La Resistance
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La Resistance

Birmingham, Alabama, United States | INDIE

Birmingham, Alabama, United States | INDIE
Band Alternative Rock

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Oct
17
La Resistance @ Bar Matchless

Brooklyn, New York, USA

Brooklyn, New York, USA

Sep
22
La Resistance @ The Record Bar

Kansas City, Missouri, USA

Kansas City, Missouri, USA

Sep
21
La Resistance @ The Vanguard

Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Music

Press


La Resistance, 'Shells' -- Video of the Day
Posted on Oct 12th 2011 6:00PM by Ben Jones

Artist: La Resistance
Video: 'Shells'
Highlight: "As far as the video goes, Hunter Barrow, the director, came up with this slightly abstract idea," singer Greg Summerlin tells Spinner. "He wanted to give the video kind of an industrial feel along with a performance by the band. The general concept is the glass factory spitting out layers of glass that are all exactly the same, which is a bit of a statement about the music business to a certain degree. The last shot was supposed to be a worker at the factory taking this sheet of glass that has an imprint of the band on it and putting it into a shelf where there are dozens of other sheets of glass that are exactly the same, but the shot didn't work out and we had to cut it. The song itself is more about building 'Shells' around us as we get older to protect ourselves from the pain of life, but as we do so we become less like the person we want to be. The thought behind the song is also a bit abstract." - AOL Spinner



The band dressed in black with dour dispositions and the moody, pop sound hails from.....Birmingham, Alabama?! Upon closer inspection it appears pop guy Greg Summerlin is the brainchild behind this band. Summerlin released a few solid pop records in the past decade then seemingly vanished. Here he reappeared with 3 other folks remade as a gothic pop outfit...and thankfully, though a bit darker, the solid songwriting is still there (with hooks a plenty).

Opener "Shells" begin with a hark of a synthesizer then icy rhythms percolate in, the rhythm becomes more prominent and finally Summerlin's vocals go from meek to confident in a matter of seconds. It's a nice way to open a record while "Understanding" follows a similar path but with a hook that explodes a bit more - and yup, there, is a song called "Isolation" (figured they had to have one in the batch). It lives up to its "I vant to be alone" name. If you're thinking of a Joy Division/New Order influence here you'd be right, but while many of those band's disciples seem to wallow in their own self pity and trench coats, Summerlin and his crew give the songs some real bite and hooks you can sink your teeth into.

Maybe there's more to Birmingham than meets the eye? - Blurt


La Resistance’s synth-heavy guitar pop recalls 1980s bands like The Cure, Tears For Fears and Jesus Jones, but the band avoids a nostalgia trip by fielding hook-filled songs with catchy vocals and a strong melodic sense. Hailing from Birmingham, Alabama, the band is the very antithesis of “Southern rock”. Frontman Greg Summerlin has established his songwriting chops with a series of solo albums, and expanding his sound to include a band has increased the sonic possibilities of his peculiar, pop-shoe-grunge soundscapes. Killer tune “Understanding” layers scratchy guitar, piles of keyboards and nyah-nyah vocals into an irresistible confection. With song titles like “Isolation”, “Pain” and “Loathing”, the prevailing mood on Philosophy isn’t exactly cheery. However, there’s enough rock ‘n’ roll attitude here to avoid an angst-fest, and some moments are positively chipper. - Popmatters


I had just watched the Joy Division biopic “Control”, and with the amazing performance by Sam Riley as Ian Curtis still buzzing in my head, I went back into my front room, put this on the stereo (for the first time, mind) to start my review, and hey presto! A coincidence or what? The first minute of opening track “Shells” is Joy Division in all their glory; well, almost. The song then morphed into a passionate indie-rock song, which did it no harm at all, and actually is the underlying blueprint for much of this album.

“Understanding” is another indie rock bombshell (forgive the pun). And the fact that track three is called “Isolation”, and is obviously inspired by Hooky and Stephen’s rhythms is no minus either, as the music bowls along at a fascinating pace, twisting this (slight) homage into another cavernous indie rock anthem. The next four minutes of “Pain” is at a slower pace, with experimental keyboard activity of a semi-minimalist kind, with a choice vocal / choral mix thrown in, making it a total pleasure and nowhere near as confusing as I’ve made it sound.

La Resistance continues on their quest to twist their own melodies on to rhythms that could well be found on Joy Division and New Order albums. They succeed admirably in this pursuit, giving us the joyous tracks “Forsaken”, “Launch” and “Knowing” to name but three, creating a most singular pleasure for anyone of a Northern post-punk persuasion, so long as you don’t mind the music having a harmonious new twist.

A one-trick pony then? I don’t think so, as the earlier “Pain” proves, and this is augmented by “Infinity”, another slower song, with keyboard and drums dominating. The final wig-out “Starchild” is unlike anything else on the album, but you can still tell that it’s their song, all six and a half minutes.

So, strange coincidence aside, there maybe a lot more to come from La Resistance (who come from Birmingham, Alabama, by the way), so I suggest we all stay tuned in, and ready to turn on.
www.laresistancemusic.com
Kev A. - Leicester Bangs (UK)


I had just watched the Joy Division biopic “Control”, and with the amazing performance by Sam Riley as Ian Curtis still buzzing in my head, I went back into my front room, put this on the stereo (for the first time, mind) to start my review, and hey presto! A coincidence or what? The first minute of opening track “Shells” is Joy Division in all their glory; well, almost. The song then morphed into a passionate indie-rock song, which did it no harm at all, and actually is the underlying blueprint for much of this album.

“Understanding” is another indie rock bombshell (forgive the pun). And the fact that track three is called “Isolation”, and is obviously inspired by Hooky and Stephen’s rhythms is no minus either, as the music bowls along at a fascinating pace, twisting this (slight) homage into another cavernous indie rock anthem. The next four minutes of “Pain” is at a slower pace, with experimental keyboard activity of a semi-minimalist kind, with a choice vocal / choral mix thrown in, making it a total pleasure and nowhere near as confusing as I’ve made it sound.

La Resistance continues on their quest to twist their own melodies on to rhythms that could well be found on Joy Division and New Order albums. They succeed admirably in this pursuit, giving us the joyous tracks “Forsaken”, “Launch” and “Knowing” to name but three, creating a most singular pleasure for anyone of a Northern post-punk persuasion, so long as you don’t mind the music having a harmonious new twist.

A one-trick pony then? I don’t think so, as the earlier “Pain” proves, and this is augmented by “Infinity”, another slower song, with keyboard and drums dominating. The final wig-out “Starchild” is unlike anything else on the album, but you can still tell that it’s their song, all six and a half minutes.

So, strange coincidence aside, there maybe a lot more to come from La Resistance (who come from Birmingham, Alabama, by the way), so I suggest we all stay tuned in, and ready to turn on.
www.laresistancemusic.com
Kev A. - Leicester Bangs (UK)


If you are distraught at the thought of New Order never making another record then take heart that Alabama band La Resistance have grasped the baton of throbbing base lines and clattering drum loops with gusto and have produced an album that could easily be from the Sumner, Hook, Morris stable.
Opener 'Shells' sets the tone that remains pretty constant throughout the 11 tracks on offer; the exceptions being the delicate 'Pain' which is all swelling vocals and mournful piano, the rather pointless 'Launch' (which is just a recorded countdown to a....rocket launch) and the doom laden 'Infinity' which has the feel of a, you've guessed it, Joy Division piece.
But this is no tribute band; the tunes are strong, especially 'Understanding', 'Isolation' and the rousing 'Loathing', although the overlong 'Starchild' is a bit of a mess, the production suitably sparse and the vocals are certainly stronger than Bernie's!!
A probable hit with fans of the Manchester post-punkers, but enough for others to appreciate in its own light.
Adrian Phillips - Allgigs (UK)


La Resistance just issued debut solo album Philosophy last month via Superphonic Records and is already gearing up for a companion EP that will feature the Birmingham, Ala., band covering the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen, Gang Of Four, New Order, Joy Division, Psychedelic Furs and the Jesus And Mary Chain. (Looks like our cassette collection circa 1985. Nice.) You can download an mp3 of La Resistance’s cover of the Bunnymen’s “Lips Like Sugar” below, as well as Philosophy tracks “Isolation” and “Understanding.” - Magnet Magazine


Here’s an anthemic three chord power popper from Birmingham, Alabama’s La Resistance. In a sort of homage to all things good and true in the universe, “Understanding” pleads for answers to everything in joyous harmony. Lots of Brit-pop influence here, as well as some great piano and string synth-y goodness, all heaped together to great effect in three minutes of cosmic rock bliss. Viva La Resistance! - Superfan


La Resistance’s Philosophy opens with a Radio 4-like punkified dance rock on “Shells.” It’s keyboard-laden, dreamy, pop-like, and urgent with just the right amount of drum fills for propulsion. “Understanding” conjures up a laid-back, post-punk of Wire, even as the song swirls about like it’s got Britpop in its claws as they sing about “faith, hope, and love.” “Isolation” hearkens back to the early 90’s electro-dance rock of the Dylans, although with crunchier drums and riffing guitars.
Interrupting things is the plaintive piano of “Pain” with its choral-like vocals and faux string keys to raise it up as a contemplation of God’s greatness in midst of pain.
Rising out of a guitar that recalls the Church’s space rock, “Forsaken” builds to punch the air with its drums even as while throwing out its arms like a brighter Muse. After the interlude “Launch,” “Loathing” lands with more electro-pop making you much happier than the title would suggest. Then let the funk, Go! Team-like marching band rhythms sweep you off your feet for “Knowing.”
Overall, then, Philosophy will provide a groove even as you sense the post-punk spirit jamming out spaced-out electro pop. - Music Spectrum


La Resistance’s debut album, Philosophy is all of two weeks old, but that hasn’t stopped Greg Summerlin and company from stroming the neighborhood studio to record new music. Not deterred by the fact that Philosophy still has marks from the jockey’s crop, reports are that the Birmingham band is already planning a covers EP for spring. And what better way to hold you over than this faithful take on Echo And The Bunnymen’s signature tune? - My Old Kentucky blog


La Resistance La Resistance (Superphonic Records)
Greg Summerlin put together a band and decided that he ought to go riding with the Factory boys. Ending up solidly in the midst of New Order, Buzzcocks and such, these perky songs are irresistible - Aiding and Abetting


La Resistance La Resistance (Superphonic Records)
Greg Summerlin put together a band and decided that he ought to go riding with the Factory boys. Ending up solidly in the midst of New Order, Buzzcocks and such, these perky songs are irresistible - Aiding and Abetting


La Resistance is Greg Summerlin's musical baby. The emerging Birmingham, Alabama threesome will relase their debut LP, Philosophy, next Tuesday (February 8) via Superphonic. Check out the album's rock-y preview cut, "Understanding." The "indie gothic pop" band obviously take influence from Gang of Four, Joy Division, and The Jesus and Mary Chain. LR will also be issuing a companion EP that sees them covering the three aforementioned bands, as well as New Order and The Psychedelic Furs. - Under the Radar


La Resistance is Greg Summerlin's musical baby. The emerging Birmingham, Alabama threesome will relase their debut LP, Philosophy, next Tuesday (February 8) via Superphonic. Check out the album's rock-y preview cut, "Understanding." The "indie gothic pop" band obviously take influence from Gang of Four, Joy Division, and The Jesus and Mary Chain. LR will also be issuing a companion EP that sees them covering the three aforementioned bands, as well as New Order and The Psychedelic Furs. - Under the Radar


La Resistance with "Philosophy"
We definitely suggest this new album to our readers/listeners. Trevor Stine loves this new album and wants to see it do good on the countdown for the weeks to come. (Trevor Stine): La Resistance hails from Birmingham and has that great chill-pop feel that we all dig here at the station. The album brings in a lot of issues that lead vocalist, Greg Summerlin, was going through with his record label and modern society at the time, so the lyrics really have the potential to resonate with a lot of people. - KSCL blog


La Resistance - Philosophy (CD, Superphonic, Pop/rock)
The debut full-length release from Birmingham, Alabama's La Resistance. Although this is the first album from this band, leader Greg Summerlin has previously released solo albums (also on the Superphonic label). When Philosophy began, we had the sneaking suspicion La Resistance was going to be a Joy Division copycat band. But while the opening bass line of "Shells" might give that impression...that's where the similarities end. Philosophy is a bright upbeat pop album full of danceable catchy tracks with impossibly groovy vocal melodies. The more we spin this disc...the classier many of the tunes sound. None of that impossibly difficult underground crap here. Summerlin and bandmates Wil Drake, Erin Tumlin, and Jake Blount are excellent musicians...and they deliver these tracks with obvious style and focused devotion. Is this pure modern pop? Slightly psychedelic dream pop? Or just good ol' hummable pop/rock music that sticks? Actually it's all of the three...and more. Killer tracks include "Understanding," "Launch," "Loathing," and "Starchild." Top pick. - babysue.com


(this is an early review of the single "Understanding"

It shows as well...or at least it does on the single, "Understanding." Sounding like something out of the hazy days of early 90's British pop, the song is straight out of the baggy / shoegazing pages of NME. Sounding something like the Dylans meets Edipussy, the band mix psychedelics with grooves and achieve pop bliss. If the album is half as good as this single, we're all in for a treat come February when Philosophy is released.
- The Pop! Stereo


Remember a couple of weeks ago we told you about Pandora - the online music station? Well, we tried it and it worked a flipping treat. One of the songs thrown up was Rolling Like A Stone by Greg Summerlin. And it instantly became our new favourite song.

The album that Rolling Like A Stone came from, The Young Meteors, is full of songs just as good. It's a fantastic listen - managing to sound like a top-flight US college-rock band bulging with the biggest Britpop melodies you're likely to hear in quite some time. And to call us new converts to the church of Greg Summerlin is quite the understatement

We caught up with Greg Summerlin to talk about The Beatles, snowboarding and disastrous long-distance relationships...

Who are you, and where are you?
My name is Greg Summerlin and I am a musician in Birmingham, Alabama in the US.

Describe your music for us, would you?
That's a tough question. Although I'm a southern American, I'm heavily influenced by British rock and pop. If you could imagine a southern kid growing up listening to The Beatles, The Clash and The Who along with American bands like The Replacements then you might end up with the music I'm making.

The Young Meteors sounds like a freewheeling summer-soundtracking album. Any plans to change for the next album?
I think the next record will be a bit different, but there will still be plenty of up tempo numbers. The Young Meteors was my attempt to make a record that maybe had some of the spirit of one of the early Beatles records. It was also a reaction to my first record which was a bit more moody. So, the songs are mostly upbeat. I'm writing songs for my next record now. The tentative plan is to get in the studio in late spring with a release date in the fall. It looks like there will be a wider range of musical styles on the record and I'm actually toying with the idea of a concept record of some kind.

Tell us about your musical past.
I've played in various bands in the Birmingham area for a few years, then joined a band called The Quinsonics where I played lead guitar. Believe it or not, we were a country alt band, kind of in the same vein as the early Wilco or Son Volt records, and had somewhat of a cult following in the South. When we broke up I started writing songs for my first self titled record which came out in 2003. I recorded the record not sure what to expect but then it was received pretty well at college radio and I began to develop a local following. When The Young Meteors came out last year I was pleasantly surprised at the critical acclaim it started receiving across the country and as a result I started getting much more national recognition. Lately, Paste Magazine picked the record as one of their recommended CDs for February and its been featured on Awarestore.com and has been licensed by MTV for one of their new shows. We'll start touring this spring mostly in the midwest and southern U.S.

We haven't been able to shift Rolling Like A Stone from our brains since we first heard it. Is there a story behind it?
The story is somewhat autobiographical. It's basically about a guy trying to persuade a girl to reconsider her plans to move to another city where another guy lives. It's primarily based on one disastrous relationship but I draw lyrical content from several similarly ill-fated situations. Unfortunately, as in real life, I don't think the guy in the song wins the argument.

A woman has 5 potatoes to feed 3 children. How can she give them equal portions without fractions?
Here in Alabama we would just serve mashed potatoes.

What's the Alabama music scene like?
I don't really know about other cities in Alabama, but the Birmingham music scene is actually really good right now. There are several bands in town that are starting to get national recognition and you hear stories all the time of major label guys coming to town to hear what's going on. I think people who are not familiar with Birmingham would be surprised at the amount of good music coming out of the city now.

Preach about something you love (not related to the band) in 100 words.
I love to snowboard, which may sound strange since I live in the deep South. I learned to snowboard about ten years ago and I usually try to take a couple of trips out west each year. A couple of years ago I drove out west with a good friend of mine and we spent a month driving around the west US and Canada snowboarding at a different mountain every three or four days. I think we ended up driving around 7500 miles. I wrote a song about the trip called A Snowboard Odyssey that is on The Young Meteors.

What's on your iPod?
I've got about 2,000 songs including almost the full library of The Clash, The Beatles and The Replacements. I've been listening to the Who's remastered Tommy that came out a couple of years ago a lot over the past couple of weeks. I've had the record for a long time, but just recently bought the remastered version and you can - Hecklerspray.com (London,UK)


"All Done In Good Time" is Birmingham, Alabama-based indie-rock veteran Greg Summerlin's third studio release and second for Superphonic Records. Recorded in a cozy Minneapolis studio with producer Ed Ackerson (the Replacements, Juliana Hatfield), the album is one that'll sneak up on you and have you unknowingly humming melodies to songs like "The Paintaker" or "Unlucky in Love". But there's more to this album than meets the eye. It is, in fact, a "story album" about a frustrated, disillusioned girl who rebels against her father, inspired by Summerlin's longtime affinity for the Who's Tommy. The storyline is pretty subtle, so don't be turned off by the whole "theme album" thing. These 14 songs are full of upbeat pop energy, well written and thoughtful lyrics and some really solid rock'n'roll production. "All Done In Good Time" is the perfect album to get you energized for those otherwise sullen and dreary autumn days.

Matt Dufour
October 17, 2007 - UR Chicago


'Concept album' is a term you don't see that often anymore. A concept album is a music album where the songs are united by a musical or narrative theme. The most famous and maybe best concept album will probably be 'Tommy' by The Who. The album even is a rock opera, it tells a story through the different songs. 'Joe's Garage' from Frank Zappa is another example and also 'Smile' from Brian Wilson and 'What's Going On' from Marvin Gaye. A more recent concept album is 'An American Idiot' by Green Day.

Greg Summerlin is a great fan of 'Tommy' and this was the main reason why he made a concept album of his third solo album.
Greg Summerlin is from Birmingham, Alabama and he used to be part of the alt-country band The Quinsonics. After rediscovering 'Tommy' Greg started working on the album "All Done In Good Time" with produced Ed Ackerson. The songs on this album, which had the subtitle "The Life and Times of Polly Shields", tells the story of a frustrated girl who rebels against her father. The album will be released by Superphonic Records, the label of which Greg Summerlin is founder and owner. The songs on the cd doesn't have such an impact on me as Pete Townsend's songs about 'that deaf dumb and blind kid', but the fourteen songs sound very good. Convince yourself with "Unlucky In Love" and "The Paintaker" or with the whole album via this e-card.

Heet Stof
September 30,2007 - Hot Stof (Netherlands)


Indie favorite, Greg Summerlin joined producer Ed Ackerson (The Replacements, Golden Smog, Brian Setzer, Juliana Hatfield) in a Minneapolis studio to produce the latest album "All done in good time". It's an ambitious and grandiose 50 minute symphonic melodrama that tells a somewhat linear storyline. It comes with a booklet that describes the plot, but I was more interested in the music. Summerlin's sound is a mix of U2 and The La's with a dash of Brit-pop thrown in. After a sleepy intro, it rocks hard in the opener "Shine on Where You Want" and really delivers the goods. The hook-laden, ringing guitars here really grow on you. It follows with "Redemption," a epic of post-punk pop that remind me of The Sundays a little. Ackerson's guitar work here is amazing throughout the album. Janey Winterbauer's supporting vocals recall Susanna Hoffs sweetness, and she does an excellent job here. Also helping out is John P. Strohm (The Lemonheads, Blake Babies). Hints of The House Martins meet The Bangles flow through "Just Listen Tonight." The narrative really works on "Please Don't Tell" with Greg and Janey's intertwining chorus, a song that is closer to a real stage musical number than the other tunes here. Almost every track here shines and the problem is that it's alot to absorb. This would've been a truly great 10-track album. But with 14 tracks, trying to follow the story with the tunes may take more effort than you expect. It's easier here to enjoy great melodies like "Atmosphere" and the epic theme from "Shine on Where You Want" reprises in the closer "The Final Plan." Summerlin is also the founder and owner of Superphonic Records and has amazing talent that should not be ignored.

Aaron
September 28, 2007 - Powerpopaholic


Greg Summerlin:
All Done in Good Time
Reviewed by Jeff Giles

Oh, right – it’s a concept album. But don’t use that as an excuse to dismiss Good Time out of hand. For one thing, the “concept” – as with most album-length song suites – is universal enough to be essentially meaningless; you can listen to this front to back without ever realizing Summerlin is trying to tell the story of someone named Polly Shields. (Other characters include her father, Mr. Shields, and two guys named Johnny the Revelator and Timmy the Deceiver. Really, it doesn’t hurt to ignore any of this.) For another thing – and most importantly – Good Time is closer to the Who than Emerson, Lake and Palmer or Jethro Tull. Yes, we’ve all suffered through prog punchbowl turds such as Tarkus and Thick as a Brick. Put them out of your mind: there are no armadillo tanks to be found here.
What you will find, in spades, are loads of happily retro pop hooks; imagine what it might have sounded like if Ian Broudie and Pete Townshend had joined forces in the late ‘80s, and you’ll be somewhere in the neighborhood. If you ever get nostalgic for the days when “alternative rock” wasn’t shorthand for nü metal, you’ll get a kick out of these songs. None of them are beat-you-over-the-head catchy, but there aren’t any wasted parts, either; unlike most concept records, Good Time never loses the plot, and Summerlin never gives the impression that he’s bent over backwards to shoehorn any particular track into the storyline.
And about that storyline: No, it really doesn’t hurt to pretend it isn’t there, but if you’re so inclined, you can leaf through the lyric booklet and leaf along as Summerlin tells the tale of Polly Shields’ life and times – and odds are you’ll find it genuinely affecting. Summerlin’s got a gift for storytelling, and that (not to mention his fluid, compact melodies) help elevate hoary clichés like the father-daughter argument in “Just Listen Tonight.” Lines like “I have tried to be your anchor / But these ties are frayed and thin” could harpoon the album in lesser hands, but here, they’re as simple as they are powerfully effective.
In that simplicity lays the heart of All Done in Good Time’s appeal. Summerlin set out to tell a story, but he doesn’t shove it down your throat, and the album is unavoidably retro, but not self-consciously so. The result is a batch of warm, sweetly addictive pop songs with no shortage of personality. We can never get enough of those, can we?
- Bullz-eye.com - Jeff Giles


Those of you in Austin need to be planning for this on Saturday. I know I've already mentioned it, but I'm so certain that it's going to be amazingly fun that I will probably bring it up a few times before the week is over; this way you know I mean it. Anyhow, after spending a lot of time lately listening to that Plastic Operator track from yesterday's EP I finally found some more electo-pop that's worthy of the same amount of praise. It comes from Greg Summerlin, a guy who use to be in an alt-country band in the late 90s called the Quinsonics. I find that to be more that a slight change of styles, but I guess it's all about whatever works. Greg's latest full length, All Done In Good Time, is due out October 2 and it's said to be a nice companion piece to the Who's Tommy. Enjoy.

:Greg Summerlin - Unlucky In Love: You may notice that this sounds less like the Who and more like New Order dipped in sunshine. But, the sound isn't what really needs to pointed out, the lyrics are. After all, they share the most similarities with Tommy in how they tell a story about a cast of characters. In particular, the tale to be told here is about two people named Polly and Jimmy who rekindle a friendship that was abruptly cutoff after a series of dramatic happenings. Yeah, eat your heart out Lifetime Network.

:Greg Summerlin - Just Listen Tonight: The press release notes that the album has a wide variety of sounds, but I really wasn't expecting such a brisk piece of vintage pop rock to follow up the electro-pop style of the song above. Once again though, the sound isn't really where you need to focus your attention. Lyrically, this one deals with Polly and her shaky relationship with her father, Mr. Shields. There are boy/girl vocals that work well in helping the story along, but lines like: "Leave me alone/I don't want to know/Just listen tonight" do the trick on their own.

John Laird
September 28, 2007
- Side One:Track One


Paul Borelli 9/26/07
Program Director KOOP 91.7 fm Austin, TX

Birmingham, Alabama’s Greg Summerlin was once in the alt-country band the Quinsonics but is now immersed in power-pop sounds and the Who’s rock opera Tommy. After becoming obsessed with Tommy and reading a biography of Keith Moon, Summerlin began writing his own power-pop song cycle with the story of Polly (named after Moon’s daughter), who rebels against her authoritarian father, falls for the shallow Timmy, who gets her pregnant, then abandons her, and finally reunites with childhood friend Johnny, who has loved her all along, and reconciles with her father. The story, much more common than the Who’s masterwork and thus perhaps easier to identify with, has a religious subtext brought to the surface in the songs “The Paintaker” (#9) and “The Final Plan” (#14), in which all the characters but Timmy learn that all is revealed in good time as part of God’s plan. Regardless of what one thinks about this sermon, the inescapable fact demonstrated here is that Summerlin writes and performs some pretty irresistible power pop. Songs like “Shine on Where You Want” (#2), “He’s a Faker” (#11), and “Just Listen Tonight” (#6) rock hard and melodically with an honest simplicity unlike Sloan and The New Pornographers. He also is adept at the majestic sweep of orchestral ballads, as shown on “Please Don’t Tell” (#7), and recalls new wave a bit with warped keyboards on “Unlucky in Love” (#5). A big dollop of Tommy, a bit Bat Out of Hell, with a dash of Jesus Christ Superstar, Summerlin’s third solo outing sounds like a classic.

Paul Borelli 9/26/07 - KOOP.org (KOOP fm in Austin,TX)


All Done In Good Time: The Life And Times Of Polly Shields by Greg Summerlin is a concept-y rock opera. No, come back - we didn't mean to scare you off. It's good. Promise.

How good? Good enough for us to assure you that All Done In Good Time: The Life And Times Of Polly Shields by Greg Summerlin is the best The Who and New Order-influenced concept album about a rebellious young girl and someone called The Paintaker of the year, and maybe ever.

No, come back, It is really good, honest.

Regular readers of hecklerspray will know that we've got something of a musical crush on Greg Summerlin. His last album The Young Meteors was a powerhouse collection of deceptively simplistic anthems, possibly the best Britpop album Alabama ever produced. But while The Young Meteors was a collection of great songs, All Done In Good Time: The Life And Times Of Polly Shields is a great album. Out are the songs about going snowboarding and in is a surprisingly poignant narrative a girl rebelling against her father.

That's right - you could say that in All Done In Good Time: The Life And Times Of Polly Shields, Greg Summerlin has created a rock opera. And if that doesn't immediately make you think of The Who, then at least some of the songs on the album will. But, far from being a cheap rip-off, the flashes of recognition you'll get listening to Summerlin's album act like a reassuring hand on your shoulder. Like the old films in When Harry Met Sally, the occasional use of The Who's trademark sounds just make All Done In Good Time feel like it's part of a lineage. Ad to some extent, it is.

We're not going to spoil the story of All Done In Good Time: The Life And Times Of Polly Shields for you - partly because it's not fair and partly because we're not sure we properly understand it - but even without the throughline Greg Summerlin has crafted a set of knockout songs; wider in perspective and with a much lusher production than anything he's put together before. Take away the allusions to (we think) drugs and The Paintaker is still a stadium-sized slab of dynamic dynamite. And Shine On Where You Want and It's My Life might just be the best things that Summerlin has ever done.

All Done In Good Time: The Life And Times Of Polly Shields is by no means the perfect album - with projects as ambitious as this there's always a chance that the artist will over-reach somewhat - but for solid, fat-free tunes and good old-fashioned heart, there's not a lot of negatives you hurl at Greg Summerlin for making it. Now go and buy it, or else he won't get round to touring Britain again.

Stuart Heritage
September 29, 2007 - Hecklerspray.com (UK)


Greg Summerlin
All Done in Good Time
Superphonic Records

For anyone not familiar with Greg Summerlin from his late 90s band, The Quinsonics, his latest album, All Done in Good Time (The Life and Times of Polly Shields), may come as something of a pop revelation.
Although early reviews drew comparisons to The Who, my initial thought was mare along the lines of Matthew Sweet. Although not as confectionary as Sweet, Summerlin has a similar gift for pop hooks and melody. Upon further listening, however, it does become obvious that Summerlin is more a student of Pete Townshend's storytelling and song structures than a pupil of The Beatles and Beach Boys, as is the case with Sweet.

Instead of wading into the headier waters of later Who/Townshend experimentation, Summerlin keeps his song structures simplified, reaching occasionally back to High Numbers territory and no further forward than the origins of Townshend's foray's into rock opera with Tommy.

Not all is steeped in The Who, as other reviews may lead you to believe, however. There's enough classic pop and 80s influence involved to keep things hipster-cool. Stinging guitars on "The Paintaker" are again reminiscent of Matthew Sweet, but rhythm parts and vocal cadence also recall 80s bands like The Proclaimers.
While Summerlin has said that his new material draws from "classic alternative" like New Order, many of these songs would have fit well in a classic John Hughes movie along side Psychedelic Furs, Simple Minds, Flesh for Lulu and Jesus and the Mary Chain. These are pop gems perfect for a summer drive.

Once you dig into the lyrics and liner notes, the album folds out as a story: i.e. "The Life and Times of Polly Shields," but the track listing is not in sequential order, assumingly for sonic flow. An outline is provided, however, for anyone interested in listening to the story in sequential order. Pretentious? Possibly, but it surely adds to Summerlin's indie credibility while retaining his unabashed love of pop hooks. All in all, it's a forgivable move if it lets him straddle the line between credibility and pop mastery without being viewed a sell-out.
Most importantly, All in Good Time is something we rarely see anymore: a joyous return to pure pop conventions, unfettered by song doctors and overproduction. In turn, it's a disc that's destined to be stranded in my car until the weather turns cold and dreary again.
-- Gary Hizer

Greg Summerlin will be at DFest's McNellie's stage at 7pm on Friday, July 25

- Urban Tulsa Weekly


Imagine an early adulthood sequel to Brian Wilson's teenage symphony to God, Smile. But instead of the genius Beach Boy overseeing the
proceedings, a braintrust of talent whereby Mitch Easter's power pop
classicism, Sufjan Stevens' fanciful hookiness and Jonathan Rundman's
everyman observational geekiness coalesce is responsible for following
up such a masterpiece. Add a sprinkling of Bacharach-David's
songwriterness and what the sounds to be oblique expression of
Christian conversion somewhere in the plotline. Former alt-country
cat Greg Summerlin manages the achievement without any of the
aforementioned folks' help, and it makes for some strangely rocking,
articulate beauty. In added touches of obfuscation and creative
whimsy, Summerlin sings most of the parts of of this easily
stage-adaptable 14-song cycle by himself, but sometimes gets assists
from guest female vocalists. Neither are the songs in order of the plot,
but that's no hindrance from enjoying Summerlin's giftings. Packaging and artwork proclaim an "event" album, but the artistry it surrounds speaks with as much humility as it does ambition.

Jamie Lee Rake - HM Magazine


Discography

"Philosophy" - February 2011

Photos

Bio

La Resistance will be performing at CMJ 2012 at Bar Matchless in Brooklyn!
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Our new video for "Loathing" was premiered at Baeble Music in September 2012 and charted as high a #2 on their video charts
http://www.baeblemusic.com/music-video/La-Resistance/Loathing.html
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Our video for Shells, directed by Hunter Barrow, was featured as AOL Spinner's Video of the Day in October 2011 and was
was premiered on Magnet Magazine's website in June 2011
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La Resistance is a featured artist in Anthony Bourdain's new show "The Layover" with 10 song placements in the series this past fall.
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After tour dates in the northeast and midwest, we will soon be announcing new dates in the South for late 2012
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La Resistance is the brainchild of Greg Summerlin, who, after releasing several solo albums on Superphonic Records, formed the band with three friends who have played with him over the past few years. These indie-rockers on the rise prove to be turning the heads of music fans across the nation as the band's debut album, "Philosophy,” barely a year old, has already been covered in such major blogs and magazines as AOL Spinner, Magnet, Blurt, My Old Kentucky Blog, Popmatters, Under the Radar, KEXP.org, The Big Takeover, Allgigs (UK) and many others. It also spent weeks in the CMJ charts and achieved #1 status at stations like KONC in Chicago.

La Resistance is the past and the future. The old and the new. The classic and the experimental. Their unique sound and perspective is hard to categorize, but their influences range from New Order, Radiohead, The Cure, and Echo and the Bunnymen, to Interpol and Arcade Fire. Without departing from the timeless foundation of catchy melodies and poetic, poignant lyrics, La Resistance has an eye for the future, pushing the words and music to a place that is altogether inspiring but never ostentatious.

Look for them on tour this fall and winter and at the CMJ Music Festival in NYC in October, and follow them on Facebook or Twitter as new tour dates are added to their calendar. La Resistance is Greg Summerlin on lead vocals and guitar, Randle Scruggs on bass, Mischa Jordy on keys and vocals, and Wil Drake on drums. Greg's previous three albums received much critical approval and had songs that appeared in numerous TV shows and movies, including network placements on ABC and NBC.

Team Clermont, one of the leading indie media companies in the US, will be providing providing publicity and marketing for the new record and handling all tour press.

*La Resistance was featured on Magnet Magazine's "MP3 at 3PM" in March*

*"Isolation" was featured in the "Sonicbids Indie Showcase" on 3,244 national flights this past November and December, 2011

Here's a few press quotes for "Philosophy"

"this debut album from his new group actually does hearken back to that late ‘70s/early ‘80s British-influenced post-punk/new wave sound (especially Joy Division, Comsat Angels, The Sound and later Echo & the Bunnymen), with its tension-filled guitars, glacial keyboards, and cinematic scope. Given those influences, it’s hard to believe this terrific album is coming from Deep South, USA."
The Big Takeover

"Is this pure modern pop? Slightly psychedelic dream pop? Or just good ol' hummable pop/rock music that sticks? Actually it's all of the three...and more. Philosophy is full of danceable catchy tracks with impossibly groovy vocal melodies. The more we spin this disc...the classier many of the tunes sound. Top pick."
Babysue.com

"Ending up solidly in the midst of New Order, Buzzcocks and such, these songs are irresistible"
Aiding and Abetting
aidabet.com

"The solid songwriting is still there (with hooks a plenty). Summerlin and his crew give the songs some real bite and hooks you can sink your teeth into"
Blurt

"fielding hook-filled songs with catchy vocals and a strong melodic sense...frontman Greg Summerlin has established his songwriting chops with a series of solo albums, and expanding his sound to include a band has increased the sonic possibilities of his peculiar, pop-shoe-grunge soundscapes"
Popmatters