmical sounds with a reggae-style of half-singing half-speaking by Bhismo.

The band went back to perform at the Power House Music Festival in the same year. In 2011, they toured the Netherlands and Germany as part of another festival, the Folklore Festival.

Bebi considered KunoKini’s four-piece as the best formation they ever had.


Astari Achiel on traditional drums.

“When Firzy left in 2011 followed by Akbar in 2012, it was very devastating for me. It was like they were breaking up with me and Bhismo. It hurt,” Bebi told The Jakarta Post on the sidelines of KunoKini’s 10th anniversary event last week.

He said Firzy left to concentrate on his business and Akbar to pursue his studies.

“It was a natural choice I guess. Something normal that happens in a band,” Bebi.

He admitted that KunoKini was not a profit-seeking band, but rather an idealistic effort to give fresh air to traditional music and to campaign for it in the modern world.

“Bhismo and I sometimes have to dig deep in our pockets for KunoKini, but that’s all right. I am poor because of KunoKini, but I also become rich because of KunoKini,” Bebi metaphorized.

KunoKini has touched a lot of like-minded people and have received support from numerous parties.

Ahead of the its 10th anniversary, Simple Projects Indonesia offered to make a documentary about the band. “They really don’t need to ask, we’re excited about it,” Bebi said.

The anniversary event on May 29 was held at My Mate Cafe in Bintaro, South Jakarta, with numerous donations and also support from dance company Legong Bali, breakdancers Undercover Brothers, and musicians Ras Muhammad, Leonardo and Mata Jiwa.

KunoKini is planning to tour cities in Java, including Jakarta, Bandung, Salatiga, Yogyakarta, Malang and Surabaya, in the latter half of the year.

“We will go to schools and will screen the documentary, then discuss the movie, before performing for the students and holding workshops for them.

“It’s part of our effort to introduce traditional music to the younger generation,” Bebi said.

Any plan for another album?

“Yes, we are planning another album release next year. The album will be lighter, compared to our first one, which was a bit heavy and very experimental.

“With our next album, we want to reach a wider audience. We want our blend of contemporary traditional music to be heard by a range of different people,” Bebi said. - Jakarta Post


"KunoKini Akan Berkolaborasi Dengan Ras Muhammad di Jakipa"

Jakarta, GATRAnews - Grup world music KunoKini akan berkolaborasi dengan musisi reggae Ras Muhammad pada pementasan Jakarta International Performing Arts (Jakipa) 2014. Di gelaran internasional yang digelar pada 6-7 Desember 2014 di Monas ini, KunoKini berjanji menampilkan pertunjukan spesial. "Kita featuring Ras Muhammad di lagu Leluhur," ungkap Bhismo saat ditemui GATRAnews, Jum`at (5/12) petang, di Lot 8 Bar, SCBD, Jakarta.

Tak hanya itu, grup beraliran Indo Ethnic Experimental ini juga akab menggandeng sejumlah seniman tradisional tampil satu panggung. KunoKini, kata Bishmo, menyiapkan pertunjukan yang dipadu padankan dengan penari, dan hip hop Betawi.

Personil KunoKini lainnya, Bebi, menambahkan bahwa persiapan untuk tampil di Jakipa cukup panjang mengingat KunoKini juga diddaulat sebagai satu di antara seniman tuan rumah. "Kita menampilkan sisi tradisionalitas Indonesia, agar punya cirikhas dan tak kalah dengan seniman luar negeri," tandasnya. - Gatra


"KunoKini Menengok Budaya Indonesia Lewat Alat Musik"

JAKARTA, KOMPAS.com -- Memasuki usia 10 tahun berkarya, grup musik KunoKini, yang terdiri dari duo Bebi dan Bhismo mencoba untuk memaknai nasionalisme lebih dari sikap berbangsa dan bernegara semata. Bagi mereka nasionalisme bisa saja muncul dalam wujud suara, visual dan harmonisasi ekletik berbagai instrumen musik yang berasal dari Barat hingga ke Timur Indonesia.

"Ulang tahun kesepuluh ini ingin kami rayakan untuk menandai dimulainya penyebaran virus KunoKini lebih masif daripada sebelumnya. Artinya, setelah 10 tahun kami ingin merangkul lebih banyak sesama anak muda untuk menengok lagi kebudayaan Indonesia yang penuh makna, lewat bermusik tentu," ujar Bebi dalam siaran pers yang diterima Kompas.com di Jakarta, Selasa (21/5/2013).

KunoKini menilai bahwa alat musik tradisional Indonesia bisa saja dipermak lebih modern untuk mendapatkan suara yang kekinian sehingga mampu menjawab kebutuhan industri musik Tanah Air.

"Indonesia punya banyak sekali alat musik yang bisa dimodernisasi tanpa menghilangkan esensi suara Indonesiais. Kami ingin merevolusi budaya bermusik," jelas Bhismo.

KunoKini yang juga dikenal dengan ciri khas sound mereka dengan mengoptimalkan berbagai alat musik Indonesia, juga berani menempatkan alat­?alat tradisional untuk tetap segaris dengan alat­?alat musik yang ada. "Sehingga akhirnya alat musik Indonesia menjadi alat konvensional yang mudah digunakan oleh orang banyak dengan tujuan akhir menduniakan alat-alat musik Indonesia," kata Bhismo.

"Kami berusaha out of the box dan keluar dari pattern yang ada, tapi kami tidak melupakan dasar­?dasar dari alat-­alat tradisional itu. Makanya kami menyebutnya 'modernisasi' yang berbudaya, yaitu revolusi budaya supaya kami dan masyarakat selalu ingat asal dan usul alat­?alat tersebut," pungkas Bebi.

Menandai 10 tahun mereka, KunoKini akan menghadirkan sebuah acara yang diberi nama "Back to the Roots" yang rencananya akan digelar di My Mate Cafe & Entertainment, Bintaro Jaya Sektor 3A, pada Rabu (29/5/2013) pukul 19.00 WIB, dengan menjadwalkan performance serta pemutaran dokumenter KunoKini. - Kompas.com


"Reinkarnasi Indonesia Dalam Perkusi"

Kunokini menghadirkan sensasi perkusi di musik mereka. "Secara universal, pola dan ritme instrumen perkusi adalah hal mendasar dan universal," kata mereka.

Kunokini memilih untuk tidak berbicara lewat nada dan melodi. Dengan lantang, mereka mencuat lewat sahut-sahutan yang dipandu geliat ritme dari membran genderang. Dengan landasan itu, Kunokini meracik bebunyian dengan pesan-pesan kritik sosial. Pada konser mereka Reinkarnasi: Kunokini Live In Concert, Selasa (18/1), semua elemen hadir dengan proporsional.

Konser tunggal yang digelar di Gedung Kesenian Jakarta merupakan jadi jembatan penghubung antara grup musik eksentrik ini dan juga para penonton yang sudah merindukan aksi mereka. Tidak sedikit audiens yang menggoyangkan kepala, menjentikkan jari, dan beberapa kali merekahkan senyum bahagia, menikmati aransemen Bhismo, Bebi, dan Akbar.

Kunokini mengumandangkan Blue Yamko, salah satu lagu yang meminjam repetisi frase dari lagu daerah Papua Yamko Rambe Yamko. Kunokini menyulapnya menjadi komposisi yang mampu membius.

Tepat setelah Blue Yamko rampung, lampu menggelap dan dimulailah Forest Addict. Seluruh pemain yang ada di panggung menggunakan topeng dan mengeluarkan suara-suara binatang--mirip primata. Kesan liar dan buas, mengiringi nuansa gelap yang hadir di panggung pada saat lagu itu.
Forest Addict sendiri merupakan karya Kunokini yang berteriak mengenai keserakahan dan kesadaran. Bukan hanya memainkan instrumen, Kunokini juga memperkuat konsep penyampaian pesan karya mereka juga dengan sedikit aksi-aksi teatrikal. Dengan wajah dibalut topeng, mereka merayap dan menelusuri sudut-sudut panggung, mengeluarkan bebunyian primata dan membentuk nuansa liar yang kelam. Totalitas berbuah apresiasi baik. Penonton terhanyut dan di akhir lagu ruangan dibanjiri tepukan tangan.

Sementara itu di lidah panggung Bebi disusul oleh tiga orang temannya dan duduk bersila dialasi oleh tikar bambu, membawa seperangkat teko dan gelas, sapu lidi dan membawa suasana hangat ala anak nongkrong. Bhismo menyesap minuman dari gelas, dan dilatari permainan suling bambu Bebi dan degup genderang Akbar, melantunlah Bamboo Raining. Kalimat-kalimat yang bersifat introspektif keluar dan dipaparkan oleh Bhismo dengan pelan dan sangat hati-hati. Pelirikan naratif yang baik, mengisahkan tentang proses pencerahan dan penemuan jati diri di hadapan Tuhan. Intimasi dan suasana khusyuk menyelimuti penonton.

Menjelang akhir pertunjukkan, mereka membawakan Indo Baru. Sebelumnya lagu itu, mereka maju ke depan panggung dan mengucapkan terima kasih ke hadapan penonton, kembali ke posisi masing-masing dan membawakan Indo Baru.

Akbar dan perangkat drum orisinalnya mendentumkan ketukan kental beraroma drum and bass, disusul dengan Darman yang menampar kulit Djembenya memberikan pukulan-pukulan paradidle yang semakin menggebu. Bhismo meneriakkan lolongan-lolongan tentang bangsa Indonesia yang bangkit dan berjuang untuk menjadi Indonesia yang baru.

Lagu usai, layar menggelap namun penonton masih lapar dan meminta-minta lagi Kunokini keluar panggung. Maka malam itu ditutup dengan manis dengan lagu Rasa Sayange dengan Kunokini turun di antara penonton dan mengajak semuanya untuk berdiri dan ikut berdendang.

Kunokini berhasil memberikan semua orang pertunjukkan seni yang total, dan juga membubuhkan pesan pelestarian budaya pada setiap hentakan karyanya. - nationalgeographic.co.id


Discography

Reinkarnasi (2010)





Photos

Bio

Arts is in a way, harmonious spontaneity that brings people to enjoy and explore it together. This spirit binds two artisans and musicians, Bhismo Whraspati & Astari Achiel (Bebi) in KUNOKINI. 

'Kuno' in Bahasa Indonesia means ancient and old is put against 'Kini' which means the latest and new. KUNOKINI’s catchy name and philosophy embodies 'renewing what is ancient to many to enable them to enjoy it again in a new package’.  

Ever since the fateful Festival Folklore in Wismar, Germany in 2003, KUNOKINI strongly put enthusiasm and nationalism first thing within their music. They use Indonesia’s abundant resources of traditional instruments to create distinct yet modern music the audience enjoy grooving to.

The way KUNOKINI explore Indonesia’s traditional instruments create perfect harmony for Serunai & Sampelong from Padang, Suling Sunda from West Java, Irian Shell, Gendang Jawa, Kolintang, Rebana Biang to name a few.

KUNOKINI claims total consistency to its genre. Their ample spirit to invite, conserve and spread the same enthusiasm towards the now generation to embrace Indonesia’s musical heritage is made evergreen by applying new ways and ideas through collaboration, workshops, clinics, documentary screenings, performances, talkshows and more to come.

KunoKini: 

Adhi Bhisma Whraspati (Bhismo) : Vocal, Tifa, Bia, Gendang Jawa, Gendang Betawi, Kangkanung, Kolintang 

Astari Achiel (Bebi) : Taganing, Banshi, Rebana Biang, Rebana, GendangJawa, Beduk Pandeglang, Backing Vocal